EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 6:03am
itwbennett writes In a letter to Google (PDF) that was published Thursday, the Article 29 Working Party, an umbrella group for European data protection authorities, said Google's privacy policy, in addition to being clear and unambiguous, should also include an exhaustive list of the types of personal data processed. But if all that information is overwhelming to users, Google should personalize the privacy policy to show users only the data processing it is performing on their data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 6:03am
itwbennett writes In a letter to Google (PDF) that was published Thursday, the Article 29 Working Party, an umbrella group for European data protection authorities, said Google's privacy policy, in addition to being clear and unambiguous, should also include an exhaustive list of the types of personal data processed. But if all that information is overwhelming to users, Google should personalize the privacy policy to show users only the data processing it is performing on their data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 6:03am
itwbennett writes In a letter to Google (PDF) that was published Thursday, the Article 29 Working Party, an umbrella group for European data protection authorities, said Google's privacy policy, in addition to being clear and unambiguous, should also include an exhaustive list of the types of personal data processed. But if all that information is overwhelming to users, Google should personalize the privacy policy to show users only the data processing it is performing on their data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 6:03am
itwbennett writes In a letter to Google (PDF) that was published Thursday, the Article 29 Working Party, an umbrella group for European data protection authorities, said Google's privacy policy, in addition to being clear and unambiguous, should also include an exhaustive list of the types of personal data processed. But if all that information is overwhelming to users, Google should personalize the privacy policy to show users only the data processing it is performing on their data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 6:03am
itwbennett writes In a letter to Google (PDF) that was published Thursday, the Article 29 Working Party, an umbrella group for European data protection authorities, said Google's privacy policy, in addition to being clear and unambiguous, should also include an exhaustive list of the types of personal data processed. But if all that information is overwhelming to users, Google should personalize the privacy policy to show users only the data processing it is performing on their data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

EU Gives Google Privacy Policy Suggestions About Data Protection

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 6:03am
itwbennett writes In a letter to Google (PDF) that was published Thursday, the Article 29 Working Party, an umbrella group for European data protection authorities, said Google's privacy policy, in addition to being clear and unambiguous, should also include an exhaustive list of the types of personal data processed. But if all that information is overwhelming to users, Google should personalize the privacy policy to show users only the data processing it is performing on their data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ultra-low-energy-consuming transistors and circuits

Kurzweil AI - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 5:40am

Concept for energy-efficient tunnel FET (field effect transistor) switches and circuits (credit: E2 SWITCH)

European project E2SWITCH is developing new electronic systems with ultra-low energy consumption, based on tunnel FET (TFET) heterostructures for switches (transistors) and circuits.

The idea is to design that will be built on silicon substrates but designed to operate at voltages that are up to five times lower than those used in mobile phones, while reducing thermal dissipation.

Transistors and circuits based on lower voltages result in reduced energy expenditures compared to current CMOS technology.

The EPFL is coordinating this new European research project, which involves six universities and research institutes, and companies IBM, CCS, and SCIPROM.

“Our objective is to make the next generation of transistors, [designed to] operate at voltages below 0.3 Volts and even as low as 0.1V,” explained Adrian Ionescu, an EPFL professor and the coordinator of E2SWITCH.

Mobile devices such as smart phones will be the first components to take advantage of such optimized electronics. along with sensors for gas and temperature and future computing systems, especially for cloud and big data applications using huge banks of servers, which represent a growing proportion of global electricity costs.

Example of an energy-efficient TFET design (credit: E2 SWITCH)

“Power dissipation is a fundamental challenge for nanoelectronic circuits,” said Heike Riel, IBM Fellow, IBM Research – Zurich.

“Within E2SWITCH we aim to significantly reduce the power consumption of electronics by researching TFETs based on III-V heterostructure nanowires with wrap-around gate and directly integrated on standard silicon substrates.”

The Universities of Udine and Bologna (Italy), IMEC (Belgium), Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany), Lund University (Sweden) and ETH Zurich (Switzerland) are also involved.

E2SWITCH is funded by 4.3 million euros under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Development of the European Union. The first research advancements were presented at the 44th European Solid-State Device Conference (ESSDERC 2014) on September 26.

Abstract for “In the Quest of Zero Power: Energy Efficient Computing Devices and Circuits”

This workshop is organized and supported by the e2-Switch European Project and will include a series of presentations dealing with state of the art advancements in Tunnel FETs as most promising energy efficient device candidates able to reduce the voltage supply of integrated circuits (ICs) below 0.25V and be hybridized with CMOS technology. The programme will also feature reports on DC/AC benchmarking for complementary n- and p-type tunnel FETs, compact models for digital and analog/RF, device scalability, operational reliability and ITRS metrics.
Categories: Science

‘Tumor Paint’ brain-tumor-detecting dye gets go-ahead for clinical study

Kurzweil AI - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:53am

Images of a soft tissue sarcoma from a dog using Tumor Paint BLZ-100. Right: standard histological stain showing the morphology of the tissue; left: fluorescence provided by Tumor Paint, with cancerous cells highlighted in red. (Photo credit: Blaze Bioscience Inc.)

The FDA has approved an investigational new drug application for Tumor Paint BLZ-100, a protein-linked dye that highlights cancer cells in images so surgeons can precisely target brain tumors.

The FDA move means Blaze Bioscience can proceed with a clinical trial in Los Angeles, Queensland, Australia and other sites.

Twenty-one adult patients who need surgery for often-deadly glioma brain tumors are expected to enroll in the study, which is aimed at examining the safety of injecting the BLZ-100 molecule into the bloodstream, where it rushes to highlight cancer cells.

The molecule was discovered and first developed by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Children’s Hospital, and the University of Washington.

BLZ-100 may be especially beneficial for patients whose cancer might otherwise be difficult for surgeons to see — and remove, said Heather Franklin, president and CEO of Blaze Bioscience. It may help solve a long-standing problem in medicine: how to identify tumor cells so surgeons don’t remove too little, leaving disease behind — or too much, removing healthy tissue.

Tests of the compound in skin cancer patients in Australia are ongoing, she added.

This first product based on Tumor Paint technology is a molecule that consists of two parts: a chlorotoxin protein that penetrates tumor cells and a dye that glows under near-infrared light.

“We believe it binds to a target protein on the surface of cancer cells,” said Jim Olson, M.D.. a Fred Hutch pediatric brain cancer expert who pioneered the notion of targeting tumors with fluorescent dye to help surgeons distinguish healthy cells from malignancies. “We believe (the target) is not present on the surface of normal cells.”

Participants are expected to enroll in the new trial through December 2015, according to the federal description. Patients must be adults ages 18 to 75 who meet a variety of criteria; eventually, Blaze researchers hope to test BLZ-100 in children, too.

May be useful or other cancers

The Phase 1 clinical trial is only one step toward routine use of Tumor Paint in hospitals around the world, Franklin said. It will be tested in brain tumors now, but preclinical evidence suggests that it may be helpful for a wide range of cancers, including lung, breast, prostate, colorectal, skin and sarcomas.

Blaze Bioscience has invested nearly $10 million, said Franklin, who estimates that it could take five or more years before the product is ready for the commercial market.

Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Piracy Police Chief Calls For State Interference To Stop Internet "Anarchy"

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 3:06am
An anonymous reader writes The City of London Police's Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU) is determined to continue its anti-piracy efforts in the years to come. However, the unit's head, Andy Fyfe, also believes that the government may have to tighten the rules on the Internet to stop people from breaking the law. PIPCU's chief believes the public has to be protected from criminals, including pirate site operators who take advantage of their trust. If that doesn't happen, then the Internet may descend into anarchy, he says, suggesting that the government may have to intervene to prevent this. The Police chief believes tighter rules may be needed to prevent people from breaking the law in the future. This could mean not everyone is allowed to launch a website, but that a license would be required, for example.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Kano Ships 18,000 Learn-To-Code Computer Kits

Slashdot - Mon, 29/09/2014 - 12:35am
drkim writes Kano Computing is a startup that plays in the learn-to-code space by adding a step-by-step, hand-holding layer atop the Raspberry Pi to make learning about computational thinking child's play. Kano has now shipped all the hardware kits in its first batch of crowdfunded orders and pre-orders. That's around 18,000 kits in all, co-founder Alex Klein confirmed to TechCrunch. The lion's share of the first batch of Kano kits — almost 13,000 kits — were ordered via its Kickstarter campaign last year, with a further 5,000 pre-orders taken via its website. The kits cost $99 (plus shipping) to crowdfunder backers, or around $160 (plus shipping) if pre-ordered on the Kano website. The company plans to focus on selling mainly via its own web channel from here on in, according to Alex.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science