News Briefs 27-11-2006

After several hours of queues on Saturday, I was told I couldn’t vote in the state election because I don’t exist. So I queued for several more hours to prove I do exist, only to be told, no, I don’t exist and I should come back on Monday. It’s Monday, and I didn’t go back. I quite like not existing.

  • Experts who study dreams say we should throw out our dream dictionaries, because symbolism is personal.
  • The Giving Gift, a holiday short story by Brian Joseph, author of The Gift Of Gabe (Amazon US or UK). I interviewed Brian somewhere on TDG, but can’t find it. Kat?
  • A British historian is giving the bird to the belief that Thanksgiving is all about turkey. I’ll find you a proper parrot story next week, Shadows.
  • A museum of sorcery and witchcraft has opened in Iceland. Bjork is the curator.
  • Music therapy can improve the symptoms of schizophrenia, according to a new study. People playing walkmans too loudly on public transport make symptoms worse.
  • A mysterious ‘dead zone’ in the US has scrambled remote-control car locks over the past few weeks.
  • A US physicist says wireless electricity is on the way. That’s good news for the Japanese.
  • Could the smudges that appear in Saturn’s rings be caused by massive lightning strikes?
  • Cassini’s spectacular image of Saturn’s polar vortex puts in the same club as Venus.
  • Indian scientists not only want to send probes to the moon, but also Mars by 2012. If that doesn’t inspire Alan Moore to write a new Captain Nemo adventure, I don’t know what will.
  • Some scientists think air pollution could help combat global warming. It may save the Earth, but too bad we’ll all asphyxiate to death.
  • A mass extinction 250 million years ago is responsible for the rich variety of sea creatures in the ocean today. Every time I eat sushi, I think of their sacrifice.
  • Too bad the rich variety of sea creatures in the ocean today will be virtually extinct themselves in another 50 years. I feel like Fry eating the last anchovie in Futurama.
  • According to Captain Obvious, money makes people selfish. It makes me happy.
  • If you fancy busting Zahi Hawass for antiquities smuggling, then Operation Art Beat is for you. Good cop or bad cop, Greg?
  • A Ming dynasty tomb has been discovered during the construction of a subway in Shanghai. Trains, not franchise food.
  • Experts have always found tumi ceremonial knives through looters, but archaeologists in northern Peru have excavated the pre-Inca treasure for the first time. I guess that depends on how you define “looter”.
  • An economic solution to the Fermi Paradox (we need a Red Pill entry for that) claims that extraterrestrials can’t afford to visit us. No wonder ET had no change to phone home.
  • Scientific data supports the theory that a cow found mutilated on a Montana ranch dropped from the sky and bounced. Bill says it makes the beef more tender.
  • Three people witnessed the transit of a triangular UFO over Caracas, Venezuela.
  • Various reports from Tenerife of strange lights in the sky and household appliances playing up.
  • Did an amateur photographer snap a UFO during a Dakota airshow?
  • BBC’s Horizon is airing a program discussing the Panspermia theory, including India’s red rain.

Thanks Brian and Captain Obvious.

Quote of the Day:

Inside you there’s an artist you don’t know about … Say yes quickly, if you know, if you’ve known it from the beginning of the universe.

Jalai Ud-Din Rumi

  1. “Some scientists think air
    “Some scientists think air pollution could help combat global warming. It may save the Earth, but too bad we’ll all asphyxiate to death.”

    This is actually misleading. The article keeps saying scientits want to put “polluants” in the atmosphere, but it seems like this is willful sabotage of the idea from the reporter.

    The idea is correctly explained in this paragraph:
    “While carbon dioxide keeps heat from escaping Earth, substances such as sulfur dioxide, a common air pollutant, reflect solar radiation, helping cool the planet.”

    Ok, whether something is a polluant or isn’t is a matter of perspective. The point is, we an throw some stuff in the atmosphere, which will reflect heat, thus causing the plant to cool.

    The issue with this solution ISN’T that we are “polluting” the atmosphere. It’s that it’s Geoengineering. Meaning Man gets to control the atmosphere. Meaning, exactly, which ‘Man’? Russia would just love to melt a bit more ice up north to open up some shipping lanes, but a lot of other nations wouldn’t. So who gets to decide?

    Oh, and of course, the main issue, which this article only mentions in passing, WE DON’T KNOW THE REAL SIDE EFFECTS. I’m sure two tiny paragraphs in the article were enough to point that out.

    Anyway, this “solution” is starting to gain a damn lot of momentum, since economically it’s the best option we have so far, and we all know that economics is all that matters really. If you want to really get informed on it, google around, or check out last issue of Rolling Stones for a great article covering all the basics.

    1. trees
      I think it would be a good idea to plant lots of trees, as trees pump oxygen into the atmosphere and pump carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. There needs to be a UN campaign to regreeen the tropics and stop the destruction of tropical rainforests.

      1. I’m assuming this is not a
        I’m assuming this is not a serious post. If it is, well, I must sadly inform you that won’t work as we are past the point of being able to fix the CO2 levels with trees (in fact, the seas are the biggest source of CO2 conversion, since there is far more algea surface than trees and grass)

      2. For Lee – about trees
        >>I think it would be a good idea to plant lots of trees.. ..and stop the destruction of tropical rainforests.

        I’m not against that idea, but when I think of humans planting ‘lots of trees’, the first images that come to mind are the South’s acres and acres of pine plantations, with their long rows of evenly spaced pine seedlings – and nothing else.

        Hopefully, more of this sort of research will provide us with a better idea of exactly which trees should be planted, and where:

        Five modes of seed dispersal — ballistic (where seeds are liberated explosively), gravity, gyration (where the progression of seeds to the ground is slowed by the shape of the seeds), wind, and animal — have been found to play a major role in the distribution of plant species in tropical forests.

        Kat

    2. Kneejerk
      Backgammon,

      Right you are lets have more chemtrails ! Such a silly response to global warming, why not trigger some more vulcanic outbursts, or simply seed the oceans with tiny scrapmetal, bioengineer white forests..and grasses, paint every human construction white, build huge ocean heat- exchangers, create floating cities…in short be creative.

      A matter of choice;
      Intimidation, corruption and lies, or serenity, sharing and sincerity.

      1. kneejerk
        >>…why not trigger some more vulcanic outbursts…

        An article in Friday’s news says global warming could unleash more seismic activity. So it seems there may soon be more volcanic activity, even without any further human encouragement. Based on the info in the article, unfortunately we may soon see an increase in strong earthquakes, and more under-sea landslides with accompanying tsunamis – all of which sounds expensive as well as dangerous.

        1. balance
          [quote=Kat]>>…why not trigger some more vulcanic outbursts…

          An article in Friday’s news says global warming could unleash more seismic activity. So it seems there may soon be more volcanic activity, even without any further human encouragement. Based on the info in the article, unfortunately we may soon see an increase in strong earthquakes, and more under-sea landslides with accompanying tsunamis – all of which sounds expensive as well as dangerous.[/quote]

          You know what, I’m starting to suspect Mother Earth will never let us fuck things up too much. Everytime we humans get to a point where we are about to wreck things, something comes along and forces things back into balance. I’m thinking mainly of the Black Death in medieval times, which happened just when wood consumption was out of control and threatning to deforest all of europe. With so many dead people, wood consuption fell drasticly and voilà, disaster averted.

      2. I’m not exactly sure what
        I’m not exactly sure what you’re objecting to, as your post is not too clear to me. I’m going to take a shot and say you think putting sulphur (or whatever) particles in the air is unrealistic. But it is. It’s not very hard to do, nor expensive, and the ROI is very high.

        The obstacles for this solution are not technical. The problem is even non-eco friendly people, the Exxon and US Governements of this world, are a tad nervous at the idea of meddling with nature on this scale, while scientists proposing other global warming solutions are up in arms at the idea of it also.

        However, from what I’m reading, resistance to the idea is slowly melting (haha pun) away. The economics of it are just so good, lots of powerful people want it to be THE solution. I’m just saying, don’t be surprised if in the coming years you start hearing more and more about this.

  2. B Joseph interview
    >>I interviewed Brian somewhere on TDG, but can’t find it. Kat?

    Errmmm…**searching**… I have no idea where it got off to. Are you sure the interview was posted at TDG? Could it have been for an issue of Sub Rosa instead?

    Kat

        1. demand a refund
          Rick, you should go to court and demand a refund on all taxes paid on the grounds that you don’t exist.

          —-
          don’t let people drive you crazy, when it is within walking distance

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