Windows 10 To Feature Native Support For MKV and FLAC

Slashdot - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 2:25pm
jones_supa writes Windows Media Player is going to become a more useful media player for those who want to play geeky file formats. Microsoft has earlier confirmed that Windows 10 will come with native support for Matroska Video, but the company now talks about also adding FLAC support. Microsoft's Gabriel Aul posted a teaser screenshot in Twitter showing support for this particular format. It can be expected to arrive in a future update for people running the Windows 10 Technical Preview. Not many GUI changes seem to be happening around Media Player, but work is done under the hood.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Wikipedia's "Complicated" Relationship With Net Neutrality

Slashdot - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:28pm
HughPickens.com writes Brian Fung writes in the Washington Post that Wikipedia has been a little hesitant to weigh in on net neutrality, the idea that all Web traffic should be treated equally by Internet service providers such as Comcast or Time Warner Cable. That's because the folks behind Wikipedia actually see a non-neutral Internet as one way to spread information cheaply to users in developing countries. With Wikipedia Zero, users in places like Pakistan and Malaysia can browse the site without it counting against the data caps on their cellphones or tablets. This preferential treatment for Wikipedia's site helps those who can't afford to pay for pricey data — but it sets the precedent for deals that cut against the net neutrality principle. "We believe in net neutrality in America," says Gayle Karen Young, adding that Wikipedia Zero requires a different perspective elsewhere. "Partnering with telecom companies in the near term, it blurs the net neutrality line in those areas. It fulfills our overall mission, though, which is providing free knowledge." Facebook and Google also operate programs internationally that are exempted from users' data caps — a tactic known somewhat cryptically as "zero rating". Facebook in particular has made "Facebook Zero" not just a sales pitch in developing markets but also part of an Internet.org initiative to expand access "to the two thirds of the world's population that doesn't have it." But a surprising decision in Chile shows what happens when policies of neutrality are applied without nuance. Chile recently put an end to the practice, widespread in developing countries, of big companies "zero-rating" access to their services. "That might seem perverse," says Glyn Moody, "since it means that Chilean mobile users must now pay to access those services, but it is nonetheless exactly what governments that have mandated net neutrality need to do."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

New research supporting stroke rehabilitation

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
New research could help improve stroke patients' rehabilitation, experts say. The research may provide useful applications for the care of stroke patients who have restricted use of their upper limbs. If stroke patients practice the techniques recommended by the study, it could potentially help maintain activity in movement-related brain areas, especially when used alongside more traditional physiotherapy techniques where the same movements are also practiced physically.
Categories: Science

Significantly increased risk of stillbirth in males, study shows

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
Boys are more likely to be stillborn than girls, a large-scale study has found. The study reviewed more than 30 million births globally, and found that the risk of stillbirth is about ten percent higher in boys. This equates to a loss of around 100,000 additional male babies per year.
Categories: Science

Impact of climate change on the soil ecosystem

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
Scientists are working to evaluate the impact of climate change on the ecosystems of the soil by monitoring its microbial properties over time. The research areas are located at altitudes of between 1,500 and 2,600 meters, which provides a broad range of different climate conditions and makes it possible to observe how the altitude affects the properties of the soil and the micro-organisms living in it. Preliminary results indicate that microbial properties are highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of the soil on a small scale and on the environmental conditions existing at the moment when the samples are gathered.
Categories: Science

Scope of research on quantum computing narrowed: Characteristics of a universal simulator

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
According to many scientists, quantum computers will have great importance in the future but, despite all efforts, research in this field is still in its infancy. One of the difficulties is understanding what criteria a quantum system should meet to be able to solve problems that are impossible for conventional computers.
Categories: Science

Ancient marine algae provides clues of climate change impact on today's microscopic ocean organisms

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
A study of ancient marine algae has found that climate change affected their growth and skeleton structure, which has potential significance for today’s equivalent microscopic organisms that play an important role in the world’s oceans. Coccolithophores, a type of marine algae, are prolific in the ocean today and have been for millions of years. These single-celled plankton produce calcite skeletons that are preserved in seafloor sediments after death. Although coccolithophores are microscopic, their abundance makes them key contributors to marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.
Categories: Science

New antimicrobial edible films increase lifespan of cheese

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
New coatings to apply to soft cheese have been developed by researchers. These coatings are totally edible and have an antimicrobial capacity, which increases the lifespan of the cheese. These films incorporate oregano and rosemary essential oils as antimicrobial agents, and chitosan, a by-product that comes from crustacean shells.
Categories: Science

'Trigger' for stress processes discovered in brain

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
An important factor for stress has been identified by scientists. This is the protein secretagogin that plays an important role in the release of the stress hormone CRH and which only then enables stress processes in the brain to be transmitted to the pituitary gland and then onwards to the organs.
Categories: Science

How do Tourette's patients react to visual stimulation with their own self-image?

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
Tourette’s syndrome is characterized by tics caused in many by premonitory urges; sensations which give patients compulsion to act to relieve discomfort. Habit reversal therapy conditions patients into heightened awareness of premonitory urges and forced counteraction of the tic. New research examines the effect on Tourette’s sufferers when exposed to their own image for a prolonged period. Could introduction of patients’ self-image reduce tics due to heightened self-awareness and subsequent self-imposed tic control? Or might watching themselves increase inclination to tic?
Categories: Science

Drug to reduce side-effects of 'binge drinking' developed

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:23pm
A drug that could reduce the harmful side-effects of ‘binge drinking’, especially by teenagers, has been successfully developed and tested by a team of scientists. Researchers say that this development may also link to new ways to treat Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases that damage the brain. 
Categories: Science

Uterine contractions increase success of artificial insemination

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:21pm
The negative impact of contractions during in vitro fertilization is a well-known fact. What was unknown until now was the effect it had on artificial insemination. A new study has discovered that it is the contrary to that seen in embryo transfer: there is an improved chance of getting pregnant. Researchers have demonstrated that the number of contractions of the uterus per minute is a parameter associated with success in artificial insemination procedures.
Categories: Science

New electrolyte for construction of magnesium-sulfur batteries

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:21pm
Scientists have now developed an electrolyte that may be used for the construction of magnesium-sulfur battery cells. With magnesium, higher storage densities could be achieved than with lithium. Moreover, magnesium is abundant in nature, it is non-toxic, and does not degrade in air.
Categories: Science

Stroke damage mechanism identified

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:21pm
A mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims has been discovered by scientists, who are now searching for drugs to block it. Strokes happen when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off but much of the harm to survivors' memory and other cognitive function is often actually caused by "oxidative stress" in the hours and days after the blood supply resumes, the authors explain.
Categories: Science

How can we avoid kelp beds turning into barren grounds?

Science Daily - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 1:21pm
Urchins are marine invertebrates that mold the biological richness of marine grounds. However, an excessive proliferation of urchins may also have severe ecological consequences on marine grounds as they reduce algal cover and affect the survival of other marine species. To explore global dynamics and the factors that turn kelp beds into barren grounds is the main objective of a new study.
Categories: Science

Saturn's Hazy Moon Titan Holds Clues About Life's Origins

Space.com - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 12:13pm
Titan's "prebiotic" environment consists of molecules that could be a precursor to life.
Categories: Science

Find Cool, Red Stars in the Night Sky This Thanksgiving

Space.com - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 12:11pm
To a casual stargazer, most stars look the same. Some may be brighter, others dimmer, but for the most part, they are all variations on the same theme. All stars are so far away that we see them only as pinpoints of light.
Categories: Science

10 British Shows You Need to Stream on Netflix This Thanksgiving

Wired News - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 12:00pm

Thanksgiving is nearly upon us, and hey, since being kind of contrary is the American way, why not celebrate this most delicious of holidays by watching some of the best TV from the country so many of those early settlers were fleeing? Yes, everybody knows about Sherlock and The Office, but there's a whole cornucopia of excellent and lesser-known British series ripe for the streaming on Netflix. Here's what you should be watching on Turkey Day.

The post 10 British Shows You Need to Stream on Netflix This Thanksgiving appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Weirdest Incidents Involving Wild Turkeys This Week

Wired News - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 11:45am

Wild turkeys were “everywhere” on Cape Cod, despite having once been extinct in Massachusetts. The birds were also booming again in Ohio, Florida, Texas, Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa, and New Jersey, where turkey numbers had increased a thousand-fold since 1977, when 22 wild turkeys were brought in from New York and Vermont to restock what was then a virtually turkey-less state. A New Jersey biologist now assured the public: “I think that they are here to stay,” and a local Op-Ed writer attributed the turkey’s success, in part, to polygamy.

The post The Weirdest Incidents Involving Wild Turkeys This Week appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

A Stylish App That Helps You Stick to a Budget

Wired News - Thu, 27/11/2014 - 11:30am

Most users don’t need charts, they just need to know if a new pair of shoes is going to blow the weekly budget.

The post A Stylish App That Helps You Stick to a Budget appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science