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Infant brains develop years faster than we thought

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:57am
A key element of infant brain development occurs years earlier than previously thought, research has shown. The way we perceive faces -- using the right hemisphere of the brain -- is unique and sets us apart from non-human primates. It was thought that this ability develops as we learn to read, but a new study shows that in babies as young as four months it is already highly evolved.
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Kids' altruism linked with better physiological regulation, less family wealth

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:57am
Children as young as four years old may reap better health from altruistic giving, a behavior that tends to be less common among kids from high-income families, according to new research on the nature and nurture of altruism.
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CT angiography links arterial plaque with diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:57am
Non-calcified arterial plaque is associated with diabetes, high systolic blood pressure and elevated 'bad' cholesterol levels in asymptomatic individuals, according to a new study. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in men and women worldwide, accounting for 17 million deaths annually.
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Teens turn to Internet to cope with health challenges

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:57am
While most teens tap online sources to learn more about puberty, drugs, sex, depression and other issues, a surprising 88 percent said they do not feel comfortable sharing their health concerns with Facebook friends or on other social networking sites, according to a study.
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Hodgkin's lymphoma: Rare case located outside of the nodules

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:56am
The case of a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma located outside of the nodules has been published as a rare case study. There have been only 26 cases described like this in the scientific literature.
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Two hours after the goal celebrations: The effect of football results on the well-being of viewers

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:56am
Football results can raise the immediate sense of well-being for viewers, but are unlikely to sustain it in the longer-term. Through a specially-designed smartphone app, scientists were able to show that the final results of football games have a shorter and less intensive effect as previously thought. The psychologists asked the study participants questions about their sense of well-being via the smartphone app before and after the group stage games of the 2014 FIFA World Cup.
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Forest-based bioenergy policies interlinked to national and EU policies

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:56am
A study combined horizontal and vertical policy interactions with three policy layers: policy objectives, policy instruments and thematic elements in implementation. National bioenergy policies were found to vary greatly, and to have complex interlinkages to national renewable energy and forest policies (horizontal dimension) and to EU policies (vertical dimension).
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Two new groups of viruses discovered

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:55am
Two new groups of viruses have been discovered within the Bunyavirus family in the tropical forest of Ivory Coast. Previously only five groups responsible for serious illnesses in humans and animals were known. Most are spread through blood-feeding insects. Based on the discovered viruses researchers conclude that the ancester to all bunyaviruses must have existed in arthropods such as insects.
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X-ray scanning to guarantee meat tenderness

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:55am
Have you ever bought an expensive steak for your evening meal only to be annoyed to find out that you're chewing on stubborn gristle? Worry no more -- change is just around the corner. Consumers may soon have a guarantee for the quality of meat they're paying for.
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A pan-European carbon dioxide storage site in the North Sea?

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:55am
Norway has the best geological ‘carbon dioxide sponge’ in the world, says an expert of climate technology. Without carbon capture and storage, the world will be unable to achieve the aim of limiting the global temperature increase to two degrees. Therefore, he wants Norway to adopt a more proactive policy: among other measures, he would like to see Norway taking the initiative to develop a major pan-European carbon dioxide storage site in the North Sea.
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Noncoding RNA CCDC26 regulates KIT expression

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:49am
An long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), which might give an impact on tyrosine kinase-targeted leukemia therapy, was found to be expressed in a leukemia cell line. The function of the lncRNA CCDC26 is not fully understood; however, researchers have now revealed the mechanisms by which CCDC26 controls the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT expression. The results provide new insights into leukemia recurrence and may help to develop new leukemia therapies.
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Genetic causes of cerebral palsy trump birth causes

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:47am
Cerebral palsy has an even stronger genetic cause than previously thought, leading researchers to call for an end to unnecessary caesareans and arbitrary litigation against obstetric staff.
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Vestibulo-ocular dysfunction in children and adolescents with sports-related concussion

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:47am
Researchers have investigated the frequency of vestibulo-ocular dysfunction in children and adolescents with sports-related concussion and found that its presence was predictive of a prolonged recovery.
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Neuroimaging findings generally nondiagnostic in children and adolescents with sports-related concussions

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:47am
Researchers examined neuroimaging studies obtained in children and adolescents with sports-related concussions and found that the images appeared normal in 78% of cases. Although usually nondiagnostic, occasionally such studies can be useful in guiding decisions about return to play.
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New electronics? Black Phosphorus Reveals Its Secrets

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:47am
Scientists have succeeded in preventing two-dimensional layers of black phosphorus from oxidating. In so doing, they have opened the doors to exploiting their striking properties in a number of electronic and optoelectronic devices.
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Transitional care, progressive mobility help patients with post-acute care recovery

Tue, 02/06/2015 - 11:47am
An article reviews post-acute transitional care as provided at a skilled nursing facility in western New York and examines the individual roles of various interdisciplinary team members, including progressive care nurses.
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New climate stress index model challenges doomsday forecasts for world's coral reefs

Mon, 01/06/2015 - 9:29pm
A newer and more complex model incorporating data from both environmental factors and field observations of coral responses to stress provides a better forecasting tool than the more widely used models and a more positive future for coral reefs, according to a new study.
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Inexperienced investors should take advantage of 'auto-pilot investing'

Mon, 01/06/2015 - 9:29pm
Use of target-date is a positive trend that will help inexperienced investors invest safely without risking significant losses based on their lack of knowledge, an expert writes. Target-date funds, which were endorsed by Congress in the Pension Protection Act of 2006, are also known as life-cycle funds. This means that TDFs change their asset mix of stocks and bonds based on the age of the investor.
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Extra love and support doesn't make up for being a helicopter parent

Mon, 01/06/2015 - 9:29pm
Scholars who found that helicopter parenting backfires have just published a follow-up study. Their question: Would lots of love and support negate the effects of parental hovering? Their data analysis says no, underscoring the need for parents to step back and let young adult children lead.
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Acid saline groundwaters and lakes of southern Western Australia

Mon, 01/06/2015 - 9:29pm
The 'wheat belt' and 'gold fields' of southern Western Australia are associated with a regional acid saline groundwater system. Groundwaters hosted in the Yilgarn Craton there have pH levels as low as 2.4 and salinities as high as 28 percent, which have greatly affected bedrock and subsurface sediments.
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