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Improving air quality in NYC would boost children's future earnings by increasing IQ

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:58pm
Reducing air pollution in New York City would result in substantial economic gains for children as a result of increasing their IQs. The study is the first to estimate the costs of IQ loss associated with exposure to air pollution, and is based on prior research on prenatal exposure to air pollutants among low-income children.
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Adults with autism virtually learn how to get the job

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:58pm
Adults with autism spectrum disorder, who may have trouble talking about themselves and interacting socially, don't always make good impressions in job interviews and have low employment rates. A new human simulation training program, now available to the public, helps adults with autism improve their job interview skills and confidence, reports a new study.
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Population screening for sudden cardiac death in young people: Feasible with basic program

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:58pm
Despite fears over cost, the wide-scale screening of young people to detect risk of sudden cardiac death is feasible and cost effective, according to a study. More than 12,000 people aged between 14 and 35 were screened at a cost of £35 each; rates of subsequent referral for further investigation were low and considered of 'a relative low additional cost' to health services.
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'Parent' cells reset cell division clock

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:58pm
A 40-year-old theory on when and how cells divide has been overturned by a study that shows that 'parent' cells program a cell division time for their offspring that is different from their own. Scientists have shown that both phases of the cell cycle contribute to the overall change in division time rather than one staying fixed in duration as previously thought. They have developed these findings into a new model that helps scientists predict how a population of cells has divided.
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Does Facebook affect our self-esteem, sense of belonging?

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:54pm
With 1.11 billion users per month on average, Facebook has become a global phenomenon offering continual and direct communication with friends and family. Research into how social media websites define us socially, and the influence that social media has on our personal welfare, suggests that a lack of social participation on Facebook leads to people feeling less meaningful.
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Light waves allow preferred bond breaking in symmetric molecules

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:54pm
Scientists have discovered a new quantum control mechanism to selectively shake and break C-H bonds in symmetric hydrocarbon molecules with the waveform of femtosecond laser pulses.
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Pesticides: New insights into their effects on shrimps and snails

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:54pm
Scientists now have a greater understanding of the effects of pesticides on aquatic invertebrates such as shrimps and snails, thanks to new research. It provides an important new approach for systematically measuring and modelling the sensitivity of aquatic invertebrates to various pesticides.
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Urine test best detects alcohol use in liver transplant candidates, recipients

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:54pm
Urinary ethyl glucuronide (uEtG) accurately detects alcohol consumption in liver transplant candidates and recipients, researchers have confirmed. The study suggests that a combination of uEtG and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for alcohol consumption (AUDIT-c) are best in alerting doctors to alcohol consumption by patients undergoing evaluation for liver transplantation or who have received liver transplants.
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Obesity drug failing patients due to lack of education about side-effects

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:54pm
Patients who gained weight 18 months after taking Orlistat attributed their weight-loss failure either to the side effects which have prevented them from sticking to the medication or felt that the medication simply had not worked. Orlistat is currently the only prescribed drug for obesity and functions by reducing the amount of fat absorbed from food eaten.
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Spanish, Japanese centenarians reveal genetic key to longevity

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:54pm
The genes of 894 men and women over the age of one hundred in Spain and Japan have revealed that the secret to longevity, at least in southern Europe, lies in a variant on chromosome 9p21.3, which had already been associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. Centenarians live at least fifteen years longer than the average person in the West. This exceptional longevity is partially genetic, and it appears that there are a number of gene variants that may hold the key to a healthy old age life.
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Elevating Brain Fluid Pressure Could Prevent Vision Loss

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:52pm
Scientists have found that pressure from the fluid surrounding the brain plays a role in maintaining proper eye function, opening a new direction for treating glaucoma — the second leading cause of blindness worldwide.
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Humans and their pet dogs: Shared cancers, shared hope

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:52pm
Scientists have developed an extensive cytogenetics “toolbox” designed to provide the necessary means to identify key cytogenetic signatures in numerous canine cancers.
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Detecting trace amounts of explosives with light

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:52pm
New research may help in the fight against terrorism with the creation of a sensor that can detect tiny quantities of explosives with the use of light and special glass fibers. The researchers describe a novel optical fiber sensor which can detect explosives in concentrations as low as 6.3 ppm (parts per million). It requires an analysis time of only a few minutes.
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One in 25 middle school children binge drinking, Canadian study finds

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:52pm
Four percent of Canadians aged 12 to 14 years old had consumed five or more drinks on at least one occasion in the preceding year, according to a new study. The findings also indicated that the odds of binge drinking were twice as high among youth with three or more chronic conditions.
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NASA telescopes coordinate best-ever flare observations

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:23am
On March 29, 2014, an X-class flare erupted from the right side of the sun ... and vaulted into history as the best-observed flare of all time. The flare was witnessed by four different NASA spacecraft and one ground-based observatory -- three of which had been fortuitously focused in on the correct spot as programmed into their viewing schedule a full day in advance.
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New study sheds light on survivors of the Black Death

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:14am
A new study suggests that people who survived the medieval mass-killing plague known as the Black Death lived significantly longer and were healthier than people who lived before the epidemic struck in 1347. These findings have important implications for understanding emerging diseases and how they impact the health of individuals and populations of people.
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New tool to measure the speed of aging: Your handshake

Thu, 08/05/2014 - 1:14am
A strong handshake can say a lot about a person: it can indicate power, confidence, health, or aggression. Now scientists say that the strength of a person’s grasp may also be one of the most useful ways to measure people’s true age.
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Overestimation of radiation exposure may keep women from critical screening

Wed, 07/05/2014 - 8:52pm
Misinformation and misunderstanding about the risks associated with ionizing radiation create heightened public concern and fear, and may result in avoidance of screening mammography that can detect early cancers. The authors conclude that medical personnel should make concerted effort to accurately inform women of the risks and benefits of mammography—specifically highlighting the low dose of mammographic ionizing radiation—and provide objective facts to ensure that women make informed decisions about screening.
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Nonscreened patients with breast cancer need more treatment than screened patients

Wed, 07/05/2014 - 8:52pm
Screening 40- to 49-year-old women for breast cancer has additional benefits beyond the proven decrease in mortality rate. Patients screened with mammography are statistically less likely to undergo chemotherapy, avoiding the associated toxic morbidities. Screening mammography also helps identify a subset of patients at increased risk of breast cancer by diagnosing high-risk lesions.
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Iterative reconstruction techniques reduce radiation dose for pediatric brain CT

Wed, 07/05/2014 - 8:52pm
Estimated radiation doses are substantially lower for pediatric CT exams of the brain that used an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique (ASIR) compared to those that did not use ASIR.
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