Graphene flakes as an ultra-fast stopwatch

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:33pm
Scientists have developed a new optical detector from graphene which reacts very rapidly to incident light of all different wavelengths and even works at room temperature. It is the first time that a single detector has been able to monitor the spectral range from visible light to infrared radiation and right through to terahertz radiation. The scientists use the new graphene detector for the exact synchronization of laser systems.
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Robotic systems: How sensorimotor intelligence may develop

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:33pm
Researchers propose a novel learning rule to explain the development of sensorimotor intelligence.
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Microscopic Brownian Carnot engine

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:31pm
Engineers have reported on the development of a microscopic motor operating between two thermal baths, that is, a micro Carnot engine.
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Artificial intelligence finds messy galaxies

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:31pm
An astrophysics student has turned to artificial intelligence to help her to see into the hearts of galaxies. She was inspired by neural networks to create a program to single out from thousands of galaxies the subjects of her study -- the most turbulent and messy galaxies.
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Coating cancels acoustic scattering from odd-shaped objects

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:31pm
Researchers have applied to acoustic waves the concept of 'scattering cancellation,' which has long been used to systematically cancel the dominant scattering modes of electromagnetic waves off objects. The work provides fundamental new tools to control acoustic scattering and should improve the ability to make acoustic measurements in the laboratory.
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Physics of booming and burping sand dunes revealed

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:31pm
Avalanching sand from dune faces can trigger loud, rumbling 'booming' or short bursts of 'burping' sounds -- behaving as a perfectly tuned musical instrument. This sound is persistent and the dunes 'sing' in frequencies ranging from 70 to 105 Hertz, with higher harmonics. Researchers discovered that the 'booming' and 'burping' correspond to the transmission of a class of different waves within the dune.
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MAME Emulating a Sonic the Hedgehog Popcorn Machine

Slashdot - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:27pm
New submitter AmericaCounterweight writes: Polygon is reporting that the MAME development team has unearthed and emulated one of the most obscure pieces of Sonic heritage: a popcorn machine. MAME developer David Haywood reports that contributors "purchased the PCB for another novelty Sonic item, this time a SegaSonic Popcorn Shop, a popcorn dispenser machine with a video display. It runs on the Sega C2 board (Genesis type hardware)." This follows news from earlier this year that the MAME team would be switching to a true Open Source license for the project and concentrating on more than just arcade games. MAME project coordinator Miodrag Milanovic also recently appeared at the BalCCon2k15 event to speak about MAME, the current direction of the project, and software preservation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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When Robots Colonize the Cosmos, Will They Be Conscious? (Op-Ed)

Space.com - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:25pm
Will conscious computers conquer the cosmos?
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Google Tells You How Unoriginal Your Halloween Costume Is

Wired News - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:24pm

Google Trends will tell you how popular your costume will be this Halloween.

The post Google Tells You How Unoriginal Your Halloween Costume Is appeared first on WIRED.











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Cassini Is About to Taste the Huge Geysers of Enceladus

Wired News - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 4:00pm

NASA's Cassini space probe makes its second-to-last passage of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus.

The post Cassini Is About to Taste the Huge Geysers of Enceladus appeared first on WIRED.











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The Droid Turbo 2 Dares You to Smash Its Screen

Wired News - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 3:53pm

Motorola's new Droid is pragmatic and powerful. The Turbo 2 has two days of battery life, fast charging, and a screen that can't be smashed.

The post The Droid Turbo 2 Dares You to Smash Its Screen appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Open Source Code Isn't a Warranty

Slashdot - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 3:46pm
An anonymous reader writes: Automotive software issues such as the Jeep hack and Volkswagen cheating on emissions tests have made headlines this year, which means the public is thinking about software in cars like never before. Some experts have argued that mandating that such software be open source is a solution to the problem. In an article on Opensource.com, Ben Cotton writes that although there are definite benefits to public scrutiny of the software, code visibility alone is no guarantee. It's an important thing to bear in mind, because "Open, therefore secure" is an easy straw man to knock down.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Two Radically Different Approaches to Private Access to Space

Slashdot - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 3:04pm
Zothecula writes: Commercial spaceflight company World View came a step closer to carrying tourists to the edge of space with a successful test flight last weekend. At Page, Arizona, a one-tenth scale replica spacecraft was carried by high-altitude ballon to a height of 100,475 ft (30,624 m) to demonstrate the technology that is intended for use in a full-size version slated to begin commercial flights next year. And with a note on the other end of the size spectrum for private access to space, reader Habberhead writes: As reported first by Wired Magazine and followed on by others including Discovery News, start-up company ThumbSat is aiming to provide turn-key access to space for students, experimenters and citizen scientists with a new femto-satellite and creative business model. Small payloads and experiments in space for $20k, including the launch? Sign me up!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Hundreds of Photos Make Up One of These Crazy Cloudscapes

Wired News - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 3:00pm

Photographer Seb Janiak brings the heavens to Earth with his carefully constructed cloudscapes.

The post Hundreds of Photos Make Up One of These Crazy Cloudscapes appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

When Does School Life Begin? Zuckerberg's New School To Admit Fetuses

Slashdot - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 2:22pm
theodp writes: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan's latest initiative to tackle educational inequity is The Primary School, a "private, non-profit school" which will eventually provide both free education and free healthcare for 700 low-income students from the Palo Alto area. "In addition to early childhood and K-12 education," Zuckerberg explained in a Facebook post, "The Primary School will also provide prenatal support for families and on-site healthcare for children. By bringing healthcare and education together in one place, the goal is to support families and help children from underserved communities reach their full potential." A job listing for Assistant Teachers notes that "the school will admit students at or before birth." Zuckerberg joins other Silicon Valley luminaries like Elon Musk and Sal Khan in what Wired calls The Tech Elite's Quest to Reinvent School in Its Own Image.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Exploring molecule's role in immune system

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 2:07pm
Proteins called cytokines are known to influence immune cell fate, but the process is complex. Researchers examined how a specific cytokine, interleukin-15, influences gene expression patterns in T helper cells.
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Acid reflux medications may increase kidney disease risk

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 2:07pm
Certain medications commonly used to treat heartburn and acid reflux may have damaging effects on the kidneys, according to two new studies. The drugs, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), are among the top 10 class of prescribed medications in the United States.
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Near-Space Balloon Flights Closer With Mini-Capsule Test | Video

Space.com - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 2:07pm
World View Enterprises of Tucson, AZ plans to charge $75,000 for 1 to 2 hours of “black sky” experience, with wi-fi, a bar, and a bathroom. A 10 percent scale model of their capsule was lofted to 100,475 feet via high-altitude balloon.
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Current climate commitments would increase global temperature around 3° C

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 2:06pm
An assessment shows that current climate commitments submitted by 155 countries for COP21 would increase global temperature around 3º C.
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Seals not competing with Irish fishing stocks, according to new research

Science Daily - Tue, 27/10/2015 - 2:06pm
Seals are not threatening commercial fishing stocks in Irish waters, with the possible exception of wild Atlantic salmon, according to new research.
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