A $5 fix for a nasty parasite

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:57pm
Engineers are the first to demonstrate that the attachment of oocysts to environmental biofilms is a calcium-mediated process -- a crucial step toward the development of an improved detection method for Cryptosporidium parvum, an infectious, sometimes deadly, parasite.
Categories: Science

Antarctic site promises to open a new window on the cosmos

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:57pm
Antarctica might be one of the most inhospitable regions on the planet, but it is a mecca for astronomers. Its cold, dry air enables observations that can't be done elsewhere on Earth. The South Pole has hosted telescopes for decades. Now, researchers are eyeing a new location -- Dome A, which offers a unique opportunity to study the universe at little-explored terahertz radio frequencies.
Categories: Science

Rural communities see steep increase in babies born with opioid withdrawal

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:57pm
The number of babies born with drug withdrawal symptoms from opioids grew substantially faster in rural communities than in cities, a new study suggests.
Categories: Science

Smoking down, number of lives saved up as more countries embrace tobacco control measures

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:57pm
Between 2008 and 2014, more than 53 million people in 88 countries stopped smoking due to tobacco control measures, which means that more than 22 million smoking-related deaths have been averted, say authors of a new report.
Categories: Science

Meeting patients' socioeconomic needs can improve cardiovascular risk factors

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:57pm
Patients enrolled in a program designed to help meet socioeconomic needs that can affect their health had modest but significant improvements in several key cardiovascular risk factors, report investigators.
Categories: Science

Applying the '80/20 rule' to social costs

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:57pm
An analysis of the lives of nearly a thousand people shows that a small group who had poor childhood 'brain health' accounts for the lion's share of social costs when they reach adulthood. Twenty percent of participants accounted for 81 percent of criminal convictions, 77 percent of fatherless childrearing, 78 percent of prescriptions filled, 66 percent of welfare benefits, 57 percent of hospital nights, 54 percent of cigarettes smoked and 36 percent of insurance claims.
Categories: Science

New blood draw protocol could minimize risk for critically ill children

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:56pm
Researchers report that implementing a checklist-style set of procedures appears to cut almost in half the number of potentially unnecessary blood culture draws in critically ill children without endangering doctors' ability to diagnose and treat life-threatening blood infections.
Categories: Science

Golden Globes Nominees Full of Surprises, Snubs, and Stranger Things

Wired News - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:46pm
'La La Land,' 'Moonlight,' and 'The People vs. O.J. Simpson' were the biggies. But Netflix's '80s-indebted series also picked up a few key nods. The post Golden Globes Nominees Full of Surprises, Snubs, and Stranger Things appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

If You Get Rich, You Won't Quit Working For Long

Slashdot - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:45pm
An anonymous reader writes: You'd think striking it suddenly rich would be the ultimate ticket to freedom. Without money worries, the world would be your oyster. Perhaps you'd champion a worthy cause, or indulge a sporting passion, but work? Surely not. However, remaining gainfully employed after sudden wealth is more common than you'd think. After all, there are numerous high-profile billionaires who haven't called it quits despite possessing the luxury to retire, including some of the world's top chief executives, such as Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg. But it turns out, the suddenly rich who aren't running companies are also loathe to quit, even though they have plenty of money. That could be, in part, because the link between salary and job satisfaction is very weak. According to a meta-analysis by University of Florida business school professor Timothy Judge and other researchers, there's less than a 2% overlap between the two factors. In the long run, we derive job satisfaction from non-monetary sources, which include positive peer relationships, the ability to work on meaningful projects and even leadership opportunities.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

That's No Supernova! It's A Black Hole Shredding A Star | Video

Space.com - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:29pm
In 2015, the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) detected what was characterized as a "superluminous supernova," the brightest ever detected. After further review, a supermassive black hole swallowing a star may be the culprit.
Categories: Science

Latest Microsoft Skype Preview Adds Real-Time Voice Translation For Phone Calls

Slashdot - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:05pm
Microsoft has added the ability to use Skype Translator on calls to mobiles and landlines to its latest Skype Preview app. From a report on ZDNet: Up until now, Skype Translator was available to individuals making Skype-to-Skype calls. The new announcement of the expansion of Skype Translator to mobiles and landlines makes Skype Translator more widely available. To test drive this, users need to be members of the Windows Insider Program. They need to install the latest version of Skype Preview on their Windows 10 PCs and to have Skype Credits or a subscription. Skype Translator, available in nine languages, uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques such as deep-learning to train artificial neural networks and convert spoken chats in almost real time. The company says the app improves as it listens to more conversations.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Astonishing Gecko That Looks Just Like a Tree

Wired News - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:00pm
Some critters are great at tearing the world up. The leaf-tailed gecko prefers to just blend in. The post The Astonishing Gecko That Looks Just Like a Tree appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

'Baby Saturns' May Be Behind Imprints Observed Around Young Star | Video

Space.com - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 4:00pm
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile have imaged the protoplanetary disk around young star HD 163296. A study of dual imprints in the disk suggests that two saturn-sized planets may be forming.
Categories: Science

Study shows effectiveness of testimonial warning labels on tobacco products

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:53pm
Cigarette warning labels featuring photos of real smokers who were harmed by their habit are more effective in getting smokers to quit than the text-only labels currently in use, research indicates.
Categories: Science

New laser scanning test to assess fire-damaged concrete

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:53pm
Laser scanning is a new and viable structural safety technique to detect the damaging effects of fire on concrete, new engineering research has found.
Categories: Science

How physical exercise aids in stroke recovery

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:53pm
Mice that had free-access to a running wheel were able to maintain ocular dominance plasticity after suffering a stroke, compared to those that didn't, new research shows. These exciting observations have the potential to provide a simple but effective method to protect and rehabilitate patients that are prone to, or have already suffered, a stroke.
Categories: Science

Trump Ignoring US Intelligence Creates Risks Beyond Russian Hacking

Wired News - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:48pm
Donald Trump's growing divide with the intelligence communities could have consequences well beyond Russia. The post Trump Ignoring US Intelligence Creates Risks Beyond Russian Hacking appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Shuttling Space Artifacts: Rocket Booster Parts Bound for Endeavour Exhibit

Space.com - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:30pm
The pieces are coming together for the towering launch-pad-like exhibit of the space shuttle Endeavour. Three massive segments from twin solid rocket boosters are now on a cross country road trip in preparation for the California Science Center display.
Categories: Science

AMD Introduces Radeon Instinct Machine Intelligence Accelerators

Slashdot - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:25pm
Reader MojoKid writes: AMD is announcing a new series of Radeon-branded products today, targeted at machine intelligence and deep learning enterprise applications, called Radeon Instinct. As its name suggests, the new Radeon Instinct line of products are comprised of GPU-based solutions for deep learning, inference and training. The new GPUs are also complemented by a free, open-source library and framework for GPU accelerators, dubbed MIOpen. MIOpen is architected for high-performance machine intelligence applications and is optimized for the deep learning frameworks in AMD's ROCm software suite. The first products in the lineup consist of the Radeon Instinct MI6, the MI8, and the MI25. The 150W Radeon Instinct MI6 accelerator is powered by a Polaris-based GPU, packs 16GB of memory (224GB/s peak bandwidth), and will offer up to 5.7 TFLOPS of peak FP16 performance. Next up in the stack is the Fiji-based Radeon Instinct MI8. Like the Radeon R9 Nano, the Radeon Instinct MI8 features 4GB of High-Bandwidth Memory (HBM) with peak bandwidth of 512GB/s. The MI8 will offer up to 8.2 TFLOPS of peak FP16 compute performance, with a board power that typical falls below 175W. The Radeon Instinct MI25 accelerator will leverage AMD's next-generation Vega GPU architecture and has a board power of approximately 300W. All of the Radeon Instinct accelerators are passively cooled but when installed into a server chassis you can bet there will be plenty of air flow. Like the recently released Radeon Pro WX series of professional graphics cards for workstations, Radeon Instinct accelerators will be built by AMD. All of the Radeon Instinct cards will also support AMD MultiGPU (MxGPU) hardware virtualization technology.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Wind farms play key role in cutting carbon emissions, study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 12/12/2016 - 3:11pm
Wind farms have made a significant impact in limiting carbon emissions from other sources of power generation in Great Britain, a study shows.
Categories: Science