White blood cell count predicts response to lung cancer immunotherapy

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 10:52pm
White blood cell counts can predict whether or not lung cancer patients will benefit from immunotherapy, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Study examines 'watch-and-wait' approach for people with rectal cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 10:52pm
New study suggests a select group of patients with rectal cancer who undergo chemotherapy and radiation may have low rates of recurrence and good survival rates regardless of whether they go on to have surgery.
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New microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomas

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 10:52pm
The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. Researchers have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses for the life-threatening disease.
Categories: Science

Google Releases DIY Open Source Raspberry Pi Voice Kit Hardware

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 10:40pm
BrianFagioli writes: Google has decided to take artificial intelligence to the maker community with a new initiative called AIY. This initiative will introduce open source AI projects to the public that makers can leverage in a simple way. Today, Google announces the first-ever AIY project. Called "Voice Kit," it is designed to work with a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B to create a voice-based virtual assistant. Billy Rutledge, Director of AIY Projects for Google, explains, "The first open source reference project is the Voice Kit: instructions to build a Voice User Interface (VUI) that can use cloud services (like the new Google Assistant SDK or Cloud Speech API) or run completely on-device. This project extends the functionality of the most popular single board computer used for digital making -- the Raspberry Pi. The included Voice Hardware Accessory on Top (HAT) contains hardware for audio capture and playback: easy-to-use connectors for the dual mic daughter board and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components like micro-servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for dedicated power supply. It was designed and tested with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Billboards Target Lawmakers Who Voted To Let ISPs Sell User Information

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: When Congress voted in March to block FCC privacy rules and let internet service providers sell users' personal data, it was a coup for the telecom industry. Now, the nonprofit, pro-privacy group Fight for the Future is publicizing just how much the industry paid in an attempt to sway those votes. The group unveiled four billboards, targeting Reps. Marsha Blackburn and John Rutherford, as well as Sens. Jeff Flake and Dean Heller. All four billboards, which were paid for through donations, were placed in the lawmakers' districts. "Congress voting to gut Internet privacy was one of the most blatant displays of corruption in recent history," Fight for the Future co-founder Tiffiniy Cheng said in a statement on the project. The billboards accuse the lawmakers of betraying their constituents, and encourage passersby to call their offices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Prolonged military-style training causes changes to intestinal bacteria, increases inflammation

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:34pm
A new study finds that long periods of physiological stress can change the composition of microorganisms residing in the intestines (intestinal microbiota), which could increase health risks in endurance athletes and military personnel.
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For people with Down Syndrome, varying test results can make it harder to get the right vision prescription

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:33pm
Even objective, automated vision testing—using a device called an autorefractor—gives variable results in patients with Down syndrome, reports a new study.
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Wood filter removes toxic dye from water

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:33pm
Engineers have developed a new use for wood: to filter water. Scientists added nanoparticles to wood, then used it to filter toxic dyes from water.
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How Not to Make a Movie About Tech

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:20pm
'The Circle' (a techno-thriller movie starring Tom Hanks and Emma Watson) is a dated, far-fetched parable about an imaginary villain -- and far less scary than its television counterpart, says Alyssa Bereznak, a staff writer at The Ringer. An anonymous reader shares the article, removing the excerpts that could spoil the plot: Hollywood is keen on illustrating the awesome power of modern-day tech companies and the elite class of entrepreneurs who run them. But lately the most effective way to do that is not to focus on what's possible, but to illustrate the real-life personalities that control the near future of tech. Stylistically, a show like HBO's Silicon Valley couldn't be further from a production like The Circle, and yet it succeeds in threading together a host of issues in tech culture, including major corporations' monopoly-like power to squash competitors, manipulate the unwitting tech press, and bypass the interests of their employees and users for the sake of better stock prices. Now at the beginning of its fourth season, the show is lauded for its highly researched, accurate depictions of the Bay Area's power players -- so much so that it has spurred at least one Business Insider post dedicated to identifying each character's real-life inspiration. (The show has even featured a handful of cameos from the industry's power brokers, including Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel and Alphabet executive chairman Eric Schmidt.) Even if it does take place in a comedy created by the man who gave us Beavis and Butt-Head, the show's researched interpretation of real life is a much more compelling way to display the tech world's flaws, rather than simply relying on imagined scaremongering.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Cloudflare Helps Serve Up Hate Online: Report

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: If you've been wondering how hate has proliferated online, especially since the 2016 election, ProPublica has some answers. According to ProPublica, Cloudflare -- a major San Francisco-based internet company -- enables extremist web sites to stay in business by providing them with internet data delivery services. Cloudflare reportedly also keeps to a policy of turning over contact information of anyone who complains to operators of the offending sites, thus exposing the complainants to personal harassment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

New research shows illegal levels of arsenic found in baby foods

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Almost half of baby rice food products contain illegal levels of inorganic arsenic despite new regulations set by the EU, new research concludes.
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Can trusting your doctor help reduce pain?

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Getting a shot at your doctor's office can be a stressful experience. But what if you knew your doctor was from your hometown, liked the same food as you, or shared your religious beliefs? Now that you feel more culturally connected to your doctor, will the shot hurt less?
Categories: Science

New math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistry

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level. Mathematical and algorithmic developments along these lines are necessary for enabling the detailed study of complex hydrocarbon molecules that are relevant in engine combustion.
Categories: Science

Direct and not indirect childhood abuse linked to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Adolescents who were physically abused or sexually abused were more likely to engage in non-suicidal self-injury than their non-abused counterparts, according to a new study.
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Biofuel pays for itself with goods made from waste

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
A recent discovery may unlock the potential of biofuel waste -- and ultimately make biofuels competitive with petroleum. The researchers solved the structure of LigM, an enzyme that breaks down molecules derived from the biofuel waste product lignin. This opens a path toward new molecules and new, marketable products.
Categories: Science

The digitization of medical knowledge

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have challenged traditional teaching and learning concepts employed in medical training. A comparison with conventional learning methods led them to conclude that tablet-based, multimedia-enhanced training improves medical examination results. Their study clearly shows that an integrated program of tablet-based theoretical training and clinical practice enhances medical training.
Categories: Science

Advanced prostate cancer treatment failure due to cell reprogramming

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that reprograms tumor cells in patients with advanced prostate cancer, reducing their response to anti-androgen therapy. The findings, based on a study in mice, could help to determine which patients should avoid anti-androgen therapy and identify new treatments for people with advanced prostate cancer.
Categories: Science

Snow in Hawai'i: What does the future hold?

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers, led by climate modelers, used satellite images to quantify recent snow cover distributions patterns on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. They developed a regional climate model to simulate the present-day snowfalls and then to project future Hawaiian snowfalls. Their results indicate that the two volcano summits are typically snow-covered at least 20 days each winter, but that the snow cover will nearly disappear by the end of the century.
Categories: Science

Noise created by humans is pervasive in US protected areas

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Anthropogenic, or human-caused, noise pervades many US protected areas and habitats of endangered species, but is rarely managed as a threat in these highly valued areas.
Categories: Science

Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor control

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
A new connection between two regions of the brain has been discovered that may help explain how motor skills develop. Working with infant rats, the scientists found that the hippocampus and the red nucleus, part of the brain stem, synchronize during REM sleep.
Categories: Science