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In the 1970s, Stanford Research Institute developed a protocol that they hoped would allow people to access their inner psychic talents, in order to view distant targets (in both time and space) without using their regular five senses. Though such talents have been reported throughout history, and labeled as “traveling clairvoyance”, the SRI researchers gave their distinct protocol its own specific name: remote viewing.

The C.I.A. became interested in SRI’s remote viewing research, not least due to concerns that the Soviets already had such a capability, and funded a $50,000 study for further experimentation and refinement of the protocol. And in the late 1970s, the U.S. Army joined the party by commissioning its own remote viewing project. During the 1980s the army continued with remote viewing under a variety of project names, which are often grouped together under the most well-known of them, Project Star Gate.

The first man recruited into the Army’s remote viewing program was Joseph McMoneagle, and even today he’s still often referred to simply as “Remote Viewer No. 1”. Drafted into the first ‘psychic intelligence’ unit, based at Fort Meade, Maryland, McMoneagle noted that his decision to join the project, after twenty years as an Intelligence NCO, came down simply to concerns about the safety of his country:

When I was first exposed to the possibility of remote viewing as an intelligence threat, I took it very seriously because the evidence already extant was significantly compelling to demand attention.

And decades later, after continuous study and practice of remote viewing, McMoneagle says he’s “more convinced than ever that there is something going on that we should be very concerned about…the greatest threat to my nation and possibly the single greatest discovery in our species’ history…remote viewing, when used appropriately, has a capacity for extensively destructive and creative contributions in our development.”

In the one hour video interview* above, McMoneagle explains remote viewing, and his own involvement over the past 30 odd years. You can also read his own account of the history of ‘Project Star Gate’ in his book The Stargate Chronicles: Memoirs of a Psychic Spy (Amazon US and UK).

And if you want to train up as a psychic spy yourself, you can download the original co-ordinate remote viewing (CRV) manual developed by SRI and the U.S. Army (though the primary author appears to be artist and original remote viewer Ingo Swann). I only pass on the link because I have encased my office within a Faraday cage…

* Beware the god-awful chime at the beginning of the video, it just about woke up my whole house.