Extreme Shrimp May Hold Clues To Alien Life On Europa

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 4:43pm
HughPickens.com writes: Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are studying a mysterious ecosystem at one of the world's deepest undersea hydrothermal vents to get clues about what life could be like on other planetary bodies, such as Jupiter's icy moon Europa, which has a subsurface ocean. At the vents, tiny shrimp are piled on top of each other, layer upon layer, crawling on rock chimneys that spew hot water. "You go along the ocean bottom and there's nothing, effectively," says Max Coleman. "And then suddenly we get these hydrothermal vents and a massive ecosystem. It's just literally teeming with life." Bacteria, inside the shrimps' mouths and in specially evolved gill covers, produce organic matter that feed the crustaceans. The particular bacteria in the vents are able to survive in extreme environments because of chemosynthesis, a process that works in the absence of sunlight and involves organisms getting energy from chemical reactions. In this case, the bacteria use hydrogen sulfide, a chemical abundant at the vents, to make organic matter. The temperatures at the vents can climb up to a scorching 842 degrees Fahrenheit (450 degrees Celsius), but waters just an inch away are cool enough to support the shrimp. The shrimp are blind, but have thermal receptors in the backs of their heads. According to the exobiologists, these mysterious shrimps and its symbiotic bacterium may hold clues "about what life could be like on other planetary bodies." It's life that may be similar—at the basic level—to what could be lurking in the oceans of Europa, deep under the icy crust of the Jupiter moon. According to Emma Versteegh "whether an animal like this could exist on Europa heavily depends on the actual amount of energy that's released there, through hydrothermal vents." Nobody is seriously planning a landing mission on Europa yet. But the European Space Agency aims to launch its JUpiter ICy moons Explorer mission (JUICE) to make the first thickness measurements of Europa's icy crust starting in 2030 and NASA also has begun planning a Europa Clipper mission that would study the icy moon while doing flybys in a Jupiter orbit.

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Categories: Science

Linux On a Motorola 68000 Solder-less Breadboard

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:34pm
New submitter lars_stefan_axelsson writes: When I was an undergrad in the eighties, "building" a computer meant that you got a bunch of chips and a soldering iron and went to work. The art is still alive today, but instead of a running BASIC interpreter as the ultimate proof of success, today the crowning achievement is getting Linux to run: "What does it take to build a little 68000-based protoboard computer, and get it running Linux? In my case, about three weeks of spare time, plenty of coffee, and a strong dose of stubbornness. After banging my head against the wall with problems ranging from the inductance of pushbutton switches to memory leaks in the C standard library, it finally works! (video)"

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Categories: Science

Judge Approves $450M Settlement For Apple's Ebook Price Fixing

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 2:29pm
An anonymous reader writes: On Friday a U.S. federal judge approved a settlement in the Apple ebook price-fixing case that could see the technology giant paying $450 million. $400 million of that would go to the roughly 23 million consumers thought to be affected by the price fixing, and the rest would go to lawyers. Though the case is now settled, the dollar amount is not necessarily final — an appeals court still has to rule on a previous verdict. If the appeals court finds in Apple's favor, then the total settlement drops to only $70 million. If they find against Apple, then it's the full amount. "The settlement appeared to reflect fatigue by Apple, the Justice Department, state attorneys general and class-action lawyers eager to conclude a case that has dragged on, largely because of delays by Apple."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Judge Approves $450M Settlement For Apple's Ebook Price Fixing

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 2:29pm
An anonymous reader writes: On Friday a U.S. federal judge approved a settlement in the Apple ebook price-fixing case that could see the technology giant paying $450 million. $400 million of that would go to the roughly 23 million consumers thought to be affected by the price fixing, and the rest would go to lawyers. Though the case is now settled, the dollar amount is not necessarily final — an appeals court still has to rule on a previous verdict. If the appeals court finds in Apple's favor, then the total settlement drops to only $70 million. If they find against Apple, then it's the full amount. "The settlement appeared to reflect fatigue by Apple, the Justice Department, state attorneys general and class-action lawyers eager to conclude a case that has dragged on, largely because of delays by Apple."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Some Early Nexus 6 Units Returned Over Startup Bug

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 1:26pm
The Register reports that Motorola has issued a recall for an early batch of its hotly anticipated new Nexus 6 smartphones that were sold through U.S. mobile carrier AT&T, owing to a software glitch that can reportedly causes the devices to boot to a black screen. ... AT&T retail stores have reportedly been told to return their existing inventory of the Nexus 6 and wait for new units to arrive from Motorola, which has already corrected the problem on its assembly line. Any customer who brings a defective unit into an AT&T store will receive a replacement. Motorola's memo to stores says that only initial shipments were affected, and that the problem has been identified. However, as the article mentions, there's thus far less luck for those like me who've found that at least some original Nexus 7 tablets do not play nicely with Lollipop. (The effects look nice, but it's never a good sign to see "System UI isn't responding. Do you want to close it?" on a tablet's screen.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Exactly Has Star Wars Made $37 Billion?

Wired News - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 12:00pm

The latest installment of Geek's Guide to the Galaxy looks at the massive business empire of Star Wars.

The post How Exactly Has Star Wars Made $37 Billion? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

While You Were Offline: Here’s All the Internet You Need to Catch Up On

Wired News - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:30am

Can't keep up with everything people are talking about on the World Wide Web? Don't worry. We read the Internet so you don't have to.

The post While You Were Offline: Here’s All the Internet You Need to Catch Up On appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:08am
An anonymous reader writes Google [Thursday] shared an update from Project Loon, the company's initiative to bring high-speed Internet access to remote areas of the world via hot air balloons. Google says it now has the ability to launch up to 20 of these balloons per day. This is in part possible because the company has improved its autofill equipment to a point where it can fill a balloon in under five minutes. This is a major achievement, given that Google says filling a Project Loon balloon with enough air so that it is ready for flight is the equivalent of inflating 7,000 party balloons.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:08am
An anonymous reader writes Google [Thursday] shared an update from Project Loon, the company's initiative to bring high-speed Internet access to remote areas of the world via hot air balloons. Google says it now has the ability to launch up to 20 of these balloons per day. This is in part possible because the company has improved its autofill equipment to a point where it can fill a balloon in under five minutes. This is a major achievement, given that Google says filling a Project Loon balloon with enough air so that it is ready for flight is the equivalent of inflating 7,000 party balloons.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 11:08am
An anonymous reader writes Google [Thursday] shared an update from Project Loon, the company's initiative to bring high-speed Internet access to remote areas of the world via hot air balloons. Google says it now has the ability to launch up to 20 of these balloons per day. This is in part possible because the company has improved its autofill equipment to a point where it can fill a balloon in under five minutes. This is a major achievement, given that Google says filling a Project Loon balloon with enough air so that it is ready for flight is the equivalent of inflating 7,000 party balloons.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Indian Brick-and-Mortar Retailers Snub Android One Phones

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 9:07am
oyenamit writes Online shopping in India is still in its infancy but is growing tremendously to reach the mostly untapped market of 1.2 billion people. Invariably, the conflict between pure online retailers like Amazon and Flipkart and brick and mortar stores was bound to emerge. Unfortunately for Google's Android One, it has been on the receiving end of this friction. Leading brick and mortar retailers in India have refused to sell Android One handsets ever since the US company chose to launch its products exclusively online. The three Android One makers in India — Micromax, Karbonn and Spice — launched their handsets exclusively online in mid-September. When sales did not meet their expectations, they decided to release their products via the brick and mortar store channel. However, smaller retailer and mom-n-pop shops have decided to show their displeasure at having being left out of the launch by deciding not to stock Android One. The Android One phones, announced at the most recent Google I/O, are Google's attempt to bring stock Android (as on Google's Nexus devices) to emerging markets, with competent but not high-end phones.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

My Other Office is on Mars

Space.com - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 7:12am
I know what you’re thinking: this is not a normal day-in-the-life of a mineralogy graduate student. And you’re right about that! I never dreamed that my love of rocks, crystals, and the atomic scale would lead me to be part of a NASA mission.
Categories: Science

Critical XSS Flaws Patched In WordPress and Popular Plug-In

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 6:20am
itwbennett writes The WordPress development team on Thursday released critical security updates that address an XSS vulnerability in the comment boxes of WordPress posts and pages. An attacker could exploit this flaw to create comments with malicious JavaScript code embedded in them that would get executed by the browsers of users seeing those comments. 'In the most obvious scenario the attacker leaves a comment containing the JavaScript and some links in order to put the comment in the moderation queue,' said Jouko Pynnonen, the security researcher who found the flaw.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Startup Assembly Banks On Paid, Open-Source Style Development

Slashdot - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 3:33am
enbody writes A year-old startup, Assembly, is built on the premise of creating products using open-source style development, but structured in a way that you get paid for your contributions. Open-source development is well-known in the Slashdot community, as are a variety of ways to earn a living around open-source, such as support. What is new here is being paid as part of the development, and not just for coding — your contribution might be as project manager or sales. A nice description with video showed up today on the Verge. Of course, the devil is in the details, but they have products so someone in Slashdot land may be interested. (Bias warning: I know one of these guys.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Feminist Hacker Barbie Is Just What Our Little Girls Need

Wired News - Sat, 22/11/2014 - 1:38am

Everyone hates Mattel's Computer Engineer Barbie book, but we've fallen in love with Feminist Hacker Barbie. She's the brainchild of Kathleen Tuite, an independent computer programmer based near Santa Cruz, California, who spent a half-day on Wednesday hacking together a website where people could re-caption the original book, hacking it to fix all of its pastel-hued problems.

The post Feminist Hacker Barbie Is Just What Our Little Girls Need appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science