News Briefs 06-09-2004

People ask me if aliens exist, how come they haven’t said hello to us yet? I point to examples like the tragedy in Beslin, Russia, and man’s ability to slaughter several hundred children just to make a political point. I wouldn’t want to visit this planet either, people make me sick.

Quote of the Day:

The majority of people dismiss those things that lie beyond the bounds of their own understanding as absurd and not worth thinking about.

from the novel The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

  1. good stuff
    Some great stuff there Rico, it will take me a while to check it all out.

    About your lead-in at the top…..gotta agree with you….hell is other people, someone wise said.

    shadows

  2. Secret chamber
    So what the two amateur Frenchman want us to believe is that the engineers who surveyed, designed, and constructed the Great Pyramid didn’t quite know what they were about? If I understand the theory, the builders changed horses several times in midstream, finally settling on a compromise for Khufu’s burial chamber. Since the prevalent theory of pyramid construction dictates that the structure rises course-by-course, when did they arrive at the conclusion that none of the existing chambers were satisfactory? Did they then excavate another chamber into the courses of an architecturally sound structure? I’m curious about another thing: if the ingenious “relieving chambers” above the King’s Chamber were necessary, why aren’t there any above the Queen’s Chamber, even though it has even more mass above it, including the heavy granite that lines the King’s Chamber? I’m not an expert, and I don’t have a bunch of letters after my name, so my opinion isn’t officially worth much. However, it seems to me that there’s a deeper mystery here, which I seriously doubt is Khufu’s hidden burial chamber. I’d wager there’s much more to this geometric solid than we can imagine, and it has very little to do with interment.

    As an example, when future archaeologists pore over the ruins of our civilization (and I use the term loosely), they will undoubtedly find golf clubs. These will likely be interpreted as weapons – the furthest thing from their minds will be that they were used to whack a small white dimpled ball repeatedly until it fell into a hole in the ground. When they dig up Disney World, they will marvel at a society that worshiped a four-fingered rodent wearing shorts, and his pantheon: Minney, Donald, Daisy, Huey, Dewey, Louie, Goofy and Pluto. What an Ennead! And when they discover the containers that hold our theater snacks, they will perceive us as a race of giants.

    Regards,
    khefre

    “Whoever undertakes to set himself up as judge in the field of truth and knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the Gods.” Albert Einstein

    1. Re: Secret Chamber
      Wise words Khefre. The question of differing ‘roof’ structures over the Kings and Queens chambers has never been sufficiently answered by the conservative side of archeology.

      One theory I recall reading suggested that each granite slab used in the ceiling of the Kings chamber had been smoothed on three sides and on the forth surface, randomly drilled to “tune” each slab to vibrate at the same frequency. The theory goes on the claim that the whole Kings chamber is designed to resonate at a predetermined frequency within the Pyramid structure. Whether this is true or not, it makes more sense then the argument of ‘weight of the structure above’.

      AAiek

    1. If you take “people make me s
      If you take “people make me sick” as a generalisation you would probably say it is wrong.
      But if you look at all the living entities on this planet, then it is certain that it is people that make you sick, and we are talking bad behaviour here.

      shadows

  3. slaughter

    man’s ability to slaughter several hundred children just to make a political point

    I was going to have a go for a moment….then I realised you were talking of the terrorists and not the russian forces. I hope…..

    1. I was most definitely referin
      I was most definitely refering to the terrorists. Hell is too good for those people.

      I feel sorry for the Russian soldiers who had no choice but to storm the building. Sure, they’re guilty of poor crowd control, but they’re not the British SAS or US Secret Service — most of them were kids who took a job in the army to escape a lifetime of unemployment. A bomb went off, hostages attempted to escape, they were gunned down, then hundreds of civilians jumped the barricades and suddenly there were people running everywhere getting shot at — the Russians did the right thing by storming the school at this point, it would have been a lot worse if they’d hesitated.

      I’m paraphrasing Salman Rushdie when I say that to blame the Russian Government and Authorities is to ignore one of the most basic of moralities: the individual is responsible for their own actions. The blame rests solely on those people evil enough to take hostage over a thousand innocent people, most of them children, and then slaughter them in the most horrible of ways.

      I’d also like to request that this is the last word for this thread — I’d hate to see people post conspiracy theories and blame the Russians for a WACO style conspiracy, like I’ve seen on other message boards.

      Peace and Respect,

      Rico

  4. Fantasy or Realism?
    Why must there be a preference? A literary diet should be just as sensible as a nutritional diet. Balanced, diverse, fulfilling, and enjoyable. When I was a lad, I read nothing but comics, tantamount to eating nothing but ice cream. My sister, seeing the trap I was in, began buying me “Classic Comics” (yeah, I’m that old), and once I discovered the depth and breadth of places I could go in my mind’s eye, I went on to devour the original works on which the CC genre was based. Ivanhoe, The Black Arrow, The Oxbow Incident, etc. From “dessert only”, my reading had become a banquet. As my reading broadened, so did my range of interests and curiosities. I love good, solid, science fiction, but I’ve read Tolkien no less than eight times. Like Shakespeare, there’s great things to be savored in how some tales are written, as well as what they are written about. Fantasy opens a person’s mind to endless possibilities; they allow you to step into a realm where there are no limitations. Read some Norse mythology if you want to really bend your brain! The tales of ancient Greece are out there, too.

    Don’t get hung up with meat and potatoes; have some onions, an artichoke or two, bok choy, kim chee, boulliabaise, falafel, and don’t forget the dessert: death by chocolate, strawberry shortcake, a hot fudge sundae! Savor each bite, let the words and ideas flow over your mind like a great meal flows over your tongue. Like a balanced, enjoyable meal nourishes your body, balanced reading will nourish your spirit, and your mind.

    Regards,
    khefre

    “A library doesn’t need windows. A library is a window.”
    Stuart Brand

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