Movin' on up? Views on social mobility shape Americans' faith in the status quo

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 9:30pm
How Americans view social mobility affects their willingness to defend the basic underpinnings of American society -- such as social and economic policies, laws, and institutions -- psychologists have found.
Categories: Science

'5-D protein fingerprinting' could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 9:30pm
In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid.
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Researchers zero-in on cholesterol's role in cells

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 9:30pm
For the first time, by using a path-breaking optical imaging technique to pinpoint cholesterol's location and movement within the cell membrane, chemists have made the surprising finding that cholesterol is a signaling molecule that transmits messages across the cell membrane.
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Strength of hair inspires new materials for body armor

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 9:30pm
In a new study, researchers are investigating why hair is incredibly strong and resistant to breaking. The findings could lead to the development of new materials for body armor and help cosmetic manufacturers create better hair care products.
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Porn Pirates Exploit Well-Known Loophole To Upload Raunchy Videos On YouTube

Slashdot - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 9:20pm
Adult video websites appear to be exploiting a YouTube loophole to host explicit material on the platform. An anonymous reader shares a report on The Next Web: A number of adult streaming websites have begun using a known backdoor that ultimately makes it possible to store infringing material on Google's servers -- entirely free of charge. To pull this off, the pirates essentially take advantage of YouTube's option to upload content without sharing it publicly, which effectively allows them to embed the videos on their websites and bypass Google's Content-ID takedown system. This means the content remains unlisted on YouTube and is served directly from the GoogleVideo.com domain instead. While the move hasn't gone unnoticed by the porn industry, California-based adult content-maker Dreamroom Productions claims it has made it much harder for producers to hunt down and flag infringing material, since the videos are not shared publicly.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Uber Sues City of Seattle To Block Landmark Driver Union Ordinance

Slashdot - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 8:40pm
Seattle's landmark law that lets drivers for ride-hailing companies decide if they want to bargain collectively was set to go into effect today, but an Uber subsidiary has sued to block key rules of the ordinance governing which drivers get to vote on unionization and other key rules. From a report: Uber subsidiary Rasier filed a petition in King County Superior Court Tuesday to block recently-published rules from Seattle's department of Finance and Administrative Services that cover issues like which drivers get a say in whether they want to unionize, working conditions subject to bargaining and how an organization gets certified to represent drivers exclusively. In court documents, Uber called the city's process flawed and asked the court to suspend the new rules. Uber wants the city to go back and tweak the rules so that they better reflect driver conditions in the ride-hailing industry. "The City failed to provide comprehensive rules and disregarded the facts and circumstances of drivers and the industry," according to Uber's petition. "Moreover, the Cityâ(TM)s rules are inconsistent with fundamental labor law principles ensuring every worker has a voice in whether to be represented by a labor organization."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

So What Exactly Is the Design Industry Anyway?

Wired News - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 8:00pm
Google and AIGA surveyed 9,000 designers about their work. Here's what they heard back. The post So What Exactly Is the Design Industry Anyway? appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Netflix is 'Killing' DVD Sales, Research Finds

Slashdot - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 8:00pm
Netflix has become the go-to destination for many movie and TV fans. The service is bringing in billions for copyright holders, but it also has a downside. New research shows that the availability of content on Netflix can severely hurt physical disc sales, which traditionally have been the industry's largest revenue source. From a report: A new study published by researchers from Hong Kong universities provides some empirical evidence on this issue. Through a natural experiment, they looked at the interplay between Netflix availability and DVD sales in the United States. The experiment took place when the Epix entertainment network, which distributes movies and TV-shows from major studios including Paramount and Lionsgate, left Netflix for Hulu in 2015. Since Hulu has a much smaller market share, these videos no longer reached a large part of the audience. At least not by default. The researchers used difference to examine the effect on DVD sales, while controlling for various other variables. The results, published in a paper this week, show that DVD sales increased significantly after the content was taken off Netflix, almost by a quarter. "Our difference-in-difference analyses show that the decline in the streaming availability of Epix's content leads to a 24.7% increase in their DVD sales in the three months after the event," the paper reads.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Toshiba Might Spin Off Its Semiconductor Business

Slashdot - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:20pm
Toshiba is considering spinning off its semiconductor business and selling a partial stake in the unit to Western Digital, the Nikkei financial daily reported on Wednesday. From the report: Toshiba will sell a roughly 20% interest in the unit for about 200 billion yen-300 billion yen ($1.77 billion-$2.66 billion) while retaining a majority stake, the newspaper reported. Besides Western Digital, U.S. investment funds are also showing interest in Toshiba's semiconductor business, the Nikkei reported, sources familiar with the matter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Did LeBron James Flop? Here’s What Physics Says

Wired News - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:04pm
In a recent game, it appears that Draymond hit LeBron. But did LeBron flop? Here is a physics analysis. The post Did LeBron James Flop? Here's What Physics Says appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Viral escape hatch could be treatment target for hepatitis E

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:03pm
The technique that the hepatitis E virus -- an emerging liver virus historically found in developing countries but now on the rise in Europe -- uses to spread could present a weak spot scientists can exploit to treat the disease, according to a new study.
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Climate change forecast: More intense deluges and downpours Down Under

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:02pm
Expect strong increases in rainfall during extreme precipitation events in Australia as a result of global warming making Dorothy Mackellar's now classic view of Australia as a country of droughts and flooding rains truer than ever.
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Trade-offs between economic growth and deforestation

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:02pm
In many developing countries, economic growth and deforestation seem to go hand in hand -- but the links are not well understood. In a new study, researchers use an innovative methodology to quantify the relationship.
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Inception of the last ice age

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:02pm
A new model reconstruction shows in exceptional detail the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last ice age. This can help scientists understand how climate and ocean warming can affect the remaining ice masses on Earth.
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Imposing 'meaningful work' can lead to staff burnout

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:02pm
Strategies to boost staff performance and morale by manipulating our desire for meaningful work often achieve the opposite -- damaging organizations and alienating employees -- a new study suggests.
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Scientists make plastic from pine trees

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:02pm
Most current plastics are made from oil, which is unsustainable. However, scientists have now developed a renewable plastic from a chemical called pinene found in pine needles.
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Sweat bees on hot chillies: Native bees thrive in traditional farming, securing good yield

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:02pm
Farming doesn't always have to be harmful to bees: Even though farmers on the Mexican peninsula of Yucatan traditionally slash-and-burn forest to create small fields, this practice can be beneficial to sweat bees by creating attractive habitats. The farmers profit also since they depend on bees to pollinate their habanero chillies.
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Study applies game theory to genomic privacy

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:01pm
A new study presents an unorthodox approach to protect the privacy of genomic data, showing how optimal trade-offs between privacy risk and scientific utility can be struck as genomic data are released for research. The framework can be used to suppress just enough genomic data to persuade would-be snoops that their best privacy attacks will be unprofitable.
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Why scientists should research emojis and emoticons :-P

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:01pm
More than 90 percent of online populations now incorporate emojis and emoticons into their texts and emails, and researchers are wondering what the use of (~_^), (>_<), or =D can reveal about human behavior. Emojis and emoticons can be used as tools for evaluating how we relate to each other in the digital age.
Categories: Science

See how immune cells break through blood vessel walls

Science Daily - Tue, 17/01/2017 - 7:01pm
In any given second, thousands of immune cells are poking holes in your blood vessels as they travel out of the blood stream to survey your organs for problems or join the fight against a pathogen. Despite the constant assault, the damage is negligible.
Categories: Science