Is shotgun marriage dead?

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 2:16pm
Shotgun marriages have faded in popularity overall, but are on the rise among some groups, shows new research. And not all shotgun marriages are as rocky as one might think.
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New theory debunks consensus that math abilities are innate

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 2:15pm
A new theory regarding how the brain first learns basic math could alter approaches to identifying and teaching students with math learning disabilities. Now researchers offer a better understanding of how, when and why people grasp every day math skills.
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Carbon levy could limit impact of climate change, study suggests

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 2:09pm
A decades-old tax system may offer an economical solution to the problem of catastrophic climate change, according to a new study. A consumer tax levy on fossil fuels could provide a means of lowering their use or encouraging the adoption of cleaner alternatives, the research suggests.
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A Chain-Smoking Robot Isn’t Just Hilarious—It’s a Big Deal

Wired News - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 2:00pm
Researchers have built a chain-smoking robot. And not because they want a real-life Bender. The post A Chain-Smoking Robot Isn't Just Hilarious—It's a Big Deal appeared first on WIRED.
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UK Government Vows To Sink $2.3 Billion Into New Cybersecurity Plan

Slashdot - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 2:00pm
The UK government has promised to spend nearly $2.3 billion over the next five years to try to tackle the growing problem of cyber attacks in the country. An anonymous reader writes: Recent research suggested that Britain is particularly susceptible to data breaches involving compromised employee account data. Nonetheless, chancellor of the exchequer Philip Hammond claimed on Tuesday that the country is "an acknowledged global leader in cyber security." Number 11's occupant crowed that the previous Tory-led coalition government had chucked 860 million pound at the problem, but Hammond then undermined himself somewhat by adding that "we must now keep up with the scale and pace of the threats we face." Which underlines the fact that the government is playing catch-up in its race against cybercrimes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Cloudy feedback on global warming

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:38pm
Researchers have identified a mechanism that causes low clouds – and their influence on Earth’s energy balance – to respond differently to global warming depending on their spatial pattern and location.
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Low-oxygen environment leads to heart regeneration in mice, research shows

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:38pm
Normal, healthy heart muscle is well-supplied with oxygen-rich blood. But now cardiologists have been able to regenerate heart muscle by placing mice in an extremely low-oxygen environment.
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New discovery could help oral medicines work better

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:35pm
A new method for customizing ingredients that help oral medications dissolve in the body and be absorbed into the bloodstream has now been discovered by researchers. The materials discovered in this study could allow life-saving drugs to work faster and more efficiently.
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Brain's multi-track road to long-term memory

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:33pm
Our brain has a tough task every time we experience something new – it must be flexible to take in new information instantly, but also stable enough to store it for a long time. And new memories may not be allowed to alter or overwrite old ones. Now researchers have investigated how different brain regions interact when long-term memories are formed.
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Scientists discover the 'switch' that makes breast cancer cells aggressive

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:32pm
By controlling a molecular switch, scientists could potentially make aggressive cancers more sensitive to conventional drugs and improve treatment outcomes, say researchers.
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Structural deficits may explain mood-independent cognitive difficulties in bipolar disorder

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:32pm
Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a new study reports a link between reduced functional activation and reduced cortical thickness in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder. The abnormalities were found in patients not currently experiencing depression or mania, which suggests that there is a structural basis for altered neural processing that may help explain why cognitive deficits persist even during periods of normal mood.
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How autoimmune disease is prevented: Mechanism discovered

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:32pm
A previously unknown safety mechanism in our immune system keeps the body free from autoimmune diseases. Researchers have discovered that a cell in our inherited immune system can prevent our adaptive (learned) immune system from reacting to the body’s native cells, which can otherwise lead to autoimmune diseases such as SLE.
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Being fit protects against health risks caused by stress at work

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:32pm
It is a well-known fact that fitness and well-being go hand in hand. But being in good shape also protects against the health problems that arise when we feel particularly stressed at work. As reported by sports scientists, it therefore pays to stay physically active, especially during periods of high stress.
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Strange behavior in the crowded cellular environment

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:32pm
The powerful K computer has been used to show how molecules move within the extremely crowded interior of a bacterial cell.
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The Clever Pen on a Mission to Finally Kill the Tape Measure

Wired News - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:13pm
The InstruMMent 01 looks like a pen and works like a tape measure. The post The Clever Pen on a Mission to Finally Kill the Tape Measure appeared first on WIRED.
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What It Would Take to Move 650 Million People into the US in One Week

Wired News - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:00pm
Donald Trump stated that we could get 650 million immigrants into the US in just a week. Is this realistic? The post What It Would Take to Move 650 Million People into the US in One Week appeared first on WIRED.
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Google's Schmidt Drew Up Draft Plan For Clinton In 2014

Slashdot - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 1:00pm
New submitter troublemaker_23 writes: Eric Schmidt, the chairman of Google's parent company Alphabet, submitted a detailed draft to a key Clinton aide on April 15, 2014, outlining his ideas for a possible run for the presidency and stressing that "The key is the development of a single record for a voter that aggregates all that is known about them." The ideas, in an email released by the whistleblower website WikiLeaks, were sent to Cheryl Mills, former deputy White House counsel to Bill Clinton. Mills forwarded it to Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, campaign manager Robby Mook and Barack Obama's 2012 campaign manager David Plouffe. The email is one of a trove from Podesta's gmail account that was obtained by WikiLeaks. About two weeks prior to this, Podesta wrote to Mook that he had met Schmidt and that he (Schmidt) was keen to be the "top outside adviser." In the April 15, 2014 email, Schmidt emphasized that what he was putting forward was a draft, writing, "Here are some comments and observations based on what we saw in the 2012 campaign. If we get started soon, we will be in a very strong position to execute well for 2016." It was titled "Notes for a 2016 Democratic campaign." He divided his comments into categories such as size, structure and timing; location; the pieces of a campaign; the rules; and what he called the key things. With regard to size, structure and timing, Schmidt wrote: "Let's assume a total budget of about US$1.5 billion, with more than 5000 paid employees and million(s) of volunteers. The entire start-up ceases operation four days after 8 November 2016." As to location, he did not like the idea of using Washington DC as a base and was keen on low-paid workers. "The campaign headquarters will have about a thousand people, mostly young and hard-working and enthusiastic. It's important to have a very large hiring pool (such as Chicago or NYC) from which to choose enthusiastic, smart and low-paid permanent employees," he wrote. "DC is a poor choice as it's full of distractions and interruptions. Moving the location from DC elsewhere guarantees visitors have taken the time to travel and to help."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Anonymous Speech Is More Important Than Ever. TED Proves It

Wired News - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 12:00pm
The ability of Americans to anonymously advocate ideas they care about is under attack at the state and federal level. The post Anonymous Speech Is More Important Than Ever. TED Proves It appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Physicists induce superconductivity in non-superconducting materials

Science Daily - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 11:51am
Researchers have reported a new method for inducing superconductivity in non-superconducting materials, demonstrating a concept proposed decades ago but never proven. The technique can also be used to boost the efficiency of known superconducting materials, suggesting a new way to advance the commercial viability of superconductors.
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Fantastic PinOut! Puts an Infinite Spin on Pinball

Wired News - Tue, 01/11/2016 - 11:00am
Go up, up, up through a (nearly) infinite pinball board that challenges you to up your skill-shot game. The post Fantastic PinOut! Puts an Infinite Spin on Pinball appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science