NASA Wants Your Help Hunting For Asteroids

Slashdot - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 3:20pm
An anonymous reader writes about new NASA software that can help you become an asteroid hunter. "Since the early 20th century, astronomers have relied on the same technique to detect asteroids — they take images of a section in the sky and look for star-like objects that move between frames. However, with an increase in sensitivity of ground-based telescopes, it has become increasingly difficult for astronomers to sift through the massive pile of data and verify every single detection. In order to increase the frequency of asteroid detection, including of those bodies that could be potential threats to our planet, NASA has released new software, developed in collaboration with Planetary Resources, Inc., capable of running on any standard PC. The software, which can be downloaded for free, will accept images from a telescope and run an algorithm on them to determine celestial bodies that are moving in a manner consistent with an asteroid."

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Categories: Science

The iPhone’s Slo-Mo Video Has Become a Dancer’s Best Friend

Wired News - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 3:00pm

For professional dancers and dance teachers, the iPhone 6's slo-mo feature isn't just a gimmick, it's a truly helpful learning tool.

The post The iPhone’s Slo-Mo Video Has Become a Dancer’s Best Friend appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Zuckerberg and Gates-Backed Startup Seeks To Shake Up African Education

Slashdot - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:35pm
theodp writes The WSJ reports an army of teachers wielding Nook tablets and backed by investors including Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg is on a mission to bring cheap [$6.50/month], internet-based, private education to millions of the world's poorest children in Africa and Asia. In Kenya, 126,000 students are enrolled at 400+ Bridge International Academies that have sprung up across the country since the company was founded in 2009. Bridge's founders are challenging the long-held assumption that governments rather than companies should lead mass education programs. The Nook tablets are used to deliver lesson plans used by teachers (aka "scripted instruction"), as well as to collect test results from students to monitor their progress."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Oceanic microbes behave in a synchrony across ocean basins

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:21pm
Researchers have found that microbial communities in different regions of the Pacific Ocean displayed strikingly similar daily rhythms in their metabolism despite inhabiting extremely different habitats -- the nutrient-rich waters off California and the nutrient-poor waters north of Hawai'i. Furthermore, in each location, the dominant photoautotrophs appear to initiate a cascade effect wherein the other major groups of microbes perform their metabolic activities in a coordinated and predictable way.
Categories: Science

New clues from the dawn of the solar system

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:21pm
Sulfide chondrules, a new type of building blocks discovered in meteorites left over from the solar system's infancy, provide evidence for a previously unknown region in the protoplanetary disk that gave rise to the planets including Earth.
Categories: Science

Australian police not prepared for death investigations, researchers say

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:21pm
Police are ill-equipped to investigate non-criminal deaths and face a challenge to avoid re-traumatizing bereaved families as well as emotionally protecting themselves, according to Australian research.
Categories: Science

MitraClip valve repair continues to show benefit in commercial setting

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:21pm
The commercial track record with transcatheter mitral valve repair, approved for patients at high risk for surgery, compares favorably with pre-approval reports, according to findings from a US registry.
Categories: Science

Self-expanding TAVR widens advantage over surgery at two years

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:21pm
Two-year data show a continued survival advantage for self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) over standard surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, according to new research.
Categories: Science

SAPIEN valve, surgery equivalent at five years

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:21pm
Five-year data suggest that the SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve is a feasible option for patients with severe aortic stenosis deemed to be at high risk for open-heart surgery, though valve leakage was more common with the first-generation valve evaluated in this study than with surgery, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Benefits seen for first-in-field brain shield used with TAVR: Device designed to deflect particles dislodged during valve replacement

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
An investigational device that deflects debris away from the brain during transcatheter aortic valve replacement seems to improve in-hospital safety outcomes and cognitive scores at discharge, according to preliminary findings from a small randomized study.
Categories: Science

SAPIEN 3 improves 30-day outcomes for major endpoints, study suggests

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
The SAPIEN 3 heart valve demonstrated lower death, stroke and paravalvular leak rates than earlier generation devices in patients at high risk for surgery and showed encouraging results in intermediate-risk patients, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Evolocumab for cholesterol: After one year, patients on new drug fare better than standard therapy

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
Patients taking evolocumab -- an investigational therapy previously shown to dramatically lower 'bad' cholesterol -- were half as likely to die, suffer a heart attack or stroke, be hospitalized or need a procedure to open blocked arteries compared with those who received standard care, according to new research.
Categories: Science

CT scans appear to dramatically improve diagnosis of heart disease

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
Use of computed tomography coronary angiography, which provides 3-D images of the heart, coupled with standard care allows doctors to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in patients presenting with chest pain, therefore, leading to more appropriate follow-up testing and treatments, according to new research. Data also showed a trend toward a lower incidence of heart attacks among the group receiving the tests, known as CT scans, compared to usual care.
Categories: Science

Novel anti-clotting therapy in halted trial no better than existing agents

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
A novel therapy that would allow doctors to turn the body's blood-clotting ability off and on in a more controlled way was about as effective as established anticoagulants in patients undergoing angioplasty but was associated with higher rates of moderate to severe bleeding, according to an analysis of data from a terminated Phase III trial.
Categories: Science

Bendavia does not reduce scarring from angioplasty after heart attack, study suggests

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

The devil's helmet for a legendary tiger moth

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:20pm
The Menetries' tiger moth (Borearctia menetriesii) is the most rare and enigmatic representative among the Palearctic Arctiinae. During an expedition in almost inaccessible wild taiga area of Eastern Siberia, Russian scientists had the luck to encounter it. During their studies they also recorded feeding larva of this mysterious species on a native devil's helmet host plant for the first time.
Categories: Science

Development of a carnivorous pitcher leaf

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:19pm
Scientists have revealed how carnivorous pitcher leaves are formed in Sarracenia purpurea, a carnivorous plant. They showed that a tissue-specific regulation of oriented cell division is the key factor for pitcher development. A computational modeling of leaf morphogenesis also supports these results.
Categories: Science

Dialing a bespoke signal: New drug design works from outside the cell

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 2:19pm
Exploring the fundamental mechanism by which a cell-surface receptor transmits its signal, an international team of researchers has established proof of concept for an entirely new approach to drug design. They report that a class of synthetic molecules known as diabodies can, from outside the cell, latch onto a target receptor and manipulate it in such a manner as to induce distinct and varying effects within cells and tissues.
Categories: Science

Nipples, Terrorism, and Sexual Descriptions - Facebook's List of Banned Content

Slashdot - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 1:51pm
Mark Wilson writes Facebook has updated its Community Standards document, outlining the type of content that is not permitted on the social network. When it's not forcing people to reveal their real names, blocking 'offensive' content, or encouraging users to vote, Facebook is often to be found removing content that has been reported for one reason or another. But what's acceptable, and what's not? A little while back, the site revealed a simplified version of its privacy policy, and now the Community Standards document has received the same treatment. Facebook has set out the types of pictures that are permissible, along with specifying guidelines for other content.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Scientists fly kites on Earth to study Mars

Science Daily - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 1:30pm
An unconventional research method allow planetary scientists to develop digital terrain models -- think Google Earth on steroids -- of geologic features on Earth, revealing that some of the things we see on Mars and other planets may not be what they seem.
Categories: Science