Young guns: High rate of firearm violence found in high-risk youth after assault injury

Science Daily - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:09am
Two young men sit in an inner-city ER. One is getting care for injuries he suffered in a fight, the other, for a sore throat. After getting care, both head back out to an environment of violence and poverty. But, a new study finds, the one who had been in a fight will have a 60% chance of involvement in a violent incident involving a firearm within the next two years.
Categories: Science

Magnet designed for Large Hadron Collider upgrade achieves high-field milestone

Science Daily - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:09am
Last month, a new superconducting magnet reached its design field of 11.5 Tesla at a temperature nearly as cold as outer space. It is the first successful twin-aperture accelerator magnet made of niobium-3-tin in the world.
Categories: Science

Eye-tracking technology aids research on infant behavior

Science Daily - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:09am
A grad student is conducting research that studies the ways in which infants' eyes track their mothers' faces -- a small detail that can have a big impact on a child's foundation for future language development.
Categories: Science

Get Lost in the Mazes of London’s Half-Finished Skyscrapers

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:02am

Lewis Bush turns London high rises into dreamlike labyrinths for 'Metropole.'

The post Get Lost in the Mazes of London’s Half-Finished Skyscrapers appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How China Is Screwing Over Its Poisoned Factory Workers

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:00am

Put simply, China's tech-factory workers are getting red-taped to death.

The post How China Is Screwing Over Its Poisoned Factory Workers appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Bill to Ban Undetectable 3D Printed Guns Is Coming Back

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:00am

In the next few months, Congressman Steve Israel plans to reintroduce legislation that would ban 3-D printed guns or any other fully-plastic firearm.

The post Bill to Ban Undetectable 3D Printed Guns Is Coming Back appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Weird Ways Science Is Trying to Improve Fertility

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:00am

In vitro fertilization is a huge business opportunity, and some companies and researchers are trying to hack reproductive biology in a bid to to treat ever more patients.

The post The Weird Ways Science Is Trying to Improve Fertility appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

These Are The People Who Graduate From Code Bootcamp

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:00am

President Obama wants everyone to learn to code. These are the people who are actually doing it.

The post These Are The People Who Graduate From Code Bootcamp appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Mad Men Recap: Sorry, But Happiness Isn’t on the Menu

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 11:00am

Don Draper has grappled with his own definition of happiness for Mad Men's seven seasons, and in last night's premiere, the battle rages on.

The post Mad Men Recap: Sorry, But Happiness Isn’t on the Menu appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Dying Light Mod Makes Every Day April Fools’ Day

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 10:30am

"Fun Mod" lets you drop-kick a zombie the length of a football field.

The post Dying Light Mod Makes Every Day April Fools’ Day appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Radio-frequency-heated iron-oxide nanoparticles open the blood-brain barrier

Kurzweil AI - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 7:08am

The schematics for the experimental procedure for reversible hyperthermic opening of the BBB. (Lef) MNPs being injected via a microcatheter inserted into the External Carotid Artery (ECA) and advanced to the Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) where its tip is finally positioned near the MCA in the Circle of Willis. (right) The anesthetized animal is exposed to the RF field for 30 min. (credit: Seyed Nasrollah Tabatabaei et al./Journal of Controlled Release)

A new method of opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver therapeutic molecules directly to the brain has been developed by researchers from the University of Montreal, Polytechnique Montréal, and CHU Sainte-Justine.

The BBB protects the brain from elements circulating in the blood that may be toxic to the brain, but currently, 98% of therapeutic molecules are unable to cross the BBB.

KurzweilAI has reported a number of recently developed techniques for delivering drugs to the blood-brain barrier, ranging from protein-based nanoparticles to most recently, ultrasound. But according to principal investigator Sylvain Martel, “previous techniques either open the BBB too wide, exposing the brain to great risks, or they are not precise enough, leading to scattering of the drugs and possible unwanted side effects.”

How to open the blood-brain barrier

To open the BBB, the researchers used a cannulation technique to deliver iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles to the surface of the middle cerebral artery of mice. (In a previous study they showed that MRI could guide nanoparticles to a desired location.)

Then they applied a radio-frequency field, heating the nanoparticles, which then dissipated the heat, creating a mechanical stress on the BBB. That allowed for a temporary and localized opening of the barrier for diffusion of a visually identifiable dye (representing a drug) for approximately two hours into the brain.

The research was described in the Journal of Controlled Release. It was supported in part by Chaire de Recherche de l’École Polytechnique de Montréal, the Canada Research Chairs, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

Abstract of Remote control of the permeability of the blood–brain barrier by magnetic heating of nanoparticles: A proof of concept for brain drug delivery

Despite advances in neurology, drug delivery to the brain remains a substantial challenge. This is mainly due to the insurmountable and selective nature of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we show that the thermal energy generated by magnetic heating (hyperthermia) of commercially available magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in the brain capillaries of rats can transiently increase barrier permeability. Here, the fluorescent Evans Blue (EB) dye was used to verify the BBB integrity. Results indicate a substantial but reversible opening of the BBB where hyperthermia is applied. Also, in this investigation, analysis of CD68 immunoreactivity, an indicator of inflammation, implies that this technique is not associated with any inflammation. We have previously investigated theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) capabilities of the MNPs, therefore, the findings presented in this investigation are particularly encouraging for a novel targeted drug delivery system to the brain.

Categories: Science

Roku’s New Streamers Add Voice Search and Personal Feeds

Wired News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 7:01am

Roku devices new and old will get a slew of enhancements, and the new Roku 3 offers voice search via a mic-equipped remote.

The post Roku’s New Streamers Add Voice Search and Personal Feeds appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Snapchat Joins the Gang, Releases Transparency Report

Slashdot - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 6:26am
Snapchat has released its first transparency report, detailing the number of requests for data it's fielded from law enforcement agencies both in the U.S. and elsewhere. For a service sometimes vilified as a conduit for shady dealings, Snapchat received surprisingly few police requests from U.S. agencies (just 375, involving 666 accounts). Perhaps agencies are put off by the small number of Snapchat messages that may be vulnerable to such requests.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

US NAVY Sonar/Lidar Editing Software Released To the World

Slashdot - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 3:32am
New submitter PFMABE writes The Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO) has spent 16 years developing the Pure File Magic Area Based Editor (PFMABE) software suite to edit the huge volumes of lidar and sonar data they collect every year. In accordance with 17 USC 105, copyright protection is not available to any work of the US government. Originally developed to run on RedHat OS with network distributed storage, it has been migrated to Windows 7. This software, and accompanying source code (Win & Linux), has been released to the public domain at pfmabe.software, free for download with registration.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Popular Android Package Uses Just XOR -- and That's Not the Worst Part

Slashdot - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 12:43am
siddesu writes A popular "encryption" package for Android that even charges a yearly subscription fee of $8 actually does nothing more than give a false sense of security to its users. Not only is the app using a worthless encryption method, it also uses weak keys and "encrypts" only a small portion of the files. One wonders how much snake oil flows through the app stores, from "battery savers" to "antivirus." What is the most worthless app purchase you made? Did you ask for a refund?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Outside Beijing, a Military-style Bootcamp For "Internet Addiction"

Slashdot - Sun, 05/04/2015 - 11:22pm
Press2ToContinue writes Last year, China recognized internet addiction as an official disorder. Since then, over 6,000 patients have submitted themselves for treatment, after some spent up to 14 hours a day online. And as these amazing pictures show, dealing with it is serious. The Daxing Internet Addiction Treatment Centre (IATC) is a military-style bootcamp nestled in the suburbs of Bejing. The young men that enter its doors are subjected to a strict military regime of exercise, medication and solitary confinement. Any kind of electronic gadgetry is completely banned. Additionally, patients are frequently subjected to psychiatric assessments and brain scans to make sure they stay on the straight and narrow. And the concept is gaining steam; the first Internet Congress on Internet Addiction Disorders was held in Milan in early 2014. Despite its recent official classification, Is internet addiction a real disorder? Or is it a red herring masking depression and escapism? And to make things more indeterminate, Isn't more and more time online the inevitable future?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Prosecutors Get an 'A' On Convictions of Atlanta Ed-Reform-Gone-Bad Test Cheats

Slashdot - Sun, 05/04/2015 - 10:15pm
theodp writes Just weeks after an L.A. Times op-ed called on public schools to emulate high-tech companies by paying high salaries to driven, talented employees whose productivity more than compensates for their high pay, the New York Times reported on the dramatic conclusion to perhaps the largest cheating scandal in the nation's history, which saw a Judge order handcuffed Atlanta educators led off to jail immediately for their roles in a standardized test cheating scandal that raised broader questions about the role of high-stakes testing in American schools. Jurors convicted 11 of the 12 defendants — a mix of Atlanta public school teachers, testing coordinators and administrators — of racketeering, a felony that carries up to 20 years in prison. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution sowed suspicion about the veracity of the test scores in 2009, and while investigators found that cheating was particularly ingrained in individual schools, they also said that the district's top officials, including Superintendent Beverly L. Hall, bore some responsibility for creating "a culture of fear, intimidation and retaliation" that had permitted "cheating — at all levels — to go unchecked for years." (More below.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

USPTO Demands EFF Censor Its Comments On Patentable Subject Matter

Slashdot - Sun, 05/04/2015 - 9:02pm
An anonymous reader writes As you know, last year the Supreme Court made a very important ruling in the Alice v. CLS Bank case .. the USPTO apparently was offended at parts of the EFF's comment submission, claiming that it was an "improper protest." Protest or not, the EFF denies in strong terms that the original comments were improper.

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Categories: Science

Slashdot Asks: What Will You (Or Your Kids) Learn This Summer?

Slashdot - Sun, 05/04/2015 - 7:49pm
For those in the northern hemisphere, summer is rapidly approaching, especially for those with kids. Camps, educational programs, and other activities are enrolling now, in advance of the long summer vacation. (Particularly long for Americans!) Aside from conventional sleepaway options for kids, there are science and technology courses, space camps, survival adventures, and more. Whatever your age, and whether on your own or as part of a formal group, do you have any specific learning activities planned for the summer, whether as participant or parent? Are there summer education opportunities you'd like to recommend to others, or ones you'd rate as not worth the price? (Naming details helps, in this context -- which space camp? How much does it cost?)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Kinect For Windows Is Dead; Long Live Kinect For Windows Via USB

Slashdot - Sun, 05/04/2015 - 6:50pm
puddingebola writes Microsoft has announced it will no longer manufacture Kinect for Windows. Only the Xbox One version will be available for purchase. Microsoft said it could not meet demand for the device, a strange claim for a company to make. The console version, though, will still work with Windows by way of a USB adapter, and as pointed out by this similar story at Gamespot, for about the same total price.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science