Does Tech Need a Culture Shock?

Wired News - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:52pm

Leading scientists and designers are pushing for more racial, gender and geographic diversity in tech research and development. Only then will we create technology that reflects who we all are. Stanford’s Fei-Fei Li observes, “On the path to create better and better AI, this is actually an opportunity for us to understand humanity and ourselves […]

The post Does Tech Need a Culture Shock? appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

How Did Rosetta's 'Rubber Duck' Comet Form? | Animation

Space.com - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:36pm
The European Space Agency probe has returned stunning imagery of oddly shaped comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. A University of Bern astrophysicist has reconstructed the process in which this comet (and others like it) may have formed.
Categories: Science

Crowdfunded, Solar-powered Spacecraft Goes Silent

Slashdot - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:22pm
Last week saw the successful launch of the Planetary Society's LightSail spacecraft, the solar-powered satellite that runs Linux and was crowdfunded on Kickstarter. The spacecraft worked flawlessly for two days, but then fell silent, and the engineering team has been working hard on a fix ever since. They've pinpointed the problem: a software glitch. "Every 15 seconds, LightSail transmits a telemetry beacon packet. The software controlling the main system board writes corresponding information to a file called beacon.csv. If you're not familiar with CSV files, you can think of them as simplified spreadsheets—in fact, most can be opened with Microsoft Excel. As more beacons are transmitted, the file grows in size. When it reaches 32 megabytes—roughly the size of ten compressed music files—it can crash the flight system." Unfortunately, the only way to clear that CSV file is to reboot LightSail. It can be done remotely, but as anyone who deals with crashing computers understands, remote commands don't always work. The command has been sent a few dozen times already, but LightSail remains silent. The best hope may now be that the system spontaneously reboots on its own.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Severe flooding hits central Texas, Oklahoma

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:11pm
A stagnant upper-air pattern that spread numerous storms and heavy rains from central Texas up into Oklahoma has resulted in record flooding for parts of the Lone Star State.
Categories: Science

Restricting firearms access for people who misuse alcohol may prevent violence

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:11pm
Restricting access to firearms for people who misuse alcohol could prevent firearm violence, but policies that more clearly define alcohol misuse should be developed to facilitate enforcement, according to a review of existing research and public policies.
Categories: Science

New technique harnesses everyday seismic waves to image Earth

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:11pm
Earth researchers have devised a technique that transforms the tiny tremors generated by the everyday hustle and bustle of city life into a tool for probing the subsurface of Earth.
Categories: Science

Finding loopholes in the genome

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:11pm
R-loops, thought to initiate cellular mutations, genome breaks and diseases, may be identified with an accuracy of between 80-90 percent at lower costs and effort.
Categories: Science

'Green chemistry' to quantify the components of cosmetics

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:10pm
There are 10,000 components that can be used to make cosmetics. These components have to be monitored to guarantee consumer safety. Scientists have now developed three 'green' analytical methods to simultaneously analyze various components used in cosmetics. In these methods very little solvent is used and very little residue is produced in comparison with other analytical techniques.
Categories: Science

Entolimod may be a promising treatment option for many solid tumors

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:09pm
The first clinical study of the anticancer effects of the novel agent entolimod are now available. Findings confirm preclinical evidence that the agent, which is derived from salmonella flagellin, is worthy of further investigation as treatment for some of the most common and most resilient solid-tumor cancers.
Categories: Science

Dry mouth: Acupuncture-like electrical nerve stimulation may help

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:09pm
Phase III results indicate that acupuncture-like, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be equally effective as pilocarpine, the current prescription medication in a pill, to treat radiation-induced xerostomia (dry mouth), according to a new study published.
Categories: Science

You Can Finally, Actually, Really, Truly Post GIFs on Facebook

Wired News - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:09pm

Real, honest-to-goodness GIFs finally land on Facebook.

The post You Can Finally, Actually, Really, Truly Post GIFs on Facebook appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

What Deep Web’s Director Learned Investigating Silk Road

Wired News - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 2:00pm

If you to turn on Epix this weekend and think it's the news, you won't be alone. The network's new doc about Ross Ulbricht is incredibly timely.

The post What Deep Web’s Director Learned Investigating Silk Road appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Hacked Emails Reveal Russian Plans To Obtain Sensitive Western Tech

Slashdot - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 1:40pm
blando writes: A trove of emails provided to The Intercept detail Russian schemes to obtain a crucial component for military thermal-imaging systems. Though emails about the thermal imaging systems date back as far as 2006, the plans to acquire them began in earnest much more recently, in 2013. To try to hide Russian involvement, a company called Cyclone established a new company in the Republic of Cyprus. They did so with the help of a company called Rayfast, which was owned by three other companies itself. After obfuscating the new company's ownership and military ties, they reached out to several Western companies who worked with the technology.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Kevlar ‘Wallpaper’ Could Protect Soldiers From RPG Blasts

Wired News - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 1:00pm

A US military research lab has created a Kevlar-lined "wallpaper" that could help fortify temporary structures in a war zone.

The post Kevlar ‘Wallpaper’ Could Protect Soldiers From RPG Blasts appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Feds Bust a Dark-Web Counterfeit Coupon Kingpin

Slashdot - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 12:57pm
Sparrowvsrevolution writes: The dark web has become the go-to corner of the Internet to buy drugs, stolen financial data, guns...and counterfeit coupons for Clif bars and condoms? The FBI indicted Beauregard Wattigney yesterday for wire fraud and trademark counterfeiting on digital black market sites Silk Road and Silk Road 2. Wattigney allegedly spoofed coupons for dozens of products and sold collections of them online in exchange for Bitcoin. The FBI accused him of doing $1 million worth of collective damage to the companies he made coupons for, but a fraud consultancy believes the total financial cost of his actions was much higher. Wattigney also offered expensive lessons that taught people how to make their own coupons. "In his tutorials, [he] explained the simple breakdown of barcode creation using the increasingly universal GS1 standard: GS1 codes begin with a 'company prefix' that can be copied from any of the company's products. The next six digits are the 'offer code,' which can be any random number for a counterfeit coupon, followed by the savings amount listed in cents and the required number of item purchases necessary to receive the discount."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Microscopic sonic screwdriver invented

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 12:35pm
Engineers have created tiny acoustic vortices and used them to grip and spin microscopic particles suspended in water.
Categories: Science

Inmates denied methadone treatment less likely to seek it once free

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 12:35pm
When people on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) are incarcerated in the United States, they are almost always forced off of the addiction-controlling medicine. In a randomized trial, inmates allowed to stay on MMT while in jail proved much more likely to seek treatment after release than those whose treatment was interrupted.
Categories: Science

Parental smoking puts nearly half a million UK children into poverty

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 12:35pm
Smoking is not only bad for your health; it also puts 400,000 children in poverty in the UK alone. Smoking places a financial burden on low income families, suggesting that parents are likely to forgo basic household and food necessities in order to fund their addiction.
Categories: Science

Many UK patients with gonorrhea prescribed outdated antibiotics

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 12:35pm
Many UK patients with gonorrhea are being prescribed antibiotics that are no longer recommended for treating the infection by their family doctor, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
Categories: Science

End European agreements with tobacco industry designed to curb smuggling, urge experts

Science Daily - Fri, 29/05/2015 - 12:35pm
The agreements drawn up between the European Union and the four major transnational tobacco companies, to crack down on cigarette smuggling and recoup lost tax revenues, are failing to meet their stated aims, concludes research.
Categories: Science