NYC To Replace Most of Its Payphones With Free Gigabit WiFi In 2015

Slashdot - Tue, 18/11/2014 - 1:24am
mrspoonsi writes: New York City announced today it has picked the companies that will deliver the technology behind its deployment of free, gigabit Wi-Fi to pay phone stations throughout the city. The LinkNYC stations will also include charging outlets, touchscreen displays that interface with city services, and free U.S. calling. It will be funded through advertising. Construction will begin in 2015, and officials expect up to 10,000 stations to be installed before it's done.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NYC To Replace Most of Its Payphones With Free Gigabit WiFi In 2015

Slashdot - Tue, 18/11/2014 - 1:24am
mrspoonsi writes: New York City announced today it has picked the companies that will deliver the technology behind its deployment of free, gigabit Wi-Fi to pay phone stations throughout the city. The LinkNYC stations will also include charging outlets, touchscreen displays that interface with city services, and free U.S. calling. It will be funded through advertising. Construction will begin in 2015, and officials expect up to 10,000 stations to be installed before it's done.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NYC To Replace Most of Its Payphones With Free Gigabit WiFi In 2015

Slashdot - Tue, 18/11/2014 - 1:24am
mrspoonsi writes: New York City announced today it has picked the companies that will deliver the technology behind its deployment of free, gigabit Wi-Fi to pay phone stations throughout the city. The LinkNYC stations will also include charging outlets, touchscreen displays that interface with city services, and free U.S. calling. It will be funded through advertising. Construction will begin in 2015, and officials expect up to 10,000 stations to be installed before it's done.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Do Good Programmers Need Agents?

Slashdot - Tue, 18/11/2014 - 12:42am
braindrainbahrain writes: A rock star needs an agent, so maybe a rock star programmer needs one, too. As described in The New Yorker, a talent agency called 10x, which got started in the music business, is not your typical head hunter/recruiter agency. "The company's name comes from the idea, well established in the tech world, that the very best programmers are superstars, capable of achieving ten times the productivity of their merely competent colleagues." The writer talks with a number of programmers using agents to find work, who generally seem pleased with it, though the article has viewpoints from skeptics as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

We’ve Done a Comprehensive Recap of The Newsroom…In Gchat

Wired News - Tue, 18/11/2014 - 12:40am

Before we have to say goodbye to The Newsroom forever, two WIRED writers—Jason Kehe and Jordan Crucchiola—are going to lovingly host walkthroughs of every episode until the series finale, doing real-time Gchat analysis of each one. Here's the first.

The post We’ve Done a Comprehensive Recap of The Newsroom…In Gchat appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Robots Put To Work On E-Waste

Slashdot - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 11:58pm
aesoteric writes: Australian researchers have programmed industrial robots to tackle the vast array of e-waste thrown out every year. The research shows robots can learn and memorize how various electronic products — such as LCD screens — are designed, enabling those products to be disassembled for recycling faster and faster. The end goal is less than five minutes to dismantle a product.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Dutch Village Where Everyone Has Dementia

Slashdot - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 11:03pm
HughPickens.com writes Josh Planos writes at The Atlantic that the isolated village of Hogewey on the outskirts of Amsterdam has been dubbed "Dementia Village" because it is home to residents who are only admitted if they're categorized as having severe cases of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. "There are no wards, long hallways, or corridors at the facility," writes Planos. "Residents live in groups of six or seven to a house, with one or two caretakers. Perhaps the most unique element of the facility—apart from the stealthy "gardener" caretakers—is its approach toward housing. Hogeway features 23 uniquely stylized homes, furnished around the time period when residents' short-term memories stopped properly functioning. There are homes resembling the 1950s, 1970s, and 2000s, accurate down to the tablecloths, because it helps residents feel as if they're home." In Holland, everyone pays into the state health care system during their working years, with the money then disbursed to pay for later-in-life expenses — and that means living in Hogewey does not cost any more than a traditional nursing home. The inspiration came about in 1992, when Yvonne van Amerongen and another member of staff at a traditional nursing home both had their own mothers die, being glad that their elderly parents had died quickly and had not had to endure hospital-like care. A series of research and brainstorming sessions in 1993 found that humans choose to surround and interact with other like-minded people of similar backgrounds and experiences; the arrangement at Hogewey provides this by ensuring that residents with similar backgrounds continue to live closely together. On a physical level, residents at Hogewey require fewer medications; they eat better and they live longer. On a mental level, they also seem to have more joy. "The people here keep their independence, as much as they can have of it, and they stay active," says Theo Visser. "Here they still have a life. It's not the sort of slow, quiet death you get in other places. Here everyone feels at home."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Catering to needs of in-store, online customers boosts marketing effectiveness, revenue

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:45pm
A University of Missouri researcher found that consumers' preferences differ when they are shopping in a physical store compared to shopping online. Catering to shoppers' online and in-store preferences can increase the effectiveness of traditional marketing tactics such as direct marketing and enhanced customer service, the researcher found.
Categories: Science

Geologic mapping of asteroid Vesta reveals history of large impacts

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:45pm
A project to map the impact sequence on the asteroid Vesta is helping scientists compare its history to other solar system objects.
Categories: Science

Computer model provides a new portrait of carbon dioxide

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:45pm
An ultra-high-resolution computer model has given scientists a stunning new look at how carbon dioxide in the atmosphere travels around the globe. Plumes of carbon dioxide in the simulation swirl and shift as winds disperse the greenhouse gas away from its sources. The simulation also illustrates differences in carbon dioxide levels in the northern and southern hemispheres and distinct swings in global carbon dioxide concentrations as the growth cycle of plants and trees changes with the seasons.
Categories: Science

Nothing fishy about health benefits of plant-based omega-3 fatty acid

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:45pm
Increasing the amount of omega-3s in your diet, whether from fish or flax, will likely decrease your risk of getting heart disease, according to nutritionists. A substantial amount of evidence exists supporting the heart-health benefits of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA), marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. However, much less evidence exists to demonstrate the positive effects of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a plant-based omega-3 fatty acid.
Categories: Science

How phthalate exposure impacts pregnancy

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:43pm
In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development. Phthalates are chemicals used to make plastic materials more flexible and can also be found in personal care products such as perfumes, deodorants and lotions. They can enter the human body by being ingested, inhaled or through the skin. Most often phthalates are metabolized and excreted quickly, but constant contact with them means that nearly everyone in the United States is exposed, some more than others.
Categories: Science

Race, Hospital, Insurance Status All Factors in How Lung Cancer Is Treated

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:43pm
African Americans, Hispanics, and those who receive care at a community hospital are all significantly less likely than other patients to receive treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer, according to a report. The study is the largest to date looking at treatment received by patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer, an early stage of lung cancer that has not spread to the lymph nodes and is characterized by a small nodules in the lung tissue. Treatment during this early stage offers the best chance for long-term survival.
Categories: Science

Physicians prescribe less brand name drugs when electronic health record default settings show generics first

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:43pm
Programming electronic health records to make generic drugs the default choice when physicians write prescriptions may offer one way to reduce unnecessary spending and improve health care value in the face of spiraling U.S. health expenditures, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Need to encourage patients to screen for colon cancer? Try a lottery

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:43pm
Convincing patients to do an often dreaded colon cancer screening test could just take a little extra nudge – like a chance to win $50. Patients who were told they had a 1-in-10 chance of winning $50 were more likely to complete home stool blood tests that help screen for colon cancer, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Bed bugs can transmit parasite that causes chagas disease

Science Daily - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:43pm
Bed bugs, like the triatomines, can transmit Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease, one of the most prevalent and deadly diseases in the Americas, research has confirmed.
Categories: Science

Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone

Slashdot - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:19pm
Clark Schultz writes The premise behind Jurassic Park just got a bit more real after scientists in South Korea said they are optimistic they can extract enough DNA from the blood of a preserved woolly mammoth to clone the long-extinct mammal. The ice-wrapped woolly mammoth was found last year on an island off of Siberia. The development is being closely watched by the scientific community with opinion sharply divided on the ethics of the project.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone

Slashdot - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:19pm
Clark Schultz writes The premise behind Jurassic Park just got a bit more real after scientists in South Korea said they are optimistic they can extract enough DNA from the blood of a preserved woolly mammoth to clone the long-extinct mammal. The ice-wrapped woolly mammoth was found last year on an island off of Siberia. The development is being closely watched by the scientific community with opinion sharply divided on the ethics of the project.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone

Slashdot - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:19pm
Clark Schultz writes The premise behind Jurassic Park just got a bit more real after scientists in South Korea said they are optimistic they can extract enough DNA from the blood of a preserved woolly mammoth to clone the long-extinct mammal. The ice-wrapped woolly mammoth was found last year on an island off of Siberia. The development is being closely watched by the scientific community with opinion sharply divided on the ethics of the project.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Scientists Optimistic About Getting a Mammoth Genome Complete Enough To Clone

Slashdot - Mon, 17/11/2014 - 10:19pm
Clark Schultz writes The premise behind Jurassic Park just got a bit more real after scientists in South Korea said they are optimistic they can extract enough DNA from the blood of a preserved woolly mammoth to clone the long-extinct mammal. The ice-wrapped woolly mammoth was found last year on an island off of Siberia. The development is being closely watched by the scientific community with opinion sharply divided on the ethics of the project.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science