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Shot by photographers Harun Mehmedinovic and Gavin Heffernan as part of the SkyGlow Project, “Stormhenge” is an epic timelapse film of ‘Carhenge’, a modern American roadside attraction that copies the construction of Stonehenge using cars. Along with the usual shots of sweeping clouds and jewel-like images of the stars at night, “Stormhenge” adds an extra element to the timelapse formula: an eclipse. Carhenge was situated directly in the path of totality for the recent “Eclipse of the Century” on August 21st, 2017.

Located in the High Plains of Alliance, Nebraska, this monument to England’s Stonehenge was conceived and created by Jim Reinders in 1987, as a memorial to his father. “Carhenge consists of 39 vintage American automobiles arranged in a circle measuring about 29 meters (95 ft) in diameter. Some are held upright in pits 1.5 meters (4.9 ft) deep, trunk end down, and arches have been formed by welding automobiles atop the supporting models.”

Because of Carhenge’s fortuitous positioning on the narrow “path of totality” of the 2017 eclipse, the site has seen an incredible explosion of media attention in recent days, with thousands flocking there to witness the event, including Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts and Carhenge creator Jim Reinders himself, now 89 years old.

The Stormhenge footage was captured during four different shoots between 2015-2017 by Harun Mehmedinovic and Gavin Heffernan as part of SkyGlow Project, their ongoing quest to raise awareness about the damage and dangers of light pollution.

The video gives a glimpse into the extreme weather volatility in the High Plains region, with extreme thunderstorms giving way to crystal clear skies overhead, seemingly at a moment’s notice.

Some amazing and surreal vision, worth a fullscreen!

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