An Awesome 8-Bit Music Video Made Using Beads as Pixels

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 4:00pm

The Very Best's "Let Go" isn't your standard-issue 8-bit-inspired music video. While it has all the fun and side-scrolling action of an 8-bit video, the clip also has something else: It was made out of beads.

The post An Awesome 8-Bit Music Video Made Using Beads as Pixels appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Hypnotic Robot 3-D Prints Webs Like a Spider

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 4:00pm

What if a robot could 3-D print a plastic shell for itself, much the way a caterpillar crafts a cozy cocoon?

The post Hypnotic Robot 3-D Prints Webs Like a Spider appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

In a heartbeat: new model shows that filaments in heart muscle cells don't automatically keep the beat

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:59pm
Each heart muscle cell consists of numerous parallel filaments comprising repeated subunits. When the heart beats, each individual filament contracts to produce muscle cell contractions. However, new research shows that the filaments in heart muscle cells don't automatically keep the beat.
Categories: Science

Gold standard management of the diabetic cat

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:59pm
An expert panel of veterinary clinicians and academics has been convened to produce practical guidance to help veterinary teams deliver optimal management for the increasing numbers of diabetic cats that are presenting to practices.
Categories: Science

When age matters: precise dating of ancient charcoal found near skull is helping reveal unique period in prehistory

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:59pm
The precise dating of ancient charcoal found near a skull is helping reveal a unique period in prehistory. The Manot Cave, a natural limestone formation, had been sealed for some 15,000 years. It was discovered by a bulldozer clearing the land for development, and the first to find the partial skull, which was sitting on a ledge, were spelunkers exploring the newly-opened cave. Five excavation seasons uncovered a rich deposit, with stone tools and stratified occupation levels covering a period of time from at least 55,000 to 27,000 years ago.
Categories: Science

Nice to sniff you: Handshakes may engage our sense of smell

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:59pm
Why do people shake hands? A new study suggests one of the reasons for this ancient custom may be to check out each other's odors. Even if we are not consciously aware of this, handshaking may provide people with a socially acceptable way of communicating via the sense of smell. People sniff their hands twice as much after a handshake.
Categories: Science

Step change for screening could boost biofuels

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:58pm
Researchers have developed a new way of rapidly screening yeasts that could help produce more sustainable biofuels. The new technique could also be a boon in the search for new ways of deriving valuable renewable chemicals from plant-based wastes, reducing our reliance on petrochemicals.
Categories: Science

Stress markers in unemployed linked to poor health

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:57pm
It appears that stress markers in unemployed people can be found, independent of smoking, alcohol consumption and overweight/obesity. Results from a study suggest that long-term unemployment may be especially damaging to health. Authors also note that older jobseekers appear more affected than younger counterparts.
Categories: Science

Plants detect bacterial endotoxin in similar process to mammals

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:57pm
Similar to humans and animals, plants possess an innate immune system that protects them from invading pathogens. Molecular structures that only occur in pathogens enable their recognition and trigger the immune response. Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) is one such substance, occurring in the outer membrane of certain bacteria. A team of scientists has now described the first endotoxin immunosensor in plants.
Categories: Science

Mystery solved: Why seashells' mineral forms differently in seawater

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:57pm
For almost a century, scientists have been puzzled by a process that is crucial to much of the life in Earth's oceans: Why does calcium carbonate, the tough material of seashells and corals, sometimes take the form of calcite, and at other times form a chemically identical form of the mineral, called aragonite, that is more soluble -- and therefore more vulnerable to ocean acidification?
Categories: Science

UK cities including London not as 'smart' as global counterparts

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:57pm
Major cities in the UK are falling behind their international counterparts in terms of their use of smart technologies, according to a new study. The research has found that smart cities in the UK, such as London, are not as advanced as the leading smart cities across the globe, such as San Francisco, Barcelona and Amsterdam, because of a lack of citizen engagement with new smart technologies.
Categories: Science

Researchers monitor for next novel influenza strain

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:55pm
While flu season starts to die down, researchers are diligently monitoring for the next novel influenza virus by monitoring swine influenza viruses. The work is starting with swine in the field. Researchers are surveying for swine influenza viruses as part of a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.
Categories: Science

Modeling chimp behavior? Try using laws that govern matter

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:55pm
To simulate chimp behavior, scientists created a computer model based on equations normally used to describe the movement of atoms and molecules in a confined space. An interdisciplinary research team has turned to the physical laws that govern matter to explore one facet of the question of climate change: how the animals will cluster and travel through their territory as the terrain they share with other members of their species shrinks.
Categories: Science

What Would Minecraft 2 Look Like Under Microsoft?

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:54pm
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft spent billions purchasing Mojang, the studio behind the game Minecraft, and while it's unlikely to start work on a sequel anytime soon, rather than continue development of the game, it's worth considering what a Minecraft 2 will look like. After all, as a public company with revenues to justify, it doesn't seem beyond unreasonable a few years down the line, especially since a Minecraft-like game was one of the stand-out tech demos shown for the software giant's HoloLens augmented reality headset. As the author points out, Microsoft will have to tread carefully, tackling issues like whether greater graphical fidelity is actually what players will want ever — and whether to continue to support Minecraft on PlayStation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

What Would Minecraft 2 Look Like Under Microsoft?

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:54pm
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft spent billions purchasing Mojang, the studio behind the game Minecraft, and while it's unlikely to start work on a sequel anytime soon, rather than continue development of the game, it's worth considering what a Minecraft 2 will look like. After all, as a public company with revenues to justify, it doesn't seem beyond unreasonable a few years down the line, especially since a Minecraft-like game was one of the stand-out tech demos shown for the software giant's HoloLens augmented reality headset. As the author points out, Microsoft will have to tread carefully, tackling issues like whether greater graphical fidelity is actually what players will want ever — and whether to continue to support Minecraft on PlayStation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Galaxy Clusters' Mass Amps Up View of Dusty Old Galaxy Behind | Video

Space.com - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:50pm
Galaxy cluster Abel 1689 is so massive, light bends around it in an effect predicted by Einstein called a gravitational lens, revealing Galaxy A1689-zD1 to be surprisingly mature despite the young age of the universe seen.
Categories: Science

Chilean Volcano Spews a Spectacular Lava Fountain

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:20pm

Villarrica unleashed an impressive lava fountain as the recent unrest continues at the Chilean volcano.

The post Chilean Volcano Spews a Spectacular Lava Fountain appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Why We Should Stop Hiding File-Name Extensions

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:13pm
An anonymous reader writes 14 years after the Anna Kournikova virus took advantage of users' ignorance about file-name extensions in order to wreak worldwide havoc, virus writers and hackers are still taking advantage of the tendency of popular consumer operating systems to hide file-name extensions: Windows users still need to activate extension visibility manually – even though email-transmitted viruses depend most on less savvy users who will never do this. Additionally applications on even the latest versions of Apple's OSX operating system still require the user to 'opt in' to including a file-name extension during an initial save. In looking at some of the eccentricities of the modern user experience, this article argues that it might be time to admit that users need to understand, embrace and responsibly use the only plain-text, obvious indicator of what a file actually is.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Why We Should Stop Hiding File-Name Extensions

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:13pm
An anonymous reader writes 14 years after the Anna Kournikova virus took advantage of users' ignorance about file-name extensions in order to wreak worldwide havoc, virus writers and hackers are still taking advantage of the tendency of popular consumer operating systems to hide file-name extensions: Windows users still need to activate extension visibility manually – even though email-transmitted viruses depend most on less savvy users who will never do this. Additionally applications on even the latest versions of Apple's OSX operating system still require the user to 'opt in' to including a file-name extension during an initial save. In looking at some of the eccentricities of the modern user experience, this article argues that it might be time to admit that users need to understand, embrace and responsibly use the only plain-text, obvious indicator of what a file actually is.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Climate Change Will Alter New York City’s Skyline

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:00pm

Stratos is aiming to ship next month. Stratos Remember Coin, the credit card-sized gizmo that promised to streamline your wallet by consolidating all your other, actual credit cards? It raked in approximately a gazillion dollars in pre-orders when it debuted in November 2013, only to become another certified crowdfunding debacle, beset by delays and acrimony. […]

The post How Climate Change Will Alter New York City’s Skyline appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science