Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals the situation was far worse, with auditors finding the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals the situation was far worse, with auditors finding the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals the situation was far worse, with auditors finding the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals the situation was far worse, with auditors finding the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals the situation was far worse, with auditors finding the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals the situation was far worse, with auditors finding the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals that the situation was far worse with auditors finding that the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Secret Memo Slams Canadian Police On Inaccurate ISP Request Records

Slashdot - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Last fall, Daniel Therrien, the government's newly appointed Privacy Commissioner of Canada, released the annual report on the Privacy Act, the legislation that governs how government collects, uses, and discloses personal information. The lead story from the report was the result of an audit of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police practices regarding warrantless requests for telecom subscriber information. Michael Geist now reports that a secret internal memo reveals that the situation was far worse with auditors finding that the records from Canada's lead law enforcement agency were unusable since they were "inaccurate and incomplete."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

New care model enhances psychological, cognitive and physical recovery of ICU survivors

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
The Critical Care Recovery Center care model -- the nation's first collaborative care concept focusing on the extensive cognitive, physical and psychological recovery needs of intensive care unit survivors -- decreases the likelihood of serious illness after discharge from an ICU, investigators report.
Categories: Science

Basal cell carcinoma drug encourages both cancer regression and loss of taste in patients

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
Many patients undergoing chemotherapy experience severe taste disruptions that make eating a challenge at a time when maintaining good nutrition is extremely important. Now, researchers report that they have identified the pathway responsible for taste changes among users of chemotherapy drugs that treat basal cell carcinoma.
Categories: Science

Peanut consumption associated with decreased total mortality and mortality from cardiovascular diseases

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
Researchers have examined the association of nut and peanut consumption with mortality among low-income and racially diverse populations and found that intake of peanuts was associated with fewer deaths, especially from heart disease.
Categories: Science

Results challenge conventional wisdom about where the brain begins processing visual information

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
Neuroscientists generally think of the front end of the human visual system as a simple light detection system: The patterns produced when light falls on the retina are relayed to the visual cortex at the rear of the brain, where all of the "magic" happens that transforms these patterns into the three-dimensional world view that we perceive with our mind's eye. Now, however, a brain imaging study challenges this basic assumption.
Categories: Science

Key to tuberculosis resistance found

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
The cascade of events leading to bacterial infection and the immune response is mostly understood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to the bacteria that causes tuberculosis have remained a mystery -- until now. Researchers have uncovered how a bacterial molecule controls the body's response to TB infection and suggest that adjusting the level of this of this molecule may be a new way to treat the disease.
Categories: Science

New genetic syndrome found, arising from errors in 'master switch' during early development

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
Analyzing a puzzling multisystem disorder in three children, genetic experts have identified a new syndrome, shedding light on key biological processes during human development. The investigators named the disorder CHOPS syndrome, with the acronym representing a group of symptoms seen in the affected children: cognitive impairment and coarse facies (facial features), heart defects, obesity, pulmonary involvement, short stature and skeletal dysplasia (abnormal bone development).
Categories: Science

Munching bugs thwart eager trees, reducing the carbon sink

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:16pm
Hungry, plant-eating insects may limit the ability of forests to take up elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, reducing their capacity to slow human-driven climate change, a new study suggests.
Categories: Science

Guidelines suggest blood thinners for more women, seniors with AFib

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:15pm
Nearly all women and people over 65 in the U.S. with atrial fibrillation are advised to take blood thinners under new guidelines. Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. It affects about 2.7 million people in the U.S. Anticoagulant drugs help prevent blood from clotting and potentially causing stroke.
Categories: Science

Sleep-walking neurons: Brain's GPS never stops working -- even during sleep

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:15pm
Navigational brain cells that help sense direction are as electrically active during deep sleep as they are during wake time, scientists have discovered. Such information could be useful in treating navigational problems associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders.
Categories: Science

Study on adolescent bariatric surgery safety concludes

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:15pm
Cardiovascular risks of severe pediatric obesity, assessed among a recent study, have been recently published. The authors found that severely obese adolescents carry not only excess weight, but also have much higher risk for CVD than previously realized. Of the 242 participants in the cohort, 95 percent had at least one CVD risk factor. Seventy-five percent had elevated blood pressure (including hypertension and pre-hypertension), 50 percent had unhealthy cholesterol levels, and nearly three-quarters of the group were insulin resistant. Importantly, the study also confirmed that increasing weight in teenagers is associated with increases in blood sugar and blood pressure.
Categories: Science

Movement of cancer cells, tumor cell detection to be studied

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:15pm
Two grants will aid development of new methods and tools to better understand cancer metastasis and tumor cell detection. Metastasis is the process in which cells from a primary tumor break-off, enter the blood stream and create new tumors elsewhere in the body. The metastasis of tumor cells is what causes death in about 70 percent of cancer patients. The basic understanding of a tumor is that once the cells enter the body's highway system (blood flow), the cancer threat becomes increasingly dangerous. Previous research has led scientists to believe the most aggressive cells are soft and deformable so they can speed through the blood stream, squeezing through spaces of various sizes and shapes. The question is why.
Categories: Science

Insulin resistance in the brain, behavioral disorders: Direct link found

Science Daily - Mon, 02/03/2015 - 5:15pm
People with diabetes are more prone to anxiety and depression than those with other chronic diseases that require similar levels of management. Genetically modifying mice to make their brains resistant to insulin, scientists first found that the animals exhibited behaviors that suggest anxiety and depression, and then pinpointed a mechanism that lowers levels of the key neurotransmitter dopamine in areas of the brain associated with those conditions.
Categories: Science