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Updated: 34 min 55 sec ago

Keeping filler ingredients out of your cup of coffee

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:43pm
Coffee drinkers beware: Surprise ingredients may be hiding in your coffee, and growing shortages may well increase the chance of having more fillers in the future. A new test may quickly find them before the beverage reaches stores and restaurants.
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Engineers to simulate, model tornado winds, their effects on buildings

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:43pm
One researcher reports on his studies of tornado winds, and the findings from simulations and modelling that will help engineers answer questions about how tornadoes interact with buildings. "The research is expected to contribute to methods and strategies that can be implemented for preventing tornado hazards from becoming disasters," he writes.
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School violence, gun-related injury among top 10 child health concerns across U.S.

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:41pm
Childhood obesity remains the top health concern for children in 2014, but when asked about national concerns, adults put school violence and gun-related injuries in the top 10. In the poll's annual top 10 list, a nationwide sample of adults were asked to identify the biggest health concerns for kids in their communities, as well as kids nationwide. Overall, childhood obesity is rated at the top of both lists: 29 percent of adults said obesity is a 'big problem' for children in their local communities and 55 percent said it is 'big problem' across the country.
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Expert panel calls for public health research on natural gas drilling

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:41pm
A group of environmental health researchers has published recommendations for public health research associated with unconventional natural gas drilling operations. Groundwater and air quality testing before, during, and after natural gas drilling -- which includes hydraulic fracturing -- should be key components of efforts to ensure the safety of communities near these sites, according to these experts
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Clues emerge to genetic architecture of cognitive abilities in children

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:41pm
A large new genetic study in thousands of children and adolescents offers early glimpses of the overall patterns and connections among cognitive abilities such as language reasoning, reading skill and types of memory. The findings may lead to new tools in understanding human cognitive development and neuropsychiatric disorders.
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How breast cancer usurps powers of mammary stem cells

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 4:41pm
During pregnancy, certain hormones trigger specialized mammary stem cells to create milk-producing cells essential to lactation. Scientists have found that mammary stem cells associated with the pregnant mammary gland are related to stem cells found in breast cancer. "By understanding a fundamental mechanism of mammary gland development during pregnancy, we have gained a rare insight into how aggressive breast cancer might be treated," said the lead author.
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2010 Chilean earthquake causes icequakes in Antarctica

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:42am
In March of 2010, the ice sheets in Antarctica vibrated a bit more than usual because of something more than 3,000 miles away: the 8.8-magnitude Chilean earthquake. A new study is the first to indicate that Antarctica's frozen ground is sensitive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes. Some of the icequakes were quick bursts and over in less than one second. Others were long duration, tremor-like signals up to 10 seconds. They occurred in various parts of the continent, including seismic stations along the coast and near the South Pole.
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Water tractor beam: Complex waves generate flow patterns to manipulate floating objects

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:42am
Physicists have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach.
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Bioengineers: Matrix stiffness is essential tool in stem cell differentiation

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:42am
Bioengineers have demonstrated that the stiffness of the extracellular matrix used to culture stem cells really does matter. The research team also found that a protein binding the stem cell to the hydrogel is not a factor in the differentiation of the stem cell as previously suggested. The protein layer is merely an adhesive, the team reports.
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Newly discovered heart molecule could lead to effective treatment for heart failure

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:41am
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown cardiac molecule that could provide a key to treating, and preventing, heart failure. The newly discovered molecule provides the heart with a tool to block a protein that orchestrates genetic disruptions when the heart is subjected to stress, such as high blood pressure.
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Scientists unlock key to blood vessel formation

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:41am
A gene that plays a vital role in blood vessel formation has been discovered by scientists, research that adds to our knowledge of how early life develops. "Blood vessel networks are not already pre-constructed but emerge rather like a river system. Vessels do not develop until the blood is already flowing and they are created in response to the amount of flow. This gene, Piezo1, provides the instructions for sensors that tell the body that blood is flowing correctly and gives the signal to form new vessel structures," the lead researcher said.
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Discovery of new form of dystrophin protein could lead to therapy for some Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:41am
Scientists have discovered a new form of dystrophin, a protein critical to normal muscle function, and identified the genetic mechanism responsible for its production. Studies of the new protein isoform suggest it may offer a novel therapeutic approach for some patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a debilitating neuromuscular condition that usually leaves patients unable to walk on their own by age 12.
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Pairing old technologies with new for next generation electronic devices

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:38am
A new method to efficiently generate and control currents based on the magnetic nature of electrons in semi-conducting materials has been developed by researchers, offering a radical way to develop a new generation of electronic devices.
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New mechanism for cancer growth discovered

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:38am
An unexpected cellular cross-talk behind ovarian cancer growth has been discovered that can be used as a therapeutic target for future immuno-oncology strategies. The research is particularly interesting because it reveals that the normally anti-tumor gamma delta (gd)  T lymphocytes (a type of white blood cells) can also be pro-tumor.
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Sanfilippo Disease: New treatment for rare inherited disease underway

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:38am
A child -- the first -- has been recruited into a new study that aims to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a treatment for Sanfilippo Disease. The disease is a progressive, genetic and life-threatening disease for which there is currently no effective treatment. The syndrome is diagnosed in childhood, with sufferers experiencing deafness, hyperactivity and behavioral problems, progressive developmental delay, and seizures during the later stages of the condition. The condition is usually fatal in late childhood or early adulthood.
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Target identified for rare inherited neurological disease in men

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:36am
The mechanism by which a rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease causes often crippling muscle weakness in men, in addition to reduced fertility, has been identified by researchers. The study shows that a gene mutation long recognized as a key to the development of Kennedy's disease impairs the body's ability to degrade, remove and recycle clumps of "trash" proteins that may otherwise build up on neurons, progressively impairing their ability to control muscle contraction.
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Spectacular 3-D sketching system revolutionizes design interaction and collaboration

Mon, 11/08/2014 - 1:36am
Collaborative three-dimensional sketching is now possible thanks to a system known as Hyve-3D. The system is a full scale immersive 3D environment. Users create drawings on hand-held tables. They can then use the tablets to manipulate the sketches to create a 3D design within the space.
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Women who earn engineering degrees soon leave profession, study finds

Sun, 10/08/2014 - 4:42pm
Nearly 40 percent of women who earn engineering degrees quit the profession or never enter the field, and for those who leave, poor workplace climates and mistreatment by managers and co-workers are common reasons, according to research. While women accounted for more than 20 percent of engineering school graduates over the past two decades, only 11 percent of practicing engineers are women, and only 9 percent of electronic and environmental engineers are, researchers report.
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Like cling wrap, new biomaterial can coat tricky burn wounds, block out infection


Sun, 10/08/2014 - 4:42pm
Wrapping wound dressings around fingers and toes can be tricky, but for burn victims, guarding them against infection is critical. Today, scientists are reporting the development of novel, ultrathin coatings called nanosheets that can cling to the body’s most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay. The materials has to date been tested on mice.
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Carbon dioxide 'sponge' could ease transition to cleaner energy


Sun, 10/08/2014 - 4:42pm
A plastic sponge that sops up the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) might ease our tranisition away from polluting fossil fuels to new energy sources like hydrogen. A relative of food container plastics could play a role in President Obama’s plan to cut CO2 emissions. The material might also someday be integrated into power plant smokestacks.
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