The Internet of Broken Things

Slashdot - 44 min 55 sec ago
szczys writes: The Internet of Things is all the hype these days. On one side we have companies clamoring to sell you Internet-Connected-everything to replace all of the stuff you already have that is now considered "dumb." On the other side are security researchers screaming that we're installing remote access with little thought about securing it properly. The truth is a little of both is happening, and that this isn't a new thing. It's been around for years in industry, the new part is that it's much wider spread and much closer to your life. Al Williams walks through some real examples of the unintended consequences of IoT, including his experiences building and deploying devices, and some recent IoT gaffs like the NEST firmware upgrade that had some users waking up to an icy-cold home.

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Categories: Science

Surprise, Surprise: The RIAA Gets Streaming All Wrong

Wired News - 1 hour 47 min ago

The RIAA has updated how albums reach platinum, but it hasn't made streaming any less sticky.

The post Surprise, Surprise: The RIAA Gets Streaming All Wrong appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

A New Fish Species Speaks in Electric Shocks

Wired News - 1 hour 47 min ago

John Sullivan has seen plenty of electric fishes. But when he pulled his trap out Gabon’s Ogooué River in 2014, he knew right away he'd found a doozy.

The post A New Fish Species Speaks in Electric Shocks appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Come to Singapore! The Sights (And Branding) Are Lovely

Wired News - 1 hour 47 min ago

Brand Guide: Singapore Edition is the first edition in a newly launched series devoted to innovative, local, well-branded companies.

The post Come to Singapore! The Sights (And Branding) Are Lovely appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Andy Rubin Unleashed Android on the World. Now Watch Him Do the Same With AI

Wired News - 2 hours 2 min ago

Rubin’s ambitions go beyond building gadgets or companies. He wants Playground to be the factory that creates the building blocks for an AI-infused future.

The post Andy Rubin Unleashed Android on the World. Now Watch Him Do the Same With AI appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Lovely Planet Is a Shooter Made of Sunshine and Rainbows

Wired News - 2 hours 16 min ago

Lovely Planet: Arcade is a back-to-basics shooter in the style of the original DOOM or Wolfenstein. It's also delightfully, subversively cute.

The post Lovely Planet Is a Shooter Made of Sunshine and Rainbows appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Obama’s New Cybersecurity Plan Sticks to the Most Basic Basics

Wired News - 3 hours 46 min ago

What's most surprising is that our government is not doing this stuff already.

The post Obama’s New Cybersecurity Plan Sticks to the Most Basic Basics appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Are Roads Safer With No Central White Lines?

Slashdot - 3 hours 49 min ago
Press2ToContinue writes: White lines along the center of roads have been removed in parts of the UK, with some experts saying it encourages motorists to slow down. So is it the beginning of the end for the central road marking? You are driving along the road when the dotted white line that has been your companion — separating your car from oncoming traffic — suddenly disappears. One theory is that you will slow down, making the road safer. What could possibly go wrong?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Google Working On Wireless Charging For Self-Driving Cars

Slashdot - 6 hours 46 min ago
MikeChino writes: New FCC filings suggest that Google is currently installing wireless charging systems for self-driving cars at its headquarters in Mountain View. The documents suggest that the systems will be installed by Hevo Power and Momentum Dynamics. Both companies offer technology that can wirelessly charge an electric car via plates that are embedded in the ground.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Powering brain implants without wires with thin-film wireless power transmission system

Kurzweil AI - 9 hours 24 min ago

Schematic of proposed architecture of an implantable wireless-powered neural interface system that can provide power to implanted devices. Adding a transmitter chip could allow for neural signals to be transmitted via the antenna for external processing. (credit: Toyohashi University Of Technology)

A research team at Toyohashi University of Technology in Japan has fabricated an implanted wireless power transmission (WPT) device to deliver power to an implanted neural interface system, such as a brain-computer interface (BCI) device.

Described in an open-access paper in Sensors journal, the system avoids having to connect an implanted device to an external power source via wires through a hole in the skull, which can cause infections through the opening and risk of infection and leakage of the cerebrospinal fluid during long-term measurement. The system also allows for free-moving subjects, allowing for more natural behavior in experiments.

Photographs of fabricated flexible antenna and bonded CMOS rectifier chip with RF transformer (credit: Kenji Okabe et al./Sensors)

The researchers used a wafer-level packaging technique to integrate a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip in a thin (5 micrometers), flexible parylene film, using flip-chip (face-down) bonding to the film. The system includes a thin-film antenna and a rectifier to convert a radio-frequency signal to DC voltage (similar to how an RFID chip works). The entire system measures 27 mm × 5 mm, and the flexible film can conform to the surface of the brain.

Coventry University prof. Kevin Warwick turns on a light with a double-click of his finger, which triggers an implant in his arm (wired to a computer connected to the light). Adding an RF transmitter chip (and associated processing) to the Toyohashi system could similarly allow for controlling devices, but without wires. (credit: Kevin Warwick/element14)

The researchers plan to integrate additional functions, including amplifiers, analog-to-digital converters, signal processors, and  a radio frequency circuit for transmitting (and receiving) data.

Tethered Braingate brain-computer interface for paralyzed patients (credit: Brown University)

Such a system could perform some of the functions of the Braingate system, which allows paralyzed patients to communicate (see “People with paralysis control robotic arms using brain-computer interface“).

This work is partially supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research, Young Scientists, and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.


element14 | Kevin Warwick’s BrainGate Implant

Abstract of Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

Categories: Science

China Just Made a Major Breakthrough In Nuclear Fusion Research

Slashdot - 9 hours 40 min ago
New submitter TechnoidNash writes: China announced last week a major breakthrough in the realm of nuclear fusion research. The Chinese Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), was able to heat hydrogen gas to a temperature of near 50 million degrees Celsius for an unprecedented 102 seconds. While this is nowhere near the hottest temperature that has ever been achieved in nuclear fusion research (that distinction belongs to the Large Hadron Collider which reached 4 trillion degrees Celsius), it is the longest amount of time one has been maintained.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Why Jeep’s $10M Super Bowl Ad Only Used a Third of the Screen

Wired News - 11 hours 7 min ago

Jeep's quiet Super Bowl ad strives for nostalgia and authenticity, and falls a bit short on both counts.

The post Why Jeep’s $10M Super Bowl Ad Only Used a Third of the Screen appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Innate teaching skills 'part of human nature'

Science Daily - 11 hours 9 min ago
A small but novel study of hunter-gatherers concludes that teaching is part of the human genome, that it is a part of our human nature, researchers say. The Aka are among the last of the world's hunter-gatherers, but their way of life accounts for 99 percent of human history. That they teach, and how they teach, offers new insight into who we are as humans and how we might best learn.
Categories: Science

National underutilization of preemptive, early kidney transplants

Science Daily - 11 hours 9 min ago
A kidney transplant is a life-changing and life-saving procedure. Yet, a new study shows that only one-third of patients who ultimately receive a living donor kidney transplant receive it preemptively (i.e., before starting dialysis). Less than two-thirds receive a transplant either preemptively or within a year of starting dialysis.
Categories: Science

Making sense of metallic glass

Science Daily - 11 hours 9 min ago
Vitrified metals, or metallic glasses, are at the frontier of materials science research. But much about them remains poorly understood. A team is trying to figure out the rules that govern metallic glass's creation. They are doing this by looking at metallic glasses under extreme pressures. High-pressure research can be used to probe structure on an atomic level and understand a material's state of order or disorder.
Categories: Science

Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic 4-drug cocktail, sparing the body

Science Daily - 11 hours 9 min ago
An implantable device can deliver a particularly toxic cocktail of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors to stunt their growth or in some cases, shrink them -- all while showing signs that the rest of the body would be spared toxic side effects, report investigators.
Categories: Science

Researchers identify most dangerous strains of often-deadly bacteria

Science Daily - 11 hours 9 min ago
For the first time, researchers have determined the genetic makeup of various strains of E. coli, which every year kills hundreds of thousands of people around the world. The study analyzed the DNA of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), which are the strains of the bacteria that cause diarrhea.
Categories: Science

A disposable, highly sensitive biosensing system

Science Daily - 11 hours 10 min ago
A new biosensing platform has been fabricated for the determination of haptoglobin in human blood.
Categories: Science

New evidence gives women informed choice in the prolapse surgery debate

Science Daily - 11 hours 10 min ago
New evidence published today highlights benefits and harms of using artificial mesh when compared with tissue repair in the surgical treatment of vaginal prolapse. Slightly better repair with mesh needs to be weighed carefully against increased risk of harms.
Categories: Science

Arthroscopic knee surgery does not cure sensations of knee catching or locking

Science Daily - 11 hours 10 min ago
A commonly used surgical treatment does not help patients who suffer from 'mechanical symptoms' associated with a degenerative knee, a new Finnish study demonstrates.
Categories: Science