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Updated: 19 hours 7 min ago

Rotational X-ray tracking uncovers hidden motion at the nanoscale

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
Over the past two decades or so, there has been increasing interest and development in measuring slow dynamics in disordered systems at the nanoscale, brought about in part from a demand for advancements in the food and consumer products industries.
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Forty not too old or too late to start endurance training

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
A study of healthy senior men has found that 'relatively intensive' endurance exercise confers benefits on the heart irrespective of the age at which they began training. The benefits were evident and comparable in those who had started training before the age of 30 or after the age of 40. As a result, said the investigators, 40 is not too old to start endurance training.
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Coyote predation on deer in Eastern U.S. manageable, research suggests

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
Coyotes are a major predator of white-tailed deer across the East, especially fawns born each spring, but wildlife managers nonetheless are able to stabilize and even grow deer herds, according to researchers. Coyotes -- Canis latrans -- are a relatively recent arrival to eastern North America, appearing first in the region in noticeable numbers in the 1970s. They are a significant source of deer mortality and most often prey on whitetails in the earliest months of their lives. Coyotes have long inhabited the American West.
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Colonization of Brazil by the cattle egret

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
A new study of the colonization patterns of the cattle egret in Brazil offers a new take on the study of alien species. It aims to present how the invasive species colonized this great new area, to compare the Brazilian population genetic composition to the native species in Africa and to detect genetic signs of demographic expansion in these two areas.
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Sneaking drugs into cancer cells before triggering release

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed an anti-cancer drug delivery method that essentially smuggles the drug into a cancer cell before triggering its release. The method can be likened to keeping a cancer-killing bomb and its detonator separate until they are inside a cancer cell, where they then combine to destroy the cell.
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How proteins acquire correct structure: Molecular high-speed origami

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
Proteins are responsible for nearly every essential process of life. Their form and structure are of crucial importance for their functionality. Scientists have recently discovered an unknown sequence of reactions which is necessary for newly generated proteins to acquire their correct structure.
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Link between insecticides and collapse of honey bee colonies strengthened

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
Two widely used neonicotinoids -- a class of insecticide -- appear to significantly harm honey bee colonies over the winter, particularly during colder winters, according to researchers. The study replicated a 2012 finding from the same research group that found a link between imidacloprid and Colony Collapse Disorder, in which bees abandon their hives over the winter and eventually die. The new study found low doses of a second neonicotinoid, clothianidin, had the same negative effect.
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Adult obesity predicted in almost all European countries by 2030

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:07pm
Rates of obesity and overweight in both male and females are projected to increase in almost all countries of Europe by 2030, according to a statistical modelling study. However, the forecast rates vary throughout the 53 Euro-region countries, with projected male obesity levels ranging from 15 percent in the Netherlands and Belgium, to 47 percent in Ireland. The highest obesity prevalence in females was projected in Ireland (47 percent), and the lowest in Romania (10 percent).
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Sustainability needs link between theory, practice in education

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:03pm
How can you ensure that people do not only spend time thinking about important global issues like climate change or world food supplies, but also roll up their sleeves and do something about them? Researchers think that the education sector holds the key. Teaching processes around the world could be given more influence and meaning by making pure science subjects, such as biology and physics, complementary to lessons in nature, environment and sustainability.
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New ways for understanding the link between the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and species diversity

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:03pm
Scientists have summarized the current state of knowledge on the diversification of Tibetan plants and animals. The study focuses in particular on how the geological processes that led to the rise of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas affected diversification and speciation directly, and indirectly, e.g. by changing climatic conditions.
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Grape skin extract may soon be answer to treating diabetes

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:02pm
The diabetes rate in the United States nearly doubled in the past 10 years. Approximately 26 million Americans are now classified as diabetic, stressing an urgent need for safe and effective complementary strategies to enhance the existing conventional treatment for diabetes.Preliminary studies have demonstrated that grape skin extract (GSE) exerts a novel inhibitory activity on hyperglycemia and could be developed and used to aid in diabetes management.
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Tracking the Source of 'Selective Attention' Problems in Brain-Injured Vets

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:01pm
The obvious cognitive symptoms of minor traumatic brain injury can dissipate within a few days, but blast-exposed veterans may continue to have problems focusing attention on one sound source and ignoring others, an ability known as "selective auditory attention.” According to a new study, such apparent "hearing" problems actually may be caused by diffuse injury to the brain's prefrontal lobe.
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Frequently Reassigning Teachers Limits Their Improvement

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:00pm
Experienced teachers make a difference in student performance, but their experience matters most if they have continued to teach the same grade, according to a new study. Students whose teachers have not switched grades show greater improvement in test scores than students in similar classrooms with equally experienced teachers who switched grades frequently.
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Aircraft noise in U.S. national parks

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 3:00pm
Visitors to the country’s National Parks may be seeking tranquil communion with nature, but what they sometimes encounter is the noise of airplanes and helicopter tours. Researchers have assessed potential effects of such flights on the experience of park visitors.
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Salt needed: Tolerance lessons from a dead sea fungus

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 11:45am
Some organisms thrive in salty environments by lying dormant when salt concentrations are very high. Other organisms need salt to grow. A team of researchers described the genome of a Dead Sea fungus through a new study. Understanding how organisms adapt to extremely salty environments could help improve salt tolerance in crops, laying the groundwork of understanding necessary to grow them in desert and saline environments.
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States opting out of Medicaid leave 1.1 million community health center patients without health insurance

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 11:45am
An estimated 1.1 million community health center patients are left without the benefits of health coverage simply because they live in one of 24 states that have opted out of the Medicaid expansion, a key part of the Affordable Care Act, according to a new report. The vast majority (71 percent) of the 1.1 million patients left behind live in just 11 southern states (AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA).
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Athletes respond better to female psychologists

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 11:42am
When listening to the voices of a sport psychologist, both male and female athletes rate women psychologists more positively than male ones. "These findings challenge the historically prevalent view that male psychologists are more successful and show that gender equality has made progress in sport," said the researcher.
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Implantable cuff with electrodes

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 11:42am
High blood pressure is the greatest health risk worldwide behind smoking and alcohol consumption. Microsystems engineers and neurosurgeons have teamed up to develop a new cuff equipped with electrodes that can lower blood pressure without causing side effects. The scientists tested the device on rats and succeeded in lowering their mean blood pressure by 30 percent, without causing side effects such as a reduced heart rate or a drastic decrease in respiratory rate.
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Experiencing letters as colors: New insights into synesthesia

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 11:41am
Scientists studying the bizarre phenomenon of synasthesia – best described as a “union of the senses” whereby two or more of the five senses that are normally experienced separately are involuntarily and automatically joined together – have made a new breakthrough in their attempts to understand the condition.
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Life on cheese: Scientists explore the cheese rind microbiome

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 11:41am
The rind is the boundary layer between a cheese and its environment. It hosts a variety of microorganisms that comprise the microbiome: a symbiotic community whose members perform different tasks. Some break down proteins and fats on the rind, for example, creating volatile sulphur and ammonia compounds that are responsible for the intensive odour of some types of cheese.
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