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Voltage tester for beating cardiac cells

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 7:43pm
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in recording the current in membrane channels of contracting cardiac cells. To do this, the scientists combined an atomic force microscope with a widely used method for measuring electrical signals in cells.
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Violations in pharmaceutical industry self-regulation of medicines promotion

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 7:43pm
A discrepancy exists between the ethical standard codified in the pharmaceutical industry Codes of Practice and the actual conduct of the pharmaceutical industry in the UK and Sweden, according to a new study.
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Primary care nurse-delivered interventions can increase physical activity in older adults

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 7:43pm
A primary care nurse-delivered intervention can lead to sustained increases in physical activity among older adults, according to a new article .
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New desalination technology could answer state drought woes

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 7:42pm
Could desalination be the answer to California’s drought? As parts of the state become drier, scientists are looking at ways to turn seawater into drinkable water.
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A rapid extension of nanographene sheets from readily available hydrocarbons

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:13pm
The rapid and uniform construction of nanographene sheets has now become possible in a precisely controlled manner from a new catalytic system developed by a team of chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University and the JST-ERATO Project led by Professor Kenichiro Itami.
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Bone-loss score may tip off doctors to gum disease in postmenopausal women

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:13pm
A link between postmenopausal women with high scores on a Fracture Assessment Risk Tool, and symptoms of severe gum disease, has been found by researchers.
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Unhealthy choices boosted mortality rates for blacks who migrated north

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:12pm
Millions of African-Americans left the rural South during the 20th century in search of greater opportunities for work, education and overall quality of life in the urban North, Midwest and West. But the gains many made were clouded by an increased mortality rate, likely the result of unhealthy habits picked up by vices common in the big city, finds a new study.
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Novel crumpling method takes flat graphene from 2-D to 3-D

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:12pm
Researchers have developed a unique single-step process to achieve three-dimensional texturing of graphene and graphite. Using a commercially available thermally activated shape-memory polymer substrate, this 3-D texturing, or 'crumpling,' allows for increased surface area and opens the doors to expanded capabilities for electronics and biomaterials.
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Building a more versatile frequency comb: Newly developed frequency combs can operate at higher power

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:12pm
Researchers have developed a room temperature frequency comb with increased power based on quantum cascade lasers. Since the discovery of optical frequency combs in the 1990s, many applications in metrology, spectroscopy, and frequency synthesis have emerged. Similar to the way a grandfather clock's pendulum ticks off the seconds before signaling the gears to turn its hands, frequency combs count oscillations and convert them into useful electronic signals.
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With new data, satellite brings early universe into focus

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:12pm
The latest data release from the Planck space telescope offers insight into everything from the fabric of space to dark matter -- and may even still have a shot at detecting gravitational waves, says an expert.
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Humans altering Adriatic ecosystems more than nature, study shows

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:12pm
The ecosystems of the Adriatic Sea have weathered natural climate shifts for 125,000 years, but humans could be rapidly altering this historically stable biodiversity hot spot, a new study shows.
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Insight into inner magnetic layers

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:12pm
Research teams from Paris, Madrid and Berlin have observed for the first time how magnetic domains mutually influence one another at interfaces of spintronic components. Using measurements taken at BESSY II, they could demonstrate that what are known as spin filters form between the outer ferromagnetic layers and the inner anti-ferromagnetic insulating layer, influencing tunnel magnetoresistance.
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Tau-associated MAPT gene increases risk for Alzheimer's disease

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 6:11pm
The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene has been identified as increasing the risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), scientists report. The MAPT gene encodes the tau protein, which is involved with a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and AD. These findings provide novel insight into Alzheimer’s neurodegeneration, possibly opening the door for improved clinical diagnosis and treatment.
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Cancer experience presents time for lifestyle changes in both survivors and family members

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:28pm
After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle.
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Women seek greater variety in men and consumer products near ovulation

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:28pm
New research suggests women seek more options in dating partners near ovulation -- when they are most fertile -- which may lead them to also seek a greater variety of products and services.
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Shy babies need secure parent bond to help prevent potential teen anxiety

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:28pm
Shy babies need to have a strong bond with their parents to avoid developing anxiety disorders in their teens, according to a new study. Attachment is especially vital, the researchers found, when a baby shows behavioral inhibition or shyness to new situations or people.
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Time for a bold dingo experiment, researchers say

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:27pm
Sturt National Park in Australia is the ideal site to test whether dingoes can play a role in restoring biodiversity and degraded rangelands. The future survival of large carnivores depends on our understanding of their role, researchers say.
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Recent research provides new data on chemical gardens, whose formation is a mystery for science

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:27pm
Recent research has yielded new data on chemical gardens, mysterious formations produced when certain solid salts -- copper sulfate, cobalt chloride -- are added to an aqueous solution of sodium silicate.
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Even animals compose: What it means to be a musical species

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:27pm
Music is found in all human cultures and thus appears to be part of our biology and not simply a cultural phenomenon. One approach to studying the biology of music is to examine other species to see if they share some of the features that make up human musicality.
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Tool can help assess cognitive impairment in multicultural populations

Tue, 17/02/2015 - 5:26pm
The ability to assess cognitive impairment in multicultural older populations will become more important as demographics change worldwide. A new study reports that the Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale is particularly effective in multicultural populations where English is not a patient's first language.
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