Ask Slashdot: Should I Let My Kids Become American Citizens?

Slashdot - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 10:43pm
An anonymous reader writes "Can you help me decide whether to allow my small daughter and son to become American citizens? I am American and my partner is Swedish. We have both lived in Belgium for many years and have no plans to leave. I became a Belgian citizen some years ago and kept my American citizenship. My partner has both her original Swedish and now Belgian citizenship. We are not married. Instead we have a registered partnership, which is common in northern Europe, confers most of the benefits of marriage, and raises no eyebrows. However, the American government does not recognize such partnerships, so in their eyes I am still single. Generally, children of American citizens abroad automatically become American citizens themselves at birth. But our kids fall under an exception. Male American citizens who live abroad and have children out of wedlock with a non-citizen mother do not automatically transmit citizenship to their children unless they sign an "affidavit of support" promising to support their children until the age of 18. If you don't sign before the child reaches 18, the child is not considered an American citizen. This has been upheld by two Supreme Court rulings (Nguyen v. INS and Flores-Villar v. United States). For legal beagles, the relevant statutes are 8 U.S.C. 1401 and 1409. (Read on below for the rest.)

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Categories: Science

Microsoft’s Vision for Games: Unifying Xbox and Windows 10

Wired News - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 10:00pm

Microsoft has a vision for the future of gaming: A unified experience across Xbox One and Windows 10. Xbox head Phil Spencer laid out that plan at the Game Developer’s Conference in San Francisco, where he conceded Windows lost the plot with gamers. The time has come, he said, to change course. “Our goal in […]

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Categories: Science

EU Free Data Roaming, Net Neutrality Plans In Jeopardy

Slashdot - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader writes EU free data roaming and net neutrality plans now look like they are in doubt as European regulators have dropped plans to ban roaming charges and have proposed net neutrality rules allowing privileged access in some cases. This comes as a U-turn of plans [compared to] 2014, when EU MEPs voted to scrap mobile roaming fees in Europe by 15th December 2015, with the proposal orginally covered on Slashdot in 2010."

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Categories: Science

The Scary-Dexterous Robots of the Darpa Challenge

Wired News - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 9:45pm

Maybe if we start training robots to save people’s lives now, some of them will collaborate with the post-Skynet human resistance later.

The post The Scary-Dexterous Robots of the Darpa Challenge appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Galaxy Cluster's Mass Splits View of Supernova Behind | Video

Space.com - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 9:30pm
Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope snapped  a cross-shaped pattern of 4 images of the same supernova. The images were discovered "around a giant foreground elliptical galaxy embedded in a cluster of galaxies."
Categories: Science

New Data Indicates Arctic-Ocean Sized Body of Water on Ancient Mars

Slashdot - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 9:22pm
mdsolar writes After six years of planetary observations, scientists at NASA say they have found convincing new evidence that ancient Mars had an ocean. It was probably the size of the Arctic Ocean, larger than previously estimated, the researchers reported on Thursday. The body of water spread across the low-lying plain of the planet's northern hemisphere for millions of years, they said. If confirmed, the findings would add significantly to scientists' understanding of the planet's history and lend new weight to the view that ancient Mars had everything needed for life to emerge. Update: 03/05 22:42 GMT by T : Correction: that headline should have read "Arctic" initially, rather than Antarctic.

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Categories: Science

CRTC Issues $1.1 Million Penalty To Compu-Finder For Spamming Canadians

Slashdot - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:42pm
zentigger writes Canadians rejoice! It looks like the new anti-spam regulations might actually have some teeth! Today, the CRTC issued a $1.1 million fine to Compu-Finder for violating Canada's anti-spam legislation by sending commercial emails without consent, as well as messages in which the unsubscribe mechanisms did not function properly. Furthermore, an analysis of the complaints made to the Spam Reporting Centre of this industry sector shows that Compu-Finder accounts for 26% of all complaints submitted.

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Categories: Science

Woman Controls a Fighter Jet Sim Using Only Her Mind

Wired News - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:30pm

A brain-computer interface lets a quadriplegic woman pilot an F-35 flight simulator with the power of her mind alone.

The post Woman Controls a Fighter Jet Sim Using Only Her Mind appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Elusive El Niño arrives: Forecasters predict it will stay weak, have little influence on weather and climate

Science Daily - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:27pm
The long-anticipated El Niño has finally arrived, according to forecasters with NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. In their updated monthly outlook released today, forecasters issued an El Niño Advisory to declare the arrival of the ocean-atmospheric phenomenon marked by warmer-than-average sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean near the equator.
Categories: Science

How healthy is genetically modified soybean oil?

Science Daily - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:21pm
Soybean oil accounts for more than 90 percent of all the seed oil production in the United States. Genetically modified soybean oil, made from seeds of GM soybean plants, was recently introduced into the food supply on the premise that it is healthier than conventional soybean oil. But is that premise true? Just barely, say scientists.
Categories: Science

Snffing out origins of methane: instrument identifies methane's origins in mines, deep-sea vents, and cows

Science Daily - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:21pm
Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide in its capacity to trap heat in Earth's atmosphere for a long time. The gas can originate from lakes and swamps, natural-gas pipelines, deep-sea vents, and livestock. Understanding the sources of methane, and how the gas is formed, could give scientists a better understanding of its role in warming the planet.
Categories: Science

Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find

Science Daily - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:21pm
An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. Ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life.
Categories: Science

Developers Race To Develop VR Headsets That Won't Make Users Nauseous

Slashdot - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 8:01pm
HughPickens.com writes Nick Wingfield reports at the NYT that for the last couple of years, the companies building virtual reality headsets have begged the public for patience as they strive to create virtual environments that don't make people physically sick. "We're going to hang ourselves out there and be judged," says John Carmack, chief technology officer of Oculus, describing what he calls a "nightmare scenario" that has worried him and other Oculus executives. "People like the demo, they take it home, and they start throwing up," says Carmack. "The fear is if a really bad V.R. product comes out, it could send the industry back to the '90s." In that era, virtual reality headsets flopped, disappointing investors and consumers. "It left a huge, smoking crater in the landscape," says Carmack, who is considered an important game designer for his work on Doom and Quake. "We've had people afraid to touch V.R. for 20 years." This time around, the backing for virtual reality is of a different magnitude. Facebook paid $2 billion last year to acquire Oculus. Microsoft is developing its own headset, HoloLens, that mixes elements of virtual reality with augmented reality, a different medium that overlays virtual images on a view of the real world. Google has invested more than $500 million in Magic Leap, a company developing an augmented reality headset. "The challenge is there is so much expectation and anticipation that that could fall away quite quickly if you don't get the type of traction you had hoped," says Neil Young. (More, below.)

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Categories: Science

Projection Mapping Brings an Ancient Greek Statue to Life

Wired News - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:50pm

Purists will scoff, but we could be nearing a future where new technologies make art museums come to life. Not hyperbolically, in the sense that virtual reality displays and touchscreen tablets let you interact with art in new ways (we’re already seeing that in spades, thanks to smart renovations at places like the Cleveland Museum […]

The post Projection Mapping Brings an Ancient Greek Statue to Life appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Clever Games Use Handcrafted, One-of-a-Kind Controllers

Wired News - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:30pm

While the games won't be coming to a PlayStation near you any time soon, the ALT.CTRL.GDC exhibit shows how we can break free of controllers and monitors.

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Categories: Science

Lauren Ipsum: A Story About Computer Science and Other Improbable Things

Slashdot - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:22pm
MassDosage writes As the full title to Lauren Ipsum: A story about Computer Science and Other Improbable Things indicates, this is a book about Computer Science but what's surprising about it is that it manages to be about Computer Science without actually ever directly referring to the subject or even to computers at all. It is in fact a fictional story about a young girl called Lauren who gets lost after wandering into a forest near her house after an argument with her mother. She stumbles into a world populated with all kinds of strange creatures and colorful characters some of whom she befriends in order to figure out how to get back to her home. The "figuring out" part of the plot is where things get interesting as she has many attempts at solving this problem with different characters giving her often contradictory advice and Lauren then has to decide what exactly she's trying to do and which of the various possible solutions is the best. This involves a fair amount of trial and error, learning from certain mistakes and trying different approaches. If this is starting to sound familiar to those who have written software then that's the whole point. Lauren Ipsum is cunningly littered with references to Computer Science and in particular to things like algorithms, logic puzzles and many other of the theoretical underpinnings of the subject. Read below to see what MassDosage has to say about the book.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Wet Mars: Red Planet Lost Ocean's Worth of Water, New Maps Reveal

Space.com - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:11pm
Ancient Mars likely once had an ocean large enough to cover 20 percent of the Martian surface, a fifth of the planet, scientists say. But over time, most of that water was lost to space.
Categories: Science

Fastest Star in the Galaxy Has a Strange Origin

Space.com - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:10pm
The fastest-known star in the Milky Way is on a path out of the galaxy, and new research suggests it was a supernova that gave it the boot.
Categories: Science

Cosmic Lens Reveals 4 Views of Same Star Explosion (Photo)

Space.com - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:09pm
For the first time, a cosmic magnifying glass has allowed scientists to see the same star explosion four times, possibly offering a revealing glimpse into these explosive stellar deaths and the nature of the accelerating universe.
Categories: Science

Ocean Covered 20 Percent Of Mars, New Research Suggests | Video

Space.com - Thu, 05/03/2015 - 7:04pm
About 4.5 billion years ago, the Red Planet was a much wetter place. New isotopic measurements of Mars by several ground-based telescopes on Earth reveal a new map of where the water laid and a model of water loss over time can be constructed.
Categories: Science