Syndicate content Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate and environment, computers, engineering, health and medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations.
Updated: 1 hour 34 min ago

A novel method for portable detection of potent drugs known as 'bath salts'

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:05pm
Despite being outlawed in 2012 in the US, the synthetic drugs known as 'bath salts' -- which really aren't meant for your daily bath -- are still readily available in some retail shops, on the Internet and on the streets. To help law enforcement, scientists are developing a novel method that could be the basis for the first portable, on-site testing device for identifying the drugs.
Categories: Science

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. A new study found that healthcare workers' adherence to hand hygiene is better when other workers are nearby.
Categories: Science

Ancient swamp creature had lips like Mick Jagger

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
A swamp-dwelling, plant-munching creature that lived 19 million years ago in Africa has been named after Rolling Stones lead singer Sir Mick Jagger, because of its big, sensitive lips and snout. The name of the animal, Jaggermeryx naida, translates to 'Jagger's water nymph.'
Categories: Science

A Mexican plant could lend the perfume industry more green credibility

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
The mere whiff of a dreamy perfume can help conjure new feelings or stir a longing for the past. But the creation of these alluring scents, from the high-end to the commonplace, can also incur an environmental toll. That could change as scientists examine a more sustainable way to produce a key perfume ingredient and supply it to fragrance makers around the world.
Categories: Science

'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an 'electronic skin' that 'feels' and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives.
Categories: Science

First clinical trial on HER-2-negative breast cancer with nintedanib shows promising results

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
The experimental drug nintedanib, combined with standard chemotherapy with paclitaxel, causes a total remission of tumors in 50 percent of patients suffering from early HER-2-negative breast cancer, the most common type of breast cancer.
Categories: Science

Monitoring response of bone metastases to treatment using MRI, PET

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
Imaging technologies are useful in evaluating response to cancer treatment, and this can be done quite effectively for most tumors using RECIST, Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. RECIST works well for tumors located in soft tissue, but not cancers that spread to the bone. More effort, therefore, is needed to improve our understanding of how to monitor the response of bone metastases to treatment using MRI and PET imaging.
Categories: Science

How skin falls apart: Pathology of autoimmune skin disease revealed at the nanoscale

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
Researchers studying a rare, blistering disease have discovered new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin. The research has the potential to help clinicians identify who may be at risk for developing Pemphigus vulgaris (PV), an autoimmune skin disorder, by distinguishing pathogenic (disease-causing) autoimmune antibodies from other nonpathogenic autoimmune antibodies.
Categories: Science

Nerve impulses can collide, continue unaffected

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
According to the traditional theory of nerves, two nerve impulses sent from opposite ends of a nerve annihilate when they collide. New research now shows that two colliding nerve impulses simply pass through each other and continue unaffected. This supports the theory that nerves function as sound pulses.
Categories: Science

Video game teaches kids how to code

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 4:04pm
Computer scientists have successfully funded on Kickstarter a new and improved version of CodeSpells, a first-person player game they developed that teaches players how to code.
Categories: Science

Researchers unlock genetic code of cancer-causing liver fluke parasite

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 2:29pm
The genetic code of the liver fluke parasite, Opisthorchis viverrini, has been cracked by an international team of researchers using a unique DNA analysis technique. Opisthorchis viverrini is a trematode that infects millions in Asia, and is a significant risk factor for Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) or bile duct cancer.
Categories: Science

Non-dominant hand vital to the evolution of the thumb

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 2:29pm
New research from biological anthropologists has shown that the use of the non-dominant hand was likely to have played a vital role in the evolution of modern human hand morphology: the production of stone tools requires the thumb on the non-dominant hand to be significantly stronger and more robust than the fingers.
Categories: Science

Researchers watch lipid molecules in motion

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 2:29pm
Researchers have 'filmed' the movement of lipid molecules using an X-ray stroboscope. Their study offers new insights into the dynamics of biomolecules, which compose materials such as cell membranes.
Categories: Science

Working during depression can offer health benefits to employees

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 2:29pm
Attending work while suffering a depressive illness could help employees better manage their depression more than taking a sickness absence from work, a new study has found. The study is the first to estimate the long-term costs and health outcomes of depression-related absence as compared to individuals who continue to work among employees with depression.
Categories: Science

Blocking single receptor could halt rheumatoid arthritis

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 2:28pm
Researchers have shown for the first time how the activation of a receptor provokes the inflammation and bone degradation of rheumatoid arthritis -- and that activation of this one receptor, found on cells in the fluid of arthritic joints, is all that is required.
Categories: Science

Bright clumps in Saturn ring now mysteriously scarce

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 2:20pm
Compared to the age of the solar system -- about four-and-a-half billion years -- a couple of decades are next to nothing. Some planetary locales change little over many millions of years, so for scientists who study the planets, any object that evolves on such a short interval makes for a tempting target for study. And so it is with the ever-changing rings of Saturn.
Categories: Science

Appetite and mortality: The two are closely connected in the eldery

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 1:32pm
A simple question about appetite can provide insights into old people's general health that may help reduce their risk of dying. A team has now investigated the connection between appetite and mortality in great depth.
Categories: Science

First 500 GHz photon switch built

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 1:32pm
The work took nearly four years to complete and it opens a fundamentally new direction in photonics -- with far-reaching potential consequences for the control of photons in optical fiber channels.
Categories: Science

New study reconstructs mega-earthquakes timeline in Indian Ocean

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 1:32pm
A new study on the frequency of past giant earthquakes in the Indian Ocean region shows that Sri Lanka, and much of the Indian Ocean, is affected by large tsunamis at highly variable intervals, from a few hundred to more than 1,000 years. The findings suggest that the accumulation of stress in the region could generate as large, or even larger tsunamis than the one that resulted from the 2004 magnitude-9.2 Sumatra earthquake.
Categories: Science

Female baboons with male companions live longer

Wed, 10/09/2014 - 1:32pm
Numerous studies have linked social interaction to improved health and survival in humans, and new research confirms that the same is true for baboons. A long-term study of more than 200 wild female baboons finds that the most sociable females live two to three years longer than their socially isolated counterparts. Socializing with males gave females an even bigger longevity boost than socializing with other females, the researchers found.
Categories: Science