New biomarkers for improved treatment of severe heart- and lung disease

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 3:26pm
New blood biomarkers reflecting vasoreactivity in lung blood vessels of patients with heart- and lung disease, can lead to simplified diagnostics and better evaluation of treatment for patients with the condition pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a new dissertation suggests.
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Ticks that transmit Lyme disease reported in nearly half of all US counties

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 3:25pm
Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus), and the range of these ticks is spreading, according to new research.
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Weak Electrical Field Found To Carry Information Around the Brain

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 3:25pm
Zothecula writes: In a development that could lead to improved understanding of memory formation and epilepsy, scientists have discovered a new way information may be traveling throughout the brain. The team has identified slow-moving brainwaves it says could be carried only by the brain's gentle electrical field (abstract), a mechanism previously thought to be incapable of spreading neural signals altogether. "Although the electrical field is of low amplitude, the field excites and activates immediate neighbors, which, in turn, excite and activate immediate neighbors, and so on across the brain at a rate of about 0.1 meter per second."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Tension Escalates Between Netflix and Its TV Foes

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 2:43pm
An anonymous reader writes: Viewership numbers are vital within the TV industry. For years, the networks have relied upon ratings to make money — higher numbers mean higher ad revenue. The most important part of the ratings system is that individual networks can't just claim whatever viewership they want; third-party companies like Nielsen control the stats. But Netflix doesn't operate by the same rulebook, and this is frustrating the networks. Execs from Netflix and various networks have started arguing about it, both at an industry event this weekend, and in media interviews. NBC had hired a firm to estimate Netflix's viewership numbers, because Netflix won't release them. Netflix says the estimate is laughably wrong, but has also suggested shows fare better on their platform than on cable or broadcast television. If true, it gives them leverage to recruit more and better talent to produce such shows. But it's impossible to refute without numbers, and the networks are increasingly annoyed they can't do that. NBC thinks the media tends to give Netflix a pass on these statements. FX chief John Landgraf said, "[Netflix's Ted Sarandos] shouldn't say something is successful in quantitative terms unless you're willing to provide data and a methodology behind those statements. You can't have it both ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Growing Flowers In Space

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 2:01pm
An anonymous reader writes: This weekend, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly posted a picture of the first flower to bloom in space. The International Space Station has been home to the Veggie plant growth facility for almost two years, and scientists have been working hard to figure out how to keep crops alive in microgravity. It's a challenge to keep plants properly heated and hydrated, and their current specimens been attacked by mold as well. "More crops for Veggie are heading to the orbiting laboratory aboard SpaceX-8. The Veg-03 run will include two sets of Chinese cabbage, and one set of red romaine lettuce. In 2018, there are plans to launch dwarf tomato seeds to the space station. Smith said the lessons learned from growing zinnia flowers will be critical in the process of growing tomatoes, a fellow flowering plant. Studies are also in progress to see how adjusting the lighting in the Veggie plant growth facility can affect plan mineral composition. There will be preflight testing to determine what 'light recipe' to use aboard the station."

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Watch: Guillermo del Toro Interviews the Coen Brothers

Wired News - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 2:00pm

For the Criterion Collection edition of "Inside Llewyn Davis," the three directors talk circular film structure and defining character traits.

The post Watch: Guillermo del Toro Interviews the Coen Brothers appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Your Selfies Are Insecure. Here’s How to Encrypt Them

Wired News - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 2:00pm

Texting is an intimate way to have a conversation. But how intimate is it, exactly, when you count up all the people who could be listening in?

The post Your Selfies Are Insecure. Here’s How to Encrypt Them appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Intelligent electronics to become durable, flexible and functional through new technology

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:45pm
With a roll-to-roll overmoulding manufacturing process recently developed, components can be easily overmoulded into durable electronics products such as wearable sports solutions, toys and, for instance, household appliances equipped with an overmoulded solar cell, report researchers.
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Scientists use wood to create biodegradable, renewable alternative to Styrofoam

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:44pm
We may soon be saying goodbye to polystyrene, the petroleum-based material that is used to make Styrofoam. In what looks like an ordinary bicycle helmet, designers have replaced Styrofoam with a new shock-absorbing material made with renewable and biodegradable wood-based material.
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Stepping beyond our 3D world

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:44pm
Over centuries, humans have tried to discover a Theory of Everything. Possible candidates for this cachet, such as String Theory and Grand Unified Theory, require higher dimensions or higher-dimensional symmetries, for instance ten dimensions, despite their radical difference from the world we actually experience. One such symmetry – known as E8 – exists in eight dimensions and is the largest symmetry without counterparts in every dimension and is therefore called exceptional. Now a scientist has constructed E8 for the first time, along with other exceptional 4D symmetries, in the 3D space we inhabit. These exceptional symmetries are essentially 3D phenomena in disguise.
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Streaming services are a blessing and a curse for the music industry

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:44pm
Paid music streaming services can increase revenues for the music industry and lead consumers to spend more money on music overall. Free streaming, in contrast, is less beneficial. These are the findings of a recent empirical study that included interviews with over 2500 music fans over the course of more than one year. They found that although free as well as paid streaming services reduce revenues from CDs and downloads, the subscription fees for paid streaming services over-compensate for the losses in other channels.
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An image is worth a thousand kilos?

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:44pm
Okay, so maybe not a thousand kilos, exactly, but a new study shows how a photo diary can keep dieters motivated, making them more likely to achieve their target weight.
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Increased childbirth at Indian health facilities led to no matching reduction in maternal deaths

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:44pm
To reduce maternal and neo-natal deaths, India launched a cash transfer program in 2005 that provides monetary incentives for women to give birth in health facilities instead of at home. While the program successfully increased the use of health facilities for child birth, it did not reduce maternal deaths as much, especially in poor areas, a new paper reports.
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Harmful mutations have accumulated during early human migrations out of Africa

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:43pm
Modern humans (Homo sapiens) are thought to have first emerged in Africa about 150,000 years ago. 100,000 years later, a few of them left their homeland traveling first to Asia and then further east, crossing the Bering Strait, and colonizing the Americas. Experts have developed theoretical models predicting that if modern humans migrated as small bands, then the populations that broke off from their original African family should progressively accumulate slightly harmful mutations - a mutation load. Moreover, the mutational load of a population should then represent a way of measuring the distance it has covered since it left Africa. In a nutshell: an individual from Mexico should be carrying more harmful genetic variants than an individual from Africa.
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Video Shows SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Land on Droneship, Then Fall Over and Explode

Space.com - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:42pm
A video posted late Sunday by billionaire Elon Musk shows just how close his spaceflight company SpaceX came to landing its Falcon 9 rocket on a robotic platform parked in the Pacific Ocean yesterday (Jan. 17).
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Ads for candy-flavored e-cigarettes could encourage vaping among school children

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:41pm
Advertisements featuring e-cigarettes with flavors such as chocolate and bubble gum are more likely to attract school children to buy and try e-cigarettes than those featuring non-flavored e-cigarettes, according to new research.
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Report identifies positive news on kidney disease in the US, yet challenges remain

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:41pm
The annual data report from the United States Renal Data System reveals both positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the US. Medicare spending for patients with chronic kidney disease aged 65 and older exceeded $50 billion in 2013 and represented 20 percent of all Medicare spending in that age group. In addition, the total cost to Medicare for end-stage kidney disease grew to $30.9 billion and accounted for 7.1 percent of the overall paid Medicare claims costs.
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Seeing where energy goes may bring scientists closer to realizing nuclear fusion

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:41pm
An international team of researchers has taken a step toward achieving controlled nuclear fusion -- a process that powers the sun and other stars, and has the potential to supply the world with limitless, clean energy. The team developed a new technique to 'see' where energy is delivered during fast ignition experiments and improve energy delivery to the fuel target.
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Thwarting abnormal neural development with a new mutation

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:41pm
Researchers have discovered how to reverse the abnormal axonal development characteristic of CFEOM3, a congenital disease that affects the muscles that control eye movements. The work shows how creating a specific mutation rescued abnormal axonal growth in the developing mouse brain.
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Astronauts Observe Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Space

Space.com - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 1:19pm
Like their cohort on the ground, astronauts aboard the U.S. segment of the International Space Station will take a day off today (Jan. 18) to celebrate the life of Martin Luther King Jr.
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