Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Confronts a Big Mobile Challenge: Native Compatibility

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:20pm
smaxp writes: "Intel has solved the problem of ARM-native incompatibility. But will developers bite? App developers now frequently bypass Android's Dalvik VM for some parts of their apps in favor of the faster native C language. According to Intel, two thirds of the top 2,000 apps in the Google Play Store use natively compiled C code, the same language in which Android, the Dalvik VM, and the Android libraries are mostly written. The natively compiled apps run faster and more efficiently, but at the cost of compatibility. The compiled code is targeted to a particular processor core's instruction set. In the Android universe, this instruction set is almost always the ARM instruction set. This is a compatibility problem for Intel because its Atom mobile processors use its X86 instruction set."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Magnetic moment of the proton measured with unprecedented precision

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:19pm
Physicists succeeded in the first direct high-precision measurement of a fundamental property of the proton. Results will contribute to a better understanding of the matter/antimatter asymmetry.
Categories: Science

Dutch student team build 40 meter ice basilica in Finland in three weeks

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 2:19pm
Last year students built the world’s biggest ice dome, with a diameter of 30 meters, in Finland. At the end of this year another team intend to travel to the frozen north to take on an even bigger challenge. They are going to build a church of ice, based on the Sagrada Familia, from pykrete – ice reinforced with wood fibers. And they aim to complete the almost 40 meter high model of the famous church in Barcelona (built on a scale of 1:4) in just three weeks.
Categories: Science

Vodafone Reveals Warrantless Wiretapping

Slashdot - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:37pm
Charliemopps writes "According to Vodafone, multiple governments have installed equipment that collects data on its customers without a warrant. This includes metadata, location data, and voice. They say, "In a small number of countries, agencies and authorities have direct access to communications data stored within an operator’s network. In those countries, Vodafone will not receive any form of demand for communications data access as the relevant agencies and authorities already have permanent access to customer communications via their own direct link." It's a rather long, and very interesting report. Vodafone also criticized the transparency process: "In our view, it is governments – not communications operators – who hold the primary duty to provide greater transparency on the number of agency and authority demands issued to operators. We believe this for two reasons."'

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

To Explore Deep Space, We Need Better Spacesuits | Video

Space.com - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:23pm
NASA is working on more efficient heating and cooling, longer lasting – nearly maintenance free – systems, more durable fabrics, and more dextrous gloves. New oxygen recovery systems might utilize local planetary materials: ‘in-situ’ consumables.
Categories: Science

HIV transmission networks mapped to reduce infection rate

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:18pm
The transmission network of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been mapped in San Diego. The mapping of HIV infections, which used genetic sequencing, allowed researchers to predictively model the likelihood of new HIV transmissions and identify persons at greatest risk for transmitting the virus.
Categories: Science

Clinical review of mixed urinary incontinence conducted

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:18pm
Many women experience mixed urinary incontinence, urine loss with laughing, coughing and sneezing AND on their way to the bathroom. When women experience both types of urine leakage, their condition is called mixed urinary incontinence. It is estimated that 20 to 36 percent of women suffer from mixed urinary incontinence, which is challenging to diagnose and treat because symptoms vary and guidelines for treatment are not clear. A review of clinical work done has been conducted and published.
Categories: Science

Prostate cancer biomarkers identified in seminal fluid

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:17pm
Improved diagnosis and management of one of the most common cancers in men -- prostate cancer -- could result from research that has discovered that seminal fluid contains biomarkers for the disease. Results of a study have shown that the presence of certain molecules in seminal fluid indicates not only whether a man has prostate cancer, but also the severity of the cancer.
Categories: Science

Soccer for untrained 70-year-old men yields amazing results

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:17pm
Untrained elderly men get markedly fitter and healthier as a result of playing soccer. After only four months of twice-weekly one-hour training sessions, the men achieved marked improvements in maximum oxygen uptake, muscle function and bone mineralization. The study revealed that inactive elderly men improved their maximum oxygen uptake by 15% and their performance during interval exercise by as much as 50% by playing soccer for 1 hour two times per week over 4 months.
Categories: Science

Deadly diseases overlooked for too long, scientists say

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:17pm
Decades of neglect have allowed infectious diseases to devastate the lives of thousands of people in the developing world, a study reveals. Researchers say three diseases in particular -- anthrax, brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis -- have failed to receive the official recognition and funding needed to combat them effectively.
Categories: Science

Saving trees in tropics could cut emissions by one-fifth, study shows

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:16pm
Reducing deforestation in the tropics would significantly cut the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere -- by as much as one-fifth -- research shows. In the first study of its kind, scientists have calculated the amount of carbon absorbed by the world's tropical forests and the amounts of greenhouse gas emissions created by loss of trees, as a result of human activity.
Categories: Science

Ability to identify source of pain varies across body

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:16pm
'Where does it hurt?' is the first question asked to any person in pain. A new study defines for the first time how our ability to identify where it hurts, called 'spatial acuity,' varies across the body, being most sensitive at the forehead and fingertips. The findings have important implications for the assessment of both acute and chronic pain.
Categories: Science

Most comprehensive 'world map of research' yet: Researchers analyze 15 million scientific articles

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:15pm
Scientists have found that, worldwide, there are three major ‘clusters’ of countries, defined by the thematic areas they investigate and that their governments invest in most. The study analyzed the scientific production of more than 80 countries over more than 10 years (1996-2006).
Categories: Science

Fecal source tracking in Norwegian water catchments: New methods

Science Daily - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 1:15pm
A set of methods for the detection of fecal pollution in Norwegian watercourses has been tested and implemented. The methods, which combine microbial and molecular biological techniques, can give answers as to whether the contamination is a result of human or animal excreta. In addition, the methods provide grounds for assessing whether the water pollution poses a health risk or not.
Categories: Science