After two years on antiretroviral therapy, survival in South African patients meets rates from North America

Science Daily - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:27pm
Provided that therapy is started promptly, South Africans with HIV have chances of remaining alive beyond two years on antiretroviral therapy that are comparable to those of North American patients, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Toyota and Tesla May Work Together Again

Slashdot - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:20pm
cartechboy writes: Tesla and Toyota have already worked together a few times. The factory in which Tesla builds the electric Model S? It bought that from Toyota. The Toyota RAV4 EV? The battery and software tuning was done by Tesla. Now it sounds like Tesla and Toyota might have another significant project in the pipeline in the next two or three years. Tesla CEO Musk said such a project could be "on a much higher volume level" than the firm's last project with Toyota, the RAV4 EV. Toyota currently has a 2.4 percent stake in Tesla Motors and has sold 2,130 RAV4 EVs through August. For its part, Toyota has no comment regarding Musk's statements about the future project. Given Toyota's stance on electric cars, Musk's comment is a bit confusing. So what exactly will this joint project be?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Watch: Hypnotizing Soundscapes Made From Cardboard

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:16pm
As the DC motors rev up, you hear the balls thwacking against the thin drum of the cardboard.






Categories: Science

Apple Unveils Its Smartwatch, Bigger iPhones, and a Mobile Wallet

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:16pm
[tumblr host="wishwecouldtellumore.tumblr.com" wide_images=true] [HTML1] CUPERTINO, CA—Apple is about to reveal the next generation of the iPhone, and from what we know so far, its mobile ecosystem is poised to become a bigger part of our lives than ever before. Apple’s media event kicks off at 10 AM PT here at Cupertino’s Flint Center for the […]






Categories: Science

Apple’s New Mobile Wallet Lets You Pay With a Tap of Your iPhone

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:16pm
Using Apple Pay couldn't be easier---simply tap your iPhone at a payment terminal.
Categories: Science

Everything You Need to Know About the Apple Watch

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:16pm
The wearable space just got bigger. Way bigger. Apple debuted its long awaited wearable Tuesday, simply called Apple Watch.
Categories: Science

Insecure Email Is Here to Stay: Let’s Fix It

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:16pm
In his thoughtful parsing of what email is and will become in The Atlantic, Alexis Madrigal writes that email is the “exciting landscape of freedom amidst the walled gardens of social networking and messaging services.” Email is easy, open, and ubiquitous. We spend as much as 80% of our workday in our email inbox and […]
Categories: Science

Cetane data used for development of energy efficient fuels and engines updated

Science Daily - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:45pm
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released a long-anticipated update to the source-of-record for cetane number data. This information is vital to the development of new, energy-efficient, low-carbon fuels and compatible engines. Researchers, as well as members of the engine, vehicle, and fuel industries, rely on these numbers to target compounds for development of new fuels capable of greater energy efficiency, cleaner emissions, and maximum performance in diesel engines.
Categories: Science

Whooping cough vaccine recommended for pregnant women amid spike in cases

Science Daily - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
Expectant moms should be vaccinated for pertussis, or whooping cough, during their third trimester, according to obstetricians. Those in close contact with the infant also should be up to date with their whooping cough vaccine.
Categories: Science

Developing first comprehensive guidelines for management of sickle cell disease

Science Daily - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has released the first comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines for management of sickle cell disease from birth to end of life. Sickle cell anemia is the most common form of sickle cell disease, a serious disorder in which the body makes sickle-shaped red blood cells.
Categories: Science

A decade of research identifies threats to Adirondack loons, provides guidance on protection

Science Daily - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
Biologists have published three new articles summarizing research on Adirondack loons. The Common Loon (Gavia immer), one of five loon species worldwide, is a charismatic icon of New York's Adirondack Park. These large, stunning black and white birds breed on Adirondack lakes, and serve as sentinels of the quality of the waterways where they summer.
Categories: Science

'Must-have' sexual health services for men outlined in report

Science Daily - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing of exams, tests and treatments that should be offered to all men of reproductive age. Now a report aims to fill that need.
Categories: Science

Apple Announces Smartwatch, Bigger iPhones, Mobile Payments

Slashdot - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:31pm
Today at Apple's September press conference, they announced the new iPhone 6 models. There are two of them — the iPhone 6 is 4.7" at 1334x750, and the iPhone 6 Plus is 5.5" at 1920x1080. Both phones are thinner than earlier models: 5S: 7.6mm, 6: 6.9mm, 6 Plus: 7.1mm. The phones have a new-generation chip, the 64-bit A8. Apple says the new phones have a 25% faster CPU, 50% faster GPU, and they're 50% more energy efficient (though they were careful to say the phones have "equal or better" battery life to the 5S). Apple upgrade the phones' wireless capabilities, moving voice calls to LTE and also enabling voice calls over Wi-Fi. The phones ship on September 19th, preceded by the release of iOS 8 on September 17th. Apple also announced its entry into the payments market with "Apple Pay." They're trying to replace traditional credit card payments with holding an iPhone up to a scanner instead. It uses NFC and the iPhone's TouchID fingerprint scanner. Users can take a picture of their credit cards, and Apple Pay will gather payment information, encrypt it, and store it. (Apple won't have any of the information about users' credit cards or their purchases, and users will be able to disable the payment option through Find My iPhone if they lose the device.) Apple Pay will work with Visa, Mastercard, and American Express cards to start. 220,000 stores that support contactless payment will accept Apple Pay, and many apps are building direct shopping support for it. It will launch in October as an update for iOS 8, and work only on the new phones. Apple capped off the conference with the announcement of the long-anticipated "Apple Watch." Their approach to UI is different from most smartwatch makers: Apple has preserved the dial often found on the side of analog watches, using it as a button and an input wheel. This "digital crown" enables features like zoom without obscuring the small screen with fingers. The screen is touch-sensitive and pressure sensitive, so software can respond to a light tap differently than a hard tap. The watch runs on a new, custom-designed chip called the S1, it has sensors to detect your pulse, and it has a microphone to receive and respond to voice commands. It's powered by a connector that has no exposed contacts — it magnetically seals to watch and charges inductively. The Apple Watch requires an iPhone of the following models to work: 6, 6Plus, 5s, 5c, 5. It will be available in early 2015, and will cost $349 for a base model.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Meet Apple’s Super-Sized iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:59pm
As foretold by the rumors, Apple announced two new larger iPhone models today: the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.
Categories: Science

Surprising Result of NYC Bike Lanes: Faster Traffic for Cars

Slashdot - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:57pm
A report at vox.com says that the implementation of bike lanes in traffic-heavy New York City has one possibly non-intuitive result: car traffic was sped up as a result. The bike lanes have caused the lanes for cars to be narrowed, but as a result of the street redesign to accomodate bikes, one big change has especially helped to keep cars moving forward more steadily: Although narrower streets can slow traffic, that doesn't seem to have happened here — perhaps because traffic in this area was crawling at around 11 miles per hour to begin with. Instead, the narrower lanes were capable of handling just as much traffic, and one major improvement to intersection design helped them handle more, while also letting bikes travel more safely. This improvement was something called a pocket lane for left-hand turns: a devoted turning lane at most intersections that takes the place of the parking lane, which gets cars out of the way of moving traffic when they're making a left.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Mid-Sized Solar Flare Blasts CME, Possibly Earth-Bound | Video

Space.com - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:51pm
Sunspot AR2158 unleashed an M4.6-class flare on September 9, 2014. NASA estimates that the coronal mass ejection (CME) was moving pretty fast. According to Spaceweather.com, "it will deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field."
Categories: Science

MOOCs 2.0: Scaling One-on-One Learning

Wired News - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:28pm
In the summer of 2011, massive open online courses, or MOOCs, appeared seemingly out of nowhere and changed the education landscape forever. In many ways, MOOCs are like the troublemakers in Apple’s legendary “Think Different” ad: You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. But the only thing you can’t do is […]
Categories: Science

Earth From ISS: Stunning Time-Lapse Video From Astronaut Photos

Space.com - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:27pm
ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst has been snapping imagery of Earth throughout his stay on the ISS. The space agency's production team created the movie with artistic effects such as light trails, created when superimposing imaging and fading slowly.
Categories: Science

Research Finds No Large-Scale Exploits of Heartbleed Before Disclosure

Slashdot - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:15pm
Trailrunner7 writes: In the days and weeks following the public disclosure of the OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability in April, security researchers and others wondered aloud whether there were some organizations – perhaps the NSA – that had known about the bug for some time and had been using it for targeted attacks. A definitive answer to that question may never come, but traffic data collected by researchers on several large networks shows no large-scale exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure. "For all four networks, over these time periods our detector found no evidence of any exploit attempt up through April 7, 2014. This provides strong evidence that at least for those time periods, no attacker with prior knowledge of Heartbleed conducted widespread scanning looking for vulnerable servers. Such scanning however could have occurred during other time periods." That result also doesn't rule out the possibility that an attacker or attackers may have been doing targeted reconnaissance on specific servers or networks. The researchers also conducted similar monitoring of the four networks, and noticed that the first attempted exploits occurred within 24 hours of the OpenSSL disclosure.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Research Finds No Large-Scale Exploits of Heartbleed Before Disclosure

Slashdot - Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:15pm
Trailrunner7 writes: In the days and weeks following the public disclosure of the OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability in April, security researchers and others wondered aloud whether there were some organizations – perhaps the NSA – that had known about the bug for some time and had been using it for targeted attacks. A definitive answer to that question may never come, but traffic data collected by researchers on several large networks shows no large-scale exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure. "For all four networks, over these time periods our detector found no evidence of any exploit attempt up through April 7, 2014. This provides strong evidence that at least for those time periods, no attacker with prior knowledge of Heartbleed conducted widespread scanning looking for vulnerable servers. Such scanning however could have occurred during other time periods." That result also doesn't rule out the possibility that an attacker or attackers may have been doing targeted reconnaissance on specific servers or networks. The researchers also conducted similar monitoring of the four networks, and noticed that the first attempted exploits occurred within 24 hours of the OpenSSL disclosure.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science