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Close up of the new mineral merelaniite

Sat, 29/10/2016 - 4:44pm
The scroll-like structure of the newly discovered mineral merelaniite grows into tiny, silver-gray whiskers. A physicist has found the mineral on a sample of larger minerals from the Merelani Mining District in Tanzania.
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Structure of toxic tau aggregates determines type of dementia, rate of progression

Sat, 29/10/2016 - 12:53am
The distinct structures of toxic protein aggregates that form in degenerating brains determine which type of dementia will occur, which regions of brain will be affected, and how quickly the disease will spread, according to a study.
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Technique reveals the basis for machine-learning systems' decisions

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 8:22pm
In recent years, the best-performing systems in artificial-intelligence research have come courtesy of neural networks, which look for patterns in training data that yield useful predictions or classifications. Now researchers present a new way to train neural networks so that they provide not only predictions and classifications but rationales for their decisions.
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When it comes to atomic-scale manufacturing, less really is more

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 8:21pm
Electrical currents can be now be switched on and off at the smallest conceivable scale enabling a new generation of 'green electronics' with the potential for great impact on the digital economy.
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A tiny machine: Infinitesimal computing device

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 8:20pm
Electrical and computer engineers have developed a design for a functional nanoscale computing device. The concept involves a dense, three-dimensional circuit operating on an unconventional type of logic that could, theoretically, be packed into a block no bigger than 50 nanometers on any side.
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See how Arctic sea ice is losing its bulwark against warming summers

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 8:19pm
Arctic sea ice, the vast sheath of frozen seawater floating on the Arctic Ocean and its neighboring seas, has been hit with a double whammy over the past decades: as its extent shrunk, the oldest and thickest ice has either thinned or melted away, leaving the sea ice cap more vulnerable to the warming ocean and atmosphere.
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Treadmill running with heavier shoes tied to slower race times

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 8:18pm
It makes sense that running with heavier shoes on will cause you to exert more energy than running with lighter shoes. That was proven several decades ago. But does using more energy while running with heavier shoes translate into slower running times? That's also a yes, say researchers who designed a clever study to show that running times slow when running shoe weight is increased, even if only by a few ounces.
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Autism spectrum disorder linked to mutations in some mitochondrial DNA

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 8:17pm
Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have greater numbers of harmful mutations in their mitochondrial DNA than family members, researchers report.
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Helping dam north of Grand Canyon balance environment, hydropower needs

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 7:56pm
Researchers have helped develop a plan for the operation of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, upstream of Grand Canyon National Park. The plan, known as the Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan, and documented in a final environmental impact statement, recommends a strategy that would balance hydropower with the protection of environmental, cultural and recreational resources in the area.
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New research on bats hunting in noise

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 7:56pm
Noise pollution, according to a new study, has been linked to lower survival and reproduction because it masks environmental cues and makes it hard for animals to hear moving prey or approaching predators.
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Colorado River's dead clams tell tales of carbon emission

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 6:21pm
Scientists have begun to account for the topsy-turvy carbon cycle of the Colorado River delta – once a massive green estuary of grassland, marshes and cottonwood, now desiccated dead land.
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Pop-culture news helped destigmatize out-of-wedlock childbirth

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 6:21pm
Celebrity news reports over the past four decades appear to have contributed to the changing makeup of the traditional American family by helping to destigmatize out-of-wedlock childbirths in the United States, according to a study.
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New technique reveals powerful, 'patchy' approach to nanoparticle synthesis

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 5:42pm
Patches of chain-like molecules placed across nanoscale particles can radically transform the optical, electronic, and magnetic properties of particle-based materials. Now, scientists have used cutting-edge electron tomography techniques—a process of 3D reconstructive imaging—to pinpoint the structure and composition of the polymer nano-patches.
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High-frequency spinal cord stimulation provides better results in chronic back, leg pain

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 4:53pm
For patients with severe, chronic back and leg pain, a new high-frequency spinal cord stimulation (SCS) technique provides superior clinical outcomes, compared to conventional low-frequency SCS, reports a clinical trial.
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Turbulent solution to a growing problem

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 3:54pm
Plasma turbulence, the wildly fluctuating pattern of particle motion, is a concern for fusion energy devices because it allows heat to escape the plasma. However, an even more serious concern is posed by naturally growing magnetic islands that tear the magnetic fabric of the plasma. In a recent experiment, researchers suggest that plasma turbulence can prevent filamentary structures called magnetic islands from growing so large that they cool off the 100 million degree plasma.
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Learning Morse code without trying

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 3:54pm
It's not exactly beating something into someone's head. More like tapping it into the side. Researchers have developed a system that teaches people Morse code within four hours using a series of vibrations felt near the ear. Participants wearing Google Glass learned it without paying attention to the signals -- they played games while feeling the taps and hearing the corresponding letters. After those few hours, they were 94 percent accurate keying a sentence that included every letter of the alphabet and 98 percent accurate writing codes for every letter.
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With cancer genome sequencing, be your own control

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 3:53pm
When a researcher found more than 1,000 genetic translocations in her mouse model of B cell lymphoma, she assumed her lab had made a mistake. To rule out experimental technique as the cause of the way-more-than-expected genomic alterations, the lab sequenced three different types of cells from "wildtype" mice - effectively the kind that might move into your garage in bad weather. Like the lymphoma cells before them, the cells from wildtype mice also had over a 1,000 translocations.
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Breakthrough in Z-pinch implosion stability opens new path to fusion

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 3:52pm
Researchers have demonstrated improved control over and understanding of implosions in a Z-pinch, a particular type of magneto-inertial device that relies on the Lorentz force to compress plasma to fusion-relevant densities and temperatures. The breakthrough was enabled by unforeseen and entirely unexpected physics.
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Antibody breaks leukemia's hold, providing new therapeutic approach

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 3:51pm
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer known for drug resistance and relapse. In an effort to uncover new treatment strategies, researchers have discovered that a cell surface molecule known as CD98 promotes AML.
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Extinguishing a fusion fire in a flash of light

Fri, 28/10/2016 - 3:51pm
Fusion energy researchers have discovered that they can rapidly extinguish and cool a magnetically confined fusion plasma hotter than the center of the sun by injecting a large quantity of neon gas to prevent damage to fusion-energy devices when there is a loss of plasma equilibrium.
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