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A quick look at electron-boson coupling: Researchers use ultrafast spectroscopy on many body effects

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 6:20pm
Using an ultrafast spectroscopy technique called time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, researchers demonstrated a link between electron-boson coupling and high-temperature superconductivity in a high-Tc cuprate.
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'Broad consensus' that violent media increase child aggression

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 6:20pm
Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study.
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Effects of growing rice in low water, high salt conditions

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:38pm
The effects of low water input, and high salt levels, on rice growth has been the focus of recent research. Rice is a staple food across Asia, with both people and economies reliant on its successful harvest. One paper finds that low water input does not affect rice growth as much as the levels of nutrients in soil can, and the second suggests that, although rice is seriously stressed by high salt levels in soil, this can be countered by the application of locally produced compost.
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High-sugar diet no problem for genetic mutants

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:35pm
A genetic pathway for circumventing the weight gain that accompanies a high-sugar diet has been discovered by scientists. Building on previous work with C. elegans, researchers found that certain genetic mutants -- those with a hyperactive SKN-1 gene -- could be fed incredibly high-sugar diets without gaining any weight, while regular C. elegans ballooned on the same diet.
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Natural gene selection can produce orange corn rich in provitamin A for Africa, U.S.

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:35pm
A set of genes that can be used to naturally boost the provitamin A content of corn kernels has been identified by researchers, a finding that could help combat vitamin A deficiency in developing countries and macular degeneration in the elderly.
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Direct fluid flow influences neuron growth, scientists demonstrate

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:34pm
A new report describes using flow from a microtube to turn axonal growth cones that connect neurons. The publication adds insight to the long accepted idea that chemical cues are primarily responsible for axonal pathfinding during human development and nervous system regeneration. Such knowledge could be essential for advances in spinal cord injuries, where fluid flow can guide regenerating axons, in addition to affecting the bio-chemicals in the injured site.
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How rabies 'hijacks' neurons to attack brain

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:34pm
For the first time, scientists have discovered the exact mechanism the killer rabies virus uses to efficiently enter the central nervous system, where it erupts in a toxic explosion of symptoms. An improved understanding of how this mechanism works could lead to new treatments for disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as well.
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Observing the Birkeland currents

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:34pm
When the supersonic solar wind hits the Earth's magnetic field, a powerful electrical connection occurs with Earth's field, generating millions of amperes of current that drive the dazzling auroras. These so-called Birkeland currents connect the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and channel solar wind energy to Earth's uppermost atmosphere. Solar storms release torrential blasts of solar wind that cause much stronger currents and can overload power grids and disrupt communications and navigation.
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Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:32pm
Hardly a day passes without pundits crying for leadership in the NFL commissioner and team owners, among high-ranking government officials, and in other public figures. If experts didn’t have evidence that this valuable trait can be taught, they might join the collective swoon that’s engulfing much of the country.
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98% forward, 125% back: China's economic boom thwarts its carbon emissions goals

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:32pm
Efforts to reduce China’s carbon dioxide emissions are being offset by the country’s rampant economic growth, according to new research. Research reveals how carbon efficiency has improved in nearly all Chinese provinces. But the country’s economic boom has simultaneously led to a growth in CO2-emitting activities such as mining, metal smelting and coal-fired electricity generation – negating any gains.
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Lizards in the caribbean: How geography influences animal evolution

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:32pm
Researchers have enlisted a Caribbean lizard to help them find out on how geography can influence the evolution of animal species.
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Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:29pm
Familiar voices can improve spoken language processing among school-age children, according to a study. However, the advantage of hearing a familiar voice only helps children to process and understand words they already know well, not new words that aren’t in their vocabularies.
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Many adults support equal access to healthcare for undocumented immigrant children

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 5:29pm
Many U.S. adults who work on behalf of children think undocumented immigrant children should have access to healthcare equal to that of U.S.-born children, a new survey finds.
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The skin cancer selfie: Gigapixel camera helps diagnose early

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:41pm
Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the US, and it's also the deadliest form of skin cancer. If caught early enough though, it is almost always curable. The gigapixel camera is essentially 34 microcameras in one and has a high enough resolution to zoom in to a tiny freckle making routine screenings available to a larger number of people at a fraction of the cost.
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New theorem determines age distribution of populations from fruit flies to humans

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:41pm
The initial motivation of a new study was to estimate the age structure of a fruit fly population, the result a fundamental theorem that can help determine the age distribution of essentially any group. This emerging theorem on stationary populations shows that you can determine the age distribution of a population by looking at how long they still have to live.
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Novel roadmap through bacterial genomes leads the way to new drug discovery

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:40pm
Researchers have innovated and demonstrated the value of an algorithm to analyze microbial genomic data and speed discovery of new therapeutic drugs.
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Aircraft safety: New imaging technique could detect acoustically 'invisible' cracks

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:40pm
The next generation of aircraft could be thinner and lighter thanks to the development of a new imaging technique that could detect damage previously invisible to acoustic imaging systems.
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Workplace diversity can help bottom line, study shows

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:40pm
An economist scrutinizes firm data suggesting diverse offices function more effectively. At the same time, individual employees may prefer less diverse settings. The study, analyzing a large white-collar U.S. firm, examined how much "social capital" offices build up in the form of things like cooperation, trust, and enjoyment of the workplace.
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Through the combining glass

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:40pm
Trying on clothes when a shop is closed could become a reality thanks to new research that uses semi-transparent mirrors in interactive systems. The system could change the way people interact and collaborate in public spaces, such as museums and shop windows.
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Simple lifestyle interventions during pregnancy can prevent children from becoming obese

Mon, 06/10/2014 - 3:39pm
In a study that followed more than 2,200 obese women during pregnancy, scientists found that some simple interventions can help prevent high birth weights in newborns. This is important because previous studies have shown that infants with a high birth weight have a greater risk of becoming obese as children or adults.
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