Lattes in Space! Espresso Machine Will Launch to Space Station

Space.com - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 6:36pm
An espresso machine on its way to the International Space Station in 2015 made its public debut at the International Astronomical Congress on Sept. 29. The "ISSPresso" project aims to give astronauts high-quality coffee in orbit.
Categories: Science

Novel method for making electrical cellulose fibers

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 6:34pm
By using liquid salts during formation instead of harsh chemicals, fibers that conduct electricity can be strengthened, according to new research.
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Memory loss associated with Alzheimer's reversed: Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 6:34pm
In the first, small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories beginning within three to six months after the program’s start.
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The Golden Age of IT: The Future Is Bright — If You Embrace the Empowered Employee

Wired News - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 6:25pm

When thinking about your IT department, words like “user friendly” and “responsive” are not the first that come to mind. More likely, it would be “unresponsive” or even “the department of no.” Sadly, if you asked your IT department how they think they’re doing, they would say the same. A survey RES software conducted with […]

The post The Golden Age of IT: The Future Is Bright — If You Embrace the Empowered Employee appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Trade You a Dragon? NASA's Private Crew Capsules Now Collectible Cards

Space.com - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 6:03pm
NASA's draft picks for its private spacecraft team now have their own rookie cards. The agency debuted 'collectible cards' featuring the Boeing and SpaceX capsules it selected to fly astronauts to the International Space Station.
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Microsoft Announces Windows 10

Slashdot - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 6:00pm
Today at a press conference in San Francisco, Microsoft announced the new version of their flagship operating system, called Windows 10. (Yes, t-e-n. I don't know.) With the new version of the operating system, they'll be unifying the application platform for all devices: desktops, laptops, consoles, tablets, and phones. As early leaks showed, the Start Menu is back — it's a hybrid of old and new, combining a list of applications with a small group of resizable tiles that can include widgets. Metro-style apps can now each operate inside their own window (video). There's a new, multiple-desktop feature, which power users have been demanding for years, and also a feature that lets users easily grab objects from one desktop and transfer it to another. The command line is even getting some love. The Technical Preview builds for desktops and laptops will be available tomorrow through the Windows Insider Program. They're requesting feedback from customers. Windows 10 will launch in late 2015.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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How RAM Scrapers Work: The Sneaky Tools Behind the Latest Credit Card Hacks

Wired News - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:55pm

In the world of hacking, every malicious tool has its heyday---that period when it rules the underground forums and media headlines and is the challenger keeping computer security pros on their toes. Viruses and worms have each had their day in the spotlight. Remote-access Trojans, which allow a hacker to open and maintain a secret backdoor on infected systems, have had their reign as well. These days, though, point-of-sale RAM scrapers are what's making the news.

The post How RAM Scrapers Work: The Sneaky Tools Behind the Latest Credit Card Hacks appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Microsoft Unveils New Operating System, Dubbed Windows 10

Wired News - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:39pm

Microsoft has unveiled its initial work on the next version of the Windows operating system, calling it Windows 10.

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Categories: Science

Depression increasing across the United States

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:28pm
Americans are more depressed now than they have been in decades, a recent study shows. Analyzing data from 6.9 million adolescents and adults from all over the country, researchers found that Americans now report more psychosomatic symptoms of depression, such as trouble sleeping and trouble concentrating, than their counterparts in the 1980s.
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eBay To Spin Off PayPal

Slashdot - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:28pm
In 2002, eBay bought PayPal for $1.5 billion in stock. Nowadays, PayPal's yearly revenues exceed $7 billion, and investors are worried that eBay and PayPal together are too big to compete effectively. (They're also too big to be acquired, which is on their minds after the ludicrously successful Alibaba IPO.) To solve that problem, eBay today announced it will be spinning off PayPal in 2015, creating two separate publicly traded companies. eBay's current CEO is stepping down, and each of the companies will have a new CEO. "As part of the separation, eBay and PayPal will sign arm’s length commercial operating agreements to work together, with payments on both sides for various referrals and services. That’s no surprise since about 30 percent of PayPal’s business is still on eBay, although that is down from 50 percent only a few years ago."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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High-speed drug screen developed

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:27pm
Engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients.
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How to predict who will suffer the most from stress

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:27pm
New research has found a way to identify those most susceptible to stress. That's a huge help for health-care professionals working to stop stress before it gets out of control. "By pinpointing those in the general population who are most vulnerable to stress, we can intervene before they hit the breaking point -- and hopefully prevent the negative consequences of stress by doing so. That's why it's important to have an objective diagnostic tool like this one," a researcher says.
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Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:27pm
The serious, complex and unique health and social challenges facing Ireland's intellectual disability population are outlined in a new report. The study is the first study of its kind in Europe and the only one in the world with the ability to compare the aging of people with intellectual disability directly with the general aging population.
Categories: Science

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:25pm
Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010. The study also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years.
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Revisiting Stokes drift: Waves of the future

Science Daily - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:25pm
The 19th-century 'Stokes drift' concept that a tiny sphere on a small wave would trace a spiral, not a closed circle, was assumed to be unlikely to occur in nature. But using 21st-century technologies, scientists found that not only do the particles move, they move predictably, and can even be planned.
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Antarctica Has Lost Enough Ice to Cause a Measurable Shift in Gravity

Wired News - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:19pm

The study further confirms global warming is changing Antarctica in fundamental ways.

The post Antarctica Has Lost Enough Ice to Cause a Measurable Shift in Gravity appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Bellabeat: A Fitbit for Pregnancy That Monitors a Baby’s Day

Wired News - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 5:00pm

Today, the company is releasing three new products that take advantage of women’s growing desire to track every heartbeat and pound gained.

The post Bellabeat: A Fitbit for Pregnancy That Monitors a Baby’s Day appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

HP Introduces Sub-$100 Windows Tablet

Slashdot - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 4:46pm
jfruh writes While Windows-based tablets haven't exactly set the world on fire, Microsoft hasn't given up on them, and its hardware partners haven't either. HP has announced a series of Windows tablets, with the 7-inch low-end model, the Stream 7, priced at $99. The Stream brand is also being used for low-priced laptops intended to compete with Chromebooks (which HP also sells). All are running Intel chips and full Windows, not Windows RT.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Apps: Fad or the Future?

Wired News - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 4:35pm

There’s always discussion of “bubbles” when apps like SnapChat get lofty valuations. With a new raise at a valuation of $10B from KPCB, you can’t blame some observers if they balk at the company that has yet to present a clear business model or revenue streams. Rightfully so: app developers know that monetization or user […]

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Categories: Science

Do neurons see what we tell them to see?

Kurzweil AI - Tue, 30/09/2014 - 4:17pm

Which U.S. president do you see in this merged image? (Credit: Q. Quiroga et al./Neuron)

Neurons programmed to fire at specific faces may have more affect on conscious recognition of faces than the  images themselves, neuroscientists have found.

Subjects presented with a blended face, such as an amalgamation of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, had significantly more firing of such face-specific neurons when they recognized the blended or morphed face as one person or the other.

Results of the study led by Christof Koch at the Allen Institute for Brain Science were published (open access) online in the journal Neuron.

Some neurons in the region of the brain known as the medial temporal lobe are observed to be extremely selective in the stimuli they respond to. A cell may only fire in response to different pictures of a particular person who is very familiar to the subject (such as loved one or a celebrity, as in the famous “Jennifer Aniston neuron“), the person’s written or spoken name, or recalling the person from memory.

“These highly specific cells are an entry point to investigate how the brain makes meaning out of visual information,” explains Christof Koch, Chief Scientific Officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science and senior author on the paper* . “We wanted to know how these cells responded not just to a simple image of a person’s face, but to a more ambiguous image of that face averaged or morphed with another person’s face.”

For the trials, subjects were first shown the “adaptor” image of the face of individuals such as Bill Clinton or George W. Bush , and then an ambiguous face that was a blend of both faces. Primed with the Clinton image, subjects tended to recognize Bush’s face in the blended image, while subjects who saw Bush’s face first recognized the blended face as Clinton. That is, even though the blended images were identical, subjects tended to consciously perceive the identity of face to which they were not adapted.

So do the selective neurons respond to the actual image on the screen, or more to the perception that the image causes in your brain. The researchers tested that and found that when subjects recognized the ambiguous face as belonging to Clinton, their Clinton-specific neurons fired.

However, when subjects recognized that same face as Bush, the “Clinton neurons” fired significantly less. These results indicated that conscious recognition of the face played a crucial role in whether the neurons fired, rather than the raw visual stimulus.

“This distinction may help us glean insight into how the brain takes raw visual information and transforms it into something meaningful, which can be further modulated by other aspects of experience in the brain,” explains Koch.

Or as comedian Richard Pryor put it, “Who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?”

Which raises a broader question: how do our past experiences bias our perception of abstract events (like climate change), based on our own different experiences?

* The study was carried out by neuroscientists Rodrigo Quian Quiroga at the University of Leicester, Alexander Kraskov at University College London, and Florian Mormann at the University of Bonn, under the clinical supervision of neurosurgeon Itzhak Fried at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical School.

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