Natural resistance gene against spruce budworm found

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:29pm
A natural resistance gene against spruce budworm in the white spruce has been discovered. The breakthrough paves the way to identifying and selecting naturally resistant trees to replant forests devastated by the destructive pest.
Categories: Science

Polyethylene mulch, glazing create optimal conditions for soil solarization

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:29pm
Researchers raised soil temperatures in high tunnels in southern Arizona to determine the efficacy of soil solarization using clear mulch on the soil surface and with tunnel glazing or with no glazing. Outcomes showed that producers using high tunnels in the region can complete solarization in less than a week during summer when the soil is fallow using glazing on the high tunnel and polyethylene mulch on the soil surface.
Categories: Science

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:28pm
A study assessed growth performance of tomato seedlings treated with vermicompost-leachate (VCL), an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material. Seedlings were subjected to various temperature and watering regimes. Results showed that VCL can be a suitable soil amendment product to improve overall soil fertility and growth of tomato plants, even under temperature and water stress conditions.
Categories: Science

Trouble with your boss? Own it

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:28pm
Don't get along with your boss? Your job performance may actually improve if the two of you can come to grips with the poor relationship. "Seeing eye-to-eye about the employee-supervisor relationship is equally, if not more important than the actual quality of the relationship," said the lead investigator on the study.
Categories: Science

Update on new treatments for liver diseases

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:28pm
Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments. The December issues of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology highlights important updates into treatments for these two debilitating diseases.
Categories: Science

Type 2 diabetes: Added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin is not proven

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:28pm
As in the first dossier assessment of canagliflozin, the drug manufacturer provided no suitable data for the fixed combination with metformin either. Therefore, no added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin has been demonstrated for type 2 diabetes care.
Categories: Science

When shareholders exacerbate their own banks' crisis

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:28pm
Banks are increasingly issuing 'CoCo' bonds to boost the levels of equity they hold. In a crisis situation, bondholders are forced to convert these bonds into a bank's equity. To date, such bonds have been regarded only as a means of averting a crisis. A study by German economists now shows that if such bonds are badly constructed, they worsen a crisis instead of stabilizing the banking system.
Categories: Science

Robots take over inspection of ballast tanks on ships

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:26pm
A new robot for inspecting ballast water tanks on board ships is being developed. The robot is able to move independently along rails built into the tanks. At the moment, people still carry out such inspections, with ships being brought into dry dock for the purpose.
Categories: Science

Impact of power prosthetic failures on amputees studied

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:25pm
Powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. New research examines what happens when these technologies fail, with the goal of developing more robust powered prostheses.
Categories: Science

New model of follow up for breast cancer patients

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:25pm
Public health researchers from Australia have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health system perspective.
Categories: Science

Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:25pm
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
Categories: Science

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studied for stroke rehab

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:25pm
Researchers are trying to help patients who have suffered a stroke to improve arm movement by stimulating the brain using a device called a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator (TMS). The idea is that when one side of the brain is damaged by a stroke, the healthy side tends to generate much more activity to compensate, but that may actually prevent the injured side from recovering, explains the principal investigator.
Categories: Science

Aereo Files For Bankruptcy

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 3:25pm
An anonymous reader writes: After losing its Supreme Court case in June and briefly attempting to transform itself into a cable company, Aereo is now filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy. Their service worked by letting people stream over-the-air television to their internet-connected devices. The content industry pushed back, and though Aereo argued its way through several lower courts, they say, "The U.S. Supreme Court decision effectively changed the laws that had governed Aereo's technology, creating regulatory and legal uncertainty. And while our team has focused its energies on exploring every path forward available to us, without that clarity, the challenges have proven too difficult to overcome."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Microsoft Rolls Out Robot Security Guards

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 2:47pm
An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft is testing a group of five robot security guards. They contain a sophisticated sensor suite that includes 360-degree HD video, thermal imaging, night vision, LIDAR, and audio recorders. They can also detect various chemicals and radiation signatures, and do some rudimentary behavioral analysis on people they see. (And they look a bit like Daleks.) The robots are unarmed, so we don't have to worry about a revolt just yet, but they can sound an alarm and call for human officers. They weigh about 300 lbs each, can last roughly a day on a battery charge, and know to head to the charging station when they're low on power.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Week’s Best TV: Jon Stewart Proposes to Benedict Cumberbatch

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 2:30pm

It's been a long week, and everyone is jonesing for that Thanksgiving break to put on their fattest pants and slip into football/food/movie comas. So we'll keep it simple. Here's a GIF of Benedict Cumberbatch being flirty with you, and the week's most noteworthy television.

The post Week’s Best TV: Jon Stewart Proposes to Benedict Cumberbatch appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

9 Works of Art That Bend Your Senses

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 2:30pm

An exhibition that explores how we can use light, space and materials to change our view of the world around us.

The post 9 Works of Art That Bend Your Senses appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

China and ‘one or two others’ can shut US electric grids and other critical infrastructure, says NSA director

Kurzweil AI - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 2:29pm

Sitting duck (credit: Achim Hering/Wikimedia Commons)

China and “one or two others” can shut down the U.S. electric grids and other critical infrastructure and is performing electronic reconnaissance on a regular basis, said NSA director Admiral Michael Rogers, testifying Thursday (Nov. 20) at a House Select Intelligence Committee hearing on U.S. efforts to combat cybersecurity.

“All of that leads me to believe it is only a matter of when, not if, we are going to see something dramatic,” he said. In cyberspace, “you can literally do almost anything you want, and there is not a price to pay for it.

“China’s economic cyber espionage … has grown exponentially in terms of volume and damage done to our nation’s economic future,” he added. “The Chinese intelligence services that conduct these attacks have little to fear because we have no practical deterrents to that theft. This problem is not going away until that changes.”

Categories: Science

5-Year-Old Becomes Youngest Person Ever Qualified to Install Microsoft Windows

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 2:25pm

A 5-year-old has passed the Microsoft Certified Professional Exam, making him perhaps the youngest IT pro in the world.

The post 5-Year-Old Becomes Youngest Person Ever Qualified to Install Microsoft Windows appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Cohesin: Cherry-shaped molecule safeguards cell-division

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:59pm
A cohesin molecule ensures the proper distribution of DNA during cell division. Scientists can now demonstrate the concept of its carabiner-like function by visualizing for the first time the open form of the complex.
Categories: Science

Possibilities for personalized vaccines

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:59pm
Medical researchers are considering the possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer. The first vaccine will be prepared from a warehouse of 72 targets previously identified by the researchers as relevant for treatment in glioblastoma.
Categories: Science