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Updated: 20 hours 21 min ago

New fruitfly sleep gene promotes the need to sleep

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 6:17pm
All creatures great and small, including fruitflies, need sleep. The timing of when we sleep versus are awake is controlled by cells in tune with circadian rhythms of light and dark. Most of the molecular components of that internal clock have been worked out. On the other hand, what drives how much we sleep is less well understood. Researchers report a new protein involved in the homeostatic regulation of sleep in the fruitfly.
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Climate change threatens to cause trillions in damage to world's coastal regions if they do not adapt to sea-level rise

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 6:15pm
New research predicts that coastal regions may face massive increases in damages from storm surge flooding over the course of the 21st century. Global average storm surge damages could increase from about $10-$40 billion per year today to up to $100,000 billion per year by the end of century, if no adaptation action is taken.
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Research: It's more than just the science

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:37pm
Researchers outline not only why it's important to pursue science collaboratively, but how to create and maintain science teams to get better research results.
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First evidence of common brain code for space, time, distance

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:37pm
A new study provides the first evidence that people use the same brain circuitry to figure out space, time and social distances. The results may help to determine whether we care enough to act: Is something happening here, now, to someone I love? Or over there, years from now, to a stranger?
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Are you big pharma's new target market?

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:37pm
New research shows that big pharma has embraced "brand personality," a marketing strategy traditionally employed by consumer-focused companies like Apple, Coca-Cola and Harley-Davidson.
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How safe to use is the enemy of a citrus-threatening pest?

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:37pm
The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) can spread the lethal and incurable citrus disease known as huanglongbing or citrus greening that threatens the multi-billion dollar global citrus industry. In 2011, for the first time entomologists released a wasp, a natural enemy of the ACP, in a citrus grove in Riverside to help control the psyllid. But is this wasp safe to use? Does its introduction pose any risk to the environment?
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Where do lizards in Qatar live? First distribution maps for the state

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:36pm
Scientists have made an intensive survey and published the first distribution maps for lizards in Qatar. The study has increased the list of lizard species present in Qatar from 15 species recorded up to 2004 to 21 species. The study fills a gap concerning reptile diversity knowledge in Qatar and the Gulf Region.
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Model predicts growth, death of membership-based websites

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:36pm
Facebook is a proven success in what the late Nobel laureate Herbert Simon called "the marketplace of attention." A new model assesses the viability of websites and social networks in this new attention economy to predict which sites are sustainable and which are not. The model attempts to replicate the dynamics of membership sites, including the role of active users as catalysts of website activity, turning dormant website members into active users and keeping them active.
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Embrace the cold: Evidence that shivering and exercise may convert white fat to brown

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:36pm
A new study suggests that shivering and bouts of moderate exercise are equally capable of stimulating the conversion of energy-storing "white fat" into energy-burning "brown fat." This makes brown fat a potential therapeutic target against obesity and diabetes.
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Appearance of lyme disease rash can help predict how bacteria spreads through body

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:36pm
Lyme disease is often evident by a rash on the skin, but infections do not always produce similar rashes. This can make it difficult to detect the disease early, when antibiotic treatment is most effective. Researchers describe a new mathematical model that captures the interactions between disease-causing bacteria and the host immune response that affect the appearance of a rash and the spread of infection.
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Eyemusic sensory substitution device enables the blind to 'see' colors and shapes

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:35pm
Using auditory or tactile stimulation, Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs) provide representations of visual information and can help the blind "see" colors and shapes. SSDs scan images and transform the information into audio or touch signals that users are trained to understand, enabling them to recognize an image without seeing it. Currently SSDs are not widely used within the blind community because they can be cumbersome and unpleasant to use. However, researchers have now developed a novel SSD that transmits shape and color information through a composition of pleasant musical tones, or "soundscapes."
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In vitro innovation: Testing nanomedicine with blood cells on a microchip

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:34pm
Scientists have engineered a microchip coated with blood vessel cells to learn more about the conditions under which nanoparticles accumulate in the plaque-filled arteries of patients with atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke.
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Beating pain and painkillers: New mental intervention treatment

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 5:34pm
With nearly one-third of Americans suffering from chronic pain, prescription opioid painkillers have become the leading form of treatment for this debilitating condition. Unfortunately, misuse of prescription opioids can lead to serious side effects -- including death by overdose. A new treatment has shown to not only lower pain but also decrease prescription opioid misuse among chronic pain patients.
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The case for tele-emergency services

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:21pm
New research supports the claim that tele-emergency services can successfully extend emergency care in rural hospitals.
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Diamond defect boosts quantum technology

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:21pm
New research shows that a remarkable defect in synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition allows researchers to measure, witness, and potentially manipulate electrons in a manner that could lead to new "quantum technology" for information processing.
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Primitive artificial cell turned into complex biological materials

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:21pm
Imagine starting from scratch with simple artificial microscopic building blocks and ending up with something much more complex: living systems, novel computers or every-day materials. For decades scientists have pursued the dream of creating artificial building blocks that can self-assemble in large numbers and reassemble to take on new tasks or to remedy defects. Now researchers have taken a step forward to make this dream into a reality.
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Gene therapy may be possible cure for Hurler syndrome: Mouse Study

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:21pm
Researchers used blood platelets and bone marrow cells to deliver potentially curative gene therapy to mouse models of the human genetic disorder Hurler syndrome -- an often fatal condition that causes organ damage and other medical complications.
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Pain sensitivity may be influenced by lifestyle, environment, twin study suggests

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:21pm
Researchers have discovered that sensitivity to pain could be altered by a person's lifestyle and environment throughout their lifetime. The study is the first to find that pain sensitivity, previously thought to be relatively inflexible, can change as a result of genes being switched on or off by lifestyle and environmental factors -- a process called epigenetics, which chemically alters the expression of genes.
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Urinary tract infections: Immune cells need a second opinion

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:20pm
Bacterial urinary tract infections are a painful nuisance. Scientists have now decoded the way in which immune cells communicate with each other in defense against infections via the messenger tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Urinary tract infections are amongst the most frequent infections and are triggered by intestinal bacteria which invade the urogenital tract through smear infections via the urethra. These infections are persistent because the bacteria are often not completely killed off.
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Connection found in pathogenesis of neurological diseases, HIV

Tue, 04/02/2014 - 4:18pm
A new study published shows similarities in the pathogenesis of prion disease -- misfolded proteins that can lead to neurological diseases -- and the HIV virus.
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