Cause for decline of Missouri River pallid sturgeon identified

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:59pm
Oxygen-depleted dead zones between dams in the upper Missouri River have been directly linked with the failure of endangered pallid sturgeon embryos to survive, according to a study. The study is the first to make a direct link among dam-induced changes in riverine sediment transport, the subsequent effects of those changes on reduced oxygen levels and the survival of an endangered species, the pallid sturgeon.
Categories: Science

Frogs prove ideal models for studying developmental timing

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:59pm
Thyroid hormone receptor alpha plays an important role in hind limb development in frogs, scientists have found. With new gene mutation technology, researchers were able to successfully mutate the gene in the tadpole models, discovering the value of tadpoles as ideal models for studying the role of hormones in development because of the timely metamorphosis from tadpole to juvenile frog, and because that transition is completely dependent on hormones.
Categories: Science

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:59pm
Scientists have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule. Understanding this kind of electronic effects in organic molecules is crucial for their use in optoelectronic applications, for example in organic light-emitting diodes, organic field-effect transistors and solar cells.
Categories: Science

Chemists find a way to unboil egg whites: Ability to quickly restore molecular proteins could slash biotechnology costs

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:59pm
Chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites -- an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to new findings.
Categories: Science

Mindfulness-based program in schools making a positive impact, study shows

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:59pm
A social and emotional learning program started by Academy Award winning actress Goldie Hawn to help school children improve their learning abilities, be more caring, and less stressed is now backed by new scientific evidence.
Categories: Science

Towards a scientific process freed from systemic bias

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:59pm
Research on how science works -- the science of science -- can benefit from studying the digital traces generated during the research process, such as peer-reviewed publications. This type of research is crucial for the future of science and that of scientists, according to experts.
Categories: Science

Mother's stress hormone levels may affect fetal growth and long term health of child

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:57pm
Increased levels of stress hormones can lead pregnant mice to overeat, but affect growth of the fetus and, potentially, the long term health of the offspring, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

How cancer turns good cells to the dark side

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:57pm
Biophysicists reveal how cancer uses notch-signaling pathways to promote metastasis. Their computer models provide a fresh theoretical framework for scientists who study ways to target cancer progression.
Categories: Science

Hemin improves adipocyte morphology, function by enhancing proteins of regeneration

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:57pm
Obesity has escalated in every segment of the population including children, adolescences and adults. In obesity, impaired lipid and glucose metabolism are implicated in the conundrum of cardiometabolic complication. Heme-oxygenase is a cytoprotective enzyme that has been recently shown to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic, hypertensive and obese animals. Thus substances capable of enhancing heme-oxygenase may be explored as novel remedies against cardiometabolic complications arising from excessive adiposity.
Categories: Science

Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:57pm
A team of scientists has developed, for the first time, a microscopic component that is small enough to fit onto a standard silicon chip that can generate a continuous supply of entangled photons.
Categories: Science

Poor psychosocial work environments may contribute to heart problems

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:54pm
A psychosocially poor work environment means that employees experience highly demanding requirements but have little ability to control their work or not feel sufficiently appreciated for the contributions they make. Research shows that these kinds of environments at work may negatively contribute to a person's heart health.
Categories: Science

Swedish model for PSA testing has little effect on mortality

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:54pm
The spontaneous PSA testing that has been applied in Sweden in recent decades has only had a marginal effect on mortality. An organized screening focused on those who have the most to gain would, however, reduce the risk of dying from prostate cancer by over 40 percent, researchers suggest.
Categories: Science

Stress during pregnancy related to infant gut microbiota

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:54pm
Women who experience stress during pregnancy are likely to have babies with a poor mix of intestinal microbiota and with a higher incidence of intestinal problems and allergic reactions. This could be related to psychological and physical problems as the child develops.
Categories: Science

Faster annotation system for prokaryotic genomes unveiled

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:53pm
A new version of a genome annotation system capable of analyzing more than 2,000 prokaryotic genomes per day has been revealed by scientists, helping researchers accelerate prokaryotic genomics-based studies worldwide (the average was 20 a day).
Categories: Science

Rabies booster defends pets with out-of-date vaccination against the disease

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:53pm
Pets with out-of-date rabies vaccinations are very unlikely to develop the fatal disease if given a rabies booster immediately after exposure to the virus, a new study by veterinary diagnosticians finds.
Categories: Science

Majority of primary care physicians find that medical imaging improves patient care

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:53pm
Large majorities of primary care physicians believe that advanced medical imaging, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), provides considerable value to patient care.
Categories: Science

Omand Warns of "Ethically Worse" Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:31pm
Press2ToContinue writes In their attempts to kill off strong encryption once and for all, top officials of the intelligence services are coming out with increasingly hyperbolic statements about why this should be done. Now, a former head of GCHQ, Sir David Omand has said: "One of the results of Snowden is that companies are now heavily encrypting [communications] end to end. Intelligence agencies are not going to give up trying to get the bad guys. They will have to get closer to the bad guys. I predict we will see more close access work." According to The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which reported his words from a talk he gave earlier this week, by this he meant things like physical observation, bugging rooms, and breaking into phones or computers. "You can say that will be more targeted but in terms of intrusion into personal privacy — collateral intrusion into privacy — we are likely to end up in an ethically worse position than we were before." That's remarkable for its implied threat: if you don't let us ban or backdoor strong encryption, we're going to start breaking into your homes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Omand Warns of "Ethically Worse" Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:31pm
Press2ToContinue writes In their attempts to kill off strong encryption once and for all, top officials of the intelligence services are coming out with increasingly hyperbolic statements about why this should be done. Now, a former head of GCHQ, Sir David Omand has said: "One of the results of Snowden is that companies are now heavily encrypting [communications] end to end. Intelligence agencies are not going to give up trying to get the bad guys. They will have to get closer to the bad guys. I predict we will see more close access work." According to The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which reported his words from a talk he gave earlier this week, by this he meant things like physical observation, bugging rooms, and breaking into phones or computers. "You can say that will be more targeted but in terms of intrusion into personal privacy — collateral intrusion into privacy — we are likely to end up in an ethically worse position than we were before." That's remarkable for its implied threat: if you don't let us ban or backdoor strong encryption, we're going to start breaking into your homes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Omand Warns of "Ethically Worse" Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:31pm
Press2ToContinue writes In their attempts to kill off strong encryption once and for all, top officials of the intelligence services are coming out with increasingly hyperbolic statements about why this should be done. Now, a former head of GCHQ, Sir David Omand has said: "One of the results of Snowden is that companies are now heavily encrypting [communications] end to end. Intelligence agencies are not going to give up trying to get the bad guys. They will have to get closer to the bad guys. I predict we will see more close access work." According to The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which reported his words from a talk he gave earlier this week, by this he meant things like physical observation, bugging rooms, and breaking into phones or computers. "You can say that will be more targeted but in terms of intrusion into personal privacy — collateral intrusion into privacy — we are likely to end up in an ethically worse position than we were before." That's remarkable for its implied threat: if you don't let us ban or backdoor strong encryption, we're going to start breaking into your homes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Omand Warns of "Ethically Worse" Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 2:31pm
Press2ToContinue writes In their attempts to kill off strong encryption once and for all, top officials of the intelligence services are coming out with increasingly hyperbolic statements about why this should be done. Now, a former head of GCHQ, Sir David Omand has said: "One of the results of Snowden is that companies are now heavily encrypting [communications] end to end. Intelligence agencies are not going to give up trying to get the bad guys. They will have to get closer to the bad guys. I predict we will see more close access work." According to The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which reported his words from a talk he gave earlier this week, by this he meant things like physical observation, bugging rooms, and breaking into phones or computers. "You can say that will be more targeted but in terms of intrusion into personal privacy — collateral intrusion into privacy — we are likely to end up in an ethically worse position than we were before." That's remarkable for its implied threat: if you don't let us ban or backdoor strong encryption, we're going to start breaking into your homes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science