Rosetta's comet target 'releases' plentiful water

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:30pm
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is releasing the Earthly equivalent of two glasses of water into space every second. The observations were made by the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO), aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft on June 6, 2014. The detection of water vapor has implications not only for cometary science, but also for mission planning, as the Rosetta team prepares the spacecraft to become the first ever to orbit a comet (planned for August), and the first to deploy a lander to its surface (planned for November 11).
Categories: Science

Samsung Release First SSD With 3D NAND

Slashdot - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:26pm
Vigile (99919) writes "As SSD controllers continue to evolve, so does the world of flash memory. With the release of the Samsung 850 Pro SSD announced today, Samsung is the first company to introduce 3D NAND technology to the consumer. By using 30nm process technology that might seem dated in some applications, Samsung has been reliably able to stack lithography and essentially "tunnel holes" in the silicon while coating the inside with the material necessary to hold a charge. The VNAND being used with the Samsung 850 Pro is now 32 layers deep, and though it lowers the total capacity per die, it allows Samsung to lower manufacturer costs with more usable die per wafer. This results in more sustainable and reliable performance as well as a longer life span, allowing Samsung to offer a 10 year warranty on the new drives. PC Perspective has a full review with performance results and usage over time that shows Samsung's innovation is leading the pack."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Weave a cell phone into your shirt? Engineers envision an electronic switch just three atoms thick

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:20pm
Researchers believe they've discovered a crystal that can form a monolayer three atoms thick. Computer simulations show that this crystal, molybdenum ditelluride, can act like a switch: its crystal lattice can be mechanically pulled and pushed, back and forth, between two different atomic structures -- one that conducts electricity well, the other that does not. The team hopes experimental scientists will make this semiconductor crystal and use it to fashion flexible electronics.
Categories: Science

Scientists discover how 'plastic' solar panels work

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:20pm
Scientists don't fully understand how 'plastic' solar panels work, which complicates the improvement of their cost efficiency, thereby blocking the wider use of the technology. However, researchers have determined how light beams excite the chemicals in solar panels, enabling them to produce charge.
Categories: Science

Inhibition of protein opens door to treatment of pancreatic cancer

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:15pm
A new protein, galectin-1, has been identified as a possible therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. For the first time, researchers have demonstrated the effects of the inhibition of this protein in mice suffering this type of cancer and the results showed an increase in survival of 20%. The work further suggests that it could be a therapeutic target with no adverse effects.
Categories: Science

The less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age, new study suggests

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
Researchers have found evidence that the less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age. These findings, relevant in the context of a rapidly ageing society, pave the way for future work on sleep loss and its contribution to cognitive decline, including dementia.
Categories: Science

Updated guidelines covering fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
Updated guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine have been published for use. This update, based on a review of recent literature, replaces the first set of guidelines published in 2005.
Categories: Science

Foodborne bacteria can cause disease in some breeds of chickens after all

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
Contrary to popular belief, the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is not a harmless commensal in chickens but can cause disease in some breeds of poultry according to research. Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis in the world and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate it affects approximately 1.3 million people per year in the United States. Chicken is the most common source of infections.
Categories: Science

Freeze-storage egg banking for egg donation treatment

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
The rapid freezing technique of vitrification is set to revolutionize egg donation as a fertility treatment by enabling freeze-storage egg-banking. The cryopreservation of eggs was one of IVF's continuing challenges until the widespread introduction of vitrification; the older slow freezing methods induced the formation of ice crystals, which could cause damage to several structures of the egg.
Categories: Science

Future reproductive lifespan may be lessened in oral contraceptive users: Lower measures of ovarian reserve

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
A project in Denmark whose aim is to assess the reliability of preconceptional lifestyle and biological factors as predictors of fertility has found a pronounced effect of the contraceptive pill on markers used to assess 'ovarian reserve,' a predictor of future reproductive lifespan.
Categories: Science

Pregnancies following egg donation associated with more than 3-fold higher risk of hypertension

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
With an ever-aging female patient population, egg donation is an increasingly common treatment in infertility. Annual reports on fertility treatments in Europe show a rise in egg donation cycles from 15,028 in 2007 to 24,517 in 2010. This proportion is still some way behind the USA, where egg donation now accounts for around 12 percent of all treatments.
Categories: Science

Most women are aware of oocyte freezing for social reasons

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
While the majority of younger women are aware of egg freezing as a technique of fertility preservation and consider it an acceptable means of reproductive planning, only one in five would consider it appropriate for them.
Categories: Science

Cancer mutations identified as targets of effective melanoma immunotherapy

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 1:14pm
A new approach demonstrated that the recognition of unique cancer mutations appeared to be responsible for complete cancer regressions in two metastatic melanoma patients treated with a type of immunotherapy called adoptive T-cell therapy. This new approach may help develop more effective cancer immunotherapies, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
Categories: Science

Biology labs: Managing the data jungle

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:54pm
Many biology labs fight with a glut of measurement data. New software aims to make this a thing of the past: it simplifies laboratory experiment evaluation and unifies how data is saved. It even identifies measurement errors on the spot.
Categories: Science

Biology of addiction risk looks like addiction

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:53pm
Research suggests that people at increased risk for developing addiction share many of the same neurobiological signatures of people who have already developed addiction. This similarity is to be expected, as individuals with family members who have struggled with addiction are over-represented in the population of addicted people.
Categories: Science

Cancer risk: Aspirin and smoking affect aging of genes

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:53pm
The risk of developing cancer increases with age. Outside factors can affect that risk, like smoking, which increases cancer risk, and regular aspirin use, which has been shown to decrease it. Now researchers have demonstrated the change in risk connected to colorectal cancer with regard to aspirin use. Numerous studies have confirmed the protective effect of the drug against different types of cancer, including reducing the risk to develop colorectal cancer by an average of 40%. However, it is unknown how exactly the drug influences the cancer risk.
Categories: Science

3-D printed wrist splints for arthritis sufferers

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:53pm
A computer software concept has been developed that will enable clinicians with no experience in Computer Aided Design (CAD) to design and make custom-made 3D printed wrist splints for rheumatoid arthritis sufferers. The 3D printed splints are not only more comfortable and attractive but potentially cheaper than the current ones that are 'ugly, bulky, and can make a patients arm sweat'.
Categories: Science

Traffic noise is dangerous for your health: Solutions exist for dense cities

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:53pm
Traffic noise is the second biggest environmental problem in the EU, according to WHO. After air pollution, noise is affecting health the most. But legislation regarding noise pollution is insufficient. A new report shows how negative health effects of noise can be reduced. Several means are easiest to apply in dense cities.
Categories: Science

JNK protein's key role in tissue regeneration

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:53pm
The major role that JNK protein plays in tissue regeneration in adult organisms has been identified by researchers. The study used planarians -— a type of worm able to regenerate any part of its body -— to address the question. To date, it has been known that JNK was involved in the control of cell proliferation and death, but little was known about the role it plays in tissue and organ regeneration.
Categories: Science

Research on inflammasomes opens new therapeutic avenues for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Science Daily - Tue, 01/07/2014 - 12:53pm
Patients with varying severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have the same painful symptoms, but does this mean that the cause of their illness is the same and that they should all receive the same treatment? Scientists have demonstrated with their research into inflammasomes that RA should be considered as a syndrome rather than a single disease.
Categories: Science