Blast-Off! X-37B Space Plane's 4th National Security Mission Begins | Video

Space.com - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 3:22pm
The Air Force space plane launched atop an United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on May 20th, 2015. AFSPC-5 mission payloads include the Orbital Test Vehicle 4 (OTV-4) and 10 cubesats.
Categories: Science

Oregon Testing Pay-Per-Mile Driving Fee To Replace Gas Tax

Slashdot - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 3:10pm
schwit1 tips news that Oregon will become the first U.S. state to test a program to replace their gas tax with a fee for each mile citizens drive on public roads. The 5,000 people voluntarily participating in the test will be charged 1.5 cents per mile. Revenue from gas tax has been on the decline as vehicles get more fuel efficient and as hybrids and electric cars become more popular. This measure is an attempt to raise the amount of money the state takes in to pay for infrastructure projects. Many owners of those hybrid and electric vehicles are upset, saying it specifically targets them and discourages environmentally-friendly transportation. Others point out that those who drive electric vehicles need the roads maintained just as much as people still driving gas-powered cars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Jupiter's Moons Perform Shadow Dances This Week

Space.com - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 3:04pm
Jupiter's rapidly moving moons constantly surprise us with their dance around the giant planet. There will be two spectacular shadow plays this week.
Categories: Science

Inside a Bonkers Plan to Build a 5-Story Skatepark

Wired News - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 3:00pm

A proposal takes the best parts of skating in a parking garage and combines them with the convenience of a more traditional skatepark.

The post Inside a Bonkers Plan to Build a 5-Story Skatepark appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Martian Moons May Have Formed Like Earth's

Slashdot - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:27pm
sciencehabit writes: Astronomers have long believed that Mars snatched its two moons — Phobos and Deimos — from the asteroid belt. That would explain why the objects look like asteroids—dark, crater-pocked, and potato-shaped. But computer simulations by two independent teams of astronomers (abstract 1, abstract 2) indicated that Mars's moons formed much like ours did, after a giant space rock smashed into the planet and sprayed debris into orbit.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Molecule designed to treat lung cancer shows promising results in mice

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:06pm
A new therapy for lung cancer, the most common cancer worldwide, has been identified by researchers. The team's study primarily focuses on lung cancer, yet further studies are ongoing in multiple cancer types, including breast cancer, prostate, sarcoma and colorectal cancer.
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Tiny grains of lithium dramatically improve performance of fusion plasma

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:06pm
An injection of small amounts of lithium produces a surprisingly large improvement in fusion plasma.
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Toward 'green' paper-thin, flexible electronics

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:06pm
The rapid evolution of gadgets has brought us an impressive array of 'smart' products from phones to tablets, and now watches and glasses. But they still haven't broken free from their rigid form. Now scientists are reporting a new step toward bendable electronics. They have developed the first light-emitting, transparent and flexible paper out of environmentally friendly materials via a simple, suction-filtration method.
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Controlling light: Scientists tune light waves by pairing exotic 2-D materials

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:06pm
Researchers take control of light emission using paired 2-D materials. They say this has the potential to lead to new kinds of light detection, thermal-management systems, and high-resolution imaging devices.
Categories: Science

Asteroid research benefits from Gaia satellite mission

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:05pm
Astronomical research on asteroids, i.e. minor planets, is also benefiting from the large-scale Gaia mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). Even though the astrometry satellite's main purpose is to precisely measure nearly one billion stars in the Milky Way, it has tracked down a multitude of minor dwarf planets in our solar system.To determine its current position in space and thus ensure Gaia's extremely high measurement accuracy, images are taken every day of the regions of the sky where the very faint satellite is located.
Categories: Science

New music strategy shows 70 per cent increase in exercise adherence

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:04pm
The use of personalized music playlists with tempo-pace synchronization increases adherence to cardiac rehab by almost 70 per cent, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Air quality effects of natural gas extraction detected in PA's Marcellus Shale region

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:04pm
Environmental engineers have taken a closer look at the air quality effects of natural gas extraction in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania. The group used a mobile air quality monitoring vehicle to survey regional air quality and pollutant emissions at 13 sites including wells, drilling rigs, compressor stations and processing areas. Their work establishes baseline measurements for this relatively new area of extraction.
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Study findings linking ovulation, racial bias questioned

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:04pm
Is ovulation related to higher racial bias? Despite previous studies, researchers have been unable to find any evidence that there is an increase in racial bias related to conception risk.
Categories: Science

Remembering Lassen Peak’s Last Blast, 100 Years Later

Wired News - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm

This week marks the 100th anniversary of the eruption of California's Lassen Peak.

The post Remembering Lassen Peak’s Last Blast, 100 Years Later appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Natural plant chemicals could help fight tooth decay, study shows

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm
Oral-care products containing a natural chemical that stops bacteria harming teeth could help prevent decay, a study suggests. The plant natural product acts against harmful mouth bacteria and could improve oral health by helping to prevent the build-up of plaque, researchers say.
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New technology could fundamentally change future wireless communications

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm
New technology is being developed that could fundamentally change radio design and could increase data rates and network capacity, reduce power consumption, create cheaper devices and enable global roaming.
Categories: Science

What happens inside a membrane? Novel method to watch ion channels in action (and much more)

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm
Little is known about how the proteins forming ion channels -- the 'pores' on the cell membrane -- change when they open and close, especially the portion that is 'embedded' in the membrane. Scientists have invented a method, based on the combined and innovative use of known techniques, which allowed them to observe in detail a specific membrane protein and its structural changes.
Categories: Science

Animals' presence may ease social anxiety in kids with autism

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm
When animals are present, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have lower readings on a device that detects anxiety and other forms of social arousal when interacting with their peers. According to a study, companion animals -- like dogs, cats or the guinea pigs in the study --may prove to be a helpful addition to treatment programs designed to help children with ASDs improve their social skills and interactions with other people.
Categories: Science

Dasabuvir in hepatitis C: Indication of added benefit in certain patients

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm
A new drug combination showed an advantage in three of a total of 10 patient groups with hepatitis C, particularly regarding virologic response, reviewers have found. The extent of added benefit remains unclear, however.
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New portable device could test how 'squishy' cancerous tumors are

Science Daily - Wed, 20/05/2015 - 2:00pm
A new device will test a tumor's squishiness (Young's modulus), providing clinicians insight into how best to treat it. Preliminary testing has found that in general, more aggressive tumors are stiffer, but the complex relationship will require more research, according to the engineers.
Categories: Science