How worms crawl: mathematical model challenges traditional view

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
A new mathematical model for earthworms and insect larvae challenges the traditional view of how these soft bodied animals get around. Researchers say that there is a far greater role for the body's mechanical properties and the local nerves which react to the surface that the animal is traveling across.
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First indirect evidence of so-far undetected strange baryons

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
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Exporting U.S. coal to Asia could drop emissions 21 percent

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
Under the right scenario, exporting U.S. coal to power plants in South Korea could lead to a 21 percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions compared to burning it at less energy-efficient U.S. plants. Other emissions, including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter, could also drop. But this success, researchers say, depends on which fuel source the coal replaces in South Korea, and which fuel is used to replace it in the U.S.
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Intimacy a strong motivator for PrEP HIV prevention

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
Many HIV-negative gay or bisexual men in steady relationships with other HIV-negative men don't always use condoms out of a desire for intimacy. That same desire, according to a new study, makes such men more inclined to use antiretroviral medications to prevent getting HIV, a recommended practice known as PrEP.
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Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
Today the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology took a stand on the promotion of childhood physical activity. This position stand provides an important overview of knowledge in the area of risk of physical activity for children and suggests both practical guidelines and a research agenda. Uniquely, this position stand addresses both benefits and risks of physical activity for children.
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First crystal structure of the C. difficile surface protein Cwp84

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
Clostridium difficile is a major problem as an aetiological agent for antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The mechanism by which the bacterium colonizes the gut during infection is poorly understood, but undoubtedly involves a myriad of components present on the bacterial surface. This study provides some insights that may help in developing a new type of drug to treat the infection.
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Zebrafish help unravel Alzheimer's disease

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study identifies the molecules responsible for this process.
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Why global warming is taking a break

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
The average temperature on Earth has barely risen over the past 16 years. Researchers in Switzerland have now found out why. And they believe that global warming is likely to continue again soon.
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C++14 Is Set In Stone

Slashdot - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:30pm
jones_supa (887896) writes "Apart from minor editorial tweaks, the ISO C++14 standard can be considered completed. Implementations are already shipping by major suppliers. C++14 is mostly an incremental update over C++11 with some new features like function return type deduction, variable templates, binary literals, generic lambdas, and so on. The official C++14 specification release will arrive later in the year, but for now Wikipedia serves as a good overview of the feature set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Opioid users breathe easier with novel drug to treat respiratory depression

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:29pm
People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally. A study has found that a new therapeutic drug, GAL-021, may reverse or prevent respiratory depression, or inadequate breathing, in patients taking opioid medication without compromising pain relief or increasing sedation.
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Organic photovoltaic cells of the future: Using charge formation efficiency to screen materials for future devices

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:29pm
Organic photovoltaic cells -- a type of solar cell that uses polymeric materials to capture sunlight -- show tremendous promise as energy conversion devices, thanks to key attributes such as flexibility and low-cost production, but have complex power conversion processes. To maneuver around this problem, researchers have developed a method to determine the absolute value of the charge formation efficiency. The secret of their method is the combination of two types of spectroscopy.
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Martian meteorite: Implications of a newly discovered mineral-rich structure

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:29pm
A new ovoid structure discovered in the Nakhla Martian meteorite is made of nanocrystalline iron-rich clay, contains a variety of minerals, and shows evidence of undergoing a past shock event from impact, with resulting melting of the permafrost and mixing of surface and subsurface fluids.
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Key to saving lives: Hands-only CPR

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:28pm
Cardiac arrest -- an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs -- is a leading cause of death. Each year, over 420,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately getting CPR from someone nearby.
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Using physics to design better drugs

Science Daily - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:28pm
Researchers are working to develop drugs by considering the dynamics -- including specific atomic motions -- of the enzymes that those drugs target.
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Supermassive Death: 3 Stars Eaten by Black Holes

Space.com - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:17pm
Astrophysicists have analyzed two decades-worth of X-ray data and discovered three events inside galactic cores that can be interpreted in only one way: stellar destruction.
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'Beam Me to Mars' Lets You Send Martian Messages to Fund Space Exploration

Space.com - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Uwingu launched its "Beam Me to Mars" project today (Aug. 19), inviting people to contribute, for a fee, to a "digital shout-out" that will send messages from Earth to the Red Planet on Nov. 28 — the 50th anniversary of Mars exploration.
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Budding Night Sky Photographer Sees a Stunning Crescent Moon (Image)

Space.com - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 2:53pm
John Nelson took this image of the crescent moon from the Pacific Northwest. See how he did it here.
Categories: Science

100 Years of Automotive Innovation, in One Amazing Display

Wired News - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 2:49pm
In an age where cars drive themselves, sip less fuel and go faster than ever, it can be hard to remember innovation isn’t a 21st century thing. For more than a century, brilliant minds have been working to make cars safer, more comfortable, and more powerful. The best part of the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, […]






Categories: Science

Iceland's Seismic Activity: A Repeat Show for Atmospheric Ash?

Slashdot - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 2:49pm
In 2010, ash spewed into the atmosphere by the volcano beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull glacier grounded European air traffic for days (and, partially, for weeks). As reported by The Guardian, a series of similarly situated earthquakes may herald a similar ash-ejecting erruption, and the country has raised its volcano risk to its second-most-severe rating (orange). From the article: Iceland met office seismologist Martin Hensch said the risk of any disruptive ash cloud similar to the one in 2010 would depend on how high any ash would be thrown, how much there would be and how fine-grained it would be. Bardarbunga is Iceland's largest volcanic system, located under the ice cap of the Vatnajokull glacier in the southeast of Iceland. It is in a different range to Eyjafjallajokull. The met office said in a statement it measured the strongest earthquake in the region since 1996 early on Monday and it now had strong indications of ongoing magma movement. "As evidence of magma movement shallower than 10km implies increased potential of a volcanic eruption, the Bardarbunga aviation colour code has been changed to orange," it said. "Presently there are no signs of eruption, but it cannot be excluded that the current activity will result in an explosive subglacial eruption, leading to an outburst flood and ash emission." ... Hensch said the biggest risk in Iceland itself was from flood waves from any eruption under the glacier. He said the area of Iceland mainly at risk of flooding was mostly uninhabited but that roads in the area had been closed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Categories: Science

Iceland's Seismic Acticity: A Repeat Show for Atmospheric Ash?

Slashdot - Tue, 19/08/2014 - 2:49pm
In 2010, ash spewed into the atmosphere by the volcano beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull glacier grounded European air traffic for days (and, partially, for weeks). As reported by The Guardian, a series of similarly situated earthquakes may herald a similar ash-ejecting erruption, and the country has raised its volcano risk to it's second-most-severe rating (orange). From the article: Iceland met office seismologist Martin Hensch said the risk of any disruptive ash cloud similar to the one in 2010 would depend on how high any ash would be thrown, how much there would be and how fine-grained it would be. Bardarbunga is Iceland's largest volcanic system, located under the ice cap of the Vatnajokull glacier in the southeast of Iceland. It is in a different range to Eyjafjallajokull. The met office said in a statement it measured the strongest earthquake in the region since 1996 early on Monday and it now had strong indications of ongoing magma movement. "As evidence of magma movement shallower than 10km implies increased potential of a volcanic eruption, the Bardarbunga aviation colour code has been changed to orange," it said. "Presently there are no signs of eruption, but it cannot be excluded that the current activity will result in an explosive subglacial eruption, leading to an outburst flood and ash emission." ... Hensch said the biggest risk in Iceland itself was from flood waves from any eruption under the glacier. He said the area of Iceland mainly at risk of flooding was mostly uninhabited but that roads in the area had been closed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science