Netflix Calls Out HBO For Not Letting Subscribers Binge On New Shows

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Netflix has gleefully poked a stick at its competitors in the video streaming market, after revealing it had added more than seven million subscribers to its service in the last three months of 2016. HBO also got a special mention. In a letter to shareholders, the company's boss Reed Hastings teased the TV drama maker by noting that, if the BBC was willing to stream shows before they air on television, then maybe HBO -- which has rigidly stuck to its strategy of eking out episodes to viewers -- should do the same. He said: "[...] the BBC has become the first major linear network to announce plans to go binge-first with new seasons, favoring internet over linear viewers. We presume HBO is not far behind the BBC. In short, it's becoming an Internet TV world, which presents both challenges and opportunities for Netflix as we strive to earn screen time." But it's worth noting that HBO currently has an exclusive deal with Sky in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria, and Italy, allowing the broadcaster to have first-run rights on the likes of Game of Thrones and Westworld until 2020 -- so any such change isn't likely to happen in the near-term. Late last year, it struck a deal with Netflix rival Amazon, allowing Prime members in the US to sign up for a monthly HBO subscription. "We have a very successful partnership with this great company that continues to evolve," said HBO exec Sofia Chang in December. The company's HBO Now streaming service shows no sign of shifting strategy, either, with programs airing simultaneously on traditional TV and online.

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Categories: Science

Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changes

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:34pm
People with Type 1 diabetes exhibit inflammation in the digestive tract and gut bacteria, a pattern that differs from individuals who do not have diabetes or those who have celiac disease, according to a new study.
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Breast cancer prognosis of African-American patients may improve with administration of chemotherapy before surgery, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:33pm
Administering chemotherapy to African-American breast cancer patients prior to surgery could improve their prognosis and survival rates from the disease, according to a new study.
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Scientists initiate first ethical guidelines for organs cultivated in vitro

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:30pm
Scientists have created an ethical guideline for research into human organ models.
Categories: Science

32% of All US Adults Watch Pirated Content

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:20pm
Nearly a third of all US adults admit to having downloaded or streamed pirated movies or TV-shows, a new survey has found. Even though many are aware that watching pirated content is not permitted, a large number of pirates are particularly hard to deter. According to a report from TorrentFreak: This is one of the main conclusions of research conducted by anti-piracy firm Irdeto, which works with prominent clients including Twentieth Century Fox and Starz. Through YouGov, the company conducted a representative survey of over 1,000 respondents which found that 32 percent of all US adults admit to streaming or downloading pirated video content. These self-confessed pirates are interested in a wide variety of video content. TV-shows and movies that still play in theaters are on the top of the list for many, with 24 percent each, but older movies, live sports and Netflix originals are mentioned as well. The data further show that the majority of US adults (69%) know that piracy is illegal. Interestingly, this also means that a large chunk of the population believes that they're doing nothing wrong.

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Categories: Science

Surgical site infections are the most common and costly of hospital infections

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:15pm
Researchers updated guidelines for the prevention, detection and management of surgical site infections, which affect as many as 300,000 patients per year in the United States.
Categories: Science

Astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:15pm
Astronomers have located the habitable zone, the region where water could exist on the surface of a planet, on the Wolf 1061, a planetary system that's 14 light years away.
Categories: Science

New findings on how plants manage immune response

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:15pm
New research has uncovered a previously unknown means by which plants are able to regulate how their immune systems respond to pathogens.
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Seeking structure with metagenome sequences

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 9:15pm
Scientists now report that structural models have been generated for 12 percent of the protein families that had previously had no structural information available.
Categories: Science

Amazon Patent Hints at Self-Driving Car Plans

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 8:40pm
Amazon is working on self-driving cars, according to a new patent that deals with the complex task of navigating reversible lanes. From a report on The Guardian: The patent, filed in November 2015 and granted on Tuesday, covers the problem of how to deal with reversible lanes, which change direction depending on the bulk of the traffic flow. This type of lane is typically used to manage commuter traffic into and out of cities, particularly in the US. Autonomous vehicles, the patent warns, "may not have information about reversible lanes when approaching a portion of a roadway that has reversible lane", leading to a worst-case scenario of them driving headfirst into oncoming traffic. More generally, the inability to plan for reversible lanes means cars and trucks can't optimize their routes by getting into the correct lane well in advance, something that could otherwise prove to be one of the benefits of self-driving cars. Amazon's solution to the problem could have much larger ramifications than simply dealing with highway traffic in large cities. The patent proposes a centralized roadway management system that can communicate with multiple self-driving cars to exchange information and coordinate vehicle movement at a large scale.

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Categories: Science

Google Uses Search To Push Its Products: WSJ

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 8:00pm
Ads for Google and related companies were found in the top spot in 91% of 25,000 searches related to items, according to a report on WSJ. For example, a search for "phones" would produce ads for Google Pixel, which the company launched last year. From a report: Similar results were found for searches on "Watches" or "smoke detector," which produced ads for Android smartwatches and Nest devices, respectively. In a statement, Google says their marketing programs are "carefully designed" to not impact outside advertisers. "All our bids are excluded from the auction when determining the price paid by other advertisers, and we have strict rules and processes -- set to tougher levels than our customers -- to govern the use of our own ads products." The auction is a process deciding which ads will appear for users when they type in certain search queries. Strategies such as using relevant keywords give advertisers a better shot at their ad appearing on a search results page.

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Categories: Science

Brief interventions help online learners persist with coursework

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:36pm
New research shows people in underdeveloped parts of the world are not as likely to complete massive open online courses, or MOOCs. But small psychological activities could help motivate them, closing the global achievement gap.
Categories: Science

How much drought can a forest take?

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:34pm
Why do some trees die in a drought and others don't? And how can we predict where trees are most likely to die in future droughts? Scientists have examined those questions in a new study.
Categories: Science

Digital assay of circulating tumor cells may improve diagnosis, monitoring of liver cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:34pm
Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction method to analyze circulating tumor cells may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment.
Categories: Science

Time to put TB on a diet

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:33pm
The tuberculosis bacillus is growing resistant to antibiotics. For this reason, biochemists are attempting to identify the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to reproduce, spread and survive in latent form in our macrophages. The scientists have discovered that the bacterium has the ability to 'reprogram' the cell it infects so that it can feed on its lipids. This results will pave the way for treatment opportunities based on starving and weakening the bacterium.
Categories: Science

Sea-surface temps during last interglacial period like modern temps

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:33pm
Sea-surface temperatures during the last interglaciation period were like those of today, a new study reports. The trend is worrisome, as sea levels during the last interglacial period were between six and nine meters above their present height.
Categories: Science

Jumbled chromosomes may dampen the immune response to tumors

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:33pm
How well a tumor responds to immunotherapy may depend in part on whether its chromosomes are intact or in a state of disarray, a new study reports. The finding could help doctors better pinpoint which cancer patients would benefit from immunotherapy.
Categories: Science

Tesla Avoids Recall After Autopilot Crash Death

Slashdot - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 7:20pm
Tesla will not be ordered to recall its semi-autonomous cars in the US, following a fatal crash in May 2016. The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration closed its investigation after it found no evidence of a defect in the vehicle. From a report: Joshua Brown was killed when his car collided with a lorry while operating in Autopilot mode. Tesla has stated Autopilot is only designed to assist drivers, who must keep their hands on the wheel. The feature is intended to be used on the motorway, where is lets cars automatically change lanes and react to traffic. The NHTSA report said data from the car showed that "the driver took no braking, steering or other actions to avoid the collision". Bryan Thomas from the NHSTA said the driver should have been able to see the lorry for seven seconds, which "should have been enough time to take some action".

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Categories: Science

Moth gut bacterium defends its host by making antibiotic

Science Daily - Thu, 19/01/2017 - 6:46pm
Nearly half of all insects are herbivores, but their diets do not consist of only plant material. It is not uncommon for potentially harmful microorganisms to slip in during a feast. Researchers now report that these insects use an ironic strategy to resist microbial infections. A bacterial species commonly found in the gut of the cotton leafworm and other moths secretes a powerful antimicrobial peptide, killing off competitors.
Categories: Science