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How rattlesnakes got, and lost, their venom

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:44pm
Millions of years ago, the ancestor of modern rattlesnakes was endowed with a genetic arsenal of toxic weaponry. But in a relatively short period of evolutionary time, different types of snakes kept different types of toxin genes, and shed others.
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Researchers map links between salmonella, sepsis

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:36pm
Research by industrial engineering and biology researchers marks a significant milestone in the battle against sepsis, the second highest cause of death in intensive care units in the U.S.
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Nuclear threat to heart patients? Experts show impact from shortage of radioactive stress test tracer

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:36pm
Nearly 15 million times a year, heart patients climb onto a treadmill to take a stress test that can reveal blockages in their heart’s blood vessels. But a looming shortage of a crucial short-lived radioactive element means many heart patients could end up getting less-precise stress tests, or more invasive, riskier heart imaging procedures.
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A talk with a nurse can persuade hospital patients to quit smoking

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:36pm
Self-reported quit rates among hospital patients more than doubled when nurses and other staff were trained to coach patients on how to stop smoking and to make sure they got the help they needed to make it happen, whether that meant counseling, patches, gum or prescription medication, a study concludes.
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Repurposed deworming drugs could combat c. Difficile epidemic, study suggests

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:36pm
Scientists have discovered a potential new weapon against Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes hundreds of thousands of severe intestinal infections in the U.S. every year and is frequently fatal.
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Retinoic acid may significantly prevent lymphedema development, experimental model suggests

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:36pm
Using newly updated mouse models, researchers demonstrated the impactful preventive properties of 9-cis retinoic acid against lymphedema. Currently, there is no cure for lymphedema, a swelling of the extremities that most commonly occurs after treatment for cancer.
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Language barriers impede treatment of children with special health care needs

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:36pm
Language barriers can have dangerous consequences for children with special health care needs, according to a new paper. Children with special health care needs account for two-thirds of pediatric hospital admissions and 90 percent of all children's medical deaths. Of those nearly 18 million children with special health care needs, 13 percent -- 2.3 million -- reside in a home where a language other than English is spoken.
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Deep insight into interfaces

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:31pm
Interfaces between different materials and their properties are of key importance for modern technology. Physicists have developed a new method, which allows them to have an extremely precise glance at these interfaces and to model their properties.
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Memory of a heart attack is stored in our genes

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:31pm
Both heredity and environmental factors influence our risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study shows now that the memory of a heart attack can be stored in our genes through epigenetic changes.
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Size is everything when it comes to high blood pressure

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:31pm
The body’s smallest organ dictates your blood pressure. The size of a grain of rice, the carotid body, located between two major arteries that feed the brain with blood, has been found to control your blood pressure. New research indicates that the carotid bodies appear to be a cause of high blood pressure, and as such now offer a new target for treatment.
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Meet AISOY1 the Robot, autism therapy assistant

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:31pm
Researchers are collaborating to expand the potential of their robot assistant for the treatment of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Specifically, the goal is to explore the ways in which the AISOY robot can enhance therapy sessions at the UMH University Clinic.
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Simple saliva test to diagnose asthma

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
A new test that can diagnose asthma from a patient's saliva has now been developed by researchers. To diagnose the condition doctors usually measure a person's airflow lung capacity, however lung function tests can be inaccurate and do not reflect underlying changes associated with asthma. Other tests, such as blood, urine or sputum analysis can be distressing, particularly for younger patients.
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Acts of altruism? New study to explore actions of solidarity with asylum seekers and refugees

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
A new study into collective actions in support of vulnerable groups – including asylum seekers and refugees - is being led by English researchers.
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Healthy fat stem cells can protect against obesity-associated type 2 diabetes

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
Obesity is responsible for the deaths of over three million people a year worldwide due to its associated diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, a subset of obese individuals seems to be protected from such diseases. Understanding the underlying protective mechanisms in the lower risk individuals could help design novel therapeutic strategies targeting those at higher risk of disease, say researchers.
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Light causes drosophila to take longer midday nap

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
Fruit flies' activity peaks especially in the morning and late afternoon. The insects extend their midday siesta on long summer days. Researchers have now found out what triggers this behavior. A miniature pair of eyelets discovered in the late 80s plays a crucial role in this context.
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How and why are measurements of ozone taken from space?

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
The hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica became an international cause for concern in the latter half of the 20th Century, but researchers point out that the issues relating to ozone levels are complex and wide-reaching.
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When hackers turn out the lights

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
The development of the smart power grid and the smart meter in our homes to accompany it brings several benefits, such as improved delivery and more efficient billing. Conversely, any digital, connected technology also represents a security risk. Researchers now explain how a malicious third party that hacked into the metering system could manipulate en masse the data being sent back to the smart grid and perhaps trigger a power generation shortfall.
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New software helps to find out why 'jumping genes' are activated

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
The genome is not a fixed code but flexible. It allows changes in the genes. Transposons, however, so-called jumping genes, interpret this flexibility in a much freer way than “normal” genes. They reproduce in the genome and chose their position themselves. Transposons can also jump into a gene and render it inoperative. Thus, they are an important distinguishing mark for the development of different organisms, report scientists.
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Origin of minor planets' rings revealed

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
A team of researchers has clarified the origin of the rings recently discovered around two minor planets known as centaurs, and their results suggest the existence of rings around other centaurs.
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Disordered protein ‘shape shifts’ to avoid crowding, study suggests

Fri, 16/09/2016 - 1:30pm
Scientists have brought physics and biology together to further understand how cells’ crowded surfaces induce complex protein behavior. Their findings suggest that a disordered protein, called alpha-synuclein, partially escapes from the cell membrane when it runs out of space.
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