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Updated: 17 hours 48 min ago

Search for biomarkers aimed at improving treatment of painful bladder condition

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:14pm
Taking advantage of technology that can analyze tissue samples and measure the activity of thousands of genes at once, scientists are on a mission to better understand and treat interstitial cystitis (IC), a painful and difficult-to-diagnose bladder condition. IC is also known as bladder pain syndrome. Symptoms can include severe pelvic pain, urinary urgency and frequency and painful sexual intercourse. IC is often misdiagnosed as other conditions such as endometriosis, kidney stones or chronic urinary tract infections.
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Clinical trial evaluates safety of stem cell transplantation in spine

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:14pm
A clinical trial to investigate the safety of neural stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic spinal cord injuries has been launched in the United States. Related goals of the clinical trial include evaluating the stem cell graft's survival and the effectiveness of immunosuppression drugs to prevent rejection. The researchers will also look for possible therapeutic benefits such as changes in motor and sensory function, bowel and bladder function, and pain levels.
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Differing interests of psychology students, professors could impact retention

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:14pm
What is the best way to keep psychology students from switching majors? According to a study, putting off intensive science courses may help. The study compared the views and interests of college students and instructors with regard to the psychology discipline, and then examined the implications of the differential interests.
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Comets forge organic molecules in their dusty atmospheres

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:11pm
Scientists have made incredible 3D images of the ghostly atmospheres surrounding comets ISON and Lemmon. These new observations provided important insights into how and where comets forge new chemicals, including intriguing organic compounds.
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Novel drug action against solid tumors explained

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:11pm
Researchers have discovered how a drug that deprives the cells of a key amino acid specifically kills cancer cells. The study describes how arginine starvation specifically kills tumor cells by a novel mechanism involving mitochondria dysfunction, reactive oxygen species generation, nuclear DNA leakage and chromatin autophagy, where leaked DNA is captured and "eaten" by giant autophagosomes.
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Long-sought drug candidate can halt tumor growth, scientists demonstrate

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:11pm
Scientists have disrupted the function of MYC, a cancer regulator thought to be “undruggable.” The researchers found that a credit card-like molecule they developed moves in and disrupts critical interactions between MYC and its binding partner. The study also shows the drug candidate can stop tumor growth in animal models.
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Bioengineers create functional 3-D brain-like tissue: Tissue kept alive for months

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:11pm
Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months. The tissue could provide a superior model for studying normal brain function as well as injury and disease, and could assist in the development of new treatments for brain dysfunction.
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Preemies' gut bacteria may depend more on gestational age than environment

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 7:11pm
In infants born prematurely, researchers have found that the population of bacteria in babies’ gastrointestinal tracts may depend more on their biological makeup and gestational age at birth than on environmental factors. The scientists discovered that bacterial communities assemble in an orderly, choreographed progression, with the pace of that assembly slowest in infants born most prematurely.
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Malaria medicine chloroquine inhibits tumor growth, metastases, study shows

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 5:23pm
The anti-cancer effect of the antimalarial agent chloroquine when combined with conventional chemotherapy has been well documented. To date, it was assumed that chloroquine increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy by means of a direct effect on the cancer cells. However, a recent study has demonstrated that chloroquine also normalizes the abnormal blood vessels in tumors. This blood vessel normalization results in an increased barrier function on the one hand, and in enhanced tumor perfusion on the other hand, which increases the response of the tumor to chemotherapy.
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Ravens rule Idaho's artificial roosts

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 5:23pm
A new study has explored how habitat alterations, including the addition of energy transmission towers, affect avian predators nesting in sagebrush landscapes. Researchers compared nesting habitat selection between Common Ravens and three raptor species commonly found in sagebrush ecosystems: Red-tailed Hawks, Swainson's Hawks, and Ferruginous Hawks.
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Helping farmers adapt to changing growing conditions

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 5:22pm
Spring rains that delayed planting and a cool summer have farmers concerned about whether their corn will reach maturity before the first frost. Two new online decision-making tools available through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Useful to Usable research project will help, according to a state climatologist. Farmers are producing crops under more variable conditions, so these tools can be critical to both food safety and the farmers’ economic survival.
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Rare frogs holding their own despite drought conditions

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
A recent survey of mountain yellow-legged frogs released into the wild by San Diego Zoo Global wildlife conservationists indicates that the populations are showing signs of stress related to drought conditions in California. The juvenile frogs, released into the San Jacinto mountains in two protected sites, are representatives of a species brought to the brink of extinction by the threat of wildfire, habitat destruction and chytrid fungus.
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Links between city design, health shown in study

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
In a rare study of how street network design affects public health, researchers have discovered that older, more compact cities promote more walking and biking and are generally healthier than many newer cities. “We built these dense, connected street networks for thousands of years but only over the last century or so did we switch to designing sparse, tree-like networks with cars in mind,” one researcher noted.
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Astrophysicists detect destruction of three stars by supermassive black holes

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
Researchers have reported registering three possible occasions of the total destruction of stars by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies.
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'Worm pill' could ease autoimmune disease symptoms

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
Experts believe a molecule in parasitic worms could help explain why worm infections can effectively treat a range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. The study successfully identified peptides from parasitic worms that suppress the body's immune response. Researchers believe this could pave the way for a new drug containing the peptide to provide relief from the symptoms of autoimmune diseases.
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'Dimmer switch' drug idea could tackle schizophrenia without side effects

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
The discovery of a new mechanism of drug action could lead to the next generation of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Affecting one per cent of the world's population, schizophrenia is a major health condition. It affects a person's ability to think, feel and act and is associated with distressing symptoms including hallucinations and delusions.
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U.S. immigration associated with rise in smoking among Latinos, Asians

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
Immigration to the US may result in increased smoking in Latino and Asian women, according to new research by sociologists. The current study found that accounting for gender differences in aspects of acculturation (including time spent in the U.S., citizenship status, and English-language proficiency) explained gender differences in smoking frequency for both Asian and Latino migrants.
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Gene likely to promote childhood cancers pinpointed by researchers

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
A gene that contributes to the development of several childhood cancers has been pinpointed by researchers in a study conducted with mice designed to model the cancers. The gene Lin28b is an attractive therapeutic target in cancer because it is ordinarily only expressed in embryos, so blocking it in children should specifically hinder cancer growth without introducing many side effects.
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Climate change negatively impacting Great Lakes, researcher says

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
Climate change is having a direct negative effect on the Great Lakes, including impacts to recreational value, drinking water potential, and becoming more suited to invasive species and infectious pathogens, according to a researcher. One of the many conclusions reached in the study was the need to develop technology that allows real-time monitoring and management of water systems.
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Fertile discovery: Treating male infertility with synthetic protein

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:51pm
A promising method of treating male infertility using a synthetic version of the sperm-originated protein known as PAWP has been developed by researchers. The research promises to diagnose and treat cases of male factor infertility where a patient's sperm is unable to initiate or induce activation of the egg to form an early embryo.
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