New Zealand's little penguins are recent Australian invaders

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 10:40pm
The little penguin species (popularly known as little blue penguins) found in southern New Zealand is a surprisingly recent invader from Australia, according to a new study. Following the recent discovery that little penguins in the southern province of Otago belong to an Australian species, a team of researchers from New Zealand and the United States set out to determine when the Aussies first arrived.
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Drug prevents key age-related brain change in rats

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 10:40pm
New findings shed light on the mechanisms of cognitive decline and identify potential strategies to stem it.
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Barracuda Copy Shutting Down

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 10:26pm
New submitter assaf07 writes: I received a notification [Monday] that Barracuda's excellent online storage option Copy will be shuttting down in May. A blog post by Rod Matthews, VP of Storage at Barracuda gives the usual business doublespeak excuse. Having used Google's Drive, Box, Dropbox, and Spideroak, I am very disappointed to lose Copy as its native Linux, Android, IOS, and Windows clients are/were wonderful.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Yahoo Will Lay Off 15 Percent of Its Workforce

Wired News - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 10:17pm

Last year was a rough one for Yahoo. Today CEO Marissa Mayer announced layoffs, cutbacks, and consolidation to help the company regain its footing.

The post Yahoo Will Lay Off 15 Percent of Its Workforce appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Morgan, Maker of Classic Handmade Sports Cars, Is Going Electric

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 10:05pm
Ars Technica reports that Morgan, idiosyncratic maker of idiosyncratic cars, is about to make a move that might seem surprising, in light of the company's tradition of conservative design. "Yes," says the article, "you'll be able to buy a wood-framed electric car in 2019." From the article: The Morgan Motor Companyâ"best known for still using postwar styling and wooden body frames for some of its carsâ"will have a full hybrid and electric range within the next three years. The British car maker is going to invest $8.6 million (£6 million) to develop hybrid and electric powertrains for all the models in its range by 2019, working in conjunction with Delta Motorsport and Potenza technology.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Socat Weak Crypto Draws Suspicions Of a Backdoor

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 9:24pm
msm1267 writes: Socat is the latest open source tool to come under suspicion that it is backdoored. A security advisory published Monday warned that the OpenSSL address implementation in Socat contains a hard-coded Diffie-Hellman 1024-bit prime number that was not prime. "The effective cryptographic strength of a key exchange using these parameters was weaker than the one one could get by using a prime p," the advisory said. "Moreover, since there is no indication of how these parameters were chosen, the existence of a trapdoor that makes possible for an eavesdropper to recover the shared secret from a key exchange that uses them cannot be ruled out." Socat said it has generated a new prime that is 2048 bits long; versions 1.7.3.0 and 2.0.0-b8 are affected. The advisory adds that a temporary workaround would be to disable the Diffie-Hellman ciphers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Perfect Coin-Toss Record Broke 6 Clinton-Sanders Deadlocks In Iowa

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 8:43pm
schwit1 writes: While it was hard to call a winner between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders last night, it's easy to say who was luckier. The race between the Democrat presidential hopefuls was so tight in the Iowa caucus Monday that in at least six precincts, the decision on awarding a county delegate came down to a coin toss. And Clinton won all six, media reports said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Utility Targets Bitcoin Miners With Power Rate Hike

Slashdot - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 8:00pm
1sockchuck writes: A public utility in Washington state wants to raise rates for high-density power users, citing a flood of requests for electricity to power bitcoin mining operations. Chelan County has some of the cheapest power in the nation, supported by hydroelectric generation from dams along the Columbia River. That got the attention of bitcoin miners, prompting requests to provision 220 megawatts of additional power. After a one-year moratorium, the Chelan utility now wants to raise rates for high density users (more than 250kW per square foot) from 3 cents to 5 cents per kilowatt hour. Bitcoin businesses say the rate hike is discriminatory. But Chelan officials cite the transient nature of the bitcoin business as a risk to recovering their costs for provisioning new power capacity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Novel nanoparticle made of common mineral may help keep tumor growth at bay

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:39pm
Engineers have found a way to keep a cancerous tumor from growing by using nanoparticles of the main ingredient in common antacid tablets. With their work, researchers show for the first time that they can modulate pH in solid tumors using intentionally designed nanoparticles.
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Building a foundation for computer science for all

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:37pm
Computer science has become a new basic skill, essential in order to excel in an increasingly computational and data-intensive world. However, access to computer science (CS) at the K-12 levels remains limited. CS is taught in less than 25 percent of US high schools. Rural and high-need schools are even less likely to offer it. Moreover, in schools that do offer CS, students of color and girls often participate in very low numbers.
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Gray treefrogs provide clues to climate change

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:37pm
Evidence indicates that 2015 was the hottest year on record. Increasing temperatures and climate variability might have an effect on the sounds produced by gray treefrogs. In a recent study, scientists found that a female's interpretation of male mating calls may not be affected by climate change; however, knowing how breeding habits are affected can help predict the health of ecosystems.
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New drug target for Rett syndrome

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:37pm
A faulty signaling pathway has been identified that, when corrected, in mice ameliorates the symptoms of Rett syndrome, a devastating neurological condition. The findings could lead to the discovery of compounds or drugs that may benefit children affected by the disease.
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Sstudy identifies mechanism for drug target to help block HIV's ability to spread

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:37pm
A new study identifies how RNA-based drug 5-aza-C blocks HIV's ability to spread by converting to DNA before infiltrating the virus. Because RNA drugs are more cost-effective, the findings could provide insight for developing more affordable HIV medications.
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Sharpin emerges from the pack as a regulator of inflammation

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:37pm
It is normal -- in fact necessary -- for our immune system to occasionally fly into an inflammatory rage to defend the host (us) against pathogens or even tumor cells. Problems arise when the rage persists or is re-directed against one's self, as occurs in autoimmune disease.
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Pharmaceutical residues increasingly disrupt aquatic life: A hidden global change

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:36pm
Let's forget about the climate for a minute. Largely hidden from public view, another global change is causing increasing disruption. Residues of medicines in water can kill aquatic animals and play havoc with their food web and reproductive cycle. An international team of researchers makes an urgent case for better wastewater treatment and biodegradable pharmaceuticals.
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New light shed on anti-adhesive molecule in the vascular endothelium

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:36pm
Researchers describe the role of endomucin, a molecule that -- under healthy circumstances -- resists the adhesion of white blood cells as they move through the circulatory system. These findings suggest that promoting the expression of endomucin may prevent the collection of white blood cells that causes tissues to become inflamed.
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Seeing exemplary peer work can undermine student performance

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:36pm
From academic honors to 'employee of the month' awards, we are regularly exposed to and made aware of the exemplary performance of others. Many believe such recognition not only acknowledges the individual but also motivates others to strive toward greater achievement. But new research suggests that exposure to exceptional performance can sometimes have the opposite results, effectively discouraging people from higher-level performance.
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Greenland ice sheet releasing 'Mississippi River' worth of phosphorus

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:31pm
Not only is Greenland's melting ice sheet adding huge amounts of water to the oceans, it could also be unleashing 400,000 metric tons of phosphorus every year -- as much as the mighty Mississippi River releases into the Gulf of Mexico, according to a new study. Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that feeds plankton at the base of the ocean food web.
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Using mathematics to improve human health

Science Daily - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:31pm
Scientists have used mathematics as a tool to provide precise details of the structure of protein nanoparticles, potentially making them more useful in vaccine design.
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How to Order a Drink Without Looking Like a N00b

Wired News - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 7:30pm

And you thought it was so easy.

The post How to Order a Drink Without Looking Like a N00b appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science