Curb your immune enthusiasm

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
Scientists have discovered how to prevent undesirable immune attacks on therapeutic viruses.
Categories: Science

Why the lights don't dim when we blink

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
Every few seconds, our eyelids automatically shutter and our eyeballs roll back in their sockets. So why doesn't blinking plunge us into intermittent darkness and light? New research shows that the brain works extra hard to stabilize our vision despite our fluttering eyes.
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As cells age, the fat content within them shifts

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
As cells age and stop dividing, their fat content changes, along with the way they produce and break down fat and other molecules classified as lipids. By providing broad insights into the connection between lipids and cellular aging, the findings open the door for additional research that could support the development of lipid-based approaches to preventing cell death or hastening it in cancerous tumors.
Categories: Science

Your 'anonmyized' web browsing history may not be anonymous

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
Researchers have written computer programs that found patterns among anonymized data about web traffic and used those patterns to identify individual users. The researchers note web users with active social media are vulnerable to the attack.
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Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
For the first time, scientists have found that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel to affect a specific improvement in precise memory. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing the building you are looking for has a specific color, shape and location, rather than simply knowing the part of town it's in. Precise memory is crucial for normal functioning, and it is often lost in people with memory disorders.
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Treated carbon pulls radioactive elements from water

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
Scientists have developed inexpensive, oxidized carbon particles that extract radioactive metals from water. They said their materials may help purify contaminated waters stored after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.
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Researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:45pm
Researchers have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper, researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.
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5G Internet is the 'Beginning of the Fourth Industrial Revolution'

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:40pm
Next-generation 5G mobile internet technology marks the beginning of the "fourth industrial revolution," the chief executive of Turkey's leading telecoms player told CNBC on Thursday. From a report: 5G is viewed as a technology that can support the developing Internet of Things (IOT) market, which refers to millions -- or potentially billions -- of internet-connected devices that are expected soon to come on to the market. Kaan Terzioglu, the chief executive of Turkcell, which has a market capitalization of $23 billion, touted the potential of the technology, saying that while 4G revolutionized the consumer market, 5G could transform the industrial space. "I think this is the beginning of the fourth generation of the industrial revolution. This will be the platform linking billions of devices together," Terzioglu told CNBC at the World Economic Forum in Davos. Turkcell has been working on 5G technologies since 2013 and this week completed a test in partnership with Ericsson, using the next-generation internet.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

WIRED Book Club: We Have Wrapped Our Tentacles Around Binti

Wired News - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:00pm
In Nnedi Okorafor's Hugo-winning novella, a young student confronts many-tentacled monsters—and it's not even her first day of school yet. The post WIRED Book Club: We Have Wrapped Our Tentacles Around Binti appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Some Colleges Have More Students From the Top 1 Percent Than the Bottom 60

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:00pm
Students at elite colleges are even richer than experts realized, according to a new study based on millions of anonymous tax filings and tuition records. At 38 colleges in America, including five in the Ivy League -- Dartmouth, Princeton, Yale, Penn and Brown -- more students came from the top 1 percent of the income scale than from the entire bottom 60 percent. From a report on the NYTimes (alternate non-paywall link): Roughly one in four of the richest students attend an elite college -- universities that typically cluster toward the top of annual rankings (you can find more on our definition of "elite" at the bottom). In contrast, less than one-half of 1 percent of children from the bottom fifth of American families attend an elite college; less than half attend any college at all. Colleges often promote their role in helping poorer students rise in life, and their commitments to affordability. But some elite colleges have focused more on being affordable to low-income families than on expanding access. "Free tuition only helps if you can get in," said Danny Yagan, an assistant professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and one of the authors of the study.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Roots of related genetic diseases found in cell powerhouses

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:56pm
Scientists have discovered the mechanisms behind a genetic change known to cause a set of related diseases.
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Ants find their way even when going backwards

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:54pm
Ants can get their bearings whatever the orientation of their body, new research shows. Their brains may be smaller than the head of a pin, but ants are excellent navigators that use celestial and terrestrial cues to memorize their paths. To do so, they use several regions of the brain simultaneously, proving once again that the brain of insects is more complex than thought.
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New method could turbocharge drug discovery, protein research

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:54pm
A team led by scientists has developed a versatile new method that should enhance the discovery of new drugs and the study of proteins.
Categories: Science

Leica Debuts Its New M10 Camera and, Yep, It’s Gorgeous

Wired News - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:27pm
The successor to the M only shoots stills, and you'll pay a lot for that red dot. The post Leica Debuts Its New M10 Camera and, Yep, It's Gorgeous appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

ProtonMail Adds Tor Onion Site To Fight Risk Of State Censorship

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:20pm
ProtonMail now has a home on the dark web. The encrypted email provider announced Thursday it will allow its users to access the site through the Tor anonymity service. From a report: Swiss-based PGP end-to-end encrypted email provider, ProtonMail, now has an onion address, allowing users to access its service via a direct connection to the Tor anonymizing network -- in what it describes as an active measure aimed at defending against state-sponsored censorship. The startup, which has amassed more than two million users for its e2e encrypted email service so far, launching out of beta just over a year ago, says it's worried about an increased risk of state-level blocking of pro-privacy tools -- pointing to recent moves such as encryption messaging app Signal being blocked in Egypt, and the UK passing expansive surveillance legislation that mandates tracking of web activity and can also require companies to eschew e2e encryption and backdoor products. The service also saw a bump in sign ups after the election of Donald Trump as US president, last fall -- with web users apparently seeking a non-US based secure email provider in light of the incoming commander-in-chief's expansive digital surveillance powers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Affordable Care Act made cancer screening more accessible for millions, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:04pm
The Affordable Care Act helped make recommended cancer screening more affordable and accessible for millions of Americans, according to new research.
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The type, not just the amount, of sugar consumption matters in risk of health problems

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:04pm
The type of sugar you eat—and not just calorie count—may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function.
Categories: Science

Technological progress alone won't stem resource use

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:02pm
While some scientists believe that the world can achieve significant dematerialization through improvements in technology, a new study finds that technological advances alone will not bring about dematerialization and, ultimately, a sustainable world. The researchers found that no matter how much more efficient and compact a product is made, consumers will only demand more of that product and in the long run increase the total amount of materials used in making that product.
Categories: Science

Caves in central China show history of natural flood patterns

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:02pm
Researchers have found that major flooding and large amounts of precipitation occur on 500-year cycles in central China. These findings shed light on the forecasting of future floods and improve understanding of climate change over time and the potential mechanism of strong precipitation in monsoon regions.
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Creating atomic scale nanoribbons

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 5:02pm
A recent study has demonstrated the first important step toward integrating atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (APGNRs) onto nonmetallic substrates.
Categories: Science