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Management of peatlands has large climate impacts

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 2:19pm
Drainage and management of pristine peatlands increase greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. A recent study, based on a new, wide data set collected from northern peatlands indicates that particularly those peatlands which have been taken into agricultural use have significant warming impact on climate.
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Mutations that may enable earlier diagnosis of colorectal cancer recurrence identified

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:35pm
A multi-disciplinary team of doctors and scientists has characterized the genetic changes associated with the spread of colorectal cancer to the liver. Most patients are initially diagnosed with an early stage disease. However, a proportion of these patients will develop a recurrence of the cancer (metastasis), typically in the liver, one to three years after their colon surgery. If identified early, the liver metastasis may be amenable to surgical removal, and cure may still be possible.
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Pregnant women not getting enough omega-3, critical for infant development, research shows

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:35pm
A research team studied the first 600 women in a cohort during and after their pregnancy to see whether they were consuming enough omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega 3-LCPUFA) to meet current recommendations. They found that in fact, most of these women were not.
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Perceived open-mindedness explains religion-based dating

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:35pm
Across a number of faiths and cultures, people tend to date and marry others who share their religious beliefs. Now, new psychology research suggests this phenomenon -- known as 'religious homogamy' -- is partially a result of inferences about religious people's personalities.
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Promising drug a 'new paradigm' for treating leukemia

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:35pm
A compound that delays leukemia in mice and effectively kills leukemia cells in human tissue samples has been developed by researchers, raising hopes that the drug could lead to improved treatments in people. The researchers call it an exciting 'new paradigm' for treating leukemia, they say.
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High prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in adults with sickle cell

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:35pm
Adults with sickle cell disease who report trouble with sleep could actually have a clinical diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing which could lower their oxygen levels at night. "Our study suggests that patients with sickle cell disorder should be screened using a questionnaire to identify problems with sleep. For further testing, an oxygen desaturation index is another low-cost screening tool that can identify sleep disordered breathing in this population," said the first author.
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Business people prefer working in their cars instead of trains, planes and airports

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:35pm
Noisy and cramped conditions in trains, planes and airports are discouraging many commuters and business people from working while travelling, new research shows.
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Zooming in on panoramas with your tablet

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:34pm
Most people are familiar with the fictional world of "Star Trek," in which the characters can use a holodeck to create and interact with virtual worlds. It is possible to recreate a similar (but milder) effect in the real world using 360-degree panoramic images. Researchers are bringing them now to our tablets -- including individual camera work and editing.
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Leukemia like Achilles, has its own weakness

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 1:34pm
Leukemia cells from patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the advanced stage, lack one of the proteins: the famous BRCA1. Importantly, the protein is not present even if the patient carries the proper, not mutated gene responsible for BRCA1 production.
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Baseball injuries: Majority of parents unaware of safe pitching practices

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:27pm
A new study found that 53 percent of the parents/caregivers of youth baseball pitchers are unaware of safe pitching practices designed to prevent overuse injuries -- common tears or damage, most often to the elbow or shoulder -- which can cause pain, lost play time and, if not treated appropriately, arthritis, deformity and disability.
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Low back pain risk factors identified

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:27pm
New research identifies nicotine dependence, obesity, alcohol abuse and depressive disorders as risk factors for low back pain, a common condition causing disability, missed work, high medical costs and diminished life quality.
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A difficult climate: New study examines the media's response to the IPCC

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:27pm
A study has for the first time analyzed how Twitter, TV and newspapers reported the IPCC's climate evidence. Understanding how media coverage varies is important because people's knowledge and opinions on climate change are influenced by how the media reports on the issue.
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Ebola: Study announces a durable vaccine

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:27pm
The durability of a novel 'disseminating' cytomegalovirus-based Ebola virus vaccine strategy may eventually have the potential to reduce ebolavirus infection in wild African ape species, scientists report. African apes serve as a main source of ebolavirus transmission into the human population. As a consequence, the prevention of ebolavirus infection in African apes could reduce the incidence of future human ebolavirus outbreaks.
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Study underscores complexity of geopolitics in the age of the Aztec empire

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:27pm
New findings from an international team of archaeological researchers highlight the complexity of geopolitics in Aztec era Mesoamerica and illustrate how the relationships among ancient states extended beyond warfare and diplomacy to issues concerning trade and the flow of goods.
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Actor Benedict Cumberbatch and Richard III are cousins

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:24pm
An historian whose genealogy research helped to confirm the identity of the remains found in the Grey Friars car park as those of King Richard III has discovered a direct link between the English actor Benedict Cumberbatch and the former Plantagenet monarch.
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Goodbye to sunburn thanks to sunburn indicator

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:24pm
Sunbathers could soon tell when to take shelter in the shade thanks to an early warning sunburn indicator. Researchers have developed a strip of plastic, containing 'smart' ink, which turns colourless from an initial blue colour just before exposure to too much ultraviolet light from the sun, prompting you to move into the shade before you burn.
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Sensor cable monitors fences of all kinds and can even detect low-level drone fly-bys

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:24pm
Fenced-in areas, such as airports, nuclear power stations, industrial sites, or private plots of land, can now be monitored thanks to novel sensor technology that has been developed by a team of experimental physicists. The sensors respond immediately as soon as someone tries to climb over or cut through the fence, providing information on the precise location of the security breach. They are even able to detect a low-flying drone passing overhead.
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Researchers solve science behind scalp cooling and the reasons for hair loss in cancer treatment

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:23pm
Hair loss is one of the most distressing side-effects of cancer treatment and can even deter some patients from undergoing life-saving chemotherapy.  But researchers are establishing the scientific basis for a rapidly-advancing scalp cooling technology that can ensure hair retention in a vast number of cases. 
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Printable particles for large, curved luminous surfaces

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:23pm
Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the modern lighting devices used in lamps, signals, signs or displays. By contrast, organic semiconducting light-emitting materials (OLEDs) can be incorporated in thin layers and used on curved surfaces. However, OLEDs for large-area illumination are cost-intensive at present owing to their low efficiency and short lifetime.
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Head injury patients show signs of faster aging in the brain

Wed, 25/03/2015 - 12:23pm
People who have suffered serious head injuries show changes in brain structure resembling those seen in older people, according to a new study. The brain injury patients in this study were estimated to be around five years older on average than their real age.
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