UK's oldest deep-water Marine Protected Area successfully protects coral reefs

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 2:00pm
Deep, cold-water corals are very slow to recover from damage, a new, unique study shows. Therefore, say researchers, deep-water Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) protect vulnerable marine ecosystems most effectively when they are put in place before that damage occurs.
Categories: Science

Want to See Daniel Radcliffe’s Body Used as a Rocket? Here You Go

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 2:00pm
Check out a new clip from 'Swiss Army Man' here. The post Want to See Daniel Radcliffe’s Body Used as a Rocket? Here You Go appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Researchers Sue the Government Over Computer Hacking Law

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 2:00pm
The CFAA makes it illegal to violate a web site's terms of service, preventing researchers from investigating possible discrimination on sites. The post Researchers Sue the Government Over Computer Hacking Law appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google Found Disastrous Symantec and Norton Vulnerabilities That Are 'As Bad As It Gets'

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 2:00pm
Google's Project Zero team has discovered a heap of critical vulnerabilities in Symantec and Norton security products. The flaws, the team says, allow hackers to completely compromise people's machines by simply sending them malicious self-replicating code through unopened emails or un-clicked links. According to a Fortune report, the vulnerabilities affect millions of people who run the company's endpoint security and antivirus software -- all 17 enterprise products (Symantec brand) and eight consumer and small business products (Norton brand). Dan Goodin, reporting for Ars Technica:The flaws reside in the engine the products use to reverse the compression tools malware developers use to conceal their malicious payloads. The unpackers work by parsing code contained in files before they're allowed to be downloaded or executed. Because Symantec runs the unpackers directly in the operating system kernel, errors can allow attackers to gain complete control over the vulnerable machine. Tavis Ormandy, a researcher with Google's Project Zero, said a better design would be for unpackers to run in a security "sandbox," which isolates untrusted code from sensitive parts of an operating system.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

At the droplet of a hat: Capturing mixable liquid interaction

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:56pm
The spreading of mixable liquids into 'droplet hats' was observed for the first time, which could lead to insight into improving strategies for cleaning animals affected by oil spills.
Categories: Science

Cannabinoids remove plaque-forming Alzheimer's proteins from brain cells

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:56pm
Scientists have found preliminary evidence that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other compounds found in marijuana can promote the cellular removal of amyloid beta, a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer's disease.
Categories: Science

Changes in Antarctic sea ice production due to surrounding ice conditions

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:56pm
Antarctic sea ice production spanning more than 20 years has been understood through the analysis of satellite observations using specially developed techniques. The results of this analysis revealed that changes to the sea ice production in the Southern Ocean were caused mainly because of surrounding ice shelf and fast ice conditions, rather than by wind, temperature, or other factors.
Categories: Science

New clues about the aging brain's memory functions

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:56pm
Dopamine D2 receptor is linked to the long-term episodic memory, which function often reduces with age and due to dementia, report researchers. This new insight can contribute to the understanding of why some but not others are affected by memory impairment, they say.
Categories: Science

Unlocking the secrets of nerve regeneration

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:56pm
A glutamate receptor GluD2 was responsible for the regeneration of synapses in the cerebellum, researchers report at the conclusion of a recent study.
Categories: Science

Testing for malaria -- or cancer -- at home, via cheap paper strips

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:56pm
Chemists are developing paper strips that detect diseases including cancer and malaria -- for a cost of 50 cents per strip. The work was created as a way to get cheap malaria diagnoses into the hands of people in rural Africa and southeast Asia, where the disease kills hundreds of thousands of people and infects hundreds of millions every year.
Categories: Science

Large-scale stability of chromosomes

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
A new study adds detail to the theoretical models used in chromatin simulations and demonstrates that even when made up of a mixture of fibers with different properties chromatin does not alter its three-dimensional structure above a certain spatial resolution. This finding points to a need to improve on current techniques for experimental observation, which are characterized by a resolution that is still too low.
Categories: Science

Your blood can reveal your risk for heart disease

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
Traditional risk factors only explain a modest proportion of cardiac incidence. New bio markers can help general practitioners to predict patients risk of getting cardiac disease.
Categories: Science

Penguin population could drop 60 percent by end of the century

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
Approximately 30 percent of current Adélie penguin colonies may be in decline by 2060, researchers predict, and approximately 60 percent may be in decline by 2099. The declines are associated with warming -- many regions of Antarctica have warmed too much and further warming is no longer positive for the species.
Categories: Science

Vision through the clouds

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
Poor weather can often make the operation of rescue helicopters a highly risky business, and sometimes even impossible. A new helmet-mounted display may in the future be able to help pilots detect hazards at an early stage, even when their visibility is severely impaired: the information required to do this is created in an on-board computer and imported into digital eye glasses.
Categories: Science

Crucial peatlands carbon-sink vulnerable to rising sea levels

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
Rising sea-levels linked to global warming could pose a significant threat to the effectiveness of the world's peatland areas as carbon sinks, a new study has shown.
Categories: Science

Eczema: Daily 'soak and smear' or steer clear?

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
For a very long time, parents of kids who have eczema have asked doctors how often they should bathe their child. A new article offers insight into what the research indicates.
Categories: Science

Campgrounds alter jay behavior

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:48pm
Anyone who's gone camping has seen birds foraging for picnic crumbs, and according to new research, the availability of food in campgrounds significantly alters jays' behavior and may even change how they interact with other bird species.
Categories: Science

Amazon Puts Out the Fire With Budget Phones for Prime Members

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:01pm
After its own phone flopped, Amazon's subsidizing popular budget devices for Prime members. The post Amazon Puts Out the Fire With Budget Phones for Prime Members appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Clinton Tech Plan Reads Like Silicon Valley Wish List

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 1:00pm
theodp writes from a report via USA Today: "If there was any lingering doubt as to tech's favored presidential candidate," writes USA Today's Jon Swartz, "Hillary Clinton put an end to that Tuesday with a tech plan that reads like a Silicon Valley wish list. It calls for connecting every U.S. household to high-speed internet by 2020, reducing regulatory barriers and supporting Net neutrality rules, [which ban internet providers from blocking or slowing content.] It proposes investments in computer science and engineering education ("engage the private sector and nonprofits to train up to 50,000 computer science teachers in the next decade"), expansion of 5G mobile data, making inexpensive Wi-Fi available at more airports and train stations, and attaching a green card to the diplomas of foreign-born students earning STEM degrees." dcblogs shares with us a report from Computerworld that specifically discusses Clinton's support of green cards for foreign students who earn STEM degrees: As president, Hillary Clinton will support automatic green cards, or permanent residency, for foreign students who earn advanced STEM degrees. Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential candidate, wants the U.S. to "staple" green cards on the diplomas of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) masters and PhD graduates "from accredited institutions." Clinton outlined her plan in a broader tech policy agenda released today. Clinton's "staple" idea isn't new. It's what Mitt Romney, the GOP presidential candidate in 2012, supported. It has had bipartisan support in Congress. But the staple idea is controversial. Critics will say this provision will be hard to control, will foster age discrimination, and put pressure on IT wages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Tethys: Saturn's Icy Moon

Space.com - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 12:48pm
Numerous craters on Saturn's moon Tethys shine brightly, suggesting the presence of water-ice.
Categories: Science