Syndicate content Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Updated: 1 hour 5 min ago

Do bearded dragons dream? Reptiles share sleep patterns with mammals and birds

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:21pm
Brain sleep appeared early in vertebrate evolution. Researchers describe the existence of REM and slow-wave sleep in the Australian dragon, with many common features with mammalian sleep: a phase characterized by low frequency/high amplitude average brain activity and rare and bursty neuronal firing (slow-wave sleep); another characterized by awake-like brain activity and rapid eye movements.
Categories: Science

Hunting wolves near Denali, Yellowstone cuts wolf sightings in half

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:21pm
Visitors to Denali National Park and Preserve and Yellowstone National Park were twice as likely to see a wolf when hunting wasn't permitted adjacent to the parks, a new study finds.
Categories: Science

Modified household utensils improve autonomy and lives of people with leprosy

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:21pm
Assistive technology -- the use of (frequently modified or customized) equipment to improve the functional capabilities of people with special needs -- is an important therapeutic tool. A new study finds that household utensils modified in relatively simple and cheap ways can increase autonomy and self-esteem and positively impact the quality of life of patients with leprosy.
Categories: Science

RNA splicing mutations play major role in genetic variation and disease

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:21pm
RNA splicing is a major underlying factor that links mutations to complex traits and diseases, according to an exhaustive analysis of gene expression in whole genome and cell line data. Researchers analyzed how thousands of mutations affect gene regulation in traits such as height, and diseases such as multiple sclerosis. The findings enable accurate functional interpretations of genome-wide association study results.
Categories: Science

Vitamin stops the aging process of organs

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:21pm
By administering nicotinamide riboside to elderly mice, researchers restored their organs' ability to regenerate and prolonged their lives. This method has potential for treating a number of degenerative diseases.
Categories: Science

Scientists turn skin cells into heart cells and brain cells using drugs

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:21pm
In a major breakthrough, scientists have transformed skin cells into heart cells and brain cells using a combination of chemicals. All previous work on cellular reprogramming required adding external genes to the cells, making this accomplishment an unprecedented feat. The research lays the groundwork for one day being able to regenerate lost or damaged cells with pharmaceutical drugs.
Categories: Science

Lifestyle has a strong impact on intestinal bacteria, which has a strong impact on health

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:18pm
Everything you eat or drink affects your intestinal bacteria, and is likely to have an impact on your health. That is the finding of a large-scale study into the effect of food and medicine on the bacterial diversity in the human gut.
Categories: Science

Rare disease gene has a key role in chronic hepatitis C infection

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 7:18pm
Hepatitis C virus hijacks the host's fat metabolism for its own survival, growth, and transport in the human body. A study identifies a host gene involved in the formation of HCV virus particles and helps explain why humans with a rare mutation in the gene have problems with their fat metabolism.
Categories: Science

BPA determined to have adverse effects on couples seeking in vitro fertilization

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:26pm
Exposure to Bisphenol-A (BPA) may lead to reduced quality of embryos during reproduction. A new study has shown that BPA could be the cause for decreases in the frequency of implantation, pregnancy and live birth rates in couples seeking in vitro fertilization.
Categories: Science

Analyzing the psyche of risky drivers

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:26pm
Road crashes are the world's leading cause of preventable death and injury in people under 35, accounting for around 5 million casualties every year. Repeat offenders make a disproportionate contribution to these statistics -- and are known for their poor response to education and prevention efforts. But a better understanding of the subconscious and emotional processes of high-risk drivers could make a difference, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Consumers' trust in online user ratings misplaced, says study

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:26pm
The belief that online user ratings are good indicators of product quality is largely an illusion, according to a new study. The analyses show a very low correspondence between average user ratings of products on Amazon.com and product ratings, based on objective tests, found in consumer reports.
Categories: Science

Shape of tumor may affect whether cells can metastasize

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:26pm
Only a few cells in a cancerous tumor are able to break away and spread to other parts of the body, but the curve along the edge of the tumor may play a large role in activating these tumor-seeding cells, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Scientists predict cell changes that affect breast cancer growth

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:26pm
Using a broad spectrum of analytical tools, scientists have shown how sometimes small, often practically imperceptible, structural changes in a key breast cancer receptor are directly linked to regulating molecules and can produce predictable effects in curbing or accelerating cancer growth.
Categories: Science

TJP1 protein may identify multiple myeloma patients most likely to benefit from proteasome inhibitors

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:22pm
A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Flightless survivors: Incredible invertebrate diversity in Los Angeles metropolitan area

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:22pm
Flight is one of nature's greatest breakthroughs. It enables escape, dispersion, and exploration. Lacking flight keeps you grounded -- sometimes for a long time even from evolution's perspective. The Madrona Marsh Preserve is a small nature preserve in one of the world's largest metropolitan areas, which has withstood decades of farming, oil exploration, and development pressures. Surprisingly, a treasure of flightless animals survived.
Categories: Science

Study links residential radon exposure to hematologic cancers in women

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:22pm
A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic (blood) cancer in women. Radon is a naturally occurring byproduct of the decay of radium, and is a known human lung carcinogen, the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.
Categories: Science

Fiber optic biosensor-integrated microfluidic chip to detect glucose levels

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:22pm
A team of researchers report integrating fiber optic glucose sensors into a microfluidic chip to create portable, high-performance, low-cost devices for measuring glucose levels.
Categories: Science

Four new genetic diseases defined within schizophrenia

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:22pm
Changes in key genes define four previously unknown conditions within schizophrenia, according to a study. Unlike "big data" genetic studies, which have loosely linked hundreds of genetic changes to schizophrenia but cannot explain varying symptoms, the new study revealed distinct disease versions that may affect large slices of patients and enable precision treatment design, say the authors.
Categories: Science

Ocean views linked to better mental health

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:22pm
Here's another reason to start saving for that beach house: new research suggests that residents with a view of the water are less stressed.
Categories: Science

Seeing the benefits of failure shapes kids' beliefs about intelligence

Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:21pm
Parents' beliefs about whether failure is a good or a bad thing guide how their children think about their own intelligence, according to new research. The research indicates that it's parents' responses to failure, and not their beliefs about intelligence, that are ultimately absorbed by their kids.
Categories: Science