Pregnancy antibiotics no cause for concern, study says

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:19pm
The four out of ten women who use antibiotics during pregnancy can breathe easy, as a comprehensive new study shows that the two most often prescribed drugs have no adverse outcome on the child’s physical development.
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Self-injury: Raising the profile of a dangerous behavior

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:17pm
Nonsuicidal self-injury is not officially recognized by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) as a mental disorder, which means insurance may not cover treatment - despite estimates that anywhere from 10 to 40 percent of adolescents suffer from it. New research lays out a case for recognizing the condition, as profiled in a new report.
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New immunotherapy treatment may clear cancer-causing HPV infections faster

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:17pm
A new therapeutic vaccine, GTL001, developed to clear HPV strains 16 and 18 – the types most likely to cause cancer – is being evaluated for safety in a Phase I clinical trial.
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Diet lacking soluble fiber promotes weight gain, mouse study suggests

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:17pm
A new study highlights the importance of the gut microbiome in maintaining intestinal and metabolic health and suggests that eating more foods high in soluble fiber may help prevent metabolic disease and obesity.
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The lying game

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:15pm
New research is leading towards a clearer understanding of how humans behave when they bend the truth. But gathering reliable research data is a tricky proposition, and so research has been difficult to conduct to date.
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Super sensitive magnetic sensor created

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:14pm
Researchers have developed a new hybrid magnetic sensor that is more sensitive than most commercially available sensors. This technological breakthrough hails opportunities for the development of smaller and cheaper sensors for various fields such as consumer electronics, information and communication technology, biotechnology and automotive.
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World’s first lab-in-a-briefcase

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:14pm
Academics hope to boost early detection rates of cancer in developing countries with their portable lab-in-a-briefcase that can operate even at high temperatures.
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Researchers identify association between reproductive factors and risk of death

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:11pm
Reproductive factors in women, such as a later starting age of menstruation, having children, breastfeeding and use of oral contraceptives, are associated with a reduced risk of death, according to new research. A better understanding of how these factors can influence long-term health could help in the development of clinical strategies to improve women's health.
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Technique for analyzing bedrock could help builders, planners identify safe building zones

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:11pm
The thin layer of bedrock below the Earth's surface is the foundation for all life on land. Cracks and fractures within bedrock provide pathways for air and water, which chemically react to break down rock, forming soil -- an essential ingredient for all terrestrial organisms. Scientists have dubbed this layer Earth's 'critical zone.' Now scientists have found a way to predict the spatial extent of bedrock weathering.
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Researchers discover new way to measure if a person is pre-diabetic

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:11pm
A new discovery may allow physicians to warn patients years before the onset of diabetes, therefore allowing them to change their lifestyle patterns potentially avoiding the diagnosis of a chronic disease.
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Obese pregnant women who lose weight save money, have healthier newborns, study shows

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:11pm
Severely obese women who maintained or lost weight during pregnancy had healthier babies and lower health care costs, a recent study shows. The work compared 82 severely obese pregnant women with 85 healthy weight women. The obese mothers experienced more medical problems during pregnancy, higher medical costs and longer lengths of hospital stay compared to non-obese women. Twenty-six percent of the obese mothers maintained or lost weight during pregnancy and experienced lower medical costs and gave birth to healthier infants.
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Researchers discover simple, affordable diagnostic kit for chikungunya

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:10pm
A novel and affordable diagnostic test for chikungunya will soon be available thanks to new research. The formerly unknown virus, now named Eilat virus, is related to chikungunya and other mosquito-borne viruses and was collected in Israel's Negev Desert about three decades ago.
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Treatment of severe acne hampered by antibiotic overuse, delays in prescribing more potent medication

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:10pm
Physicians who treat severe acne leave too many patients on ineffective antibiotics for far too long before prescribing more potent needed therapy with the medication isotretinoin, sometimes known by its former brand name Accutane, a medical records analysis concludes.
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Leap Second May Be On the Chopping Block

Slashdot - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 3:04pm
szotz writes: The days of 61-second minutes may be coming to an end. The World Radiocommunication Conference is meeting for nearly the entire month of November, and one of the hot-button issues is what to do about the leap second. The addition to UTC is supposed to keep atomic time aligned with Earth's rotation, but past leap seconds have caused server crashes, and some are worried that future problems could be even worse. Going into the conference, it doesn't look like there's much of a consensus on what to do. One official is expecting weeks of debate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Kids meals, toys, and TV advertising: A triple threat to child health

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 2:52pm
Fast food companies advertise children's meals on TV with ads that feature toy premiums, and it has been suggested that the use of these toy premiums may prompt children to request eating at fast food restaurants. In a new study, researchers found that the more children watched television channels that aired ads for children's fast food meals, the more frequently their families visited those fast food restaurants.
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Tug of war among bacteria

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 2:52pm
As hide-outs for bacteria, biofilms cause problems for antibiotic treatment or the cleaning of medical tubes. They contribute to the spreading of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. A biofilm is created when bacteria attach to surfaces and multiply. Gradually, bacterial subpopulations can develop different properties although they originated from the same cell. However, very little is known about how this heterogeneity contributes to the development of structure in such biofilms
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Reptile pets: Food insects shuttle allergens into homes

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 2:52pm
Reptiles are becoming increasingly popular as pets. The number of reptile pets, such as lizards, turtles and snakes, has doubled in the past ten years. Researchers recently showed that grasshoppers used as reptile food can be a source of allergies.
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Working memory: Underlying processes are more complex than we thought

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 2:52pm
In order to retain a piece of information for a short time, working memory is required. The underlying processes are considerably more complex than hitherto assumed. Two brain states must alternate rhythmically in order for a piece of information to be successfully maintained.
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African lion survival may be dependent on corridor creation

Science Daily - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 2:52pm
Across Africa, lion populations are threatened by continued reductions in their range and associated genetic isolation. A new study published this month in Landscape Ecology shows that strategic directional fencing and/or corridors aimed at directing lions between protected areas may be a viable solution for lion conservation. Landscape connectivity is critical to the survival of the African lion.
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The OnePlus X Is a Steal—And That’s Why It’s So Hard to Buy

Wired News - Fri, 30/10/2015 - 2:30pm

The OnePlus X is a $250 smartphone that looks twice as nice. Good luck getting your hands on one.

The post The OnePlus X Is a Steal—And That’s Why It’s So Hard to Buy appeared first on WIRED.











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