Antibody appears to attack cancer cells, leaving other cells unscathed

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 5:39pm
An antibody has been developed from the body's own immune system that preferentially attacks cancer cells. The antibody works by targeting a natural defense mechanism that cancer tumors exploit. Cells in the body essentially use a home security system that relies on certain proteins to protect the cell surface and keep it safe. These proteins help the cell avoid injury and even death from unwanted activation of the immune system.
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Research suggests diabetes drug acts differently from previous theories

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 5:39pm
Laboratory findings do not tell the whole story of how the diabetes drug metformin works to limit the level of glucose in the blood, say scientists. The researchers found that metformin does not limit the action of the hormone glucagon, specifically glucagon-stimulated glucose production from the liver.
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Lung tumors hijack metabolic processes in the liver, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 5:39pm
Scientists who study how circadian rhythms -- our own body clocks -- control liver function have discovered that cancerous lung tumors can hijack this process and profoundly alter metabolism. Their research is the first showing that lung adenocarcinoma can affect the body clock's sway over lipid metabolism and sensitivity to insulin and glucose.
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Sepsis: Sneak attack or false alarm?

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 5:38pm
Severe bacterial infections can push the human body into sepsis, a life-threatening cascade of inflammation and cell death that can be difficult to cure. Scientists and doctors have long puzzled over this; why does the body mount such a dangerous, self-damaging response? Researchers propose an explanation: the cells aren't really being invaded. They just think they are.
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Snapchat Sued For Facilitating 107 MPH Car Crash

Slashdot - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 5:30pm
An anonymous reader writes: A Georgia couple is suing Snapchat, a popular instant messaging and photo sharing app, after a car accident last year seriously injured the husband, leaving him permanently brain damaged. According to media reports, Wentworth Maynard, the victim, was driving in a 55-mile-per-hour zone when 18-year-old Christal McGee crashed into him traveling at 107 miles per hour. McGee, according to lawsuits, was attempting to use Snapchat's "speed filter" -- a feature that overlays the speed one is traveling on a picture. "Snapchat's speed filter facilitated McGee's excessive speeding," reads the lawsuit. "McGee was motivated to drive at an excessive speed in order to obtain recognition through Snapchat by the means of a Snapchat 'trophy.'"

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Sci-Hub Faces Millions Of Dollars In Damages, Elsevier Complaint Shuts Down Domain

Slashdot - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 4:50pm
Reader Taco Cowboy writes: Sci-Hub is facing millions of dollars in damages in a lawsuit filed by Elsevier, one of the largest academic publishers. As a result of the legal battle the site just lost one of its latest domain names. However, the site has no intentions of backing down, and will continue its fight to keep access to scientific knowledge free and open. Several 'backup' domain names are still in play, including Sci-Hub.bz and Sci-Hub.cc. In addition to the alternative domain names users can access the site directly through the IP-address 31.184.194.81. Its TOR domain is also still working -- http://scihub22266oqcxt.onion/. Authorized or not, there is definitely plenty of interest in Sci-Hub's service. The site currently hosts more than 51 million academic papers and receives millions of visitors per month. Many visits come from countries where access to academic journals is limited, such as Iran, Russia or China. But even in countries where access is more common, many researchers visit the site, an analysis from Science magazine revealed last week. Late last month we learned that plenty of people were downloading academic papers from Sci-Hub. Over the 6 months leading up to March, Sci-Hub had served over 28 million documents, with Iran, China, India, Russia, and the United States being the leading requestors.

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Windows 10 Now Runs On 300M Active Devices; Upgrade To Cost $119 After July 29

Slashdot - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 4:10pm
On Thursday (May 5), Microsoft announced that Windows 10 is now running on 300 million active devices, up from 270 million monthly active devices as of March 30. The feat comes nine months after Microsoft released Windows 10, the latest version of its desktop operating system, after offering it for months to developers. The company also announced today that Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 (as well as Windows 8) users with a valid license wouldn't be eligible for the free upgrade starting July 29. After July 29th, Microsoft says, users will be able to continue to get Windows 10 on a new device, or purchase a full version of Windows 10 Home for $119. Windows 10 offers a range of interesting features including virtual digital assistant Cortana. While these features and a substantial boost to performance and speeds could be a big reason for the fast adoption of Windows 10, it's also no secret that Microsoft continues to push Windows 10 update to computers ... sometimes even when users don't want that.

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National Astronaut Day Launches with New 'Signature' Space Pens

Space.com - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 4:03pm
The first annual National Astronaut Day has arrived, and with it a new line of space pens. Founded by Uniphi Space Agency, National Astronaut Day aims to provide inspiration by sharing the stories and experiences of U.S. space explorers.
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The Universe Has Probably Hosted Many Alien Civilizations: Study

Space.com - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 4:00pm
The probability of a civilization developing on a potentially habitable alien planet would have to be less than one in 10 billion trillion for humanity to be the first technologically advanced species the cosmos has ever known, according to a new study.
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'Apple Stole My Music. No, Seriously'

Slashdot - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 3:30pm
Vellum's James has written about his ordeal with Apple Music which many people can relate to. Apple Music, the Cupertino-based giant's online music streaming service, deleted 122GB of music files that James had stored on his computer. He writes: What Amber (supposed Apple Support representative) explained was exactly what I'd feared: through the Apple Music subscription, which I had, Apple now deletes files from its users' computers. When I signed up for Apple Music, iTunes evaluated my massive collection of Mp3s and WAV files, scanned Apple's database for what it considered matches, then removed the original files from my internal hard drive. REMOVED them. Deleted. If Apple Music saw a file it didn't recognize -- which came up often, since I'm a freelance composer and have many music files that I created myself -- it would then download it to Apple's database, delete it from my hard drive, and serve it back to me when I wanted to listen, just like it would with my other music files it had deleted. This isn't the first time Apple Music has deleted a user's locally stored music files. Long-time Apple watcher Jim Dalrymple canceled his subscription last year and called Apple Music a "nightmare" after the service allegedly deleted over 4,700 of his previously bought songs. At the time, he wrote: At some point, enough is enough. That time has come for me -- Apple Music is just too much of a hassle to be bothered with. Nobody I've spoken at Apple or outside the company has any idea how to fix it, so the chances of a positive outcome seem slim to none.Incidentally, Apple Music is rumoured for a reboot at the company's developer conference in June. It's not clear if fixing the aforementioned glitch is among Apple's imminent agenda.

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Whoa: A Tesla Coil Can Zap Nanotubes Into Long Nanowires

Wired News - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 3:00pm
Researchers at Rice University have found a new method for assembling carbon nanotubes into wires using high electric fields produced by a Tesla coil. The post Whoa: A Tesla Coil Can Zap Nanotubes Into Long Nanowires appeared first on WIRED.
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Team boosts lithium-ion battery performance

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:52pm
Researchers are working to solve the problem of short-life of lithium-ion batteries like those used in laptops and cellphones, making them reliable and longer-lasting using a thin-film coating technique called atomic layer deposition (ALD).
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Pond scum and the gene pool: One critical gene in green algae responsible for multicellular evolution, understanding of cancer origin

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:50pm
A single gene is responsible for the evolution of multicellular organisms, new research indicates. Scientists were looking for what caused single-celled organisms to evolve into multicellular organisms when they discovered the importance of a single gene, retinoblastoma, or RB. RB, known for being defective in cancer patients, is a critical gene necessary for multicellular life; previous theories have indicated that multiple genes might be responsible for multicellularity.
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First gene linked to temperature sex switch identified

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:50pm
The sex of many reptile species is set by temperature. New research identifies the first gene associated with temperature-dependent sex determination in any reptile. Variation at this gene in snapping turtles contributes to geographic differences in the way sex ratio is influenced by temperature. Understanding the genetics of sex determination could help predict how reptiles will evolve in response to climate change.
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Old Qualcomm Vulnerability Exposes Android User Data

Slashdot - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:50pm
Reader wiredmikey writes: Researchers from FireEye have disclosed the details of a serious information disclosure vulnerability affecting a Qualcomm software package found in hundreds of Android device models (Editor's note: the link could have pop-up ads, here's an alternate source). The vulnerability is in the Qualcomm tethering controller (CVE-2016-2060) and could allow a malicious application to access user information. While the flaw could expose millions of Android devices, the vulnerability has limited impact on devices running Android 4.4 and later, which include significant security enhancements, and also does not affect Nexus devices. FireEye said its researchers informed Qualcomm about the vulnerability in January and the vendor developed a fix by early March and started reaching out to OEMs to let them know about the issue. Now it's up to the device manufacturers to push out the patch to customers.FireEye said: "The OEMs will now need to provide updates for their devices; however, many devices will likely never be patched."

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Prostate cancer screening guidelines called into question

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:48pm
Researchers discuss their findings related to PSA screening, and urge reconsideration of prostate cancer screening after finding critical flaw in landmark study.
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Study finds link between handedness, mathematical skills

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:48pm
The relationship between handedness and mathematical abilities is controversial. Now researchers say that a link between handedness and mathematical skills exists, but is more complex than is thought.
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Thinking differently could affect power of traumatic memories

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:48pm
Using a thinking technique called 'concrete processing' could reduce the number of intrusive memories experienced after a traumatic event, say scientists. These intrusive memories are one of the core symptoms of PTSD.
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Can believing you are a food addict affect your eating behavior?

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:48pm
Obesity is often attributed to an addiction to food and many people believe themselves to be "food addicts." However, until now no studies have looked at whether believing oneself to be a food addict influences how much we eat. Researchers have published a paper regarding their work on how beliefs about food addiction can affect eating behavior.
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Advances in medical care have led to type 1 diabetes boom

Science Daily - Thu, 05/05/2016 - 2:47pm
The global increase in cases of type 1 diabetes is directly linked to advances in medical care, researchers say, with the underlying genetics of the disease more likely to be passed from one generation to the next.
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