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Himalayan ice shows chemicals ban is working

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 1:25pm
A unique study of frozen ice cores from the Tibetan Himalayas has shown that international agreements on phasing out the use of toxic persistent organic pollutants are working. "Chemical residues are carried thousands of miles on the prevailing winds and deposited in the ice. Ice cores are very effective barometers of pollution over time as ice is laid down over the decades," authors explain.
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Playful adults preferred in choice of partner

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 1:25pm
Which characteristics do young adults value in a potential partner for long-term relationships? A new study reveals that, besides friendliness, intelligence and a sense of humor, playfulness is also important – regardless of gender. Playful people also deem humor, a fun tendency, a laid-back attitude and creativity more important in partners than their non-playful counterparts.
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Spin laser: Rapid data transfer thanks to quantum physics

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 1:25pm
Engineers have developed a new concept for accelerating data transfer in server farms. To this end, the team has applied a quantum-mechanical variable, i.e. the spin. Researchers are optimizing the so-called spin lasers for data transfer.
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New nanowire structure absorbs light efficiently: May be used in LEDs and solar cells

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 1:25pm
Researchers have developed a new method to implement different types of nanowires side-by-side into a single array on a single substrate. The new technique makes it possible to use different semiconductor materials for the different types of nanowires.
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Novel computer model designed to understand cardiovascular diseases

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 1:25pm
A novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of endothelial cells monolayer, the inner lining of artery, has been developed by researchers to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.  
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Easy on the eyes: Optimum length of eyelashes is one third width of eye

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 12:27am
A new study finds that the optimal eyelash length is one-third the width of the eye for humans and 21 other mammals. Anything shorter or longer increases airflow around the eye and leads to more dust hitting the surface.
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Boy or girl? Lemur scents have the answer

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 12:27am
Dozens of pregnancy myths claim to predict whether a mom-to-be is carrying a boy or a girl. Some say you can tell by the shape of a woman's bump, or whether she craves salty or sweet. Even ultrasound doesn't always get it right. But for lemurs, the answer is in the mother's scent.
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Crocodiles rocked pre-Amazonian Peru: Seven crocodile species found in single 13-million-year-old bone bed

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 12:27am
Thirteen million years ago, as many as seven different species of crocodiles hunted in the swampy waters of what is now northeastern Peru, new research shows. This hyperdiverse assemblage, revealed through more than a decade of work in Amazon bone beds, contains the largest number of crocodile species co-existing in one place at any time in Earth's history, likely due to a food source that forms a small part of modern crocodile diets: mollusks.
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Bionic reconstruction lets patients use a robotic prosthetic hand controlled by the mind

Wed, 25/02/2015 - 12:26am
Three Austrian men have become the first in the world to undergo a new technique called "bionic reconstruction", enabling them to use a robotic prosthetic hand controlled by their mind, according to new research. All three men suffered for many years with brachial plexus injuries and poor hand function as a result of motor vehicle and climbing accidents.
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High-energy breakfast with low-energy dinner helps control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 11:25pm
A small new study shows that, in people with type 2 diabetes, those who consume a high-energy breakfast and a low-energy dinner have better blood sugar control than those who eat a low-energy breakfast and a high-energy dinner.
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Tissue engineering: Scientists grow leg muscle from cells in a dish

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 11:25pm
Scientists have generated mature, functional skeletal muscles in mice using a new approach for tissue engineering. The scientists grew a leg muscle starting from engineered cells cultured in a dish to produce a graft. The subsequent graft was implanted close to a normal, contracting skeletal muscle where the new muscle was nurtured and grown. In time, the method could allow for patient-specific treatments for a large number of muscle disorders.
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Potential treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis discovered

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 10:21pm
A new small molecule drug has been discovered that may serve as a treatment against multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, a form of the disease that cannot be cured with conventional therapies. While standard anti-tuberculosis drugs can cure most people of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, improper use of antibiotics has led to new strains of the bacterium resistant to the two most powerful medications, isoniazid and rifampicin.
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Skin test may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 9:49pm
Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The study showed that skin biopsies can be used to detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins found in the two diseases.
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SOHO sees something new near the sun: Comet survives close encounter

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 9:48pm
An unusual comet skimmed past the sun on Feb 18-21, 2015, as captured by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO.
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Sensor-packed smartphones can read your mood, guard your data, and wreak havoc in the wrong hands

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 8:47pm
Smartphones have replaced nearly every conceivable gadget, but computer scientists are teaching them some new tricks. The researchers are adapting accelerometers, GPS chips, gyroscopes and other sensors to make phones that can read a user's mood, eliminate passwords, protect financial transactions and more.
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Yellowstone: Geysers erupt periodically because they have loops in their plumbing

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 7:31pm
Volcanologists threaded sensors and cameras into the superheated water of geysers in Chile and Yellowstone, and have come up with an explanation for why geysers erupt periodically. They've even built a laboratory geyser that erupts every 20 minutes to demonstrate that loops and bends in the underground plumbing trap steam bubbles that slowly leak out, heating the water above until it suddenly boils from the top down.
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Use of neuroscience in law may face political resistance

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 7:31pm
Republicans and Independents disapprove of neuroscience-informed criminal justice reforms when the reforms are seen as being too lenient with criminal defendants. When framed differently, however, there is stronger support for neurolaw.
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Dendrite eraser: New electrolyte rids batteries of short-circuiting fibers

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 7:31pm
A new electrolyte allows rechargeable batteries to operate well without growing dendrites, tiny pin-like fibers that short-circuit rechargeable batteries.
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World's protected natural areas receive eight billion visits a year

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 7:29pm
Researchers say that the first study to attempt to gauge global visitation figures for protected areas reveals nature-based tourism has an economic value of hundreds of billions of dollars annually, and call for much greater investment in the conservation of protected areas in line with the values they sustain – both economically and ecologically.
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Teen girls from rural areas more likely to have undiagnosed asthma, be depressed

Tue, 24/02/2015 - 6:13pm
Teen girls who live in rural areas are more likely than their male counterparts to have undiagnosed asthma, and they often are at a higher risk of depression, according to researchers. "There's a lot of speculation about why females are more likely to be undiagnosed," says the lead researcher. "Maybe it's because boys are more likely to get a sports physical for athletics and they catch it then. Or maybe it's because girls attribute asthma symptoms to something else, like anxiety. That needs further study."
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