Music Industry Argues Works Entering Public Domain Are Not In Public Interest

Slashdot - Fri, 24/04/2015 - 1:58am
An anonymous reader writes: With news that Canada intends to extend the term of copyright for sound recordings and performers, the recording industry is now pushing the change by arguing that works entering the public domain is not in the public interest. It is hard to see how anyone can credibly claim that works are "lost" to the public domain and that the public interest in not served by increased public access, but if anyone would make the claim, it would be the recording industry.

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Categories: Science

Fracking? Injecting wastewater? New insight on ground shaking from human-made earthquakes

Science Daily - Fri, 24/04/2015 - 1:56am
Significant strides in science have been made to better understand potential ground shaking from induced earthquakes, which are earthquakes triggered by human practices. Earthquake activity has sharply increased since 2009 in the central and eastern United States. Many questions have been raised about whether hydraulic fracturing -- commonly referred to as "fracking" -- is responsible for the recent increase of earthquakes. The increase has been linked to industrial operations that dispose of wastewater by injecting it into deep wells.
Categories: Science

James Webb Space Telescope: Building Hubble's successor

Science Daily - Fri, 24/04/2015 - 1:41am
Inside NASA's giant thermal vacuum chamber, called Chamber A, at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, the James Webb Space Telescope's Pathfinder backplane test model, is being prepared for its cryogenic test. Previously used for manned spaceflight missions, this historic chamber is now filled with engineers and technicians preparing for a crucial test.
Categories: Science

Four-dimensional printing unfolding as technology that takes 3D printing to an entirely new level

Science Daily - Fri, 24/04/2015 - 1:35am
The fourth dimension is time, shape shifting in fact, and scientists are already working on the next revolution in additive manufacturing.
Categories: Science

Charged holes in graphene increase energy storage capacity

Kurzweil AI - Fri, 24/04/2015 - 1:20am

This image shows “zigzag” and “armchair” defects in graphene (credit: Rajaram Narayanan/Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego)

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, which could increase battery storage capacity.

The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the energy storage ability (energy density) of capacitors for potential uses in cars, wind turbines, and solar power. Capacitors charge and discharge very fast (have fhigh power density), so they are useful for quick large bursts of energy, such as in camera flashes, but they store less energy than batteries.

Punching holes in graphene

The industrially viable solution to increasing charge capacity, found in the lab of mechanical engineering professor Prabhakar Bandaru at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UCSD, was to take advantage of defects — holes corresponding to missing carbon atoms — in graphene material.

To do that, the team used argon-ion based plasma processing to bombard graphene samples with positively charged argon ions. That knocked out carbon atoms, leaving behind “holes” containing positive charges, which increased the capacitance of the materials three-fold. These “armchair” and “zigzag” defects are named based on the configurations of the missing carbon atoms.

The team also discovered a new length scale that measures the distance between charges that can “provide a basis for how small we can make electrical devices,” said Bandaru.

This work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Abstract of Modulation of the Electrostatic and Quantum Capacitances of Few Layered Graphenes through Plasma Processing

It is shown that charged defect generation, through argon ion-based plasma processing, in few layer graphene, could substantially enhance the electrical capacitance for electrochemical energy storage. Detailed consideration of the constituent space charge and quantum capacitances were used to delineate a new length scale, correlated to electrically active defects contributing to the capacitance, and was found to be smaller than a structural correlation length determined through Raman spectroscopy. The study offers insights into an industrially viable method (i.e., plasma processing) for modifying and enhancing the energy density of graphene-based electrochemical capacitors.

Categories: Science

Scientists announce final trial results of the world’s most advanced malaria vaccine

Science Daily - Fri, 24/04/2015 - 1:13am
The first malaria vaccine candidate (RTS,S/AS01) to reach phase 3 clinical testing is partially effective against clinical disease in young African children up to 4 years after vaccination, according to final trial data. The results suggest that the vaccine could prevent a substantial number of cases of clinical malaria, especially in areas of high transmission.
Categories: Science

Groupon Refuses To Pay Security Expert Who Found Serious XSS Site Bugs

Slashdot - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 11:57pm
Mark Wilson writes: Bounty programs benefit everyone. Companies like Microsoft get help from security experts, customers gain improved security, and those who discover and report vulnerabilities reap the rewards financially. Or at least that's how things are supposed to work. Having reported a series of security problems to discount and deal site Groupon, security researcher Brute Logic from XSSposed.org was expecting a pay-out — but the site refuses to give up the cash. In all, Brute Logic reported more than 30 security issues with Groupon's site, but the company cites its Responsible Disclosure policy as the reason for not handing over the cash.

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Categories: Science

Amazon Reveals Just How Huge the Cloud Is for Its Business

Wired News - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 11:34pm

In the cloud, Amazon is both powerful and profitable.

The post Amazon Reveals Just How Huge the Cloud Is for Its Business appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Median Age At Google Is 29, Says Age Discrimination Lawsuit

Slashdot - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 11:15pm
dcblogs writes: The typical employee at Google is relatively young, according to a lawsuit brought by an older programmer who is alleging age discrimination. Between 2007 and 2013, Google's workforce grew from 9,500 to more than 28,000 employees, "yet as of 2013, its employees' median age was 29 years old," the lawsuit claims. That's in contrast to the median age of nearly 43 for all U.S. workers who are computer programmers, according to the lawsuit.

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Categories: Science

Gen. Petraeus To Be Sentenced To Two Years Probation and Fine

Slashdot - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:51pm
An anonymous reader writes: Petraeus, a now-retired U.S. Army General, has already agreed to plead guilty to a criminal misdemeanor charge of unauthorized removal and retention of classified material. As part of the agreement with prosecutors filed in March, the government will not seek any prison time. Instead, Petraeus will agree to pay a $40,000 fine and receive two years of probation, according to court documents. The recommendations are not binding on the federal judge who will preside at the hearing Thursday afternoon in Charlotte.

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Categories: Science

Xbox Sales and Revenue Are Down Big Time in 2015

Wired News - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:32pm

Microsoft's Xbox gaming consoles aren't doing as well as they were last year, the company said today.

The post Xbox Sales and Revenue Are Down Big Time in 2015 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Researcher Discloses Methods For Bypassing All OS X Security Protections

Slashdot - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:30pm
Trailrunner7 writes: For years, Apple has enjoyed a pretty good reputation among users for the security of its products. That halo has been enhanced by the addition of new security features such as Gatekeeper and XProtect to OS X recently, but one researcher said that all of those protections are simple to bypass and gaining persistence on a Mac as an attacker isn't much of a challenge at all. Gatekeeper is one of the key technologies that Apple uses to prevent malware from running on OS X machines. It gives users the ability to restrict which applications can run on their machines by choosing to only allow apps from the Mac App Store. With that setting in play, only signed, legitimate apps should be able to run on the machine. But Patrick Wardle, director of research at Synack, said that getting around that restriction is trivial. "Gatekeeper doesn't verify an extra content in the apps. So if I can find an Apple-approved app and get it to load external content, when the user runs it, it will bypass Gatekeeper," Wardle said in a talk at the RSA Conference here Thursday. "It only verifies the app bundle. If Macs were totally secure, I wouldn't be here talking," Wardle said. "It's trivial for any attacker to bypass the security tools on Macs."

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Categories: Science

Second possible specimen of 'pocket shark' ever found

Science Daily - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:27pm
An extraordinarily rare ocean discovery of an inches-long 'pocket shark' has been made. Sharks come in all shapes and sizes and are best known as a dominant predator in the marine food web. Understanding their movements, behaviors and anatomies gives fishery managers a better idea of their diets and relationships with other species.
Categories: Science

Can a parent's concerns predict autism?

Science Daily - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:25pm
New research shows that many parents notice signs of autism spectrum disorder in their infant children far before an official diagnosis. The study concludes that parental concerns for their children starting as early as six months of age can be predictive of autism spectrum disorder.
Categories: Science

Heavy drinking and binge drinking rise sharply in US counties

Science Daily - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:25pm
Today, Americans are more likely to be heavy drinkers and binge drinkers than in recent years due in large part to rising rates of drinking among women, according to a new analysis of county-level drinking patterns in the United States. By contrast, the percentage of people who drink any alcohol has remained relatively unchanged over time, according to the latest research.
Categories: Science

Samsung Redesigns Its VR Headset to Fit the Galaxy S6

Wired News - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:25pm

Samsung is expanding its virtual-reality wares to its new flagship phones.

The post Samsung Redesigns Its VR Headset to Fit the Galaxy S6 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Why do animals fight members of other species?

Science Daily - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:25pm
Why do animals fight with members of other species? A nine-year study by biologists says the reason often has to do with 'obtaining priority access to females' in the area.
Categories: Science

Strength vs. endurance: Does exercise type matter in the fight against obesity?

Science Daily - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:24pm
Researchers look at which form of exercise -- strength, endurance or a combination of both -- work best in tandem with diet to reduce weight and change body composition among obese study participants.
Categories: Science

Making the heart beat with ultrasonic waves

Science Daily - Thu, 23/04/2015 - 10:24pm
Researchers have demonstrated that ultrasound can increase the rate at which heart cells beat and describe the settings that can do so most effectively.
Categories: Science