Everything in moderation: Micro-8 to study regulating pathogens in space

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:26pm
Candida albicans, an opportunistic yeast pathogen and model organism for research, is common and usually doesn't damage our healthy personal ecosystem. However, when our immune system is stressed on Earth or in space, such as during long-duration space travel, C. albicans can grow out of control and potentially cause infections. Scientists want to address controlling these outbreaks with the next round of cellular growth experiments on the International Space Station -- Micro-8.
Categories: Science

Dawn spacecraft operating normally after safe mode triggered

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:24pm
The Dawn spacecraft has resumed normal ion thrusting after the thrusting unexpectedly stopped and the spacecraft entered safe mode on September 11. That anomaly occurred shortly before a planned communication with NASA's Deep Space Network that morning. The spacecraft was not performing any special activities at the time.
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NASA Mars spacecraft ready for Sept. 21 orbit insertion

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:22pm
NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft is nearing its scheduled Sept. 21 insertion into Martian orbit after completing a 10-month interplanetary journey of 442 million miles (711 million kilometers).
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Alice Is Killing Trolls But Patent Lawyers Will Strike Back

Slashdot - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:17pm
snydeq writes The wheels of justice spin slowly, but they seem finally to be running software patents out of town, writes Simon Phipps in his analysis of how Alice Corp. v CLS Bank is becoming a landmark decision for patent cases in the U.S. 'In case after case, the Court of Appeals is using Alice to resolve patent appeals. In each case so far, the Court of Appeals has found the software patents in question to be invalid. ... As PatentlyO points out, the Alice effect is even reaching to lower courts, saving the Court of Appeals from having to strike down patent findings on appeal.' Although the patent industry broadly speaking sees the Alice verdict as a death knell for many existing patents, some expect Alice to turn software patents into 'draftsmen's art because as you and I have seen over the years, every time there's a court ruling it just means that you have to word the patent claims differently.'

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Categories: Science

Flu vaccine for expectant moms a top priority, experts say

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:14pm
All pregnant women and those planning to become pregnant should receive a flu shot because the normal changes to a pregnant woman's immune system, heart and lungs put moms-to-be at increased risk of the harmful effects of flu infection, experts say. Also, babies born to mothers who got their flu shot while pregnant were protected from serious illness from influenza during their first six months of life, research shows.
Categories: Science

Smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:14pm
Researchers have built the first smartphone app that automatically reveals college students' mental health, academic performance and behavioral trends. In other words, your smartphone knows your state of mind -- even if you don't -- and how that affects you. The StudentLife app, which compares students' happiness, stress, depression and loneliness to their academic performance, also may be used in the general population -- for example, to monitor mental health, trigger intervention and improve productivity in workplace employees.
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New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites 'exhibit significant damage'

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:14pm
In war-torn Syria, five of six World Heritage sites now 'exhibit significant damage' and some structures have been 'reduced to rubble,' according to new high-resolution satellite image analysis by the nonprofit, nonpartisan American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Gambling with confidence: Are you sure about that?

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:14pm
Confidence determines much of our path through life, but what is it? Most people would describe it as an emotion or a feeling. In contrast, scientists have found that confidence is actually a measurable quantity, and not reserved just for humans. The team has identified a brain region in rats whose function is required to for the animals to express confidence in their decisions.
Categories: Science

Single dose of antidepressant changes the brain

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:14pm
A single dose of antidepressant is enough to produce dramatic changes in the functional architecture of the human brain. Brain scans taken of people before and after an acute dose of a commonly prescribed serotonin reuptake inhibitor reveal changes in connectivity within three hours, say researchers.
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Stem cells use 'first aid kits' to repair damage

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:13pm
Neural stem cells -- master cells that can develop into any type of nerve cell -- are able to generate mini “first aid kits” and transfer them to immune cells, according to a new study.
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Gene linked to increased dendritic spines -- a signpost of autism

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:13pm
Knocking out the gene NrCAM increases the number of dendritic spines on excitatory pyramidal neurons, researchers have discovered. Other studies have confirmed that the overabundance of dendritic spines allows for too many synaptic connections – a phenomenon strongly linked to autism.
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Newer tests clarify hereditary risk of cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:13pm
Not all genetics tests that screen for cancer risk are the same, says a genetics counselor. While knowing you are at a higher genetic risk for cancer is stressful, that knowledge can guide how you manage your health going forward. For instance, you might be more likely to stay on top of health screenings or choose to have preventative surgery, which can be a difficult choice, she outlines.
Categories: Science

Germanium tin could mean better and cheaper infrared cameras in smartphones, and faster computer chips

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:13pm
Researchers have fabricated a new semiconductor material that can be used to build better and less expensive infrared cameras for smartphone and automobiles.
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Pulse of a dead star powers intense gamma rays

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:08pm
NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, is helping to untangle the mystery of what powers high-energy gamma rays emanating from supernova. The observatory's high-energy X-ray eyes were able to peer into a particular site of powerful gamma rays and confirm the source: A spinning, dead star called a pulsar.
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NASA's wind-watching ISS-RapidScat ready for launch

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:04pm
The fourth SpaceX cargo mission to the International Space Station (ISS) under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services contract, carrying the ISS-RapidScat scatterometer instrument designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is scheduled to launch Saturday, Sept. 20, from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The one-day adjustment in the launch date was made to accommodate preparations of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and was coordinated with the station's partners and managers.
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Comet landing mission: 'J' marks the spot for Rosetta's lander

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 4:00pm
The European Space Agency's Rosetta's lander, Philae, will target Site J, an intriguing region on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that offers unique scientific potential, with hints of activity nearby, and minimum risk to the lander compared to the other candidate sites. The 220-pound (100-kilogram) lander is scheduled to reach the surface on November 11, where it will perform in-depth measurements to characterize the nucleus. Rosetta is an international mission spearheaded by the European Space Agency with support and instruments provided by NASA.
Categories: Science

SpaceX Dragon Flying Mice in Space & More for NASA (Infographic)

Space.com - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 3:43pm
SpaceX's fourth cargo mission to the International Space Station includes some mice, the first 3D printer in space and other weird science. See our take on the cargo in this Space.com infographic.
Categories: Science

An Open Source Pitfall? Mozilla Labs Closed, Quietly

Slashdot - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 3:35pm
mikejuk writes with this excerpt: When Google Labs closed there was an outcry. How could an organization just pull the rug from under so many projects? At least Google announced what it was doing. Mozilla, it seems since there is no official record, just quietly tiptoes away — leaving the lights on since the Mozilla Labs Website is still accessible. It is accessible but when you start to explore the website you notice it is moribund with the last blog post being December 2013 with the penultimate one being September 2013. The fact that it is gone is confirmed by recent blog posts and by the redeployment of the people who used to run it. The projects that survived have been moved to their own websites. It isn't clear what has happened to the Hatchery -the incubator that invited new ideas from all and sundry. One of the big advantages of open source is the ease with which a project can be started. One of the big disadvantages of open source is the ease with which projects can be allowed to die — often without any clear cut time of death. It seems Mozilla applies this to groups and initiatives as much as projects. This isn't good. The same is true at companies that aren't open source centric, though, too, isn't it?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

August and June-August global temperatures each reach record high, driven largely by record warm global oceans

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 3:19pm
According to NOAA scientists, the globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for August 2014 was the highest for August since record keeping began in 1880. It also marked the 38th consecutive August with a global temperature above the 20th century average. The last below-average global temperature for August occurred in 1976.
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Mysterious volcanic eruption of 1808 described

Science Daily - Thu, 18/09/2014 - 3:12pm
New light has been shed on one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in the last 500 years -- the so-called 'Unknown eruption' -- thanks to an unusual collaboration between a historian and a team of earth scientists.
Categories: Science