What Federal Employees Really Need To Worry About After the Chinese Hack

Slashdot - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:43pm
HughPickens.com writes: Lisa Rein writes in the Washington Post that a new government review of what the Chinese hack of sensitive security clearance files of 21 million people means for national security is in — and some of the implications are quite grave. According to the Congressional Research Service, covert intelligence officers and their operations could be exposed and high-resolution fingerprints could be copied by criminals. Some suspect that the Chinese government may build a database of U.S. government employees that could help identify U.S. officials and their roles or that could help target individuals to gain access to additional systems or information. National security concerns include whether hackers could have obtained information that could help them identify clandestine and covert officers and operations (PDF). CRS says that if the fingerprints in the background investigation files are of high enough quality, "depending on whose hands the fingerprints come into, they could be used for criminal or counterintelligence purposes." Fingerprints also could be trafficked on the black market for profit — or used to blow the covers of spies and other covert and clandestine officers, the research service found. And if they're compromised, fingerprints can't be reissued like a new credit card, the report says, making "recovery from the breach more challenging for some." vivaoporto Also points out that these same hackers are believed to be responsible for hacking United Airlines.

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Categories: Science

The World’s Most Dangerous Volcano May Kill Another City

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:39pm

What can be done to prepare Naples for the volcano in their midst?

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Categories: Science

This Is Still Our Best Theory For MH370

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:31pm

Fifteen months later, we have no idea know what happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. But we keep going back to a theory posited by a pilot Chris Goodfellow just days after March 2014 disappearance. Goodfellow thinks an electrical fire in the cockpit could have caused the loss of transponders and communications in the aircraft. […]

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Categories: Science

Entertainment Podcast: Adam Sandler Is Out, Virtual Reality Is In

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:30pm

This week's entertainment podcast is packed full of VR hedgehogs, HBO hits, and Adam Sandler misses. Join us, won't you?

The post Entertainment Podcast: Adam Sandler Is Out, Virtual Reality Is In appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Bioethicists call for end to 'pay-to-play' clinical research

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:24pm
Charging people to participate in research studies is likely to undermine the fundamental ethical basis of clinical research, according to a new paper written by bioethicists. The paper outlines the arguments for and against the concept of "pay-to-play" research, ultimately concluding that this type of approach compromises the overall integrity of clinical research.
Categories: Science

Red grape chemical may help prevent bowel cancer but less is more

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:23pm
Resveratrol, a chemical found in red grapes, is more effective in smaller doses at preventing bowel cancer in mice than high doses, according to new research. Previous research looked at high doses of purified resveratrol to study its potential to prevent cancer. This is the first study to look at the effects of a lower daily dose -- equivalent to the amount of resveratrol found in one large (approx. 250ml) glass of red wine -- comparing it with a dose 200 times higher.
Categories: Science

Early prosocial behavior good predictor of kids' future

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:21pm
Kindergarteners' social-emotional skills are a significant predictor of their future education, employment and criminal activity, among other outcomes, according to a study.
Categories: Science

'Failed stars' host powerful auroral displays

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:21pm
By observing a brown dwarf 20 light-years away using both radio and optical telescopes, astronomers have found that such so-called failed stars host powerful auroras near their magnetic poles -- additional evidence that brown dwarfs are more like giant planets than small stars.
Categories: Science

Tiny grains of rice hold big promise for greenhouse gas reductions, bioenergy

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:21pm
Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world's population, but the paddies it's grown in contributes up to 17 percent of global methane emissions -- about 100 million tons a year. Now, with the addition of a single gene, rice can be cultivated to emit virtually no methane, more starch for a richer food source and biomass for energy production.
Categories: Science

Dense star clusters shown to be binary black hole factories

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:20pm
The merger of two black holes is one of the most sought-after observations of modern astronomy. The first observatories capable of directly detecting gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of spacetime predicted by Albert Einstein -- will begin observing the universe later this year. When these waves rolling in from space are detected on Earth for the first time, astrophysicists predict astronomers will 'hear,' through these waves, five times more colliding black holes than previously expected.
Categories: Science

Vaccination rates in older adults fall short of targets

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:20pm
A new white paper discusses factors for underutilization of vaccines in older adults and offers recommendations to improve immunization rates.
Categories: Science

Shoring up Tor: Researchers mount successful attacks against popular anonymity network -- and show how to prevent them

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:20pm
With 2.5 million daily users, the Tor network is the world's most popular system for protecting Internet users' anonymity. Researchers have now demonstrated a vulnerability in Tor's design. They show that an adversary could infer a hidden server's location, or the source of the information reaching a given Tor user, by analyzing the traffic patterns of encrypted data passing through a single computer in the all-volunteer Tor network.
Categories: Science

Colonoscopies of the future: Adjustable-focus endoscope helps to reduce discomfort

Science Daily - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:19pm
An endoscopic probe that delivers adjustable-focus capabilities in a slimmer package has been developed by researchers. The findings could ultimately facilitate more effective and less painful imaging of internal tissues.
Categories: Science

Interviews: Ask Richard Stallman a Question

Slashdot - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 6:00pm
RMS founded the GNU Project, the Free Software Foundation, and remains one of the most important and outspoken advocates for software freedom. He now spends much of his time fighting excessive extension of copyright laws, digital restrictions management, and software patents. RMS has agreed to answer your questions about GNU/Linux, how GNU relates to Linux the kernel, free software, why he disagrees with the idea of open source, and other issues of public concern. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one question per post.

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Categories: Science

How You Lose an Airplane in the 21st Century

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 5:53pm

There's no radar tracking over the open ocean, which is a big, deep place.

The post How You Lose an Airplane in the 21st Century appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Yahoo’s Video Messenger Is Weird, But Actually Pretty Cool

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 5:53pm

Yahoo's new Livetext app is trying to combine the ease of texting with the personal touch of phone calls.

The post Yahoo’s Video Messenger Is Weird, But Actually Pretty Cool appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Stephen Hawking on Reddit: Ask Him a Question on Artificial Intelligence

Space.com - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 5:50pm
Got questions about artificial intelligence? Stephen Hawking has answers.
Categories: Science

The Deceptive Simplicity of Intel’s New Memory Tech

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 5:42pm

The new computer memory from Intel and Micron is deceptively simple.

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Categories: Science

The Perfect Medium for Bauhaus Artists? Postcards

Wired News - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 5:32pm

Postcards are industrialized pieces of art—cheap to produce, made in bulk, and free of envelopes.

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Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Caps Lock Key Still So Prominent On Keyboards?

Slashdot - Wed, 29/07/2015 - 5:18pm
Esther Schindler writes: The developers at .io are into tracking things, I guess. In any case, a few weeks back they decided to track team performance in terms of keyboard and mouse activity during the working day. They installed a simple Chrome plugin on every Macbook and collected some statistics. For instance, developers have fewer keypresses than editors and managers—around 4k every day. Managers type more than 23k characters per day. And so on. Some pretty neat statistics. But the piece that jumped out at me was this: "What's curious—the least popular keys are Capslock and Right Mouse Button. Somewhere around 0.1% of all keypresses together. It's time to make some changes to keyboards." I've been whining about this for years. Why is it that the least-used key on my keyboard is not just in a prominent position, but also bigger than most other keys? I can I invest in a real alternate keyboard with a different layout (my husband's a big fan of the Kinesis keyboards, initially to cope with carpal tunnel). But surely it's time to re-visit the standard key layout? What keys would you eliminate or re-arrange?

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Categories: Science