Recommendations for prostate cancer active surveillance

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:06pm
Active surveillance offers low-risk prostate cancer patients a means to avoid the potentially harmful side effects from treatment. Pathologists help determine patient eligibility for active surveillance and today a multi-specialty team published their recommendations for making such determinations in a special on-line posting from the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.
Categories: Science

Health care workers in poor nations lack gear needed to protect from hiv and other bloodborne infections like ebola

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:06pm
Health care workers in some of the world’s poorest countries lack basic equipment to shield them from HIV and other bloodborne infections during surgical and other procedures, new research suggests. The findings underscore the lack of adequate protective supplies in nations at the center of the current Ebola outbreak.
Categories: Science

California Passes Law Mandating Smartphone Kill Switch

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:26pm
alphadogg (971356) writes "Smartphones sold in California will soon be required to have a kill switch that lets users remotely lock them and wipe them of data in the event they are lost or stolen. The demand is the result of a new law, http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/... into effect on Monday, that applies to phones manufactured after July 1, 2015, and sold in the state. While its legal reach does not extend beyond the state's borders, the inefficiency of producing phones solely for California means the kill switch is expected to be adopted by phone makers on handsets sold across the U.S. and around the world."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

US Military Blows Up Hypersonic Weapon After Failed Test Launch

Space.com - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:13pm
The U.S. Army launched a prototype hypersonic weapon test from Alaska on Monday (Aug. 25), only to destroy the superfast vehicle seconds later when something went wrong.
Categories: Science

Eye implant could lead to better glaucoma treatments

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Lowering internal eye pressure is currently the only way to treat glaucoma. A tiny eye implant recently developed could pair with a smartphone to improve the way doctors measure and lower a patient's eye pressure. Daily or hourly measurements of eye pressure could help doctors tailor more effective treatment plans.
Categories: Science

Duality principle is 'safe and sound'

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Decades of experiments have verified the quirky laws of quantum theory again and again. So when scientists in Germany announced in 2012 an apparent violation of a fundamental law of quantum mechanics, physicists were determined to find an explanation.
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Cancer leaves common fingerprint on DNA

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes in a broad variety of cancers to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA, which help govern whether genes are turned 'on' or 'off.'
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RNA sequence could help doctors to tailor unique prostate cancer treatment programs

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Sequencing RNA, not just DNA, could help doctors predict how prostate cancer tumors will respond to treatment, according to research. Because a tumor's RNA shows the real time changes a treatment is causing, the authors think this could be a useful tool to aid diagnosis and predict which treatment will most benefit individual cancer patients.
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Flu outbreak provides rare study material

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Five years ago this month, one of the first U.S. outbreaks of the H1N1 virus swept through the Washington State University campus, striking some 2,000 people. A university math and biology professor has used a trove of data gathered at the time to gain insight into how only a few infected people could launch the virus's rapid spread across the university community.
Categories: Science

Common European MRSA originated in Africa, study concludes

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
The predominant strain of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infecting people in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa derived from a single sub-Saharan ancestor, a team of international researchers have reported.
Categories: Science

U.S. has seen widespread adoption of robot-assisted cancer surgery to remove the prostate

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
The US has experienced widespread adoption of robot-assisted prostate removal surgery to treat prostate cancer in recent years, a new study reveals. The study also found that while such surgeries are more expensive than traditional surgeries, their costs are decreasing over time.
Categories: Science

Wii Balance Board induces changes in brains of people with multiple sclerosis

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
A balance board accessory for a popular video game console can help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce their risk of accidental falls, according to new research. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that use of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board system appears to induce favorable changes in brain connections associated with balance and movement.
Categories: Science

Watch 800 Wooden Balls Shape-Shift Into a Perfect Spiral

Wired News - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:05pm
Organized chaos comes with a caveat: The chaos is only organized from the perspective of the person who created it in the first place. To everyone else, it’s just a mess. A new kinetic sculpture called Breaking Wave explores the idea of how a change in perspective can bring clarity to chaos—in this case the […]






Categories: Science

Cannibalism may contribute to successful invasion by harlequin ladybirds of new habitats

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:59pm
The cannibalistic behavior of native and invasive populations of the Harmonia axyridis ladybird have been the focus of recent study. The researchers' findings suggest that this behavior may procure them a real survival advantage during the colonization of new habitats. 
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New guidance on antithrombotic use in AF patients with ACS having PCI

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:58pm
New guidance on antithrombotic use in AF patients with ACS having PCI has been published today. "The document published today provides very focused, clear and comprehensive recommendations that are based on the very latest evidence on how best to manage this complex group of patients," one expert said.
Categories: Science

Student designs soccer video game adapted to people with cerebral palsy

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:58pm
A soccer game adapted for people with cerebral palsy has been designed that is operated with a foot switch, a push rod head switch and a hand switch. A new tool allows any player to have equal access with different physical conditions.
Categories: Science

New tool to probe cancer's molecular make-up

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:58pm
Scientists have shown how to better identify and measure vital molecules that control cell behavior – paving the way for improved tools for diagnosis, prediction and monitoring of cancer. The study's leader said: “Protein kinases regulate how cells communicate. When these molecules are deregulated it corresponds to cells “hearing voices” with a resulting change in their behavior. Doctors need a way to spot changes in kinase levels in individual tumors so they can see how they respond to treatments and match patients to the treatment that works best for them.” 
Categories: Science

Symptoms after breast cancer surgery need to be treated on an individual basis

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:57pm
For those affected, breast cancer is a dramatic diagnosis. Patients often have to endure chemotherapy and surgery, which, depending on the individual scenario, may mean breast conserving surgery or breast removal—mastectomy. In the aftermath, many women experience symptoms such as pain, fatigue/exhaustion, or sleep disturbances. However, the symptoms are highly individual, researchers state.
Categories: Science

Hotels with smart bracelets

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:57pm
Scientists have developed smart bracelets - the Smart VIB (Very Important Bracelet) that enables clients access hotel rooms without the need for a card, make payments using the PayPal system, share experiences on social networks via the numerous tactile screen, and receive completely personalized services, while at all times guaranteeing protection of information.
Categories: Science

Discovery explains how receptor regulates fat accumulation in obesity

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 12:57pm
The sensitivity of fat cells to signals that increase the breakdown of fat is linked to the receptor ALK7, according to a study. The discovery suggests that ALK7 might be an interesting target for future strategies to treat obesity.
Categories: Science