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Updated: 1 hour 44 min ago

Eradicating fatal sleeping sickness by killing off the tsetse fly

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:49pm
A professor of biology has lent his expertise in understanding insect movement to help shape a UN-sanctioned eradication effort of the tsetse fly -- a creature that passes the fatal African sleeping sickness to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. The tsetse fly is the main vector for Human African Trypanosomiasis (aka sleeping sickness), and spreads the disease by biting humans or animals. The disease affects the central nervous system and is fatal if untreated. For some forms of the disease, victims can reach the terminal stage before symptoms even start to show.
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Birdsongs automatically decoded by computer scientists

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:49pm
Scientists have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike.
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Map reveals worldwide impacts of climate change

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:48pm
A new map, which shows the impact climate change could have on the whole planet by the end of the century if carbon emissions continue to increase, has been developed by scientists. Temperatures on the warmest days of the year are rising by 6°C or more across Europe, parts of Asia and part of North America, it shows. Also an increase in risk of flooding across 70 per cent of Asia, and the number of days of drought increasing in parts of South America, Australia and Southern Africa are illuminated by the new map.
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Women's professional self-identity impacts on childcare balance, but not men's

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:48pm
Research shows that a mother’s self-identity impacts on the amount of time her partner spends on childcare – with strong professional identity in women creating a more equal childcare balance in a couple. A father’s self-identity, however, has no bearing on a mother’s time with children.
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Danish DNA could be key to happiness

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:48pm
Genetics could be the key to explaining nation’s levels of happiness, according to new research. Economists have found the closer a nation is to the genetic makeup of Denmark, the happier that country is. The research could help to solve the puzzle of why a country like Denmark so regularly tops the world happiness rankings.
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The rate at which groundwater reservoirs are being depleted is increasing

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:48pm
In what parts of the world and to what degree have(groundwater reservoirs been depleted over the past 50 years? Scientists have been researching this using the global water model WaterGAP.
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Math can make the Internet 5-10 times faster

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:48pm
Mathematical equations can make Internet communication via computer, mobile phone or satellite many times faster and more secure than today. A new study uses a four minute long mobile video as an example. The method used by the Danish and US researchers in the study resulted in the video being downloaded five times faster than state of the art technology. The video also streamed without interruptions. In comparison, the original video got stuck 13 times along the way.
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New view of Mount Rainier's volcanic plumbing: Electrical images show upward flow of fluids to magma chamber

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:46pm
By measuring how fast Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, scientists have made a detailed picture of Mount Rainier’s deep volcanic plumbing and partly molten rock that will erupt again someday.
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Effects of starvation can be passed to future generations, through small RNAs apparently without DNA involvement

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:46pm
A new study, involving roundworms, shows that starvation induces specific changes in so-called small RNAs and that these changes are inherited through at least three consecutive generations, apparently without any DNA involvement.
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Measuring nurture: Study shows how 'good mothering' hardwires infant brain

Thu, 17/07/2014 - 1:45pm
By carefully watching nearly a hundred hours of video showing mother rats protecting, warming, and feeding their young pups, and then matching up what they saw to real-time electrical readings from the pups’ brains, researchers have found that the mother’s presence and social interactions -— her nurturing role -— directly molds the early neural activity and growth of her offsprings’ brain.
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Asthma drugs suppress children's growth, study suggest

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 11:46pm
Corticosteroid drugs that are given by inhalers to children with asthma may suppress their growth, evidence suggests. Two new systematic reviews focus on the effects of inhaled corticosteroid drugs on growth rates. The authors found children's growth slowed in the first year of treatment, although the effects were minimized by using lower doses.
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No-wait data centers: Data-transmission delays across server farms can be reducd by 99. 6 percent

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 10:32pm
Big websites usually maintain their own "data centers," banks of tens or even hundreds of thousands of servers, all passing data back and forth to field users' requests. Like any big, decentralized network, data centers are prone to congestion: Packets of data arriving at the same router at the same time are put in a queue, and if the queues get too long, packets can be delayed. Researchers have designed a new network-management system that, in experiments, reduced the average queue length of routers in a Facebook data center by 99.6 percent -- virtually doing away with queues.
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Alaska's resources and changing climate connect, clash

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 10:31pm
Alaska’s natural resources, such as fish, metal ore, and predominately oil, play a pivotal role in the state’s economy. With the region’s recent climate changes (Alaska is on track to warm 8°F by the last quarter of the century), this has the potential to have major effects on ecosystems, as well as on the people and industries that depend on them. How can the state balance the economic potential of its undeveloped resources with the cost of their use?
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Are ants the answer to carbon dioxide sequestration?

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 10:31pm
A 25-year-long study provides the first quantitative measurement of in situ calcium-magnesium silicate mineral dissolution by ants, termites, tree roots, and bare ground. This study reveals that ants are one of the most powerful biological agents of mineral decay yet observed. It may be that an understanding of the geobiology of ant-mineral interactions might offer a line of research on how to "geoengineer" accelerated carbon dioxide consumption by Ca-Mg silicates.
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Humans walking on all fours is not backward evolution

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 7:11pm
Five siblings in the family, who live in a remote corner of Turkey, walk exclusively on their hands and feet. Since they were discovered in 2005, scientists have debated the nature of their disability, with speculation they represent a backward stage of evolution. An anthropologist finds quadrupedal humans with Uner Tan Syndrome do not walk in the diagonal pattern characteristic of nonhuman primates such as apes and monkeys.
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Sharpest map of Mars surface properties

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 6:13pm
A heat-sensing camera has provided data to create the most detailed global map yet made of Martian surface properties. Surface properties tell geologists about the physical nature of a planet or moon's surface. Is a particular area coated with dust, and if so, how thick is it likely to be? Where are the outcrops of bedrock? How loose are the sediments that fill this crater or that valley? A map of surface properties lets scientists begin to answer questions such as these.
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70-foot-long, 52-ton concrete bridge survives series of simulated earthquakes

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 6:13pm
A 70-foot-long, 52-ton concrete bridge survived a series of earthquakes in the first multiple-shake-table experiment in the University of Nevada, Reno's new Earthquake Engineering Lab, the newest addition to the world-renowned earthquake and seismic engineering facility.
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Indus river dolphin's declining range: Patterns of river fragmentation provide insight into river dolphin conservation

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 6:13pm
Removal of river water for irrigation and habitat fragmentation by irrigation dams were shown to be the principal factors contributing to the decline of the Indus river dolphin.
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Whale shark fringe migration: 16-year study suggests Azore islands may play increasing role in whale shark habitat

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 6:13pm
At the fringe of the whale shark range, the volcanic Azore islands may play an increasing role for the north Atlantic population as sea surface temperatures rise.
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Borneo deforested 30 percent over past 40 years

Wed, 16/07/2014 - 6:13pm
Forest cover in Borneo may have declined by up to 30% over the past 40 years, according to a new study. he native forests of Borneo have been increasingly impacted by logging, fire, and conversion to plantations since the early 1970s. Borneo lacks island-wide forest clearance and logging documentation, making forest conservation planning difficult, especially for selectively logged forests that have high conservation potential but are vulnerable to being converted to plantations.
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