8 Wild Ideas That Debuted at the Indy 500, From Seat Belts to Mirrors

Wired News - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 2:00pm
If you think the Indy 500 hasn't impacted your life, pump your brakes, buckle your seat belt, or look in your rearview mirror. The post 8 Wild Ideas That Debuted at the Indy 500, From Seat Belts to Mirrors appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Cyborgs closer to becoming a reality of human evolution

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:12pm
Our excitement with and rapid uptake of technology -- and the growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement -- are putting humans more firmly on the path to becoming cyborgs, according to evolution experts.
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Molds and plants share similar ways in alkaloid biosynthesis

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:10pm
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces a group of previously unknown natural products. With reference to plant isoquinoline alkaloids, these substances have been named fumisoquins. Researchers have discovered the novel substances together with their American colleagues while studying the fungal genome. The family of isoquinoline alkaloids contains many pharmacologically active molecules. This study shows that fungi and plants developed biosynthetic pathways for these complex molecules independently of each other.
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Using virtual users to develop accessible ICT-based applications

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:10pm
In a new report, researchers report the development of a set of parametric cognitive virtual models of users with disabilities that can be used to simulate the user interaction with Information and communications technology (ICT) applications. This simulation will allow researchers to develop more efficient and accessible ICT applications for people with functional limitations and disabilities.
Categories: Science

New model of T cell activation

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:10pm
Biologists show that cholesterol prevents an immune response, even when no antigen is present. T cell receptors are an important part of the human immune system. They are able to switch their conformation from an inactive to an active state spontaneously without any antigens present. Cholesterol binds and stabilizes inactive receptors, giving it a decisive role in the activation of a T cell, the study shows.
Categories: Science

Sharks have individual personalities: Study

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:10pm
A new study indicates that sharks of the same species can have different personalities.
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Rapid bone growth and underwater breathing: Putting the science of Harry Potter’s universe to the test

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:09pm
In the world of Harry Potter the young wizard undergoes two magical biological transformations: eating Gillyweed to grow gills in order to breathe underwater and drinking Skele-Gro to repair broken bones. Students have put these arcane medical practices to the test -- and have concluded that a little magic might indeed be required in both situations to make them scientifically feasible.
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Predicting the spread of the Zika virus

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:09pm
A new tool predicts the risk of Zika virus importation and local transmission for 189 countries.
Categories: Science

Novel multi-field invisible sensor designed by scientists

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:09pm
Made of pure copper, a new ultra-thin ‘shell’ conceals sensors from remote inspection while still allowing them to probe the exterior environment, report researchers.
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Investment in energy storage vital if renewables to achieve full potential

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
Government subsidies should be used to encourage investment in energy storage systems if renewable power is to be fully integrated into the sector, according to researchers.
Categories: Science

Tax on plug-in vehicles is not answer to road-funding woes, study shows

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
Given declining revenues from gasoline and diesel fuel taxes and the need for new ways of funding road infrastructure, state and federal policymakers are considering or have enacted annual registration fees for plug-in vehicles. In a new paper, researchers say that approach is misguided.
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Small talk: Electronic media keeping kids from communicating with parents

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
It happens in many households. Kids are tapping on their cell phones or are preoccupied by their favorite TV show as their parents ask them a question or want them to do a chore. Unlike previous research that has relied on self-reports by parents tracking their children's media usage, a new study used enhanced audio equipment to track the home environment of preschoolers as they interacted with parents in 2010 and 2011.
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Vitamin nicotinamide riboside protects mice from diabetes complications

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
A naturally occurring vitamin, nicotinamide riboside, can improve metabolic symptoms and prevent peripheral nerve damage in mouse models of diabetes, according to a new study.
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Remains of bizarre group of extinct snail-eating Australian marsupials discovered

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
Fossil remains of a previously unknown family of carnivorous Australian marsupials that lived 15 million years ago have been discovered at the Riversleigh World Heritage Fossil Site in north-western Queensland. The ancient animals appeared to eat snails using a huge, hammer-like premolar that would have been able to crack the strongest of snail shells.
Categories: Science

Restoring chemotherapy sensitivity by boosting microRNA levels

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
By increasing the level of a specific microRNA (miRNA) molecule, researchers have for the first time restored chemotherapy sensitivity in vitro to a line of human pancreatic cancer cells that had developed resistance to a common treatment drug.
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Study finds that protein puts the brakes on melanin

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
Skin, eye and hair pigmentation requires a delicate balance of acidity within the cellular compartments where melanin is made -- that balance is partly regulated, scientists now know, by a protein called TPC2.
Categories: Science

The dying child: Room for improvement in end-of-life care

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
Many pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists believe that their clinical care extends from treating ill children through end-of-life care. However, are pediatricians actually meeting the needs of families and their dying child? In a new study, researchers surveyed bereaved parents and found that pediatric end-of-life care needs improvement.
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Slithery new species: Silver boa discovered in the Bahamas Islands

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
In July of 2015 a team of scientists discovered a new species of boa during an expedition to a remote corner of the Bahamian Archipelago. They have named the new species the Silver Boa, Chilabothrus argentum. Significantly, this is the first new species of boa discovered in situ in the Caribbean since the 1940s. This new boa species is considered Critically Endangered, and is one of the most endangered boa species globally.
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Palliative, hospice care lacking among dying cancer patients, researcher finds

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:06pm
Medical societies recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life. Yet major gaps persist between these recommendations and real-life practice, a new study shows.
Categories: Science

A Trailer for the Hard-R X-Men: Apocalypse Fox Didn’t Make

Wired News - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 1:00pm
Curious what an R-rated X-Men movie might look like? We made a parody trailer for that. The post A Trailer for the Hard-R X-Men: Apocalypse Fox Didn't Make appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science