New window of opportunity to prevent cardiovascular, diseases

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:09pm
Future prevention and treatment strategies for vascular diseases may lie in the evaluation of early brain imaging tests long before heart attacks or strokes occur, according to a systematic review conducted by a team of cardiologists, neuroscientists, and psychiatrists.
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Beetroot beneficial for athletes, heart failure patients, research finds

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:09pm
The nitrate in beetroot targets fast-twitch muscles, increasing the blood flow to muscles that receive less oxygen, researchers report. This can increase high-intensity athletic performance and improve quality of life of heart failure patients.
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Babies' interest in faces linked to callous, unemotional traits

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:09pm
An infant's preference for a person's face, rather than an object, is associated with lower levels of callous and unemotional behaviors in toddlerhood, scientists have found. Callous and unemotional behaviours include a lack of guilt and empathy, reduced concern for other's distress and difficulties with understanding emotions. In older children and adults, callous unemotional traits have been associated with reduced attention to important social features such as other people's faces and eyes.
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Dispositional mindfulness associated with better cardiovascular health

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:09pm
A new study that measured 'dispositional mindfulness' along with seven indicators of cardiovascular health found that persons reporting higher degrees of awareness of their present feelings and experiences had better health. The research suggests that interventions to improve mindfulness could benefit cardiovascular health, an idea researchers can test.
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'Watch' cites concern about flexible reamer breakage during anatomic ACL reconstruction

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:09pm
Experts have issued a 'Watch' regarding concerns over flexible reamer breakage during anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Flexible reamers help surgeons achieve optimal femoral-tunnel parameters, but they are prone to breakage in certain situations, as the 'Watch' article explains.
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Added benefit of vedolizumab is not proven

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:09pm
In its dossier, the drug manufacturer of vedolizumab presented no suitable data for the therapeutic indication Crohn's disease or for ulcerative colitis, investigators conclude.
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Rare diseases: No reason for lower demands for studies

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
High-quality randomized controlled trials are also meaningful and feasible in rare diseases, experts say. For a different approach than in more common diseases, there are neither scientific reasons nor specific designs and methods that would not also be relevant for more common diseases. This is the case for both drug and non-drug treatments, they note.
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Sea turtles' first days of life: Sprint and ride towards safety

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors.
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Precise, programmable biological circuits

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
Several new components for biological circuits have been developed by researchers. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers. "The ability to combine biological components at will in a modular, plug-and-play fashion means that we now approach the stage when the concept of programming as we know it from software engineering can be applied to biological computers. Bio-engineers will literally be able to program in future."
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RF heating of magnetic nanoparticles improves thawing of cryopreserved biomaterials

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
Successful techniques for cryopreserving bulk biomaterials and organ systems would transform current approaches to transplantation and regenerative medicine. However, while vitrified cryopreservation holds great promise, practical application has been limited to smaller systems (cells and thin tissues) due to diffusive heat and mass transfer limitations, which are typically manifested as devitrification and cracking failures during thaw. Reserachers leverage a clinically proven technology platform, in magnetically heated nanoparticles, to overcome this major hurdle limiting further advancement in the field of cryopreservation.
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Acousto-optic tunable filter technology for balloon-borne platforms

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
A balloon-borne acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imager is ideally suited to address numerous outstanding questions in planetary science. Their spectral agility, narrowband wavelength selection, tolerance to the near-space environment, and spectral coverage would enable investigations not feasible from the ground. Example use cases include synoptic observations of clouds on Venus and the giant planets, studies of molecular emissions from cometary comae, the mapping of surface ices on small bodies, and polarimetry.
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Retaining forests where raptors nest can help to protect biodiversity

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
Raptors can affect the distribution of other species and they can also be used to find forests with high biodiversity value, researchers say. Predators influence decisions on conservation actions because they awake a remarkable interest in the society. However, favoring just predators in conservation can also mislead the scarce funding invested in nature conservation.
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No-till agriculture may not bring hoped-for boost in global crop yields, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:07pm
No-till farming appears to hold promise for boosting crop yields only in dry regions, not in the cool, moist areas of the world, this study found. As the core principle of conservation agriculture, no-till has been promoted worldwide in an effort to sustainably meet global food demand.
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Intelligent materials that work in space

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:06pm
Scientists will be testing technology developed in the International Space Station. The technology is based on intelligent materials that allow objects to be sent into orbit without the use of explosives.
Categories: Science

Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances

Slashdot - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:06pm
Trailrunner7 writes "There is a severe remote code execution vulnerability in a number of Cisco's security appliances, a bug that was first disclosed nearly three years ago. The vulnerability is in Telnet and there has been a Metasploit module available to exploit it for years. The FreeBSD Project first disclosed the vulnerability in telnet in December 2011 and it was widely publicized at the time. Recently, Glafkos Charalambous, a security researcher, discovered that the bug was still present in several of Cisco's security boxes, including the Web Security Appliance, Email Security Appliance and Content Security Management Appliance. The vulnerability is in the AsyncOS software in those appliances and affects all versions of the products." At long last, though, as the article points out, "Cisco has released a patched version of the AsyncOS software to address the vulnerability and also has recommended some workarounds for customers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Hippos-Sussita excavation: Silent evidence of the earthquake of 363 CE

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:04pm
Silent evidence of a large earthquake in 363 CE -- the skeleton of a woman with a dove-shaped pendant -- was discovered under the tiles of a collapsed roof by archeologists from the University of Haifa during this excavation season at Hippos-Sussita. They also found a large muscular marble leg and artillery ammunition from some 2,000 years ago. "The data is finally beginning to form a clear historical-archaeological picture," said Dr. Michael Eisenberg, head of the international excavation team.
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A new tune: There is intonation in sign language too

Science Daily - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 2:04pm
Intonation is an integral part of communication for all speakers. But can sign languages have intonation? A new study shows that signers use their faces to create intonational ‘melodies’ just as speakers use their voices, and that the melodies of the face can differ from one sign language to another.
Categories: Science

Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review

Slashdot - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 1:25pm
dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review

Slashdot - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 1:25pm
dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review

Slashdot - Thu, 23/10/2014 - 1:25pm
dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science