'Serious Sam 1' Engine Released As Open Source

Slashdot - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 9:03pm
jones_supa writes: id Software is well known for publicly releasing the source code of its old first-person-shooter games. Now Croteam is joining the club by releasing the source code of the engine of the very first Serious Sam game. It's the very same engine that the company used for Serious Sam Classic: The First Encounter and The Second Encounter. Croteam's Vyacheslav Nikitenko, who worked on the source code and prepared Serious Engine v.1.10 for this release, had this to say: "Historically, this version of Serious Engine is very important for Croteam and for me personally. I created several mods for Serious Sam back in the day, before even starting the work on the source code, and it was a great tool for learning. And it's even better today! Obviously, Serious Engine v1.10 won't produce top-notch graphics, but the source code is very well commented, easy to modify, and there are lots of user generated mods out there. This version has everything you need to build your own game – or just experiment. If you're looking to get started, just download the files from GitHub and head over to SeriousZone, it has a great community and lots of tutorials." Happy hacking! (And here's a video with some game play that shows what this engine can do.)

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Categories: Science

New Documents Solve a Few Mysteries in the Apple-FBI Saga

Wired News - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 9:01pm
New documents filed on Thursday provide new details about the password on the San Bernardino phone and the bungled iCloud backup. The post New Documents Solve a Few Mysteries in the Apple-FBI Saga appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Game|Life Podcast: The Division, Hitman and More

Wired News - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 9:00pm
WIRED's gaming crew discusses The Division, Hitman, Super Mario Maker, and Peter Panic on this week's podcast. The post Game|Life Podcast: The Division, Hitman and More appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

DARPA Wants Ideas On Weaponizing Off-the-Shelf Tech

Slashdot - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:22pm
An anonymous reader writes: The good news is that some of today's most advanced technologies are cheap and easy to find, both online and on the shelves of major chain stores. That's also the bad news, according to DARPA. The defense agency is nervous that criminals and terrorists will turn off-the-shelf products into tools and devices to harm citizens or disrupt American military operations. On Friday, DARPA announced a new project called 'Improv' that invites technologists to propose designs for military applications or weaponry built exclusively from commercial software, open source code, and readily available materials. The program's goal is to demonstrate how easy it is to transform everyday technology into a system or device that threatens national security. See also this story about transforming into weapons items commonly found in the purportedly secure area of U.S. airports.

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Categories: Science

It Had to Happen: Now There’s an On-Demand Economy for Photojournalists

Wired News - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:14pm
Fresco News lets newsrooms send out requests for photos and videos from the scene to anyone with a smartphone. If their pictures get used, they get paid. The post It Had to Happen: Now There's an On-Demand Economy for Photojournalists appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Gadget Lab Podcast: LOL, Peace Out, Flickr

Wired News - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:14pm
This week: Yahoo's changes to its premiere photo-sharing service; and also email bankruptcy. The post Gadget Lab Podcast: LOL, Peace Out, Flickr appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Practicing tai chi reduces risk of falling in older adults

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:01pm
Researchers have compared the effects of tai chi to leg strengthening exercises (a physical therapy called 'lower extremity training,' or LET) in reducing falls. After six months of training, people in the tai chi group were significantly less likely to experience an injury-causing fall than were people in the LET group.
Categories: Science

Neurofeedback reduces pain, increases quality of life for cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neuropathy

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:01pm
A new study evaluating the use of neurofeedback found a decrease in the experience of chronic pain and increase quality of life in patients with neuropathic pain, researchers report.
Categories: Science

Spray-on coating could ice-proof airplanes, power lines, windshields

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:01pm
On your car windshield, ice is a nuisance. But on an airplane, a wind turbine, an oil rig or power line, it can be downright dangerous. And removing it with the methods that are available today -- usually chemical melting agents or labor-intensive scrapers and hammers -- is difficult and expensive work. That could soon change thanks to a durable, inexpensive ice-repellent coating.
Categories: Science

Quality control for genetic sequencing

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:01pm
Genetic sequencing is in widespread use today, but until now has not been accurate enough to identify an antibody immune response. Now, thanks to a new control system based on genetic barcodes, the technique is far more reliable -- and ready for use in the development of vaccines and antibody drugs.
Categories: Science

Magnetic chips could dramatically increase computing's energy efficiency, experiment shows

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:01pm
Magnetic bits operating at one-millionth the energy of today's chips, say researchers.
Categories: Science

Song Exploder: Oneohtrix Point Never’s ‘Sticky Drama’ Sounds Like a Chorus of Robots

Wired News - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 8:00pm
"Sticky Drama" from the experimental electronic musician's seventh album uses YouTube clips and robotic noises to put multiple voices on the same track. The post Song Exploder: Oneohtrix Point Never's 'Sticky Drama' Sounds Like a Chorus of Robots appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Apple Might Be Forced to Hand Over iOS Source Code to the FBI

Slashdot - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:40pm
Bruce66423 writes: In its latest filing, the FBI implies that, if the burden on Apple programmers of their alternative approach is too great, then Apple should release the whole source code to the FBI to allow them to do the work, quoting the precedent of the Lavabit confrontation. Clearly it is time for Apple to move offshore!? To recall, Lavabit abruptly shut down in 2013 when the FBI attempted to get the company to hand over the encryption keys for its secure email service. While the current situation seems to put Apple in the same ballpark as Lavabit, what gives the Cupertino-giant company an advantage is the immense support it is receiving from other Silicon Valley companies and personnel. Many believe that the FBI doesn't really need Apple's help in unlocking the iPhone. Reports claim that the iPhone in question already has a "backdoor" which could allow the government-backed institution to access the data on the smartphone. Other widely reported theories include cracking the iPhone and manipulating the innards to trick the system into spilling out all the information. One proposed method, which requires the phone's NAND flash chip to be taken out, may not work, though. Daniel Kahn Gillmor, a technology fellow with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, pointed out the risks in playing with flash memory. He said that an error in removing the memory could make the data unreadable forever.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Engine test marks major milestone on NASA's journey to Mars

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:26pm
NASA successfully tested the first deep space RS-25 rocket engine for 500 seconds March 10, clearing a major milestone toward the next great era of space exploration. The next time rocket engine No. 2059 fires for that length of time, it will be carrying humans on their first deep-space mission in more than 45 years.
Categories: Science

What's eating at Pluto?

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:25pm
Far in the western hemisphere, scientists on NASA's New Horizons mission have discovered what looks like a giant "bite mark" on Pluto's surface. They suspect it may be caused by a process known as sublimation -- the transition of a substance from a solid to a gas. The methane ice-rich surface on Pluto may be sublimating away into the atmosphere, exposing a layer of water-ice underneath, they report.
Categories: Science

Satellites and shipwrecks: Landsat satellite spots foundered ships in coastal waters

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:24pm
An estimated 3 million shipwrecks are scattered across the planet's oceans. Most maritime mishaps take place close to shore where hazards to navigation -- such as rocks, reefs, other submerged objects and vessel congestion -- are abundant. While there is a romantic association of shipwrecks and buried treasure, it is desirable to know where they are located for many other practical reasons. The ships may be of historical significance or, if the hard substrate of the ship has created a reef, of ecological significance. Modern-era shipwrecks are also commonly sources of pollution, leaking onboard fuel and corroded heavy metals. Nearshore shipwrecks can be navigational hazards themselves.
Categories: Science

NASA Targets May 2018 Launch of Mars InSight Mission

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:22pm
NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission to study the deep interior of Mars is targeting a new launch window that begins May 5, 2018, with a Mars landing scheduled for Nov. 26, 2018.
Categories: Science

Double cheeseburger and a diet soda, please

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:18pm
While more consumers than ever are making healthier choices at the grocery store, they tend to purchase a balance of healthy and less-healthy foods, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Social Networks Used in the Assessment of Damage Caused by Natural Disasters

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 7:17pm
It is possible to determine the damage caused by a natural disaster in just a few hours, by using data from social networks, such as Twitter, say researchers
Categories: Science

Science can now link climate change with some extreme weather events

Science Daily - Fri, 11/03/2016 - 6:35pm
Extreme weather events like floods, heat waves and droughts can devastate communities and populations worldwide. Recent scientific advances have enabled researchers to confidently say that the increased intensity and frequency of some, but not all, of these extreme weather events is influenced by human-induced climate change, according to a new report.
Categories: Science