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First widely protective vaccine against chlamydia

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:25pm
The first steps towards developing a vaccine against an insidious sexual transmitted infection (STI) have been accomplished.
Categories: Science

Men more aggressive on dating sites, women more self-conscious

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:25pm
Using data collected from Baihe, one of the largest dating websites in China, researchers developed a reciprocal recommendation system that better matches users who are mutually interested in and likely to communicate with each other. The data revealed behavioral differences between male and female users when it comes to contacting potential partners. In particular, males tend to be focused on their own interests and be oblivious toward their attractiveness to potential dates, while females are more conscious of their own attractiveness.
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What hibernating toads tell us about climate

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:13pm
The ability to predict when toads come out of hibernation in southern Canada could provide valuable insights into the future effects of climate change on a range of animals and plants.
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Helping racehorses put their best foot forward

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:11pm
An international research team is working to understand how horseshoes affect foot skeleton stress in racehorses, in a project that is likely to benefit the racing industry and protect horses from injury.
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Mountain pine beetles infest and ravage thousands of acres of forest lands, Landsat satellites show

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:11pm
In western North America, mountain pine beetles infest and ravage thousands of acres of forest lands. Landsat satellites bear witness to the onslaught in a way that neither humans nor most other satellites can.
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Developing highly drought-resistant crops

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:11pm
International research has found how plants, such as rice and wheat, sense and respond to extreme drought stress, in a breakthrough that could lead to the development of next-generation drought-proof crops.
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Can robots recognize faces even under backlighting?

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:11pm
Researchers have developed a novel technique to address the problem of vision-based face detection and recognition under normal and severe illumination conditions. This technique contributes to help robotic systems that use face information for providing user-dependent services to work well under a large variety of illumination conditions.
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By causing cells to cannibalize themselves, researchers prevent lung injury in mice

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:11pm
Study offers a new solution to prevent Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), the most common chronic lung disease in premature infants.
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For ancient deep-sea plankton, a long decline before extinction

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:11pm
A new study of nearly 22,000 fossils finds that ancient plankton communities began changing in important ways as much as 400,000 years before massive die-offs ensued during the first of Earth's five great extinctions. The research suggests that the effects of environmental degradation can be subtle until they reach a tipping point, at which dramatic declines in population begin.
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Fighting life-threatening bacteria without antibiotics

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:02pm
Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis often die of life-threatening bacterial infections. In these patients the immune cells are unable to eliminate the bacterial infections. Scientist have now discovered that type I IFN released by immune cells due to increased migration of gut bacteria into the cirrhotic liver incapacitate the immune system. Based on their findings, such infections can be contained by strengthening the immune response -- without antibiotics.
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House-hunting ants know how to take the hassle out of moving

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:02pm
Ants employ a few simple and flexible rules to ensure that moving a colony to a new nest does not end in chaos, especially if this is done over some distance. A new study indicates that when it comes to giving directions, ants have it down to a fine art.
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On the path to controlled gene therapy

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:02pm
The ability to switch disease-causing genes on and off remains a dream for many physicians, research scientists and patients. Researchers have now programmed a virus to transport the necessary genetic material to affected tissue and nerve cells inside the body.
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Policy makers and ecologists must develop a more constructive dialogue to save the planet

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:02pm
An international consensus demands human impacts on the environment 'sustain', 'maintain', 'conserve', 'protect', 'safeguard', and 'secure' it. But, policy makers have little idea what these terms mean or how to connect them to a wealth of ecological data and ideas.
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High fat diet improves cartilage repair in mice

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:02pm
Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis, but its effects on cartilage repair are unknown. In a recent study in a mouse model of cartilage repair, a high fat diet and increased body weight did not negatively impair cartilage repair, and it could even accelerate it.
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Elderly Japanese most resilient in wake of triple disaster, study finds

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 3:02pm
Older people in Japan are more resistant to the impacts of disasters on their health than younger generations, a study suggests.
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Risk of low blood sugar differs among similar diabetes drugs

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 2:58pm
Adding sulphonylureas (SUs) to metformin remains a commonly used strategy for treating type 2 diabetes, but individual SUs differ and may confer different risks of abnormally low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. SUs -- which include newer generation agents such as gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride, and glibenclamide -- stimulate the production of insulin in the pancreas and increase the effectiveness of insulin in the body.
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Huge time-lag between erosion and mountain building

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 2:57pm
An unprecedented record of erosion rates dating back millions of years shows a significant time-lag between tectonic uplift and maximum erosion rates in the Argentine Precordillera mountains. According to a new study, tectonic shortening and exhumation of rocks peaked between twelve and nine million years ago whereas the maximum erosional response is detected roughly seven million years ago, i.e. two million years later.
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A new tracking and quantification tool for single cells

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 2:57pm
Scientists have developed software that allows observing cells for weeks while also measuring molecular properties. The software is freely available.
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A mini-antenna for the data processing of tomorrow

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 2:57pm
With the rapid advance of miniaturization, data processing using electric currents faces tough challenges, some of which are insurmountable. Magnetic spin waves are a promising alternative for the transfer of information in even more compact chips. Scientists have now succeeded in generating spin waves with extremely short wavelengths in the nanometer range -- a key feature for their future application.
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'Big mama' bonobos help younger females stand up for themselves

Tue, 19/07/2016 - 2:57pm
Bullying happens in the primate world too, but for young bonobo females, big mama comes to the rescue. Kyoto University primatologists report that bonobo females frequently aid younger females when males behave aggressively towards them. This partly explains how females maintain a superior status in bonobo society.
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