Americans salute sexual freedom, but still frown on extramarital affairs

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:30pm
Acceptance of premarital sex is at an all-time high along with an acceptance of homosexuality, find researchers. Researchers analyzed data from the General Social Survey, a nationally representative survey of more than 33,000 adults taken between 1972 and 2012. They found substantial generational shifts in attitudes toward non-marital sex and number of sexual partners.
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New centimeter-accurate GPS system could transform virtual reality and mobile devices

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:30pm
Scientists have built a low-cost centimeter-accurate GPS system that reduces location errors from the size of a large car to the size of a nickel -- a more than 100 times increase in accuracy. The breakthrough is a powerful and sensitive software-defined GPS receiver that can extract centimeter accuracies from the inexpensive antennas found in mobile devices.
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Snow and avalanche research: Remote assessment of avalanche risk

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:29pm
Geographers have developed a novel measuring system relying on two different physical methods that promises to enhance forecasting of avalanches and spring floods. The method combines GPS and radar to measure snow properties also on the slopes.
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Realistic surface rendering in computer games

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:29pm
The surface of rendered objects in computer games often looks unrealistic. A new method creates much more realistic images, imitating the complex scattering processes under the surface.
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First extensive description of the human secreted miRNome

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:29pm
In an elaborate study, biologists have found out that small molecules named microRNAs are, against many hopes, not yet suitable for early diagnosis of skin cancer, as well as supposedly for other types of cancer, in blood samples. For the first time they analyzed all microRNAs in the serum of healthy people and thus provided a first complete image of the human miRNome in blood samples, in reference to the better-known genome.
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Graphene spintronics: From science to technology

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:29pm
Electronics is based on the manipulation of electrons and other charge carriers, but in addition to charge, electrons possess a property known as spin. When spin is manipulated with magnetic and electric fields, the result is a spin-polarized current that carries more information than is possible with charge alone.
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Profiling approach to enable right lung cancer treatment match

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:29pm
A new way to genetically profile lung cancer samples has been developed by researchers, potentially allowing doctors to more easily identify the most appropriate treatment for patients.
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New laser-light source to shed light on fundamental physics

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:29pm
With the aid of extremely short and highly intense pulses of laser light, scientists have made great strides in their efforts to observe and control particle motions outside the confines of atomic nuclei. Indeed, the future of electronics lies in optical control of electron flows. That would enable data processing operations to be performed at frequencies equivalent to the rate of oscillation of visible light -- some 100,000 times faster than is feasible with current techniques. To reach this goal, advances in laser technology are essential. Physicists have now developed a new laser-light source that will lead to significant advances in research on fundamental physics.
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Researchers design new tiny QWERTY soft keyboards for wearable devices

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:28pm
There are a growing number of wearable devices featuring a touchscreen, such as smart watches, smart glasses or digital jewellery. These devices can receive notifications in many forms but usually there is no direct way of replying since they lack a text entry system, mainly because the space available onscreen is very limited. Now, computer scientists have developed two tiny QWERTY soft keyboard prototypes, which enable users to answer or enter text on their wearable devices.
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New formula for high-strength shotcrete: Protecting tunnels from fires and terrorist attacks

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:28pm
Engineers have developed a shotcrete which is much more robust than traditional concrete. It can render tunnels, bridges and other constructions more resistant against fires and explosions. The new formula includes 140 kilograms steel fibers per cubic meter concrete – a figure that was thought to be impossible for shotcrete.
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Gene variant determines early or late onset of Huntington's disease

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:28pm
A gene variant that influences whether Huntington’s disease breaks out earlier or later than expected has been identified by researchers. The findings can contribute to improved diagnosis and disease-modifying therapies, the group says.
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How do salmon change from freshwater to saltwater fish?

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:28pm
For decades, researchers have tried to find out what regulates changes in salmon when they transform from being freshwater to saltwater fish. Now they have come a little closer to an answer. A new study shows that light -- increases in day length in the spring -- affects developmental processes in the fish's brain during smoltification.
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Nerves move to avoid damage

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:28pm
New research can help explain the prevalence of widespread syndromes such as carpal tunnel syndrome and sciatica. According to the results, neural movements can be measured by using non-invasive techniques, which are also applicable in diagnostics and rehabilitation planning.
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Oral spores of harmless C. difficile prevent repeated C. difficile infection

Science Daily - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:27pm
In what is a major step towards the prevention of recurring bouts of Clostridium difficile (Cdiff) infection, an international team of researchers has shown that giving spores of non-toxic Cdiff by mouth is effective in stopping repeated bouts of Cdiff infection which occurs in 25-30 percent of patients who suffer an initial episode of diarrhea or colitis.
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The Programming Talent Myth

Slashdot - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:05pm
HughPickens.com writes: Jake Edge writes at LWN.net that there is a myth that programming skill is somehow distributed on a U-shaped curve and that people either "suck at programming" or that they "rock at programming", without leaving any room for those in between. Everyone is either an amazing programmer or "a worthless use of a seat" which doesn't make much sense. If you could measure programming ability somehow, its curve would look like the normal distribution. According to Edge this belief that programming ability fits into a bi-modal distribution is both "dangerous and a myth". "This myth sets up a world where you can only program if you are a rock star or a ninja. It is actively harmful in that is keeping people from learning programming, driving people out of programming, and it is preventing most of the growth and the improvement we'd like to see." If the only options are to be amazing or terrible, it leads people to believe they must be passionate about their career, that they must think about programming every waking moment of their life. If they take their eye off the ball even for a minute, they will slide right from amazing to terrible again leading people to be working crazy hours at work, to be constantly studying programming topics on their own time, and so on. The truth is that programming isn't a passion or a talent, says Edge, it is just a bunch of skills that can be learned. Programming isn't even one thing, though people talk about it as if it were; it requires all sorts of skills and coding is just a small part of that. Things like design, communication, writing, and debugging are needed. If we embrace this idea that "it's cool to be okay at these skills"—that being average is fine—it will make programming less intimidating for newcomers. If the bar for success is set "at okay, rather than exceptional", the bar seems a lot easier to clear for those new to the community. According to Edge the tech industry is rife with sexism, racism, homophobia, and discrimination and although it is a multi-faceted problem, the talent myth is part of the problem. "In our industry, we recast the talent myth as "the myth of the brilliant asshole", says Jacob Kaplan-Moss. "This is the "10x programmer" who is so good at his job that people have to work with him even though his behavior is toxic. In reality, given the normal distribution, it's likely that these people aren't actually exceptional, but even if you grant that they are, how many developers does a 10x programmer have to drive away before it is a wash?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Inside the Inflatable Hospital That’s Saving Lives in Nepal

Wired News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:00pm

Doctors Without Borders is setting up a 54-bed inflatable hospital in Nepal.

The post Inside the Inflatable Hospital That’s Saving Lives in Nepal appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Explaining the Greatest Game Ever…Really, Really Quickly

Wired News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:00pm

One take, one run-on sentence, zero preparation. That's the Unnecessarily Rushed Explanation.

The post Explaining the Greatest Game Ever…Really, Really Quickly appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Alien Volcanoes on 'Super Earth' May Explain Wild Temperature Swings

Space.com - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 11:38am
Researchers found that temperatures on the "super Earth" exoplanet 55 Cancri e varied by nearly a factor of three between 2011 and 2013. One possible explanation for this huge variability is massive volcanism, astronomers said.
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Amazing Photo Shows SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Just Before Crash

Space.com - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 11:33am
The new image was snapped from the deck of the drone ship on April 14, a second or so before the rocket stage toppled over and exploded in a dramatic demise that SpaceX captured on video.
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Century-Old 'Mini-Supernova' Captured in Gorgeous NASA Photo

Space.com - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 11:19am
The century-old outburst from a classical nova is still going strong and surprising astronomers with its steady temperature.
Categories: Science