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Updated: 1 hour 16 min ago

As Americans age, caregiving challenges increase

Mon, 09/06/2014 - 1:36pm
As people continue to live longer, more Americans are caring for someone with a chronic condition, disability or old age. There are approximately 90 million family caregivers in the U.S. today and two out of every five adults care for a family member. As the baby boomer generation ages, caregiving will continue to be a crucial issue among Americans.
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More than just a hill of beans: Phaseolus genome lends insights into nitrogen fixation

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:27pm
Research into the common bean has been pursued because of its importance in enhancing nitrogen use efficiency for bioenergy crops sustainability, and for increasing plant resilience and productivity in the face of the changing climate and environment. To this end, a team of researchers sequenced and analyzed the genome of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris.
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Targeting tumors using silver nanoparticles

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:27pm
A nanoparticle that has a couple of unique -- and important -- properties has been designed by scientists. Spherical in shape and silver in composition, it is encased in a shell coated with a peptide that enables it to target tumor cells. What's more, the shell is etchable so those nanoparticles that don't hit their target can be broken down and eliminated.
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I shouldn't have eaten there: Rats show behavior of 'regret' in choosing the wrong 'restaurant'

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:27pm
New research reveals that rats show signs of 'regret' -- a cognitive behavior once thought to be uniquely and fundamentally human. To measure the cognitive behavior of regret, scientists developed a task that asked rats how long they were willing to wait for certain foods. In this task, the rats are presented with a series of food options but have limited time at each 'restaurant.'
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Warming climates intensify greenhouse gas given out by oceans

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:27pm
Rising global temperatures could increase the amount of carbon dioxide naturally released by the world's oceans, fueling further climate change, a study suggests. Scientists studied a 26,000-year-old sediment core to find out how the ocean's ability to take up atmospheric CO2 has changed over time, and found that when silicon was least abundant in ocean waters corresponded with relatively warm climates, low levels of atmospheric iron, and reduced CO2 uptake by the oceans' plankton.
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Retracing early cultivation steps: Lessons from comparing citrus genomes

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:27pm
Citrus is the world's most widely cultivated fruit crop but it is now under attack from citrus greening, an insidious emerging infectious disease destroying entire orchards. Researchers worldwide are mobilizing to apply genomic tools and approaches to understand how citrus varieties arose and how they respond to disease and other stresses. An international consortium of researchers analyzed and compared the genome sequences of ten diverse citrus varieties.
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New molecule enables quick drug monitoring

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:27pm
A molecule that can easily and quickly show how much drug is in a patient's system has been invented by scientists. The molecule, now the basis of a start-up company, is expected to enable point-of-care therapeutic drug monitoring. "This system is a cheap, effective solution for customizing drug dosage in patients across a whole array of diseases," says one of the authors.
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Quick getaway: How flies escape a looming predator

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:25pm
Every millisecond counts when a fruit fly is being hunted by a damselfly. Scientists find that fruit flies can deploy two escape behaviors, depending on circumstances. New research reveals how a quick-escape circuit in the fly's brain overrides the fly's slower, more controlled behavior when a threat becomes urgent.
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Tiny molecule may help battle depression

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:25pm
Levels of a small molecule found only in humans and in other primates are lower in the brains of depressed individuals, according to researchers. This discovery may hold a key to improving treatment options for those who suffer from depression. The discovery may provide "a potential target for the development of new and more effective antidepressant treatments," one researcher notes.
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Longer telomeres linked to risk of brain cancer: Double-edged sword, gene variants may promote overall health while increasing risk of gliomas

Sun, 08/06/2014 - 7:25pm
New genomic research reveals that two common gene variants that lead to longer telomeres, the caps on chromosome ends thought by many scientists to confer health by protecting cells from aging, also significantly increase the risk of developing the deadly brain cancers known as gliomas.
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Details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells explained

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 10:54pm
The atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells has been detailed by scientists, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets.
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Argument with dad? Find friendly ears to talk it out, study shows

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 10:54pm
Adolescents' well-being can improve when conflicts with their father are adequately explained -- by mom, a friend or even dad himself. Adolescents who receive an reason for the father's behavior or a better understanding of who is at fault feel better about themselves and about dad as well. Those feelings about dad, in turn, are linked to a lower risk of depression for youth.
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Better tissue healing with disappearing hydrogels

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 10:49pm
When stem cells are used to regenerate bone tissue, many wind up migrating away from the repair site, which disrupts the healing process. But a research team makes use of a technique that keeps the stem cells in place, resulting in faster and better tissue regeneration.
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Fruit flies: Brain traffic jams that can disappear in 30 seconds

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 10:48pm
Motorists in Los Angeles, San Francisco and other gridlocked cities could learn something from the fruit fly. Scientists have found that cellular blockages, the molecular equivalent to traffic jams, in nerve cells of the insect’s brain can form and dissolve in 30 seconds or less.
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Vitamin D and the nursing mother

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 10:48pm
The not-often-discussed issue of Vitamin D deficiency in nursing mothers is discussed by an expert, and how it can affect the infants in their care. An "adequate" intake for nursing mothers is not the 400 IU/d the IOM recommends, but is instead in the range of 5,000-6,000 IU/d, taken daily. If they get that much, they will meet not only their own needs, but their infant's as well.
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Health policy researchers lack confidence in social media for communicating scientific evidence

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 5:54pm
Though Twitter boats 645 million users across the world, only 14 percent of health policy researchers reported using Twitter – and approximately 20 percent used blogs and Facebook – to communicate their research findings over the past year, according to a new study. In contrast, sixty-five percent used traditional media channels, such as press releases or media interviews. While participants believed that social media can be an effective way to communicate research findings, many lacked the confidence to use it and felt their academic peers and institutions did not value it or respect it as much as traditional media and direct contact with policy makers.
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Tougher penalties credited for fewer casualties among young male drivers

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 5:14pm
A significant decline in speeding-related fatalities and injuries among young men has been found in Ontario since the province's tough extreme speeding and aggressive driving laws were introduced in 2007. A study found a sustained reduction of about 58 speeding-related injuries and fatalities a month among males aged 16-24. That means about 700 fewer young men have been injured or killed in speeding-related crashes yearly since the law was passed.
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Evolution of a bimetallic nanocatalyst

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 5:14pm
Atomic-scale snapshots of a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst in action have provided insights that could help improve the industrial process by which fuels and chemicals are synthesized from natural gas, coal or plant biomass.
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El Hierro Volcano helps improve algorithms used by satellites

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 4:04pm
Information provided by satellites on the amount of chlorophyll-A and the roughness of the sea following the eruption of the underwater volcano off the island of El Hierro (Spain) did not coincide with the actual data collected in situ by vessels carrying out oceanographic studies. The models have been corrected by researchers who have for the first time processed very high resolution images of this kind of natural phenomenon captured from space.
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U.S. Fed interventions during financial crisis actually worked, study finds

Fri, 06/06/2014 - 4:04pm
Contrary to popular belief, the Federal Reserve’s effort to encourage banks’ lending during the recent financial crisis by providing them short-term loans worked -- and, in fact, worked quite well, a new study finds.
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