Researchers find moderate vascular risk in southwest native population

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
A relatively low prevalence of vascular risk has been reported among participants of the Southwest Heart Mind Study, especially among those treated for hypertension and hyperlipidemia despite overweight and obesity.
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Water color, phytoplankton growth in the Gulf of Maine are changing

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:12pm
The amount of dissolved organic carbon from rivers emptying into the Gulf of Maine has increased over the last 80 years, a trend they predict will continue through 2100 if annual precipitation continues to increase, warn researchers. Runoff is changing the color of the seawater, reducing the light available to phytoplankton for photosynthesis, causing a decline in overall productivity.
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Immune cells in organ cavities play essential role in fast tissue repair

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:12pm
While scientists have known for many years that there are cells living in the cavities surrounding various organs such as the heart, lung and liver, their function has remained unknown. A recent study examined these cells, and discovered they play an integral role in fast tissue repair.
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Advances in extracting uranium from seawater

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:12pm
The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium -- enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have now been made.
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Tighter enforcement along the US-Mexico border backfired, researchers find

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:11pm
The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the United States, according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money.
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Young adult survivors of childhood cancer report feeling middle-aged

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:11pm
Do survivors of childhood cancer return to normal health as they grow up? New research finds young adult survivors of childhood cancer, age 18-29, report health-related quality of life that resembles that of adults, 40-49, in the general population, according to a study.
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Is the $400 Billion F-35's 'Brain' Broken?

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:00pm
Zachary Cohen, reporting for CNN News: Almost 2,500 of the world's most advanced warplanes, with a total price tag of $400 billion, and they may not have a "brain" in the bunch? That's the fear of federal watchdogs who say problems with the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's complex logistics software system could lead to a grounding of the entire fleet, not to mention future cost increases and schedule delays. Documenting risks to the F-35's Autonomic Logistics Information System, which Department of Defense officials have described as the "brains" of the fifth-generation fighter, an April 14 Government Accountability Office report says a failure "could take the entire fleet offline," (PDF) in part, due to the lack of a backup system. The report also outlines concerns related to the lack of testing done to ensure the software will work properly by the time the Air Force plans to declare its version of the aircraft ready for deployment this August and the Navy reaches that milestone in 2018. The Marine Corps declared the first squadron of its F-35 variant ready for combat in July 2015, with the intention of upgrading and resolving the software issues before its first planned deployment in 2017.

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New Maps Make Aftershocks Look Scarier Than the Main Quake

Wired News - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 8:47pm
USGS releases maps that show the seismic parades happening in Ecuador and Japan. Here's how they're wreaking havoc. The post New Maps Make Aftershocks Look Scarier Than the Main Quake appeared first on WIRED.
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FBI Hints It Paid Hackers $1 Million to Get Into San Bernardino iPhone

Wired News - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 8:26pm
If correct, this would mean that taxpayers shelled out more than $1 million for a solution that reportedly produced nothing useful for the investigation. The post FBI Hints It Paid Hackers $1 Million to Get Into San Bernardino iPhone appeared first on WIRED.
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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Available To Download; Mozilla To Offer 0-Day Firefox Releases Via Snaps

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 8:13pm
Reader prisoninmate writes: The latest, and hopefully, the greatest version of Ubuntu is now available to download. On the sidelines, Mozilla today announced the availability of future releases of its popular Firefox web browser in the snap package format for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Earlier today, Canonical unleashed the final release of the highly anticipated Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, bringing users a great set of new features and improvements. Also today, it looks like Canonical has renewed its partnership with Mozilla to offer Firefox as the default web browser on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and upcoming releases of the Linux kernel-based operating systems. As part of the new partnership, Mozilla is committed to distributing future versions of Firefox as a snap package. Having Firefox distributed in the snap format means that you'll have 0-day releases in Ubuntu 16.04. Yes, just like Windows and Mac OS X, users are enjoying their 0-day releases of Mozilla Firefox and don't have to wait for package maintainers of a particular GNU/Linux distribution to update the software in the main repositories. For Mozilla, having Firefox as a snap package means that they'll be able to continually optimize it for Ubuntu.

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Categories: Science

VC, Entrepreneur Says Basic Income Would Work Even If 90% People 'Smoked Pot' and Didn't Work

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:33pm
An anonymous reader cites a story on TI: The chief complaint people lodge at universal basic income -- a form of income distribution that gives people money to cover basic needs regardless of whether they work or not -- is that it'll make them lazy. Sam Altman doesn't buy it. In a recent episode of the Freakonomics podcast, entitled "Is the World Ready for a Guaranteed Basic Income?" Altman argued basic income could support huge amounts of productivity loss and still carry the economy on its shoulders. "Maybe 90% of people will go smoke pot and play video games, but if 10% of the people go create incredible new products and services and new wealth, that's still a huge net-win," Altman says. "And the American puritanical ideal that hard work for its own sake is valuable -- period -- and that you can't question that, I think that's just wrong." [...] The complaint Altman addressed on the Freakonomics podcast is a common one. Study after study, however, has shown that giving people extra money makes them feel financially secure. That security ends up leading to empowerment, not de-motivation.

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We’ll Never Understand Prince, and That’s Why We Love Him

Wired News - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:15pm
The most enthralling—and often most frustrating—aspect of being a fan of Prince was this: No matter what, you were never going to figure him out. The post We'll Never Understand Prince, and That's Why We Love Him appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Volcanoes tied to shifts in Earth's climate over millions of years

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:00pm
A new study reveals that volcanic activity associated with the plate-tectonic movement of continents may be responsible for climatic shifts from hot to cold over tens and hundreds of millions of years throughout much of Earth's history.
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New molecule-building method opens vast realm of chemistry for pharma and other industries

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:00pm
Scientists have devised a new molecule-building method likely to have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry and other chemistry-based enterprises. The method allows construction of novel, complex and potentially valuable molecules, starting from a large class of relatively cheap and non-toxic carboxylic acids compounds.
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Leg-wing cooperation in baby birds, dinosaurs is key transition in origin of flight

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:00pm
New research based on high-resolution x-ray movies reveals that despite having extremely underdeveloped muscles and wings, young birds acquire a mature flight stroke early in their development, initially relying heavily on their legs and wings to work in tandem to power the strenuous movement. The new study is important for understanding the development of flight in modern birds and reconstructing its origins in extinct dinosaurs.
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Trick of the light may help diseased plants attract greenfly

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:00pm
The leaves of virus-infected plants reflect light differently to attract the attention of disease-spreading greenfly, new research suggests. Scientists have shown for the first time that plant viruses alter the surface of leaves, influencing how light is polarized and helping insects to potentially 'see' infected plants.
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The importance of resting phases in B cell development

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:00pm
Everyone preparing for the London Marathon likely knows that to perform their best during the event, they need to rest up now. New research describes a new mechanism through which B cells ensure that they rest up between intensive developmental events.
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Cool combination produces easier carbon bonds

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:00pm
By combining two century-old techniques in organic chemistry, chemists are able to make organic compounds with greater ease and precision. Such compounds are important for drug discovery and development.
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Giant dinosaurs hatched with adult-like proportions

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 6:58pm
Analysis of a new dinosaur fossil suggests that the largest species ever known to walk the Earth was born with adult-like proportions, perhaps allowing it to be more independent than some other species of dinosaur.
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Chemists shed new light on global energy, food supply challenge

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 6:58pm
All living things require nitrogen for survival, but the world depends on only two known processes to break nitrogen's ultra-strong bonds to allow conversion to a form humans, animals and plants can consume. One is a natural, bacterial process on which farmers have relied since the dawn of agriculture. The other is the century-old Haber-Bösch process, which revolutionized fertilizer production and spurred unprecedented growth of the global food supply.
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