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Prepare for a slight taste of onion today. Unfortunately, it’s not in the story about a fast-moving cloud.

  • 594-page hand-written ‘Genealogy of Christ‘ was analysed at a top auction house today.
  • Discovery of 450 Million Years Old ‘Missing Link’.
  • New evidence challenges “Out-of-Africa” hypothesis of modern human origins.
  • Lord God Is Resurrected!: The ivory-billed woodpecker, last seen in 1944 and long thought extinct, has been rediscovered in the Big Woods area of Arkansas. An excerpt from The Race to Save the Lord God Bird. Amazon US and UK.
  • Mycenaean Port of Athens, associated with myths of Theseus and the Argonauts, Has Been Found.
  • Ancient Metalworkers Burned Out of History.
  • Anonimo Mexicano: an English translation of the late sixteenth century Classical Aztec manuscript.
  • Do you believe in fairies? Your great-great-grandparents would have said, “Of Course!”
  • The Guardian‘s take on the Philadelphia Experiment.
  • Some deaths mark the end of an era, as with the passing of kings, presidents, and certain beloved pop stars, but seldom do they signal the end of a particular species, the last of their kind.
  • Sonofusion: ‘bubble power‘ researchers present more convincing evidence, and explain how they plan to turn their improved apparatus into a full-scale electricity-generating device.
  • The Twilight Zone: A ‘creature of the oil industry’, who taught for 11 years at the Royal School of Mines, has revealed six shocking things he’s discovered over the past year.
  • Richard Leakey On Climate.
  • Why Do Some People Have a Conscience, While Others Don’t?
  • Mysterious interference is playing havoc with British cars.
  • Britain To Go Nuclear: Downing St. is drawing up secret plans for new generation of nuclear power stations.
  • Another day at the hydrogen-powered office.
  • Lunar Tourism by 2020?: just think of the economic value of traveling in space.
  • Engineer turns bacteria into living computers.
  • Scientists confirm Earth’s energy is out of balance.
  • Climate Change Threatens Food Supply: Rise in ground-level ozone limits photosynthesis, resulting in 20 percent loss in crop yields.
  • Smarter honeybees: can selective breeding produce enough of them fast enough to avert an agricultural crisis?
  • NASA Gives Artificial Gravity A New Spin.
  • Stellar Rebirth: Old star’s re-ignition of fusion reactions has surprised astronomers — by failing to follow their computer simulation’s script.
  • Eliminating enzyme dramatically reduces cardiovascular disease, lowers levels of atherosclerosis by 85 percent.
  • What’s worse than a cold, and almost as deadly as influenza? Something you’ve probably never heard of, that’s far more common than previously thought. RSV: the other ‘flu’.
  • Yale researchers identify molecule for detecting parasitic infection in humans.
  • Use of Insecticides Linked to Lasting Neurological Problems for Farmers.
  • New Role for Ecstacy: drug will soon be used to treat a handful of traumatized vets from Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Internal combustion engines to be made cleaner, more efficient, with the help of newly found algorithms for a so-called ion current analyzer. For David.
  • Microbial Fuel Cell: High Yield Hydrogen Source And Wastewater Cleaner.
  • Molecular motors that shuttle material within living cells cooperate in a delicate choreography of steps, rather than engaging in the brute-force tug of war many scientists had imagined.
  • Ten-year experiment proves ‘No-till‘ is key to keeping carbon in the soil, and greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere.
  • Already covering 6,000 square miles, the Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone may grow even larger in 2005.
  • Snooze news: gene discovery helps researchers zero in on cellular mechanisms of sleep. A single mutation may control how much – or how little – you need.
  • Swiss complete world’s third longest rail tunnel through the Alps.
  • Binoomea: Australian Aborigines legendary underground world.
  • Teen orgies go by another name, and raise a ruckus in the UK.
  • The Imminent Threat: One primative nuclear weapon detonated at high altitude would produce a devastating electromagnetic pulse that would send US back to a nineteeth-century lifestyle. Republican Senator’s article: ‘Unready For This Attack’. Iran military journal eyes EMP attack.
  • Britain says it will not support any U.S. military action against Iran.
  • The Forces That Set the Agenda: who’s molding collective thought?
  • Ally or Enemy?: Saudi chief justice urges young Saudi men to join battle against US in Iraq.
  • Bush escapes to bunker, VP is evacuated, as fast-moving cloud bears down on White House. So what do you think they thought it was?
  • The number of people killed by terrorists each year is surging upward. Critics pounce.
  • Down to the Wire: The US has fallen far behind in deploying broadband and the latest mobile phone technologies. Having the slowest, most expensive, and least reliable broadband in the developed world will soon cost it dearly.
  • Lessons from German History.
  • Freakonomics author says “an economist — whose science is less a subject matter than a science of measurement, of proving cause and effect — is in a position to see through all kinds of clutter, from the cultural to the ideological.”
  • Banks are installing anti-money-laundering software on a massive scale. The new systems may help track al-Qaida, but they’ll also track everyone else’s money.
  • Victorian values revisited as the rich-poor health gap widens.
  • Income Inequalities: ‘progressives‘, ‘conservatives‘, and ‘the faithful‘ continue to argue over who’s to blame, while the design flaws of money itself (pdf) continue to be largely unknown, unexamined, unquestioned, or ignored.
  • Revolt of the Middle.
  • TV’s distracting visuals: the crawls, the anchor person, sports scores, weather forecast, the stock index — are conflicting bits of information that make it more difficult to attend to and remember the central message. No, it wasn’t just you.
  • Girls who identify with certain fairytale characters are more likely to stay in destructive relationships as adults.
  • Did they really need functional magnetic resonance imaging to prove ice cream stimulates brain’s pleasure centres?
  • Sherlock Holmes: imagining the fictional detective’s life at age 93. A review of A Slight Trick of the Mind. Amazon US and UK.
  • New fast, low-cost, human motion animation system needs no markers, bodysuits, or other sensors; allows animated characters to be generated and displayed in real-time.
  • Oxford scientists develop spin transistor that works up to 1,000 times better than previous designs.
  • Has the American Dream given way to the European Dream?
  • “Nothing to it”: 80-year-old carries friend out of fire.
  • Eight Ain’t Enough for the Rattlesnake King.
  • Amazing New Hyperbolic Chamber Greatest Invention In The History of Mankind Ever — and kinda like some of today’s news articles.

Thanks Bill.

Quote of the Day:

The modern conservative is engaged in one of man’s oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.

John Kenneth Galbraith