Telepathy During the Near Death Experience

Fascinated at the moment by the number of times I've come across two aspects of the near-death experience while researching my book Stop Worrying, There Probably Is An Afterlife: that the appearance of the deceased loved ones meeting the newly-dead is 'assumed' for the experiencer's benefit (a la Ellie Arroway/Jodie Foster's father in the movie Contact), and that communication with these individuals is nearly always explicitly noted as being via telepathy.

These elements are present in what I regard as one of the most 'archetypal' near-death accounts that I've ever come across (mentioned previously in my essay "Death Before Life After Life"), the story of Louis Tucker, a Catholic priest. What makes Tucker's NDE account doubly interesting is that it was described in his 1943 memoirs, Clerical Errors, published a number of decades before the near-death experience was common knowledge. The experience itself took place in 1909, when Tucker was suffering the life-threatening effects of a severe case of food poisoning. With the family physician in attendance, Tucker lost consciousness, and was shortly thereafter pronounced dead by the doctor:

The unconsciousness was short. The sensation was not quite like anything earthly; the nearest familiar thing to it is passing through a short tunnel on a train… I emerged into a place where people were being met by friends. It was quiet and full of light, and Father was waiting for me. He looked exactly as he had in the last few years of his life and wore the last suit of clothes he had owned…I knew that the clothes Father wore were assumed because they were familiar to me, so that I might feel no strangeness in seeing him, and that to some lesser extent, his appearance was assumed also; I knew all these things by contagion, because he did.

Soon I discovered that we were not talking, but thinking. I knew dozens of things that we did not mention because he knew them. He thought a question, I an answer, without speaking; the process was practically instantaneous… What he said was in ideas, no words: if I were to go back at all I must go at once…I did not want to go back; not in the least; the idea of self-preservation, the will to live was quite gone…I swung into the blackness again, as a man might swing on a train, thoroughly disgusted that I could not stay, and absolutely certain that it was right for me to go back. That certainty has never wavered.

There was a short interval of confused and hurrying blackness and I came to, to find myself lying on my bed with the doctor bending over telling me that I was safe now and would live… I told him I knew that some time ago, and went to sleep.

For more fascinating glimpses 'behind the veil' of death, make sure you pre-order a copy/package of Stop Worrying, There Probably Is An Afterlife from the IndieGoGo crowd-funding page - every order helps support the writing of the book, and is greatly appreciated.

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Ishtar Dingir's picture
Member since:
22 September 2011
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2 years 3 weeks

This subject of 'death and dying' needs to be viewed more holistically, if we are to make any sense of the issues it raises, like why is telepathy the preferred means of communication after 'death'.

"Death and dying" is just another word for inter-dimensional travel or journeying, a familar occupation to the shaman who regularly crosses through 'veils' that are normally only transcended at 'death'.

Through shamanic journeying, I have found that in all other dimensions, communication is by telepathy or something we call 'instantaneous downloads'.

In other words, it's only in this dimension that we're reduced to vibrating the air with our mouths in order to communicate.

All of this would make a lot more sense if shamanism hadn't been driven underground and with it, the role of the psychopomp. Psychopomping or carrying the soul of the recently deceased was one of the functions of the shaman. In this way, the shaman would act as guide through the astral planes, thus helping the Deceased to avoid unnecessary detours into 'a bad trip'.

I've written an article about the role of shaman as psychopomp in this article: http://www.ishtarsgate.com/forum/showthr... and also about how shamans are beginning to perform this role again today.

Inannawhimsey's picture
Member since:
14 April 2009
Last activity:
51 weeks 2 days

Fascinating stuff!

I can see psychopomp archeologists (just what was Caanan anyway?), psychopomp physicists, psychopomp detectives (able to solve crimes by talking with the dead), even psychopomp Linguists (want to know what the original Latin sounded like or the Britons?) and Literature profs.

Sheer endless possibilities :3

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

Ishtar Dingir's picture
Member since:
22 September 2011
Last activity:
2 years 3 weeks

Er... yes and no, Inanna.

Journeying into these dimensions is actually self-transformative in that it changes your consciousness. So things that seem to important back here on Earth suddenly seem less so once you're through the veil, as there are much much more interesting problems to solve and questions to ask like:

Who am I?

Why am I in a human body?

What did I come to Earth to do?

Besides all that, what the original Latin sounded like from an ancient Briton pales into insignificance. From that end of the telescope, anyway. :-)

Inannawhimsey's picture
Member since:
14 April 2009
Last activity:
51 weeks 2 days
Ishtar Dingir wrote:

Er... yes and no, Inanna.

Journeying into these dimensions is actually self-transformative in that it changes your consciousness. So things that seem to important back here on Earth suddenly seem less so once you're through the veil, as there are much much more interesting problems to solve and questions to ask like:

Who am I?

Why am I in a human body?

What did I come to Earth to do?

Besides all that, what the original Latin sounded like from an ancient Briton pales into insignificance. From that end of the telescope, anyway. :-)

Are you saying that there are actually human beings who find those questions to be so DIFFICULT that they have to wait to die before u
they understand them? I find that notion to be quite bizarre, actually.

If death is a more permanent state, then just imagine the thoughts people can do...I look at what Einstein was able to accomplish in such a short time. Steve Jobs could still do amazing things for Apple (and thus, for humanity).

It'd be fun, I think, to be able to walk on the photosphere of a star safely :3

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

emlong's picture
Member since:
18 September 2007
Last activity:
16 hours 33 min

Some of the NDE'ers I personally know actually regard the earth plane state as being the more "deathly" one. It is a dying to the noumenal plane in order to return to this one that they find more disquieting than the other way around. There is a great interview of an NDE'er that sort of explains the new attitude that develops:

See video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ai-HgIEdV7Q

See video

There are 3 different stories weaving in and out of this episode, but it is the guy who was crushed on his motorcycle who has the attitude I am talking about. Now when he reads the obituaries me mutters something to the effect of "Lucky sucker. Now you get to go home."

Inannawhimsey's picture
Member since:
14 April 2009
Last activity:
51 weeks 2 days

Thanks for the vids :3

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake