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Updated: 4 hours 29 min ago

Horizontal levitation: The ultimate solution to particle separation

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 2:05pm
Separating particles from the liquid they are in can now be done with a new concept. Magnetic separators exploit the difference in magnetic properties between minerals, for example when separating magnetite from quartz. But this exercise becomes considerably more complex when the particles are not magnetic. In the wake of previous particle levitation experiments under high-power magnetic fields, a new study reveals that particles are deflected away from the magnet's round-shaped bore center in a horizontal direction.
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New quantum mechanism to trigger the emission of tunable light at terahertz frequencies

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 2:05pm
Scientists have found that two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructures with asymmetric design enable a new quantum mechanism, triggering the emission of tunable light at terahertz frequencies-with unprecedented efficiency. The researchers found that quantum wells, 2-D nanostructures formed of several layers of semi-conductor alloys placed on top of each other like a sandwich, can enhance light emission in a technological challenging spectral range.
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Yoga exercise program tailored for pulmonary hypertension patients

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 2:05pm
A first-of-its-kind yoga exercise program has been developed for patients living with pulmonary hypertension, a chronic lung disease that afflicts women at least two times more than men. Called Yoga for PH, the 40-minute program includes three yoga exercise levels and a nutrition and lifestyle discussion.
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Punishment plays important role in forgiveness

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 2:05pm
It's easier for people to forgive someone for doing wrong against them if some form of punishment is involved, according to psychology researchers. "Justice and forgiveness are often considered to be opposites, but we've found that victims who punish their offender are more able to forgive and move on," one researcher says.
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Exposure to TV violence related to irregular attention and brain structure

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 2:05pm
Young adult men who watched more violence on television showed indications of less mature brain development and poorer executive functioning, according to new results. Executive functioning abilities can be important for controlling impulsive behaviors, including aggression.
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Fishing resources mapped to assist land managers, anglers

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 2:05pm
Researchers mapped a cultural ecosystem service by identifying the key features that influence anglers’ enjoyment, such as environmental quality, accessibility, and fish abundance. Freshwater recreational fishing generates income, jobs, and funding for conservation. In 2011, more than 27 million people fished U.S. freshwaters, and Americans spent more than $41 billion on fishing-related equipment, licenses, transportation, and other activities. As a result, every state spends substantial public funds annually to support and manage freshwater recreational fishing.
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Moral tales with positive outcomes motivate kids to be honest

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:20am
A moral story that praises a character's honesty is more effective at getting young children to tell the truth than a story that emphasizes the negative repercussions of lying, according to research. The findings suggest that stories such as 'The Boy Who Cried Wolf' and 'Pinocchio' may not be effective cautionary tales when it comes to inspiring honest behavior in children.
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Supplements of calcium, vitamin D may have too much for some older women

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:20am
Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some of them, shows a new study. The good news in this study is that the investigators found a way to predict which women were likely to develop these excess levels.
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Shortage of cybersecurity professionals poses risk to U.S. national security

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:20am
The nationwide shortage of cybersecurity professionals -- particularly for positions within the federal government -- creates risks for national and homeland security, according to a new study. Demand for trained cybersecurity professionals who work to protect organizations from cybercrime is high nationwide, but the shortage is particularly severe in the federal government, which does not offer salaries as high as the private sector.
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No evidence that soy food protects against endometrial cancer, study finds

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:20am
No evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk has been found, concludes a new study. Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen. Some studies have highlighted their potential cancer protective properties, however, research looking at the link to endometrial cancer has been inconsistent.
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Animals conceal sickness symptoms in certain social situations

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:19am
Animals have the ability to conceal their sickness in certain social situations. According to a new review, when given the opportunity to mate or in the presence of their young, sick animals will behave as though they were healthy. The research has implications for our understanding of the spread of infectious diseases.
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Spanish slug: Busting an invasion myth

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:19am
Spanish slugs (Arion lusitanicus) are one of the most common slug species in Central Europe. The animals sometimes nicknamed “killer slugs” are known to do their fair share of damage in fields and gardens. The slug was thought to have originated in Southern Europe. However researchers have now found out that the prime example of an invasive species is originally from Central Europe and thus no “immigrant” after all.
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Gender 'rebalancing' in China: An uncertain future

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:17am
China is the most gender imbalanced country in the world, with an official sex ratio at birth (SRB) of 117.78 (boys for every one hundred girls) in 2011. Over the past two decades the rise in China’s SRB has had a wide range of economic and social consequences. Researchers investigate the future impact of this rise using demographic and economic projections. Their results suggest that even if the Chinese government takes action to rebalance the sex ratio, the long-term picture is uncertain.
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Energy-optimized buildings: Keeping a cool head at the workplace

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:17am
A new climate chamber has been built to study what it is like to work in a comfortable air-conditioned room at high temperatures. The study focused on comfort and user behavior at office workplaces in energy-optimized buildings, with a focus on the effect of ceiling fans under summer conditions. The result: The fan enhances comfort only if it has a cooling effect, and users feel that their control power over the fan is effective.
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Proteins in urine could play important role in stress incontinence

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:17am
Incontinence is the world's most common chronic condition. However, the problem continues to be a taboo subject: two out of three sufferers do not talk about it, preventing access to successful treatment. Stress incontinence, in which urine is lost involuntarily when coughing, laughing or sneezing, is the most common form of incontinence, affecting 60 per cent of all cases. How it develops is largely unresearched. Scientists have now been able to demonstrate that proteins in the urine could play an important role.
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World’s first light technology to control proteins in living cells

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:17am
The world’s first technology to control specific protein functions in living cells by using lights has been developed, which may be useful in future cancer cell research. The research group has found that this technology allows scientists to inactivate critical biological phenomena, including cell migration and cell division, by using only lights, and without the assistance of chemical drug treatments or genetic modification.
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Birds evolve 'signature' patterns to distinguish cuckoo eggs from their own

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 11:17am
For some birds, recognizing their own eggs can be a matter of life or death. In a new study, scientists have shown that many birds affected by the parasitic Common Cuckoo -- which lays its lethal offspring in other birds' nests -- have evolved distinctive patterns on their eggs in order to distinguish them from those laid by a cuckoo cheat.
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Brain imaging shows enhanced executive brain function in people with musical training

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 1:10am
A controlled study using functional MRI brain imaging reveals a possible biological link between early musical training and improved executive functioning in both children and adults, report researchers. The study uses functional MRI of brain areas associated with executive function, adjusting for socioeconomic factors.
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Transfusion after trauma can benefit or harm patients depending on their risk of death

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 1:08am
The risks and benefits of red blood cell transfusions for patients with trauma and major bleeding might vary considerably based on a patient's predicted risk of death on arrival at a trauma center, according to new research.
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Shipping needs radical rethink warn climate experts

Wed, 18/06/2014 - 1:03am
Avoiding dangerous levels of climate change requires a radical rethink of the shipping system, according to a new report. If global shipping is to make its fair contribution to avoiding the 2°C of warming associated with dangerous climate change, CO2 emissions need to be cut within the next decade and fall by at least 80% by 2050 compared to 1990 levels, say experts.
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