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Coming of The Cryptoterrestrials

Review by Nick Redfern. For more information on The Cryptoterrestrials, visit the Anomalist books website. The book is available now from Amazon US and UK.

Over the course of the last 60 years or so, the world of ufology has spawned a truly huge number of books: many very good indeed, a not-insignificant number very bad, and a great deal hovering precariously somewhere in between. Just occasionally, however, a title comes along that is truly revolutionary, ground-breaking and – as far as its potential implications are concerned – thought-provoking in the extreme.

For me, personally, Jacque Vallee’s Messengers of Deception and John Keel’s UFOs: Operation Trojan Horse both fall into that latter category. Albeit in admittedly different ways, Vallee and Keel made equally strong cases for the existence of genuine UFOs in our midst. But, both Messengers and Trojan delivered to the reader two far more explicit messages: (A) UFOs are real; but that doesn’t mean they are necessarily extraterrestrial; and (B) the phenomenon is clearly deceptive and manipulative in nature and intent.

Of course, for many of the longstanding (a.k.a. the bloody old) players within ufology, any talk of deceptive messengers, or of Keel’s super-spectrum, is dismissed as mere speculation and not much else. For them, UFOs have to be extraterrestrial. After all, they have upheld such notions and beliefs for decades; and to relegate them to the rubbish-bin is not an option.

Well, I have a few choice words for those people who are so rigidly set in their ways: the extraterrestrial hypothesis is itself entirely speculative and totally lacking in hard evidence. All we really know for certain is that there most assuredly is a genuine UFO phenomenon. But, as for definitive proof of its actual point of origin or origins? Please! There is none. At all. There is merely a lot of data clearly demonstrating the presence of unidentified “others” amongst us.

Vallee and Keel most assuredly and astutely recognized this. They understood that a puzzle which – at first glance – seemed to be defined by the presence of nuts-and-bolts spacecraft and flesh-and-blood aliens in our midst, was far, far stranger than many within ufology wanted to admit.

And there was someone else who also recognized this ufological factor: Mac Tonnies. Mac was a very good friend of mine; and like all his friends I was shocked to the core when he passed away suddenly and tragically in October 2009, at the age of only 34.

But, I am pleased to say, Mac’s latest – and, inevitably, final – piece of work ensures that his memory, legacy and ability to think outside of the conventional ufological box will live on. That work is The Cryptoterrestrials: A Meditation on Indigenous Humanoids and the Aliens Among Us.

Like Vallee and Keel, Mac rightly recognized that UFO encounters could not be dismissed as the ravings of lunatics, the tales of the fantasy-prone, or the lies of those seeking fame and fortune. But, he was also careful not to get sucked into the near-viral mindset that practically screams (take a deep breath): UFOs = alien spaceships piloted by little gray chaps from across the galaxy, who are on a mission to save their dying race by stealing our DNA, eggs and sperm.

Rather, Mac – right up until the time of his death – was chasing down the theory suggesting that the UFOnauts may actually represent the last vestiges of a very ancient race of distinctly terrestrial origins; a race that – tens of thousands of years ago may have ruled our planet, but whose position of power was thrown into overwhelming chaos by two things: (A) the appearance of a “debilitating genetic syndrome” that ravaged their society; and (B) the rising infestation of a violent species that threatened to eclipse – in number – their own society.

They are the Cryptoterrestrials. And that violent species that blusters around like an insane, unruly and spoiled child, and that has done more damage in its short life-time than can ever be truly imagined, is, of course, us.

With their society waning, their health and ability to even successfully reproduce collapsing, and their absolute worst nightmare – the Human Race – becoming the new gang in town, the Cryptoterrestrials followed what was perceived as the only viable option: they quietly retreated into the shadows, into the darkened corners of our world, below the oceans, into the deeper caverns that pepper the planet, and in their own uniquely silent and detached way, set about a new course of action.

That course of action – given that they were in some fashion genetically related to the Human Race – was to eventually resurface; to move amongst us in stealth; to pass themselves off as entities from far-off worlds (as part of a concerted effort to protect and hide their real point of origin); and to use and exploit us – medically – in an attempt to try and inject their waning species with a considerable amount of new blood: ours.

In addition, Mac believed, the Cryptoterrestrials were – and, by definition, still are – subtle-yet-brilliant, cosmic magicians. For them, however, there is no top-hat from which a white-rabbit is pulled. There is no hot babe sliced in half and then miraculously rejoined at the waist. No: their tricks are far more fantastic. As well as deceiving us about their origins, the Cryptoterrestrials have – via, perhaps, the use of advanced hologram-style technology, mind-manipulation and much more – led us to conclude that they have an infinite number of craft, resources and technologies at their disposal.

And that is the trick, the ruse: in actuality, their numbers today may be very small. They may well be staging faked UFO events to try and convince us that they have a veritable armada at their disposal when, perhaps, the exact opposite is the case. And, most important of all, they desperately want us to think of them as visitors from the stars. If their plan to rejuvenate their species is to work, then stealth, subterfuge and camouflage are the essential orders of the day.

Of course, the above all amounts to a theory – just like the ETH. And, Mac’s book makes it very clear that he is theorizing, rather than being able to provide the reader with definitive proof for such a scenario. He does, however, offer a logical, and at times powerful, argument in support of the theme of his book.

As for so-called “alien abductions”: the clumsy, intrusive means by which ova and sperm are taken by a race of beings we are led to believe are countless years ahead of us is addressed. That the ability of the aliens to wipe out the memories of those they abduct is constantly and regularly overturned by nothing more than simple hypnosis is highlighted. And the unlikely scenario that our DNA would even be compatible, in the first place, with extraterrestrial entities is also firmly dissected. Mac’s conclusion: all this points not to the presence of highly-advanced aliens who are thousands of years ahead of us; but to the actions of an ancient Earth-based society whose technology may not be more than a century or so in advance of our current knowledge.

Mac also noted how the “aliens” seem to spend a hell of a lot time ensuring they are seen: whether its taking “soil-samples” at the side of the road; equipping their craft with bright, flashing lights; or hammering home the point to the abductees that they are from this planet, from that star-system, or from some far off galaxy. Just about anywhere aside from right here, in fact.

Roswell comes into the equation, too: and in ingenious fashion. Those who do not adhere to the extraterrestrial hypothesis for Roswell point to the fact that many of the witness descriptions of what was found at Roswell, are collectively suggestive of some form of large balloon-type structure having come down at the Foster Ranch, Lincoln County, NM on that fateful day in the summer of 1947.

The possibility that ET would be flying around New Mexico in a balloon is absurd. But, as Mac notes, a race of impoverished, underground-dwellers, highly worried by the sudden influx of military activity in New Mexico (White Sands, Los Alamos etc), just might employ the use of an advance balloon-type vehicle to secretly scope out the area late at night.

Perhaps, when elements of the U.S. military came across the debris, they really did assume it was balloon-borne material and probably of American origin. Until, maybe, they stumbled across something else amid the debris, too…

The Cryptoterrestrials continues in a similar vein; to the extent that we are left with a stark and surreal image of a very ancient – and very strange – race of beings who may once have been the masters of this planet; who were sidelined thousands of years ago; and who are now – under cover of darkness and while the cities sleep – forced to grudgingly surface from their darkened lairs and interact with the very things they fear (and perhaps even hate and despise) most of all: us.

Survival is the name of their game. And deception is the means by which it is being cunningly achieved.

Whether you agree with Mac’s theorizing or not, The Cryptoterrestrials is a book that is expertly and beautifully written. It challenges the reader to throw out old, rigid views. It represents the careful studies of a man who knew he was going out on a limb – but who, thankfully, didn’t give a damn about appeasing the UFO research community in fawning style. And, for me, it truly is a Messengers of Deception for the 21st Century and for Generation-Next.

For more information on The Cryptoterrestrials, visit the Anomalist books website. The book is now available from Amazon US and UK.

Editor
  1. I am excited to read this
    I am excited to read this book. I’ve thought for quite some time now that it would make much more sense for ‘greys’ to be a terrestrial in nature, rather than men from space.

    Although, I also wonder if Mac is speculating too broadly. From the perspective of many organisms on this planet, our scientists regularly “abduct” and perform experiments on them. Is it possible that ‘greys’ are simply few in number, but not nessicarily ‘desperate’ or ‘previous rulers of the planet’, but simply a co-existing intelligent being that views us, not as equals, but as animals to be studied?

    1. Theories, not dogma
      It is not my position to speak on behalf of Mac Tonnies; there are other people far better qualified to do that —the ones fortunate enough to have met him in person, like Nick Redfern, Paul Kimball & Greg Bishop.

      However, from what I’ve been able to deduct from my frequent visits at Posthuman Blues, I get the feeling that Mac didn’t treat his speculative theories as dogmatism. In other words, even if he found reasons to suspect on the cryptoterrestrial origin of SOME UFO-related phenomena, he wasn’t closed to consider other ideas, including the much-lambasted ETH hypothesis. After all, Mac’s first book was After the Martian Apocalypse; and he also had a great contribution to Darklore with his essay The Ancients are Watching, where he applied his ideas about transhumanism to suggest that behind the UFO phenomenon lies a post-biologic intelligence trying to hide its true nature in order not to frighten us —the deceptive nature of UFOs does seem to be a constant in his line of thinking.

      So, does that mean Mac didn’t take himself seriously? Not at all; why I do think is that Mac was mature enough as a researcher to propose interesting avenues of inquiry that, hopefully, would prompt people to look at the phenomenon from different perspectives; but in doing so he didnt’t close his mind to the possibility that he could be completely wrong. He didn’t invest his ego in the defense of his research, and that is a very rare thing in every intellectual field I can think of.

      1. Thanks for the insight in to
        Thanks for the insight in to his thinking! 🙂

        I hope I didn’t give the impression that I thought Mac didn’t take his work seriously or that he was not a competent researcher! I certainly meant nothing of the sort!!!

        I am, admittedly, not as well read on the subject as I would like to be. Thus, my interest in his work!

        1. No problemo 🙂
          And just to add a couple more things into the discussion; it seems that some people might get the impression that in the UFO business you need to choose sides once you get ‘affiliated’: Either you are with the ETH advocates like Stanton Friedman, or you’re with the believers in the Ultraterrestrials, like John Keel.

          I think a person like Mac often got frustrated with these pointless turf wars and obsession with labels.

          Even someone like Stanton Friedman, the most prominent speaker and proponent of the ETH hypothesis, doesn’t necessarily think the phenomenon can be explained in an “either/or” basis; when someone says to him that aliens must be multidimensional, he quickly responds that in order to travel through the vast interstellar distances, you necessarily have to dominate multiple dimensions. So if you come from some other planet, you’re an interstellar/multidimensional/time traveler all rolled up into one.

          Likewise, I think that if you think of aliens, they could be BOTH cryptoterrestrials and ETs at the same time; meaning they could have come from God knows where in the galaxy million of years ago, and decided to stay here undetected beneath the surface of the planet. Even the X Files played with that possibility in their first (and lame) movie.

          I suppose the important thing Mac wanted to explore with his theory is that the so-called aliens could have a vested interest in this planet and they way we tend to it, because they share it with us, instead of traveling from planet A to planet B to check up on us.

          I think that to me, and maybe to Mac as well, the answer to the UFO phenomenon is an “all of the above” kind of answer; and that’s something people don’t want to hear because they want easy answers and easy labels; reality is much more complicated, though.

          1. Choosing Sides
            Although I’m no UFO researcher, it stands to reason that there is a fair amount of side choosing. The “UFO business” is not going to be any different than any other cultural movement (for lack of a better term). It seems to be ruled by a paradigm that has emerged over the course of, as Mr. Redfern points out, 60 years, and those who approach the phenomenon from a perspective that is counter to, or deconstructs, that reigning paradigm are often judged much more harshly than those who only seek to validate and reaffirm that reigning paradigm.

            It’s very Kuhnian, I suppose. Naturally.

            For my own part, being only slightly less skeptical than the skeptics, I find Mr. Tonnies’ willingness to freely speculate to be breath of fresh air in what had become a rather stale and confining mythological arena.

            I plan on purchasing this book ASAP.

          2. an interesting aspect of UFO’s
            many have said, and tried to create negativity about UFO’s by saying it is only a resent emergence.

            If you google “ufo’s in ancient art” you will find that humans have been seeing and noteing UFO’s for a very long time. A lot of these pictures are undeniable as craft. This is way before the interest in them ca.1947.

          3. Recent Emergence
            Well, all things being equal it is a recent emergence. There is no empirical evidence (Puma Punku aside) that any of the myths and legends of ancient cultures are accounts of ET contact.

            All it does tell us is that ancient humans were much like modern humans in that we like to mythologize the unknown. Those mythologies, in turn, become entrenched spiritual, and cosmological, truths.

            And this is what I was referring to with the “60 years” comment, because it is only in that short time that we have seen the emergence of a modern mythology surrounding UFOs. And it is that mythology which has created the boundaries of the paradigm.

            It’s certainly a Chicken and Egg question. Which came first, Alien stories, or stories about Aliens?

            However, no matter the ultimate causation (whether it was actual ETs making contact or misidentifications of the planet Venus, swamp gas, etc…) human beings have an innate psycho-cultural urge to envelope our reality within our narrative. It becomes ruled and managed by our unconscious mind, and lines between what is “out there” and what is “in here” become very blurred.

            And that is, I suppose, why Mac Tonnies’ book so interests me. He doesn’t seem to be trying to fit the reality within the story (as has been the historical want of UFO researchers), rather he seems to be going about it in a very Scientific manner and is endeavoring to create a story (a theory) that best fits reality.

          4. Very good point

            However, no matter the ultimate causation (whether it was actual ETs making contact or misidentifications of the planet Venus, swamp gas, etc…) human beings have an innate psycho-cultural urge to envelope our reality within our narrative. It becomes ruled and managed by our unconscious mind, and lines between what is “out there” and what is “in here” become very blurred.

            That’s a very good point. And I do often wonder if our inner narrative couldn’t distort or influence the communication between a human and a non-human entity. Specially if the method of communication is non-verbal

      2. Hay RPJ, I find this idea
        Hay RPJ,

        I find this idea quite refreshing, but perhaps have a few more issues with it than other members of the forum might.

        I remember an article in a semi-recent New Scientist by an astronomer arguing for the drip feeding of astronomical data to astronomers for research. I found his argument interesting. Rather than argue that the researchers should be presented with all the available evidence and data to construct their theories he believed that the nature of astronomy required a different approach.

        The difficulty he saw was that in astronomy you reach a limit, given by the technology, where you hit a wall and have no more new data. Telescopes are getting better, but technological limits are being reached and there will come a point when no new data is coming in, or astronomers will be left sitting around until the next big project is built.

        He argued that in the instance of fixed data sets astronomers should be drip fed data, so they could hypothesis, then some more data would be released and they could test against it; then repeat. Effectively simulating the progression of new experimentation while non was occurring.

        Though there is part of me that would be frustrated by that I can sort of see what he is getting at – at least in his technical argument.

        UFOlogy exists as a large dataset, and this dataset is being mined for correlations. Technically though this is problematic. New data is coming in, but I am not sure whether the data is changing the dataset in any way, or just adding to it. If it is just adding to it without presenting avenues for change or conclusion then it is not that useful.

        This doesn’t reflect on the dataset so much as on the technicality of the conclusions deduced by analysing the whole fixed dataset in one go.

        In an instance when experimentation cannot be done and all we are left with is pattern spotting then we are left in this decisive position with people making personal or best fit choices, but with a large number of equally valid interpretations of different patterns.

        I am not sure whether drip feeding data is any answer, but he made a good case for it which only seems increased in UFOlogy where there is even less opportunity to experiment than in astronomy, and where data mining is a main ingredient.

        ——

        Now on to my main issue with this hypothesis. We know what has been required to progress technologically as a species. You could attempt to put some sort of equation together to show the total hours worked, resources required, and geographical area and impact of resource gathering to reach our technological level.

        There are some assumptions involved with this, the biggest being that this is the only way to gain this knowledge. It does not stop it being a question worth asking though. How does a small group progress past us without our numbers, geographical distribution, or some type of environmental impact? I can well imagine a smarter species coming up with solutions to navigate issues we have caused ourselves, but I cannot see an easy way to get to them without some path that would lead them through us (in intelligence) so the argument seems to require that they got to our level of intellect, then decided to do nothing with it. Clearly they would have been capable of doing what we have since they later apparently surpassed it. Why at that point would they not go through a similar stage as us? And if they did why do we not see it in the geological record. We see no evidence of mass mining of resources for at least the past 300 million years, for example.

        That’s an interesting observation in itself. No mass alien species landed on this planet and depleted its resources in at least the past 300 million years. The possible answers to that can only be very cool.

        1. Sorry for the late reply
          OK, here we go then:

          Telescopes are getting better, but technological limits are being reached and there will come a point when no new data is coming in, or astronomers will be left sitting around until the next big project is built.

          Hmm. That reminds me of that guy who predicted the end of science not too long ago. A bit pessimistic, don’t you think? After all, Astronomy does not exist in a cultural vacuum, and will surely benefit from discoveries in other fields. I prefer to see the scientific development as never-ending, and even Hawking has accepted that we probably will never have a ‘theory of everything’.

          New data is coming in, but I am not sure whether the data is changing the dataset in any way, or just adding to it. If it is just adding to it without presenting avenues for change or conclusion then it is not that useful.

          LOL. I think Ufology has long left the age of dataset collecting. It’s all about who can come up with the wildest theories, and cherry-pick among the filed cases to support your argument.

          Tonnies was not excluded from this, obviously. But at least he was honest about it when he admitted that he wasn’t in possession of the ‘truth’ about UFOs. There’s room for speculation and theoretician, and arm-chair ‘investigators’ can contribute with ideas and work to the field. I would still think that, in order to be considered a bonafide ‘Ufologist’, you need to go out in the field at least once; interview the witnesses, collect some samples, but most importantly: see for yourself, in order to gain the appropriate perspective to judge new or old cases.

          There are some assumptions involved with this, the biggest being that this is the only way to gain this knowledge. It does not stop it being a question worth asking though. How does a small group progress past us without our numbers, geographical distribution, or some type of environmental impact? I can well imagine a smarter species coming up with solutions to navigate issues we have caused ourselves, but I cannot see an easy way to get to them without some path that would lead them through us (in intelligence) so the argument seems to require that they got to our level of intellect, then decided to do nothing with it. Clearly they would have been capable of doing what we have since they later apparently surpassed it. Why at that point would they not go through a similar stage as us? And if they did why do we not see it in the geological record. We see no evidence of mass mining of resources for at least the past 300 million years, for example.

          Let’s look at history: in isolation, civilizations might converge on some basic premises, but diverge radically on others, due partly to environmental factors. Mesoamerican cultures were masters of astronomy and mathematics, but fared poorly on mechanics, at least compared with the Greeks. People used to think they didn’t discover the wheel, which we know they did, but didn’t apply it the same way Europeans did, because:

          a)they didn’t have horses or beasts of equal strength.

          b) the terrain where they founded their cities was more irregular.

          Nevertheless, we can see that small groups of human can accomplish impressive feats if they have the will. Clearly, the Egyptians weren’t as numerous as their modern descendants today —yeah, I know Fahim— and yet they built gigantic monuments.

          So my point is: our way of development may not be, as you point out, the ONLY way to raise an advanced civilization. Consequently, I would argue that a truly advanced civilization seeks to manage their resources, something we clearly have no been able to accomplish ourselves.

          Now, with regard to the mining of resources: Obviously we haven’t studies the totality of the minerals to be found in all the caverns and subterranean systems of the Earth. And we can still be pleasantly surprised about the hidden treasures stored by our planet.

          Also, you’re assuming that an advanced civilization would need exactly the same kind of resources we do. Maybe that’s not the case. As a geologist, you obviously know better reasons why lithium, a mineral that’s becoming more vital for our development, is rather scarce; as a layman, I could easily speculate that an advanced civilization exploited the lithium resources and lefts us the mere crumbles we find today in places like Bolivia. I all probability, this speculation is completely wrong, but the point is: the resources an advanced underground civilization might need may have nothing to do with our current needs. They may just rely completely on geothermal energy, and be quite happy with keeping an agrarian level on other instances of their society.

          Anyway, this reminds me of that old book about ‘The Coming Race’ and their use of Vril. While I’m not claiming this novel should be seen as factual, it’s interesting as an speculation of how an advanced civilization might seek resources we know nothing about, or discard since we haven’t found use for them… yet —e.g. the lithium I mentioned above, might have been seen as garbage to the Conquistadores who were seeking solely for gold. And BTW the current mess with BP and the oil spill equally illustrates this: the oil companies look like obsessed prospectors looking for gold nuggets amid a mountain of diamonds (the methane hydrate crystals that could be a potential source of clean energy for centuries).

  2. The interdemensional theory
    The interdemensional theory certainly interests me as well. And I definitely do not rule out the possibility of visitors from other world, or even a combination of different scenarios. Perhaps we haven’t even come up with the right answer yet – we’ll just have to see, yes?

  3. I definitely agree, Red Pill
    I definitely agree, Red Pill Junkie, about Mac’s rare openmindedness. And because of that, I think out of all the discussions I’ve had about UFOs with people online over the years, my few interactions with Mac are the best I’ve had.

    And thank you, Nick Redfern, for such a superb explanation of Mac’s cryptoterrestrial theory! I think it gives Vallee’s interdimensional hypothesis a run for its money (for its Occam’s Razor factor and for its ability to accommodate ancient astronauts, Atlanteans, etc.). I just ordered the book.

  4. Slightly other possibilities
    Whatever the source of “the others”, it appears that they deliberately confuse us by exhibiting behavior that appears both extraterrestrial, cryptoterrestrial, and just plain weird, so that we can’t figure out their true origin or nature, possibly to avoid culturally altering us too much (the old approach of “hide in plain sight, by looking like something you’re not”). As for the “inter-dimensional” hypothesis, I think it least fits Occam’s Razor, since I don’t see it as necessary to explain a sufficiently advanced species’ ability to appear, transform, and disappear at will, or even to travel from another star system, if that system is/was close enough to travel from, without its taking too much time (at least compared to traveling from halfway across the galaxy), using advanced versions of sub-lightspeed propulsion-based technology.

  5. Unfortunate that Mac was taken so soon.
    I have been fortunate enough to read Mac Tonnes’ book, “The Cryptoterrestrials.”

    I found it very well thought out, and the material Tonnes presents to be a great collection of reports that just don’t fit the standard “UFO” mold.

    But it is obvious that it was not complete. The book to me read like an introduction for what he REALLY wanted to say.

    His ideas, theories, and material are really nothing new to anyone who has spent any amount of time going over the existing literature, (especially Keel and Vallee, who he references constantly…and rightly so!)

    But I think that Mac is really the first writer to put it all down in one singular compendium.

    I feel that this book COULD BE a FANTASTIC primer for a newcomer to the material, or a very eye-opening take on anyone who has been to this point a proponent of the ETH.

    The shortcoming of this book for me is that it takes a good amount of what the reader might and might not have had the opportunity to read for granted, referencing obscure cases, (the Hopkinsville Kentucky “Goblins”,) and material from books that have been out of print for YEARS, (and demand a rather high price on Bookfinder, Amazon, and eBay when you can find them at all. Keel’s “The Eighth Tower,” for example, goes for about $100 for a battered paperback!)

    I know that Tonnes was in the process of a major rewrite on this book when he was so suddenly taken away from us, and I feel that the rewrites that he was doing would probably have corrected this problem, (and fleshed out the references by including the material in these rare books.)

    As it stands, this incomplete edition unfortunately spends a lot of time preaching to the choir. Many of us who long ago abandon the ETH and who are familiar with the material I have mentioned are already on board with Tonnes’s ideas about the possiblity that these things are as native to this world as we are.

    Now, FOR US, this book is a valuable addition to the library. But I feel that “The Cryptoterrestrials” could have been so much more if Tonnes had been able to complete is as he wanted.

    1. Taking the banner
      I listened last week to the Paracast interview between Gene, Paul Kimball, Nick Redfern & Greg Bishop.

      Greg said something really interesting about the book. He felt that the book would cause a mild sensation among the UFO buffs for a short while, and then it would be forgotten; only to be re-discovered after some time had passed, when the current vocal proponents of the ETH were no longer here, by a young generation open-minded enough to seriously face the questions Mac proposed with the book. The book was aimed at them.

      You’re right: Mac’s task was not complete. Maybe that will inspire new people to take the banner and start seeing the UFO phenomenon from different fresh perspectives; I think that will be Mr. Tonnies’ final legacy —to serve as inspiration.

  6. Crypto Terrestrials
    Greetings from Ireland!

    I have just signed on to this site to give the following as it may be of some particular interest in the context of the subject matter.

    I recall this proposition canvassed many moons ago in the seventies, possibly in either the old Fate or Omni publications. I am delighted that it has now surfaced yet again. I have not read the book, just the article.

    The proposition that this race if it exists, is only about a century ahead of us is interesting given that the first UFOs reported towards the end of the 19th, century were cigar shaped and of the rocket variety, more or less where Nazi rocket technology was sixty to seventy years later. Same since, physical descriptions always put the technology ahead but not so far that humans in contact, cannot relate to it!

    The Old Gaelic Legends of Ireland were committed to writing around 450 AD with the spread of Christianity from the memories of a special learned class who had trained in memorizing techniques for seven, fourteen or a full twenty one in the case of a Druid. Most of these tales are erroneously referred to as Fairy Stories. While some of the beings or manifestations described in Gaelic culture can be found described in other European cultures also, some are uniquely Irish.

    These were Tall, noble slim beings, with fair hair and of very white skin. They, men and women , regularly met mortals and in some instances invited them away to their own lands. These descriptions come from one such invite poem…… Mider’s call to Fairy Land.

    (Translation.) The crowns of their head like the primrose hair/ Their bodies as the color of snow.
    There in that land is no ‘mine’ or ‘thine’ / White the teeth, there eyebrows black / Brilliant the eyes-great is the host-/……. and they are characterized as… Noble beings who know no stain / Conception without sin, without lust.

    As can be seen there is nothing diabolical about these beings, they are human like but super human. These beings either live in underground in caverns with entrances concealed from humans or over the seas. They have a high civilization devoted to leisure and the arts etc., higher and more advanced than that of the Gael and but yet the visitor can access the culture and relate to the society.

    The invite away by either the males or females is usually based on sexual attraction for their earthly opposites, but sometimes it is the persons accomplishments in the performed arts or learning that leads to the contact. In my personal view these stories are worth professional perusal by persons interested in this whole area.

    They are seldom malevolent or threatening, some of those enticed away to find that what they thought was a year of earth earth time was in fact a half century or more. In fact the longer they stayed the more passage of earth time and total the change to the landscape they knew.

    Hope this may be of interest to someone following this story up. Enjoy!

    1. Nuada

      These were Tall, noble slim beings, with fair hair and of very white skin. They, men and women , regularly met mortals and in some instances invited them away to their own lands. […] As can be seen there is nothing diabolical about these beings, they are human like but super human.

      That’s NOT what Guillermo told me! 😉

       

      Prince Nuada

      1. crypto Terrestrials
        And there is me thinking that something from a fifteen hundred year old authoritative source would be taken seriously. Apparently not; I will know better the next time and just flick through as before.
        Cheers !

        1. Apologies
          You should know that a little tongue-in-cheek is not unusual here at TDG.

          On the other hand, you have to acknowledge that Del Toro does a great deal of research for his projects. So no doubt he read a great deal of Gaelic lore on the faerie people.

    2. Timely
      [quote=SeanDraoi]The Old Gaelic Legends of Ireland were committed to writing around 450 AD with the spread of Christianity from the memories of a special learned class who had trained in memorizing techniques for seven, fourteen or a full twenty one in the case of a Druid. [/quote]

      Hi SeanDraoi,

      Welcome, and thanks for sharing your thoughts. Is the word “years” missing from the 7, 14 and 21 sentence? That’s my best guess.

      [quote]They are seldom malevolent or threatening, some of those enticed away to find that what they thought was a year of earth earth time was in fact a half century or more. In fact the longer they stayed the more passage of earth time and total the change to the landscape they knew.[/quote]

      This aspect argues for a ‘non-terrestrial’ origin (ie. if simply a hidden indigenous species, there would be no reason for time to change). If we take the stories literally, rather than mythical/allegorical, we’d have to be considering some sort of relativistic time dilation effect (ala Einstein), or stepping outside of time altogether (multidimensional?).

      1. crypto Terrestrials
        Hi Greg,

        Sorry a bit careless, in a hurry at the time : yes it should have been years.

        I also did not properly differentiate between various types of the fairy hosts, while in 19th century folklore all are lumped together, in these early accounts there are several different types in the grouping that mostly resemble the human form except they are more ‘fair of form’, taller and better build. They are also more advanced in the Arts.

        The time dilation is usually associated with ‘ going away over the sea, usually the ‘Western Sea’.
        This was also the location in all Celtic Legends for ‘HI Brazil’ a magical lands so real in story that St Brendan set out to find them and it is now generally accepted that going by way of the North Atlantic, Iceland, Greenland, New Found land etc, to the East Coast Of The States! If interested google The Brendan Voyage. It also gave rise later to the name of present Brazil.

        Another kind of beautiful woman associated with poetic inspiration and found frequently mentioned in Gaelic poetry up to the 18th, century was the ‘Speir Bhean’……. ‘Sky woman’…… self explanatory.

        The below ground being kind, lived underground in luxury and comfort. Most encounters were as they were traversing from one reputed underground mansion to another, almost always during moonlight nights. They were known as ‘The Good People’ and were always described as a joyful band, looking beautiful both the males and females, and they were also dressed in luxury garments and had splendid horses with richly adorned harness.

        They were mannerly to encountered humans but generally stayed aloof and apart. However if interfered with or angered they were not to be trifled with. These latter beings would seem to be closest to the beings described. I must get the book. Meanwhile google Jim Fitzpatrick, Artist, some of his work should be on the net, he went into some kind of trance in his early twenties and got visions of these beings, which he then painted and this has continued all his life.

        These Irish legends are recorded in …… Saltar Na Rann…. I have not googled it in a long while now so I do not know what will come up but good hunting. Cheers!

    3. thanykyou, SeanDraoi
      I think all these old “tales” should be looked at very seriously.
      I think “contact” may have been common over a thousand years ago. Maybe cause of our technology back then. No threat.

      UFO in art work done in the early 1st millenium show very accurate depictions of rockets and saucers. Some with beams of light shooting directionally.

      Von Danikins books in the late sixty’s early seventy’s also show much art with mysterious beings.

      I found that poem fasinating…..thanks.

      1. Crypto Terrestrials
        the floppy

        Had all of Von’s books, they were good in their day and they certainly brought a wealth of info about such matters as they covered into poplar culture. I ceased to read him or take him seriously after the South American tunnels work, that had to be proven or fall. As you may recall it crashed and risked discrediting all previous work, fact or otherwise.

        Unfortunate that such a clever mind should also be a flawed one that resorted to blatant deceit. However as an Old Gaelic proverb has it…….. ‘ There is no genius without flaw ‘ This indeed sadly is the case here!.

        1. a matter of money Sean
          I think Von, after bringing all he did to mainstream media back in the early 70,s, had to find another way of making cash. He cashed in on himself and crashed.
          The thing is, all he brought to the common people, can not be disreguarded. He did rave on a bit with his own theories for sensationalism reasons to sell.
          We really only had mags like Nexus and Omni back then to get fringe type knowledge. Now we have the internet and it’s open slaver.
          But for research purposses it is good. Allows discussion like this. A sharing of knowledge and ideas and content.
          Thanks for replying.

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