New class of optoelectronic materials developed

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
A new class of semiconductor materials has been pioneered that might enhance the functionality of optoelectronic devices and solar panels -- perhaps even using one hundred times less material than the commonly used silicon.
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Microbiologists discover possible new strategy to fight oral thrush

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
An antimicrobial protein caused a dramatic reduction in the creamy white lesions associated with oral thrush in a preclinical study, report microbiologists in a new report.
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Distracted? Slowing down, not a safe option

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
Drivers who slow down while using mobile phones have the potential to increase on-road conflicts, a new study warns. Distracted drivers reducing their speed might sound favorable in terms of safety, but it could also lead to other types of crash risk, say investigators.
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Marine ecologists discover and name the first endemic tree-climbing crab

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
A new species of mangrove-climbing micro-crab from Hong Kong, Haberma tingkok, has recently been discovered, described and named.
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Humans and sponges share gene regulation

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
Humans have a lot in common with the humble sea sponge, according to research that changes the way we think about animal evolution. A research team report that a collaborative study found sponges use a complex gene regulation toolkit similar to much more complex organisms such as humans.
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How many dolphins are there in Hong Kong waters?

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
The first-ever comprehensive population assessment of the Chinese white dolphins that inhabit Hong Kong waters has been presented by researchers. In their report, they include information on how what they found differs from the common public belief.
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Palaeontologist reconstructs feathered dinosaurs in the flesh

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
Until now it has been hard to get an accurate idea of the shape of a dinosaur from its fossilized remains, as only their bones are usually preserved. Using a new technique, palaeontologists have reconstructed the first highly detailed body outline of a feathered dinosaur based on high-definition images of its preserved soft tissues.
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One in three teens with autism spectrum disorder receives driver's license

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
One in three adolescents with autism spectrum disorder acquires an intermediate driver's license, and the majority does so in their 17th year. The vast majority of teens with ASD who receive a learner's permit goes on to receive their license within two years after becoming eligible, suggesting that families make the decision of whether their children with ASD will learn to drive before their teens ever get behind the wheel.
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Glowing bacteria detect buried landmines

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:45pm
Clearing landmines is dangerous work, posing risk of injury or death to personnel trying to find them. Responding to this need, researchers report a novel system combining lasers and fluorescent bacteria to remotely map the location of buried landmines and unexploded ordnance.
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New hope for more effective treatment of leukemia

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:44pm
The discovery of a protein signature that is highly predictive of leukemia could lead to novel treatments of the leading childhood cancer, according to new study showing that competition among certain proteins causes an imbalance that leads to leukemia.
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Environmental DNA helps protect great crested newts

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:44pm
Research has revealed how tiny amounts of DNA (eDNA) released into water by great crested newts can be used to monitor the species. This can bring benefits for its conservation, and help protect great crested newts from major construction projects. It has also revealed, for the first time, how great crested newt eDNA varies throughout the year in relation to population size and environmental factors.
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Researchers unravel how stevia controls blood sugar levels

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:44pm
What makes stevia taste so extremely sweet? And how does the sweetener keep our blood sugar level under control? Researchers have discovered that stevia stimulates a protein that is essential for our perception of taste and is involved in the release of insulin after a meal. These results create new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes.
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2nd 'Great Spot' on Jupiter Discovered by Astronomers | Video

Space.com - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:44pm
A large dark spot in the planet’s high-altitude thermosphere has been found to be 200K (Kelvin) cooler than the surrounding atmosphere, which can range from 700K (426º C) and 1000K (726º C).
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Fitbit's New Smartwatch Has Been Plagued By Production Mishaps

Slashdot - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:40pm
JP Mangalindan, reporting for Yahoo Finance: Fitbit's first "proper" smartwatch and first-ever pair of bluetooth headphones are due out this fall after a series of production mishaps delayed the project, Yahoo Finance has learned. The fitness tracker company's smartwatch project has been a troubled one. Production problems have forced Fitbit to push an original spring launch to this fall, according to two sources familiar with the matter. "In one of the more final prototypes, the GPS wasn't working because the antennae wasn't in the right place," one of those sources told Yahoo Finance. "They had to go back to the drawing board to redesign the product so the GPS got a strong signal." Fitbit's design team also ran into problems making its smartwatch fully waterproof, even though that's a key design element for the Apple Watch Series 2. Indeed, it's still unclear as of the publication of this article whether the device will launch with the waterproof feature.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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How the FBI Took Down Russia’s Spam King—And His Massive Botnet

Wired News - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:38pm
The arrest of Peter Yuryevich Levashov notches another win for the FBI's top cyber talent. The post How the FBI Took Down Russia's Spam King---And His Massive Botnet appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Why Do Airlines Overbook?

Slashdot - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:20pm
From a report on BBC: A common overbooking problem on a United Airlines flight on Sunday ended with a man being bloodied and dragged from his seat and an already troubled airline earning more bad press. How did it all go so wrong? Overbooking on flights happens all the time. Empty seats cost airlines money, so they offset the number of passengers who miss flights by selling too many tickets. In this case, the problem arose because United decided at the last minute to fly four members of staff to a connection point and needed to bump four passengers to make way for them. When there's an overbooking issue the first step is to offer an inducement to the passengers to take a later flight. [...] Of the 613 million people who flew on major US carriers in 2015, 46,000 were involuntarily denied boarding, according to data from the Department of Transportation -- less than 0.008%.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Void Star: Terrifying Silicon Valley Sci-Fi Only an AI Expert Could Pen

Wired News - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:00pm
The AI thriller is as authoritative as it is imaginative, thanks to an author with a background in computational linguistics. The post Void Star: Terrifying Silicon Valley Sci-Fi Only an AI Expert Could Pen appeared first on WIRED.
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Google Schools US Government About Gender Pay Gap

Slashdot - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 2:00pm
Google wants the US government to know that it takes gender pay equity very seriously -- and is baffled by the contention that a gap exists at the tech giant. From a report: In responding to allegations lodged by the US Department of Labor that Google systematically pays its female employees less than it pays men, the search giant said in a blog post that employee gender doesn't factor into compensation decisions. Google described the process that it arrives at suggested compensation as "extremely scientific and robust," relying on the employee's role, job level and location, as well as recent performance ratings. What isn't considered in determining pay is whether the employee is male or female -- that information is masked out to those making the compensation decisions, Eileen Naughton, Google vice president for People Operations, explained in the post late Tuesday. "The analysts who calculate the suggested amounts do not have access to employees' gender data," Naughton wrote. "An employee's manager has limited discretion to adjust the suggested amount, providing they cite a legitimate adjustment rationale.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Norwegian women drink least while pregnant, British women drink most

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 1:02pm
A study among over 7000 women in 11 European countries shows the proportion of women in Europe who drink alcohol when they know they are pregnant is lowest in Norway and highest in the UK. The countries with the highest proportion of women who reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy were the UK (28.5 %), Russia (26.5 %) and Switzerland (20.9 %).
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First photoactive drug for pain treatments

Science Daily - Tue, 11/04/2017 - 1:02pm
The design of the first light-activated drug – the JF-NP-26 – is underway for the treatment of pain, according to a research with animal models.
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