Zero-G 3D Printer Set for Launch: What Will Be Made In Space First?

Space.com - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 5:13pm
The first-ever item to be 3D printed in space is being kept a well-guarded secret. The first 3D printer designed to operate in zero-g is set to launch to the space station to learn if 3D printing is viable in orbit. But what will it print first?
Categories: Science

See Jupiter and the Moon Meet Up in Pre-dawn Sky Saturday

Space.com - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 5:11pm
Look toward the eastern sky during the predawn hours tomorrow, and, weather permitting, your eyes will immediately be drawn to the two brightest objects in the sky: the moon and Jupiter.
Categories: Science

TrueCrypt Gets a New Life, New Name

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 5:08pm
storagedude writes: Amid ongoing security concerns, the popular open source encryption program TrueCrypt may have found new life under a new name. Under the terms of the TrueCrypt license — which was a homemade open source license written by the authors themselves rather than a standard one — a forking of the code is allowed if references to TrueCrypt are removed from the code and the resulting application is not called TrueCrypt. Thus, CipherShed will be released under a standard open source license, with long-term ambitions to become a completely new product.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Genetically driven gut feelings help female flies choose a mate

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:49pm
Even among flies, mating is a complicated ritual. Their elaborate, and entirely innate, courtship dance combines multiple motor skills with advanced sensory cues. Now, researchers have determined that the Abdominal-B (Abd-B) gene, previously known as the gene that sculpts the posterior parts of the developing fly, is also important for this complex behavior, at least in the case of female flies.
Categories: Science

Science Has a Sexual Assault Problem

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:26pm
cold fjord writes: Phys.org reports, "The life sciences have come under fire recently with a study published in PLOS ONE that investigated the level of sexual harassment and sexual assault of trainees in academic fieldwork environments. The study found 71% of women and 41% of men respondents experienced sexual harassment, while 26% of women and 6% of men reported experiencing sexual assault. The research team also found that within the hierarchy of academic field sites surveyed, the majority of incidents were perpetrated by peers and supervisors. The New York Times notes, "Most of these women encountered this abuse very early in their careers, as trainees. The travel inherent to scientific fieldwork increases vulnerability as one struggles to work within unfamiliar and unpredictable conditions."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Fingertip sensor gives robot unprecedented dexterity

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:22pm
Researchers have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable draped freely over a hook and insert it into a USB port.
Categories: Science

Gene responsible for traits involved in diabetes discovered

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:22pm
A new gene associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in rats, mice and in humans, has been discovered by researchers. 29 million Americans have diabetes -- more than nine percent of the total population. It is the 7th leading cause of death, and experts estimate diabetes is an underreported cause of death because of the comorbidities and complications associated with the disease.
Categories: Science

A refined approach to proteins at low resolution

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:22pm
Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determination of several structures at low resolution. Now, DEN refinement has been reviewed.
Categories: Science

Soft robotics 'toolkit' features everything a robot-maker needs

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:21pm
A new resource provides both experienced and aspiring researchers with the intellectual raw materials needed to design, build, and operate robots made from soft, flexible materials. With the advent of low-cost 3-D printing, laser cutters, and other advances in manufacturing technology, soft robotics is emerging as an increasingly important field.
Categories: Science

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:21pm
Engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users "train" their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.
Categories: Science

Millennials Don’t Care About Mobile Security, and Here’s What to Do About It

Wired News - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 4:19pm

As if the world hasn’t given Millennials enough flak and attention, a new study is providing corporate IT departments with a reason to fear employees in their 20s and 30s. According to a survey conducted by TrackVia, a do-it-yourself business application platform, 60% of the Millennials “aren’t concerned about corporate security when they use personal […]

The post Millennials Don’t Care About Mobile Security, and Here’s What to Do About It appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Minecraft Parent

Slashdot - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:44pm
HughPickens.com writes: Michael Agger has an interesting article in the New Yorker about parenting in the internet era and why Minecraft is the one game parents want their kids to play. He says, "Screens are no longer simply bicycles for the mind; they are bicycles that children can ride anywhere, into the virtual schoolyard where they might encounter disturbing news photos, bullies, creeps, and worse. Setting a child free on the Internet is a failure to cordon off the world and its dangers. It's nuts. ... The comfort of games is that they are partially walled off from the larger Internet, with their own communities and leaderboards. But what unsettles parents about Internet gaming, despite fond memories of after-school Nintendo afternoons, is its interconnectivity. Minecraft is played by both boys and girls, unusually. ... At its best, the game is not unlike being in the woods with your best friends. Parents also join in." According to Agger, the significance of Minecraft is how the game shows us that lively, pleasant virtual worlds can exist alongside our own, and that they are places where we want to spend time, where we learn and socialize. "To me what Minecraft represents is more than a hit game franchise," says new Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. "It's this open-world platform. If you think about it, it's the one game parents want their kids to play." We need to meet our kids halfway in these worlds, and try to guide them like we do in the real world, concludes Agger. "Who knows how Minecraft will change under Microsoft's ownership, but it's a historic game that has shown many of us a middle way to navigate the eternal screens debate."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Don't cry wolf: Drivers fed up with slowing down at inactive roadwork sites

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
Drivers are frustrated at slowing down at inactive roadwork sites are ignoring reduced speed limits, an Australian study has found. The survey involved more than 400 people who were asked to estimate their speed for a range of different roadwork site scenarios, some of which were inactive sites and others with road workers visible.
Categories: Science

Hadrosaur with huge nose discovered: Function of dinosaur's unusual trait a mystery

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs -- a newly discovered hadrosaur with a truly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by paleontologists, lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period.
Categories: Science

Simple test can help detect Alzheimer's before dementia signs show, study shows

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
A simple test that combines thinking and movement can help to detect heightened risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in a person, even before there are any telltale behavioural signs of dementia, researchers report, adding that the findings don't predict who will develop Alzheimer's disease, but they do show there is something different in the brains of those who go on to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's.
Categories: Science

Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer. The biosensor has been shown to be more than five times more sensitive than bioassay tests currently in use, and was able to provide results in a matter of minutes, opening up the possibility of a rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tool for patients.
Categories: Science

Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers have demonstrated how this happens, and it can help us better predict contamination risks, especially in the Arctic.
Categories: Science

Computers 1,000 times faster? Quick-change materials break silicon speed limit for computers

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
Faster, smaller, greener computers, capable of processing information up to 1,000 times faster than currently available models, could be made possible by replacing silicon with materials that can switch back and forth between different electrical states.
Categories: Science

Some patients with advanced, incurable cancer denied palliative care

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:06pm
Many patients with advanced, incurable cancer do not receive any palliative care, reveals new research. The findings are astonishing as they come at the same time as 15 new oncology centres in Europe, Canada, South America and Africa are being awarded the title of 'ESMO Designated Centre of Integrated Oncology and Palliative Care.'
Categories: Science

An anomaly in satellites' flybys confounds scientists

Science Daily - Fri, 19/09/2014 - 3:05pm
When space probes, such as Rosetta and Cassini, fly over certain planets and moons, in order to gain momentum and travel long distances, their speed changes slightly for an unknown reason. A researcher has now analyzed whether or not a hypothetical gravitomagnetic field could have an influence. However, other factors such as solar radiation, tides, or even relativistic effects or dark matter could be behind this mystery.
Categories: Science