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Anti-inflammatory protein may trigger plaque in Alzheimer's disease

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer's, but in a counter-intuitive finding reported by researchers has uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease.
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'Organizational forgetting' erodes quality gains in supply chains

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
The depreciation of organizational knowledge can mute the effects of a company's quality performance initiatives, says research.
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Tablet computers good medium for educational materials

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
It's increasingly important for educators to understand how mobile technology such as touch-screen tablets can enhance learning instead of being classroom distractions, says a professor of business administration, and co-author of new research in business and e-learning.
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Surprising insights into effects of wood fuel burning

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
The harvesting of wood to meet the heating and cooking demands for billions of people worldwide has less of an impact on global forest loss and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions than previously believed, according to a new study.
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Scientists set quantum speed limit

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
The flip side of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, the energy time uncertainty principle, establishes a speed limit for transitions between two states. Physical chemists have now proved this principle for transitions between states that are not entirely distinct, allowing the calculation of speed limits for processes such as quantum computing and tunneling. The proof puts on sound footing a relationship that most physicists use daily.
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Pictured together for the first time: A chemokine and its receptor

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
The first crystal structure of the cellular receptor CXCR4 bound to an immune signaling protein called a chemokine has been reported by researchers. The structure answers longstanding questions about a molecular interaction that plays an important role in human development, immune responses, cancer metastasis and HIV infections.
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Treatment restores sociability in autism mouse model

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 8:48pm
Researchers have treated mice that mimic human autism with a neuropeptide called oxytocin, and have found that it restores normal social behavior. In addition, the findings suggest that giving oxytocin as early as possible in the animal's life leads to more lasting effects in adults and adolescents.
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Many of the smallest babies in California not referred for follow-up care, study finds

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
The tiniest babies need special follow-up care when they go home from the hospital after birth. But, of the thousands of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California during 2010 and 2011, 20 percent were not referred to the state's high-risk infant follow-up program, according to a new study.
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Early human ancestors used their hands like modern humans

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
New research suggests pre-Homo human ancestral species, such as Australopithecus africanus, used human-like hand postures much earlier than was previously thought. The distinctly human ability for forceful precision (e.g. when turning a key) and power "squeeze" gripping (e.g. when using a hammer) is linked to two key evolutionary transitions in hand use: a reduction in arboreal climbing and the manufacture and use of stone tools. However, it is unclear when these locomotory and manipulative transitions occurred.
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Risk of HIV infection in studies of African women using hormonal contraceptives

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
Use of the injectable progestin contraceptive depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is linked to an increased risk for HIV infection, according to a new article. The researchers did not find a significantly increased risk for HIV infection in women who used a different injectable progestin, norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN), nor in those who used combined oral contraceptives (COC).
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Rosetta data reveals more surprises about comet 67P

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
As the Rosetta spacecraft orbits comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, an international team of scientists have discovered that the comet's atmosphere, or coma, is much less homogenous than expected and comet outgassing varies significantly over time.
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Rosetta data give closest-ever look at a comet

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
On Nov. 12, 2014, the Rosetta mission's Philae lander touched down on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. While this achievement gained lots of headlines, it was only the beginning for researchers back on Earth. New data provides the closest and most detailed look at a comet that scientists have ever seen.
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New research re-creates planet formation, super-Earths and giant planets in the laboratory

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
New laser-driven compression experiments reproduce the conditions deep inside exotic super-Earths and giant planet cores, and the conditions during the violent birth of Earth-like planets, documenting the material properties that determined planets' formation and evolution processes.
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First major analysis of Human Protein Atlas is published

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:54pm
The first major analysis based on the Human Protein Atlas has been published, including a detailed picture of the proteins that are linked to cancer, the number of proteins present in the bloodstream, and the targets for all approved drugs on the market.
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Rosetta Comet 'pouring' more water into space

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:30pm
There has been a significant increase in the amount of water "pouring" out of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the comet on which the Rosetta mission's Philae lander touched down in November 2014. The 2.5-mile-wide (4-kilometer) comet was releasing the earthly equivalent of 40 ounces (1.2 liters) of water into space every second at the end of August 2014.
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Watching the birth of a comet magnetosphere

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:18pm
Astronomers have shown what happens when a magnetosphere forms round a comet. The RPC-ICA instrument onboard the Rosetta spacecraft has been watching the early stages of how a magnetosphere forms around Comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it moves closer to the Sun along its orbit and begins to interact with the solar wind. As the comet gets warmer, volatile substances, mainly water, evaporate from the surface and form an atmosphere around the comet. The Sun's ultraviolet radiation and collisions with the solar wind ionizes some of the comet's atmosphere. The newly formed ions are affected by the solar wind electric and magnetic fields and can be accelerated to high speeds. When the comet gets close enough to the Sun, its atmosphere becomes so dense and ionized that it becomes electrically conductive. When this happens, the atmosphere starts to resist the solar wind and a comet's magnetosphere is born - a region surrounding the comet that is shielded from the solar wind.
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Gas variations are suggestive of seasons on comet Chury

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 7:18pm
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko continues to reveal more of its secrets: Researchers have detected considerable variations in the gas escaping from the comet. This could amount to seasonal changes on the tiny celestial body. Meanwhile, the camera OSIRIS on board the Rosetta comet probe is revealing new details of the surface of Chury.
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Going with the flow: Is river basin management misguided?

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 6:32pm
Millions of Americans live in flood-prone areas. In 2012 alone, the cost of direct flood damage hit nearly half a billion dollars. However, because the factors contributing to flood risk are not fully understood, river basin management -- and even the calculation of flood insurance premiums -- may be misguided.
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When it comes to variations in crop yield, climate has a big say

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 6:32pm
What impact will future climate change have on food supply? That depends in part on the extent to which variations in crop yield are attributable to variations in climate. A new report has found that climate variability historically accounts for one-third of yield variability for maize, rice, wheat and soybeans worldwide -- the equivalent of 36 million metric tons of food each year.
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Infants can learn to communicate from videos, study shows

Thu, 22/01/2015 - 6:32pm
Children under two years old can learn certain communication skills from a video, such as how to use signs in sign language, and perform similarly in tests when compared to babies taught by their parents, according to a new paper. The study is the first to isolate the effects of purportedly educational commercial videos on infant learning.
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