Ebola Vaccine 100% Successful In Guinea Trial

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 5:55pm
An anonymous reader writes: Doctors and researchers have been testing a vaccine to protect against Ebola in the west African nation of Guinea. Trials involving 4,000 people have now shown a 100% success rate in preventing infection. "When Ebola flared up in a village, researchers vaccinated all the contacts of the sick person who were willing — the family, friends and neighbors — and their immediate contacts. Children, adolescents and pregnant women were excluded because of an absence of safety data for them. In practice about 50% of people in these clusters were vaccinated. To test how well the vaccine protected people, the cluster outbreaks were randomly assigned either to receive the vaccine immediately or three weeks after Ebola was confirmed. Among the 2,014 people vaccinated immediately, there were no cases of Ebola from 10 days after vaccination — allowing time for immunity to develop — according to the results published online in the Lancet medical journal (PDF). In the clusters with delayed vaccination, there were 16 cases out of 2,380."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Patch Your OnStar iOS App to Avoid Getting Your Car Hacked

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 5:49pm

GM admits its fix for a wireless OnStar hack was incomplete and is urging iOS users to update their RemoteLink app.

The post Patch Your OnStar iOS App to Avoid Getting Your Car Hacked appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Follow Us Down the Weekly Instagram Rabbit Hole

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 5:18pm

WIRED goes down the rabbit hole to discover the best Instagram has to offer.

The post Follow Us Down the Weekly Instagram Rabbit Hole appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Samsung Wants To Bring Back the Flip Phone With Bendable Screens

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 5:13pm
redletterdave writes: A new patent filed last April but published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office earlier this month suggests Samsung might be working on a smartphone that can bend in half like a flip phone. The biggest problem, according to the patent, is all the strain that accumulates by continually folding the display, or keeping the display folded for a long period of time, which can result in deformations and imperfections, Samsung notes. But Samsung's patent also describes how the phone could keep track of how long it's been in the folded and unfolded states, so as to alert the user of any strain that needs to be relieved. This could help extend the lifetime of the phone and its display.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Drake-Meek Mill Beef, Explained in Game of Thrones GIFs

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 4:53pm

What better analogue for a rap beef than everyone's favorite tale of intrigue and backstabbery?

The post The Drake-Meek Mill Beef, Explained in Game of Thrones GIFs appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Mozilla Calls Out Microsoft For Pushing Edge Over Firefox

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 4:39pm

A little unfriendly competition.

The post Mozilla Calls Out Microsoft For Pushing Edge Over Firefox appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Clinton Lauds Airbnb for Its Push Into Cuba

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 4:37pm

Clinton says Internet companies can play an important role in normalizing relations with Cuba.

The post Clinton Lauds Airbnb for Its Push Into Cuba appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Cheers! 'Blue Moon' Beer Celebrates Lunar Sight for 20th Anniversary

Space.com - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 4:33pm
In a coincidence of cosmic proportions, the second full moon of July rises tonight, making it a so-called "Blue Moon" — and Blue Moon Brewing Co. will celebrate its 20th anniversary by painting the town red.
Categories: Science

NASA's Drone For Other Worlds

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 4:29pm
An anonymous reader writes: A group of engineers is building a new drone. What sets this apart from the hundreds of other drone development projects going on around the world? Well, these engineers are at the Kennedy Space Center, and the drone will be used to gather samples on other worlds. The drone is specifically designed to be able to fly in low- or no-atmosphere situations. Senior technologist Rob Mueller describes it as a "prospecting robot." He says, "The first step in being able to use resources on Mars or an asteroid is to find out where the resources are. They are most likely in hard-to-access areas where there is permanent shadow. Some of the crater walls are angled 30 degrees or more, and that's far too steep for a traditional rover to navigate and climb." They face major challenges with rotor and gas-jet design, they have to figure out navigation without GPS, and the whole system needs to be largely autonomous — you can't really steer a drone yourself with a latency of several minutes (or more).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Welcome to Booze Science, Our Drunkest Video Series Ever

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 4:11pm

A new video series takes a look at the science behind cocktails---in the bar and at home.

The post Welcome to Booze Science, Our Drunkest Video Series Ever appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

NVIDIA Recalls Shield Tablets Over Heat Risk

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 3:46pm
An anonymous reader writes: NVIDIA has issued a recall for 88,000 units of its 8-inch Shield tablet sold in the past year. Predictably, it's because of the battery. There have been reports of overheating, including two reports that the tablet got so hot it damaged the floor it was resting on. Oddly, the company is requiring anyone returning the tablet to update its OS to the latest release.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Nvidia Recalls Its Shield Tablets Due to Fire Hazard

Wired News - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 3:32pm

If you bought one of Nvidia's 8-inch Shield tablets between July 2014 and July 2015, the company wants to replace it for free.

The post Nvidia Recalls Its Shield Tablets Due to Fire Hazard appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Affordable genetic diagnostic technique for target DNA analysis developed

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 3:20pm
A technique to analyze various target DNAs has been developed using an aptamer, a DNA fragment that can recognize and bind to a specific protein or enzyme.
Categories: Science

Magnetism at nanoscale

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 3:19pm
As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials’ behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists are building a unique optical magnetometer to probe magnetism at the nano- and mesoscale.
Categories: Science

Effects of spinach extract on satiety: Feel full, curb cravings

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 3:13pm
A new study examines how consuming the concentrated extract of thylakoids found in spinach can reduce hunger and cravings. Thylakoids encourage the release of satiety hormones, which is very beneficial in slowing down fat digestion.
Categories: Science

Mozilla CEO: Windows 10 Strips User Choice For Browsers and Other Software

Slashdot - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 3:04pm
puddingebola writes: Mozilla CEO Chris Beard has sent an open letter to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella complaining about the default settings in Windows 10. Users who upgrade to 10 will have their default browser automatically changed to the new Edge browser. Beard said, "We appreciate that it’s still technically possible to preserve people’s previous settings and defaults, but the design of the whole upgrade experience and the default settings APIs have been changed to make this less obvious and more difficult. It now takes more than twice the number of mouse clicks, scrolling through content and some technical sophistication for people to reassert the choices they had previously made in earlier versions of Windows. It’s confusing, hard to navigate and easy to get lost. ... We strongly urge you to reconsider your business tactic here and again respect people’s right to choice and control of their online experience by making it easier, more obvious and intuitive for people to maintain the choices they have already made through the upgrade experience.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

New cancer marker identified; possible therapeutic target for breast cancer

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 2:52pm
Basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) is an aggressive form of breast cancer and is often referred to as "triple negative," which means it is not responsive to the common medical therapeutics. BLBC is more likely to metastasize -- or spread to different areas of the body -- quicker and earlier, and is associated with a poor prognosis. A new way to detect - and perhaps treat -- this deadly form of breast cancer has now been found, scientists report.
Categories: Science

Perfectionism linked to burnout at work, school and sports, research finds

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 2:52pm
Perfectionistic concerns have a positive relationship with overall burnout and symptoms of burnout, research has found. Perfectionistic concerns can create stress, interfere with relationships and more.
Categories: Science

New insights on hurricane intensity, pollution transport

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 2:52pm
As tropical storm Isaac was gaining momentum toward the Mississippi River in August 2012, researchers were dropping instruments from the sky above to study the ocean conditions beneath the storm. The newly published study showed how a downwelling of warm waters deepened the storm's fuel tank for a rapid intensification toward hurricane status. The results also revealed how hurricane-generated currents and ocean eddies can transport oil and other pollutants to coastal regions.
Categories: Science

Starvation effects handed down for generations

Science Daily - Fri, 31/07/2015 - 2:52pm
Starvation early in life can alter an organism for generations to come, according to a new study in nematodes. The epigenetic effects are a 'bet-hedging strategy.' Famine survivors are smaller and less fertile, and they acquire a toughness that lasts at least two generations. The mechanism of the epigenetic inheritance has not been identified, however.
Categories: Science