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Updated: 18 min 19 sec ago

Transgender relationships undermined by stigma

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:23pm
A study that looked at the effect of stressors such as poverty, discrimination and the stigma of transgender relationships, found that they weigh heavily on transgender women and their male partners. Stigma can even undermine the relationship itself. The findings have implications not only for mental health but also for the spread of HIV, the researchers said.
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Lead released from African cookware contaminates food

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:23pm
Researchers tested 29 samples of aluminum cookware made in Cameroon and found almost all had considerable lead content. This cookware is common throughout Africa and Asia and is made from recycled scrap metal including auto and computer parts, cans, and other industrial debris. Lead exposure in children is linked to brain damage, mental retardation, lower educational performance, and a range of other health effects. Globally, lead accounts for more than 674,000 deaths per year.
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Stability of wonder material silicene demonstrated

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:23pm
An international team of researchers has taken a significant step towards understanding the fundamental properties of the two-dimensional material silicene by showing that it can remain stable in the presence of oxygen.
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Highly sensitive microsphere-based assay for early detection of type I diabetes

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:22pm
A rapid, highly sensitive assay technique for measuring type 1 diabetes mellitus marker autoantibodies can provide better temporal resolution of disease onset and progression, researchers report. "This is a clever combination of the several existing techniques, the result of which is a more sensitive, non-radioactive, clinically-relevant assay," says the senior author on the paper. "It is our hope that this technique will become a useful tool for early detection of Islet Cell Autoantibodies in at risk patients."
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Is empathy in humans and apes actually different? 'Yawn contagion' effect studied

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:22pm
Whether or not humans are the only empathic beings is still under debate. In a new study, researchers directly compared the 'yawn contagion' effect between humans and bonobos -- our closest evolutionary cousins. By doing so they were able to directly compare the empathic abilities of ourselves with another species, and found that a close relationship between individuals is more important to their empathic response than the fact that individuals might be from the same species.
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The Maldives and the whale shark: World's biggest fish adds value to paradise

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:22pm
They are the largest fish in the world but the impact of this majestic and charismatic animal on the economy of the island nation of the Maldives was largely unknown. A new study reveals that a small group of whale sharks in a single Maldivian Atoll accounts for nearly 3 percent of the global shark ecotourism and nearly half that of the Maldives'.
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Prognosis of pneumonia: value of respiratory rate often overlooked

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:18pm
Pneumonia – a severe lung infection – is the most common disease calling for hospital admission. More than one out of ten pneumonia patients die of the disease. Thus it is vital to accurately predict and closely monitor the clinical course. Here, measuring the respiratory rate – the number of breaths a person takes in a minute – provides valuable information. However, far too little use is still being made of this vital sign in clinical practice, researchers conclude.
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Pioneering online treatment for people with bipolar disorder

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:18pm
The first effective web-based treatment for Bipolar Disorder based on the latest research evidence has been developed by psychologists. 92% of the participants in the trial of the online intervention found the content positive -- and one said it had changed her life. People with Bipolar Disorder have problems getting access to psychological therapy and this online intervention may offer a round the clock solution at a reduced cost.
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Awake within a dream: Lucid dreamers show greater insight in waking life

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:18pm
People who are aware they are asleep when they are dreaming have better than average problem-solving abilities, new research has discovered. Experts say that those who experience ‘lucid dreaming’ – a phenomena where someone who is asleep can recognize that they are dreaming – can solve problems in the waking world better than those who remain unaware of the dream until they wake up. The concept of lucid dreaming was explored in the 2010 film Inception, where the dreamers were able to spot incongruities within their dream. It is thought some people are able to do this because of a higher level of insight, meaning their brains detect they are in a dream because events would not make sense otherwise.
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Treating mental illness by changing memories of things past

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:18pm
Author Marcel Proust makes a compelling case that our identities and decisions are shaped in profound and ongoing ways by our memories. This truth is powerfully reflected in mental illnesses, like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addictions. In PTSD, memories of traumas intrude vividly upon consciousness, causing distress, driving people to avoid reminders of their traumas, and increasing risk for addiction and suicide. In addiction, memories of drug use influence reactions to drug-related cues and motivate compulsive drug use.
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New look at heart disease may reduce stroke, heart attack

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:17pm
A long-overlooked function of vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis has been identified by researchers. Atherosclerosis, the buildup of plaques in the arteries, leads to myocardial infarction and stroke and is the major cause of death in the Western world. It is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries arising from interactions of modified lipoproteins and various cell types including monocyte-derived macrophages from the blood and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the vessel wall.
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Managers: Less stress when work relationships are good

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:17pm
Managers who enjoy a good relationship with their employees, suffer less dangerous stress at work, according to a study of nearly 3000 managers. Much research has been conducted regarding stress, but not many studies have looked specifically at stress among managers. How is life among those in the driving seat in companies and organizations? Are they more stressed than what is good for them?
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Integrons hold key to antibiotic resistance crisis

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:17pm
In Mexico, the sale of antibiotics for human consumption is controlled to prevent misuse, although in the veterinary sector failure in the implementation of the "Guidelines for veterinarian products prescription”, has prompted common bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella to become resistant to regular drugs such as streptomycin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, gentamicin, and tetracycline as a result of excess drug use.
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Our ancestor's 'leaky' membrane answers big questions in biology

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:17pm
All life on Earth came from one common ancestor -- a single-celled organism -- but what it looked like, how it lived and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four billion year old mystery being solved by researchers at using mathematical modelling. Findings suggest for the first time that life's Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a 'leaky' membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology's biggest questions.
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Neutrino detectors could help detect nuclear weapons

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:16pm
Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland and even in the fictional world of CBS' "The Big Bang Theory" look to subatomic particles called neutrinos to answer the big questions about the universe. Scientists now believe neutrinos could be used to monitor nuclear power plants for signs of nuclear proliferation.
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Can instant noodles lead to heart disease, diabetes and stroke?

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:16pm
Significant consumption of instant noodles -- ramen included -- may increase a person’s risk for cardiometabolic syndrome, especially in women, research shows. The findings could shed new light on the risks of a worldwide dietary habit. "This research is significant since many people are consuming instant noodles without knowing possible health risks," one researcher said. "My hope is that this study can lay a foundation for future research about the health effects of instant noodle consumption."
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Hijacking the brain's blood supply: Tumor discovery could aid treatment

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:16pm
Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels. The findings help explain why drugs that aim to stop growth of new vessels have failed in brain tumor clinical trials.
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Stinky gases emanating from landfills could transform into clean energy

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:16pm
A new technique transforming stinky, air-polluting landfill gas could produce the sweet smell of success as it leads to development of a fuel cell generating clean electricity for homes, offices and hospitals, researchers say. The advance would convert methane gas into hydrogen, an efficient, clean form of energy.
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Could hemp nanosheets topple graphene for making the ideal supercapacitor? 


Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:15pm
As hemp makes a comeback in the U.S. after a decades-long ban on its cultivation, scientists are reporting that fibers from the plant can pack as much energy and power as graphene, long-touted as the model material for supercapacitors.
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Sniffing out billions in U.S. currency smuggled across the border to Mexico

Tue, 12/08/2014 - 4:15pm
Criminals are smuggling an estimated $30 billion in U.S. currency into Mexico each year from the United States, but help could be on the way for border guards, researchers report. The answer to the problem: a portable device that identifies specific vapors emitted by U.S. paper money, to be described by researchers.
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