White sharks grow more slowly, mature much later than previously thought

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:19pm
A new study on white sharks in the western North Atlantic indicates they grow more slowly and mature much later than previously thought. The findings present the first reliable growth curve for this species in the western North Atlantic. The results: males are sexually mature around age 26 and females around age 33, much later than currently accepted estimates of 4-10 years for males and 7-13 years for females.
Categories: Science

State funding boosts stem cell research in California, other states

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:19pm
A new study analyzed stem cell funding programs in four states and found that in both California and Connecticut, state programs have contributed to an increase in the share of publications in the field produced in these states.
Categories: Science

Men more dissatisfied with extra chores in more gender equal countries

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:18pm
Men are more likely to feel it's unfair when they tackle a greater share of household chores in countries where a more egalitarian division of labor is considered the norm, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

From the scent of geranium to cough medicine

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:18pm
Terpenes and their derivatives exert important biological and pharmaceutical functions. Starting out from a few basic building blocks nature elegantly builds up complex structures. Chemically particularly challenging are bridged ring systems such as eucalyptol. Chemists have now developed a catalyst that initiates the formation of such compounds. A special feature of the catalyst: it self-assembles from smaller units.
Categories: Science

Increased DNA mutations found in children of teenage fathers

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:18pm
New research reveals that the sperm cells of adolescent boys have more than six times the rate of DNA mutations as the equivalent egg cells in adolescent girls, resulting in higher rates of DNA mutation being passed down to children of teenage fathers. The findings suggest that the risk of birth defects is higher in the children of teenage fathers as a consequence.
Categories: Science

Brain's iconic seat of speech goes silent when we actually talk

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:18pm
The brain's speech area, named after 19th century French physician Pierre Paul Broca, shuts down when we talk out loud, according to a new study that challenges the long-held assumption that 'Broca's area' governs all aspects of speech production.
Categories: Science

Study recommends better EPA labels on cost of traditional vs. hybrid, electric cars

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:18pm
Small to mid-sized car consumers would be more likely to choose a hybrid or plug-in electric vehicle over a gasoline vehicle if they know the total cost of ownership instead of simply looking at five-year fuel cost comparison, researchers conclude.
Categories: Science

Synthetic biology yields new approach to gene therapy

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:18pm
A novel gene-delivery system that shuttles a gene into a cell, but only for a temporary stay, has been developed by researchers, providing a potential new gene-therapy strategy for treating disease. The approach offers distinct advantages over other types of gene therapies currently under investigation, said the lead author of a study describing the new technique.
Categories: Science

Predicting cancers' cell of origin

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:16pm
A study suggests a new way to trace cancer back to its cell type of origin, providing new insights into the early events that shape a cancer, and could have important implications for the many cancer patients for whom the originating site of the cancer is unknown.
Categories: Science

People who believe they were 'born that way' more inclined to blame God for bad behavior

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:16pm
People are more likely to blame God for their bad moral behavior when they believe they were born to act that way, according to an ongoing project on spirituality and religion.
Categories: Science

Size matters in the battle to adapt to diverse environments, avoid extinction

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:16pm
By examining research on global patterns of amphibian diversification over hundreds of millions of years, researchers have discovered that 'sexually dimorphic' species -- those in which males and females differ in size, for example -- are at lower risk of extinction and better able to adapt to diverse environments.
Categories: Science

Specialized consultations improve geriatric care for elderly patients who are hospitalized for traumatic injuries

Science Daily - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:15pm
Elderly patients who are admitted to the hospital for monitoring and surgical treatment of traumatic injuries could have better geriatric care if medical teams took one extra step--offering geriatric consultation, according to new research findings.
Categories: Science

The Sex Talk You Never Had With Your Parents

Wired News - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 3:00pm

It’s time for a talk. The talk. Yep, S-E-X. Sure, your parents probably busted out the anatomy books when you were a kid. That goes there, those do that, etc. (Yuck!) And you may have taken some sex ed classes in school, or had frank discussions with your doctor. But here’s a dirty secret: When […]

The post The Sex Talk You Never Had With Your Parents appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Theory of Information Could Resolve One of the Great Paradoxes of Cosmology

Slashdot - Wed, 18/02/2015 - 2:43pm
KentuckyFC writes: When physicists attempt to calculate the energy density of the universe from first principles, the number they come up using quantum mechanics is 10^94 g/cm^3 . And yet the observed energy density is about 10^-27 g/cm^3. In other words, our best theory of reality misses the mark by 120 orders of magnitude. Now one researcher says the paradox can be resolved by considering the information content of the universe. Specifying the location of the 10^25 stars in the visible universe to an accuracy of 10 cubic kilometers requires some 10^93 bits. And using Landauer's principle to calculate the energy associated with all these bits gives an energy density of about 10^-30 g/cm^3. That's not a bad first principles result. But if the location has to be specified to the Planck length, then the energy density is about 117 orders of magnitude larger. In other words, the nature of information should lie at the heart of our best theory of reality, not quantum mechanics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science