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Graham Hancock Visits the Ancient Megalithic Site of Göbekli Tepe

Alternative history author Graham Hancock is currently researching a follow-up to his bestselling book Fingerprints of the Gods, and he recently visited a site that surely would have been in that book if its age was known at the time: the Turkish megalithic site of Göbekli Tepe, which is thought to be a (mind-shattering) 12,000 years old. The above short video, filmed and edited by Hugh Newman last month during the ‘Origins of Civilization’ tour organised by Megalithomania and Andrew Collins, has some nice images of the site, as well as some commentary from Graham and Andrew.

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  1. The challenge with all
    The challenge with all research is resistance to contrarian ideas, regardless of evidence. Gobekli proves humans were more than nomadic hunter gatherers in 10,000 bc. From what I’ve read, this sight is huge, taking possibly hundreds if not thousands of years to build, and then an equally enormous effort to intentionally bury to preserve in some manner for some purpose. This requires a huge organized sustained effort – not the result of inarticulate, unsophisticated roaming wildmen…

    As Graham points out, all ancient megalithic sights need to have their age reexamined within this context, putting aside preconceived beliefs about timelines and abilities of the ancients. But when scientists, researchers, archeologist have vested a lifetime of work, research, writing, and belief in certain paradigms, they fight tooth and nail to hold onto them, so as not to be found wrong and have their life’s work invalidated, or at minimum shown to be in error to some degree.

    In my mind, Puma Punku is one of the most fascinating megalithic sites, with its assembly line interlocking “H” blocks that fit together. As Graham says, there is a whole chunk of history of our ancestors that has been forgotten and ignored by modern archeologist…

    1. Well Said, Greg
      [quote=Greg H.]The challenge with all research is resistance to contrarian ideas, regardless of evidence. Gobekli proves humans were more than nomadic hunter gatherers in 10,000 bc. From what I’ve read, this sight is huge, taking possibly hundreds if not thousands of years to build, and then an equally enormous effort to intentionally bury to preserve in some manner for some purpose. This requires a huge organized sustained effort – not the result of inarticulate, unsophisticated roaming wildmen…

      As Graham points out, all ancient megalithic sights need to have their age reexamined within this context, putting aside preconceived beliefs about timelines and abilities of the ancients. But when scientists, researchers, archeologist have vested a lifetime of work, research, writing, and belief in certain paradigms, they fight tooth and nail to hold onto them, so as not to be found wrong and have their life’s work invalidated, or at minimum shown to be in error to some degree.

      In my mind, Puma Punku is one of the most fascinating megalithic sites, with its assembly line interlocking “H” blocks that fit together. As Graham says, there is a whole chunk of history of our ancestors that has been forgotten and ignored by modern archeologist…[/quote]

      Couldn’t agree more. Especially the last paragraph.

    1. Good Smithsonian article,
      Good Smithsonian article, but…

      “Schmidt, a German archaeologist who has been working here more than a decade, is convinced it’s the site of the world’s oldest temple.”

      Don’t you just love how whatever the latest breakthrough, discovery, etc… it is automatically presumed to be the oldest, best, most accurate, etc… Gobekli Tepe is discovered, and the presumption is made it is the world’s oldest temple…based on what? Maybe oldest “known” temple, but that is not the statement. This implies this is the first and oldest temple.

      I see this discovery and my presumption is this is the tip of the iceberg…prodding us to further discoveries. Search under the coastlines as Graham Hancock suggest in Underworld, look underground for other buried sites, using satellites and ground penetrating radar of other known megalithic sites.

      All branches of science jump to these types of conclusions with their new discoveries. A form of narcissism IMO. Rather than being humble and saying, “Wow, maybe we need to rethink our paradigm and the possible implications.” Science is good, don’t get me wrong, but often close minded and short sighted and a little egotistic, at best stifling further discoveries, at worst making dangerous presumptions with unintended consequences…

          1. i’m interested in knowing in
            i’m interested in knowing in there exists on the internet somewhere a comprehensive survey of the worlds megalithic sites.

            it would be fascinating to know exactly how many standing stones pepper the british isles, france, etc. how many stone circles, etc. how many temples in asia, of what presumed age, etc.

            i’d love to read the calculated total of man hours required to build the totality of the megalithic structures on the planet, cross-referenced with the presumed population in each region at the time said structure was purported to be built as well as the presumed technological status of the population responsible.

            i suspect that if all these numbers were crunched the short-comings of current thought would be made glaring.

            it is a total no-brainer that gobekli tepe should throw into question the dating of the worlds other ancient sites instead of being named simply the oldest one yet discovered. the smugness of discoveries such as stonehenge had pools that didn’t ice over does little to explain all the other rocks dotting the landscape pretty much everywhere !!

            all in all fascinating stuff and i feel way more will come to light in our lifetimes. my morbid curiosity wonders what surprises may be revealed via melting ice caps at the south pole … or maybe there’s too much lovecraft on the brain 😉

          2. thanks pov
            i do know the site

            thanks pov

            i do know the site but have yet to slog through all it’s nooks and crannies

            best
            billy

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