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Updated: 1 hour 21 min ago

Lung disease case finding in pharmacies could save £264 million

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:52pm
Using community pharmacies to identify undiagnosed cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at an early stage could save £264 million a year, English researchers report. The new research shows the value of pharmacies in addressing diseases at an early stage. It reveals that case-finding would provide 'significant NHS and societal benefits' and save the NHS more money than the service costs to deliver.
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The oceans' sensitive skin: Ocean acidification affects climate-relevant functions at the sea-surface microlayer

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:52pm
Ocean acidification might alter climate-relevant functions of the oceans' uppermost layer, according to a study by a group of marine scientists. Researchers observed a close coupling between biological processes in the seawater and the chemistry of the sea surface microlayer.
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Creating bright X-ray pulses in the laser lab

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:52pm
To create X-rays -- short wave radiation -- scientists have started out with very long wavelengths -- infrared laser. Long wavelength laser pulses rip atoms out of metal and accelerate them, which leads to emission of X-rays.
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Weeds yet to reach full potential as invaders in United Kingdom, after centuries of change

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:52pm
Weeds in the UK are still evolving hundreds of years after their introduction and are unlikely to have yet reached their full potential as invaders, Australian scientists have discovered. The study is the first to have tracked the physical evolution of introduced plant species from the beginning of their invasion to the present day, and was made possible by the centuries-old British tradition of storing plant specimens in herbaria.
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Typhoid gene unravelled

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:51pm
People who carry a particular type of gene have natural resistance against typhoid fever according to new research. Enteric fever, or typhoid fever as it more commonly known, is a considerable health burden to lower-income countries. This finding is important because this natural resistance represents one of the largest human gene effects on an infectious disease.
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The Trojan horse burger: Do companies that 'do good' sell unhealthy food?

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:49pm
When consumers see a company performing good deeds, they often assume that the company's products are healthy. According to a new study this may be far from true, and the company’s socially responsible behavior may be creating a “health halo” over unhealthy foods.
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HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected adults

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:48pm
HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.
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Bizarre mapping error puts newly discovered species in jeopardy

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 3:48pm
Scientists in the Democratic Republic of Congo have discovered a new species of plant living in a remote rift valley escarpment that’s supposed to be inside of a protected area. But an administrative mapping error puts the reserve’s borders some 50 kilometers west of the actual location.
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Mapping spread of diarrhea bacteria a major step toward new vaccine

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 2:28pm
Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are responsible each year for around 400 million cases of diarrhea and 400,000 deaths in the world's low- and middle-income countries. Children under the age of five are most affected. ETEC bacteria also cause diarrhea in nearly one in two travelers to these areas. In a major breakthrough, researchers used comprehensive DNA analyses to reveal the ETEC bacteria's genetic composition – an analysis that also makes it possible to map how the bacteria spread.
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Promising prognostic biomarker candidates for ovarian cancer uncovered

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 2:27pm
Through separate studies, researchers have clarified the role of cancer testis antigen in ovarian cancer, and report new evidence that certain ligand/receptor interactions influence ovarian cancer prognosis.
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Controversial medication has benefits for breastfeeding, researchers find

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 2:27pm
A controversial medication used by breastfeeding women should not be restricted because of the benefits it offers mothers and their babies, according to researchers. The medication domperidone has recently been the subject of warnings based on research that there is a link between the medication and fatal heart conditions.
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'Landmark' results for curing hepatitis C in liver transplant patients

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 2:27pm
A new treatment regimen for hepatitis C, the most common cause of liver cancer and transplantation, has produced results that will transform treatment protocols for transplant patients, according to research.
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The cave paintings of Valltorta-Gassulla could be dated in absolute terms thanks to new analyses

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:43pm
Researchers have presented the first characterization of the black pigments used in the shelters of the Remígia cave, in the Valltorta-Gassulla area, between the Valencian regions of L’Alt Maestrat and La Plana (Castelló). The objective of this study was to identify the raw material of the black pigments and the techniques used to prepare them, and to make an approach to the cultural patterns associated with the use of pigments.
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Astronomers preparing for first-ever comet landing attempt

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:43pm
Astronomers are preparing for the first ever landing by a spacecraft on an icy comet tomorrow. The Rosetta spacecraft was launched in 2004, and has spent a decade manoeuvring to rendezvous with the comet.
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Prosthetic, orthotic service in developing countries examined

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:38pm
How well do prosthetic and orthotic services work in countries characterized by poverty and civil war? A new study focuses on this issue, revealing current the state of the matter.
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Toxic mix of fast-food outlets in inner city neighborhoods fuelling diabetes, obesity epidemic

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:38pm
There is twice the number of fast-food outlets in inner city neighborhoods with high density non-white ethnic minority groups and in socially deprived areas, a study shows. “The results are quite alarming and have major implications for public health interventions to limit the number of fast food outlets in more deprived areas,” notes one researcher.
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Legionella outbreaks of Alcoy may have multiple sources

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:38pm
A genomic analysis has been carried out of Legionella pneumophila strains of 13 legionellosis outbreaks produced in Alcoy during the period from 1999 to 2010. Legionella pneumophila is a strictly environmental pathogen, an opportunistic bacterium that inhabits aquatic and soil environments, spreading through the air and that can infect humans with certain susceptibility characteristics, such as being over 65 years, with breathing problems or smokers, among others. L. pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease.
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Beta-blockers have no mortality benefit in post-heart attack patients, say researchers

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:38pm
Beta-blockers have been a cornerstone in the treatment of heart attack survivors for more than a quarter of a century. However, many of the data predate contemporary medical therapy such as reperfusion, statins, and antiplatelet agents, and recent data have called the role of beta-blockers into question. Two new studies evaluated the traditional management of these patients after their discharge from the hospital and in the light of changing medical treatment, as well as the impact of the discharge heart rate and conventional treatment with beta-blockers.
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All the electronics that's fit to print

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:33pm
New technology allows you to print electronic devices in the same way your inkjet printer prints a document or photo. Now researchers have used this technique to build a portable X-ray imager and small mechanical devices.
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Multiple models reveal new genetic links in autism

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 1:33pm
With the help of mouse models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the “tooth fairy,” researchers have implicated a new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism.
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