Apple Isn’t the Only One to Blame for Smartphone Labor Abuses

Wired News - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 8:51pm

Apple is not the only company that benefits from a system where cost-saving efficiencies come with a human toll.

The post Apple Isn’t the Only One to Blame for Smartphone Labor Abuses appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

World View Captures Spectacular Sunrise with High-Altitude Balloon (Video)

Space.com - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 8:40pm
World View has just released new footage from a recent unmanned flight, offering a glimpse at the vistas future customers might experience during a sunrise voyage.
Categories: Science

If You Think Deep Links Are a Big Deal Now, Just Wait

Wired News - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 8:30pm

They were a discussion topic on Google’s Earnings Call and were a focus at I/O. Facebook created a standalone initiative called App Links to take a leadership position. Long time internet watcher John Battelle claims the quickening is nigh. What is it about deep links that has everyone so worked up? Today, they help us […]

The post If You Think Deep Links Are a Big Deal Now, Just Wait appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Obama’s Bold Sony Statement: Canceling The Interview Was a ‘Mistake’

Wired News - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 8:14pm

In his end-of-year press conference today, President Barack Obama called the decision by Sony Pictures Entertainment to cancel the release of its film The Interview a “mistake.” “I am sympathetic to the threats they face,” Obama said. “Having said all that, yes, I think they made a mistake…. “We cannot have a society in which […]

The post Obama’s Bold Sony Statement: Canceling The Interview Was a ‘Mistake’ appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

LinuxFest Northwest 2015 Will be Held April 25 and 26 (Video)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 8:14pm
Their website says, 'Come for the code, stay for the people! We have awesome attendees and electrifying parties. Check out the robotics club, the automated home brewing system running on Linux, or the game room for extra conference fun.' This is an all-volunteer conference, and for a change the volunteers who run it are getting things together far in advance instead of having sessions that don't get scheduled until a few days before the conference, which has happened more than once with LFNW. So if you have an idea for a session, this is the time to start thinking about it. Sponsors are also welcome -- and since LFNW sponsorships regularly sell out, it's not to soon to start thinking about becoming a sponsor -- and if you are part of a non-profit group or FOSS project, LFNW offers free exhibit space because this is a conference that exists for the community, not to make money for a corporate owner. But don't delay. As you can imagine, those free exhibit spots tend to fill up early. (Alternate Video Link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Time Warp of the Week: The ’90s TV Special That Profiled Hackers and Their Glorious Hair

Wired News - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:39pm

In 1996, the first episode of Internet Cafe looked at the net's hacker problem. Not a lot has change since then.

The post Tech Time Warp of the Week: The ’90s TV Special That Profiled Hackers and Their Glorious Hair appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Space Celebrities Sing in Final Episode of 'Colbert Report'

Space.com - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
TV personality Stephen Colbert ended his final episode of Comedy Central's "Colbert Report" with a truly epic celebrity sing-along featuring more than a few space-themed surprises.
Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Schneier Explains How To Protect Yourself From Sony-Style Attacks (You Can't)

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 7:31pm
phantomfive writes: Bruce Schneier has an opinion piece discussing the Sony attack. He says, "Your reaction to the massive hacking of such a prominent company will depend on whether you're fluent in information-technology security. If you're not, you're probably wondering how in the world this could happen. If you are, you're aware that this could happen to any company." He continues, "The worst invasion of privacy from the Sony hack didn’t happen to the executives or the stars; it happened to the blameless random employees who were just using their company’s email system. Because of that, they’ve had their most personal conversations—gossip, medical conditions, love lives—exposed. The press may not have divulged this information, but their friends and relatives peeked at it. Hundreds of personal tragedies must be unfolding right now. This could be any of us." Related: the FBI has officially concluded that the North Korean government is behind the attack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Machine Learning Reveals Genetic Controls

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 6:50pm
An anonymous reader writes with this quote from Quanta Magazine: Most genetic research to date has focused on just 1 percent of the genome — the areas that code for proteins. But new research, published today in Science, provides an initial map for the sections of the genome that orchestrate this protein-building process. "It's one thing to have the book — the big question is how you read the book," said Brendan Frey, a computational biologist at the University of Toronto who led the new research (abstract). For example, researchers can use the model to predict what will happen to a protein when there’s a mistake in part of the regulatory code. Mutations in splicing instructions have already been linked to diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, a leading cause of infant death, and some forms of colorectal cancer. In the new study, researchers used the trained model to analyze genetic data from people afflicted with some of those diseases. The scientists identified some known mutations linked to these maladies, verifying that the model works. They picked out some new candidate mutations as well, most notably for autism. One of the benefits of the model, Frey said, is that it wasn’t trained using disease data, so it should work on any disease or trait of interest. The researchers plan to make the system publicly available, which means that scientists will be able to apply it to many more diseases.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Dominant Life Form In the Cosmos Is Probably Superintelligent Robots

Slashdot - Fri, 19/12/2014 - 6:08pm
Jason Koebler writes: If and when we finally encounter aliens, they probably won't look like little green men, or spiny insectoids. It's likely they won't be biological creatures at all, but rather, advanced robots that outstrip our intelligence in every conceivable way. Susan Schneider, a professor of philosophy at the University of Connecticut, joins a handful of astronomers, including Seth Shostak, director of NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, NASA Astrobiologist Paul Davies, and Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology Stephen Dick in espousing the view that the dominant intelligence in the cosmos is probably artificial. In her paper "Alien Minds," written for a forthcoming NASA publication, Schneider describes why alien life forms are likely to be synthetic, and how such creatures might think.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science