Breast cancer study raises hope of therapy to stop tumor spread

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Scientists have discovered a trigger that allows breast cancer cells to spread to the lungs. The findings could lead to new therapies that stop the progression of breast cancer, the researchers report.
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Psychology researchers report a major discovery of harmony amid chaos

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Natural delays in the human nervous system can actually enhance anticipation when coordinating with another person's unpredictable behaviors. The researchers say the study demonstrates that inherent delays in the nervous system may play a constructive role in enabling individuals to anticipate the movement of others.
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Lean despite many calories

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Scientists have identified an enzyme in mice that is involved in obesity and metabolic disruptions associated with it, such as type 2 diabetes. When the investigators turned off the enzyme in experiments, the animals did not gain any weight despite being fed a diet that was rich in fat and caloric content. Furthermore, they did not develop diabetes. So far, however, there is still not much evidence that this mechanism also plays a role in humans.
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New composite material as carbon dioxide sensor

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:21pm
A new material changes its conductivity depending on the concentration of carbon dioxide in the environment. The researchers who developed it have utilized the material to produce a miniature, simply constructed sensor.
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Dwarf Planet Ceres' Violent Past Etched Into Its Face | Video

Space.com - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:19pm
As NASA’s Dawn Mission mapped the crater-riddled little world, the images used to make this animation were captured from about 8,400 miles altitude and include navigation imagery from 3,200 miles out.
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Researchers develop models for targeted cancer therapy

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:16pm
The results of a recent study on targeted therapy of a specific type of brain cancer show specific progress in cancer treatment. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma may be one of the lesser-known forms of cancer, yet may be one of the most diabolical.
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Researchers use prehistoric amber to test glass theory

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:16pm
Researchers have used prehistoric amber to test glass theory. Along the way, the investigation sheds light on the long-held urban myth of the fluidity of stained glass.
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Data scientists find connections between birth month and health

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:15pm
Scientists have developed a computational method to investigate the relationship between birth month and disease risk. The researchers used this algorithm to examine New York City medical databases and found 55 diseases that correlated with the season of birth. Overall, the study indicated people born in May had the lowest disease risk, and those born in October the highest.
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Futuristic components on silicon chips, fabricated successfully

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:15pm
Scientists have developed a relatively simple, robust and versatile process for growing crystals made from compound semiconductor materials that will allow them be integrated onto silicon wafers -- an important step toward making future computer chips that will allow integrated circuits to continue shrinking in size and cost even as they increase in performance.
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Debunking the Batteriser's Claims

Slashdot - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 3:02pm
An anonymous reader writes: Last week we discussed news about the "Batteriser," a small device that fits around a battery and extends its lifetime. Many of us were skeptical, particularly with the claim that it could extend battery life up to 8x. Now, David L. Jones at the EEVBlog explains exactly why the device won't be as good as its creators claim. The technology itself, he says, does actually work at extending battery life, and has existed for a long time. What this company seems to have done is just shrink it down to a more useful size. Unfortunately, their claims about when a battery stop working and how much energy is left don't really hold up. Batteroo, the company making the Batteriser, claims products stop working when a battery's voltage drops below 1.3v, but a simple test of common household gadgets finds that to be untrue. Further, the percentage of energy left in the battery after this cutoff can vary wildly. Sometimes it will be 80%, but most of the time it won't, and it's frequently 20% or lower for Alkaline batteries. Jones writes, "I'm genuinely baffled as to why Batteroo would need to resort to claims like 8 times life. This thing would still sell like hot cakes if they claimed realistic practical figures. 50% increase in your battery life? – great, countless people would still buy it at the super low price point it's at."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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The War of Food Emoji in Beyoncé’s Instagram Comments

Wired News - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:59pm

This might be the first time a hamburger emoji was used as a weapon.

The post The War of Food Emoji in Beyoncé’s Instagram Comments appeared first on WIRED.









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Graceful Ballet of SpaceX Jettisoned Junk | Video

Space.com - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:49pm
A GoPro camera on the payload fairing of a recently launched SpaceX Falcon 9 captured stunning views as its spun its way back down to Earth, post-separation.
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Asian economic integration means huge challenges for trees, farmers and food supply

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:29pm
Ten Southeast Asian nations will form a single economic bloc at the end of 2015. Agroforestry, forestry and agricultural policies, implementation and law enforcement are lagging behind. The gap threatens millions of livelihoods, environmental safety and national abilities to adapt to climate change, despite some inspiring progress.
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New microscope technique could speed identification of deadly bacteria

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:29pm
A new way of rapidly identifying bacteria, which requires a slight modification to a simple microscope, may change the way doctors approach treatment for patients who develop potentially deadly infections and may also help the food industry screen against contamination with harmful pathogens, according to researchers.
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Getting to the heart of the matter: CERN's hidden heritage

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:29pm
A nuclear physicist and an archaeologist have joined forces to produce a unique appraisal of the cultural significance of one of the world's most important locations for scientific inquiry: CERN, the home of the Large Hadron Collider on the Franco-Swiss border. Situated between the Jura Mountains and the Alps, CERN was established in 1954 to promote peaceful co-operation between nations still recovering from the Second World War.
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New approach for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:29pm
Researchers have identified a potential novel drug target for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a dangerous chronic lung disease. They elucidated a new mechanism of fibrosis formation that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease.
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Recovery of sensory function by stem cell transplants

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:29pm
New research shows promising progress in the use of stem cells for treatment of spinal cord injury. The results show that human stem cells that are transplanted to the injured spinal cord contribute to restoration of some sensory functions.
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California Academy of Sciences discovers 100 new species in the Philippines

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:29pm
Scientists are celebrating World Ocean's Day with a slew of brand new marine discoveries -- more than 100 species that are likely new to science. Mysterious live animals from dimly-lit, deep-water reefs were also collected.
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What do walnuts smell like? Using aroma to control pests

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:28pm
Walnut aromas will allow walnut pests to be controlled and the use of pesticides to be reduced, researchers have discovered. The outcome of the research is that the team has identified the aromas that differentiate between intact walnuts and damaged ones and which may lure insect pests that harm the Californian crops. This pioneering research is opening up the way for conducting studies on pest control in autochthonous crops.
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Why crystals could be the shape of future pharmaceuticals

Science Daily - Mon, 08/06/2015 - 2:28pm
Scientists are building a better understanding of the chemical processes behind the creation of crystals with the aim of developing new ways to produce pharmaceuticals.
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