Watney Would Approve: Ordnance Survey Maps Mars

Space.com - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 4:25pm
The British mapping agency Ordnance Survey has created a map of the Martian surface using precision NASA data — and it's beautiful.
Categories: Science

Uber Losing $1 Billion a Year In China

Slashdot - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 4:25pm
An anonymous reader writes: Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has revealed that the ride-sharing company is writing off $1 billion a year in order to consolidate its place in the Chinese ride-sharing app market. Kalanick said in a speech at the Vancouver Launch Academy that Uber is deeply engaged in a fight for customers in the Chinese market, and that an unnamed competitor is "buying up market share." Uber's main rival in China is Didi Kuaidi, which invested $100 million in Lyft and Ola to last year in a consolidation effort against Uber's incursion into the market — which many believe to have occurred too late into the development of ride-share schemes in China.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Hawking: Gravitational Waves Could Revolutionize Astronomy

Space.com - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 4:10pm
Black hole theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has some thoughts on the discovery of gravitational waves.
Categories: Science

Ringing Bells' India-Only Android Phone To Run About $4

Slashdot - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 3:44pm
An anonymous reader writes: Freedom 251 is the name of a new affordable Android smartphone which is going on sale in India. It features an 4-core 1.3 Ghz Processor, with 1GB RAM and 8GB internal memory, and runs an Android Lollipop 5.1 distribution complete with civilian and government applications for Indian citizens. It is being heavily subsidized to make up for the benefits that it will bring to the people who could never afford a smartphone before. Ars Technica notes that the phone is apparently not carrier-subsidized, but as Pocket Now points out, "[t]he nation's defence minister will be at the launch event, a sign that the government has heavily subsidized the project in line with its developmental prerogatives."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Book Ventures to the Edge of Space, With First Chapter Audio | Video

Space.com - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 3:28pm
A copy of author Rob Boffard's new book 'Zero-G' took a balloon flight to the stratosphere along with an audio recording of the first chapter -- which was played during the flight. The book is available on Amazon.
Categories: Science

Samsung Returns To 2D, Releases 250GB 750 EVO For $75

Slashdot - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 3:04pm
Vigile writes: Even with Samsung pushing forward into 3D NAND with 32-layer technologies used in SSDs like the 850 Pro and the recently released M.2 PCIe NVMe 950 Pro, there is still plenty of traditional 2D planar memory being fabbed on production lines. To utilize that inventory, Samsung is shifting its low-capacity SSDs back to it, announcing the 750 EVO drives today available in 120GB and 250GB capacities. Though based largely on the very popular, but sometimes troubled, 840 EVO specs, the new drives are faster and start with some impressively low prices. The starting MSRP for the 250GB 750 EVO will be just $75.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Mars in 3 Days? Photonic Propulsion Technology Could Bridge The Gap | Video

Space.com - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 3:03pm
To reach the power levels needed to reach a proportion of the speed of light humanity will need to create new technologies. One such technology, photonics propulsion, is showing promise.
Categories: Science

IBM and Microsoft Will Let You Roll Your Own Blockchain

Wired News - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 3:00pm

They call it the Hyperledger. And it can be yours.

The post IBM and Microsoft Will Let You Roll Your Own Blockchain appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

ReactOS 0.4 Brings Open Source Windows Closer To Reality

Slashdot - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:23pm
jeditobe was one of several readers to point out the newest major release of Windows NT-inspired ReactOS, which has just hit version 0.4, brings open source Windows compatibility a little bit closer. The new release includes out-of-the-box support for ext2, ext3, and ext4, as well as (remember, it is NT based) read-only support for NTFS. What else? Support was generally improved for third-party device drivers, making it substantially easier to install and use real hardware, as opposed to just virtual machines like VirtualBox. The internal WINE library was updated to improve support for Win32 programs. Support for Python 2.7 was added, making it possible to use python scripts in ReactOS. A substantial number of visual changes were added, with a vastly improved shell and file explorer, newer icons throughout ReactOS, improved support for fonts, and customizable visual themes. Even with these improvements, ReactOS 0.4 is still generally considered alpha-level software, though Alexander Rechitskiy, the innovation manager for ReactOS, notes that 0.4.1 may be almost beta-level software.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Socialization alters fruit fly sexuality

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:14pm
A genetic study on the courtship behavior of mutant fruit flies may illuminate human sexual orientation.
Categories: Science

New physics and application of antiferromagnet uncovered

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:13pm
Researchers have studied the control of magnetization using a current applied to heterostructures comprising an antiferromagnet. They found that the current gives rise to a flow of electron spin in the antiferromagnet, which induces magnetization switching in a neighboring ferromagnet.
Categories: Science

Fulmars contaminated more by food than microplastics

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:13pm
Contrary to previous belief, new research has shown that microplastics are not a significant source of environmental pollutants in fulmars. Seabirds ingest most of these pollutants through food, the researchers concluded.
Categories: Science

Scientists discover bird blood cell which destroys fatal fungal infection

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:13pm
Scientists reveal how birds can carry potentially fatal infections to humans but not get ill. They say that the white blood cell in birds blocks growth of fatal infection, adding that this discovery could help in preventing humans from contracting diseases including bird flu.
Categories: Science

Children born in winter, or to smoking mothers, have vulnerable lungs

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:13pm
Smoking mothers, respiratory infections and the date you were born contribute to determine how fast your lungs are aging, shows research. People who have been exposed to the aforementioned factors have a faster decline in lung function, which practically means a faster aging process. Still, this only becomes apparent if they themselves start smoking or if other risk factors have been a part of their early life.
Categories: Science

'Super-recognizers' could play key role in border control, research finds

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:13pm
Super-recognizers – people with exceptional face-processing and matching abilities – could play an important role in policing and security settings such as border control, research has found.
Categories: Science

Material deformation at atomic scale resembles avalanches

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:13pm
The rearrangement of particles in materials during deformation, such as when a spoon is bent, doesn’t occur independently, but rather resembles highly collective avalanches that span the entire material. The finding offers a new universal theory of deformation.
Categories: Science

Many school children avoid basic foods unnecessarily

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:10pm
A study on hypersensitivity to the basic foods milk, egg, fish and wheat among young school children showed that reported food hypersensitivity was eight times more common than allergies confirmed by allergy tests.
Categories: Science

Novel synthesis method opens up new possibilities for utilizing Li-ion batteries

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:09pm
Lithium-ion batteries are a rapidly growing energy storage method due to their high energy density, especially in mobile applications such as personal electronics and electric cars. However, the materials currently used in Li-ion batteries are expensive, many of them, like lithium cobalt oxide (belonging to the EU Critical Raw Materials, CRMs), are difficult to handle and dispose of. Additionally, batteries using these materials have relatively short lifetimes. Researchers say that new novel materials are being developed for next generation Li-ion batteries.
Categories: Science

New ways to construct contactless magnetic gears

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:09pm
The new milk frother you are using to prepare your cappuccino is likely using magnetic gears. Magnetic gears transmit rotary motion like mechanical gears but instead of teeth they use magnetic attraction and repulsion between rotating magnets. Researchers have published a theory that extends the possibilities and applications for smooth magnetic couplings, which can produce an even motion without any counterforce. This research has several potential applications in nanotechnology, microfluidics and robotics.
Categories: Science

Study uncovers key player contributing to healthy maintenance of bone marrow niche

Science Daily - Wed, 17/02/2016 - 2:09pm
A new study has uncovered a key player contributing to the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), blood cell precursors which have the ability to become any type of blood cell in the body. Research findings could contribute towards better understanding of the underlying causes of blood diseases, say the scientists.
Categories: Science