NASA Tests Feasibility of 3D Printing on the Moon and Other Planets

Slashdot - 1 hour 6 min ago
ErnieKey writes A major application of 3d printing that could revolutionize space travel would be using 3d printers to create structures on non-terrestrial bodies like the moon, other planets, and even asteroids. Researchers from NASA's Kennedy Space Center have been working to develop solutions to materials issues, and recently presented initial findings on the potential for using in-situ materials like basalt for 3D printing. Their innovative method is based on only using in-situ supplies, and not materials that need to be brought into space.

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Categories: Science

Switching to spintronics: Electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temperature

Science Daily - 1 hour 29 min ago
Researchers have used an electric field to reverse the magnetization direction in a multiferroic spintronic device at room temperature, a demonstration that points a new way towards spintronics and smaller, faster and cheaper ways of storing and processing data.
Categories: Science

Book Review: Build Your Own Website: A Comic Guide to HTML, CSS, and WordPress

Slashdot - 1 hour 48 min ago
MassDosage writes "At the the risk of exposing my age I remember building my first website using a rudimentary Unix text editor (Joe) and carefully handcrafting the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) while directly logged on to the web server it was being served from. Back then Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) weren't even a glint in the eyes of their creators. A lot has changed and there's now a world of fancy WYSIWYG web page editors to choose from as well as Content Management Systems that allow you to create websites without looking at the underlying code at all. While this is all very useful and allows less technical people to create websites I still feel that having at least some knowledge of how everything works under the hood is empowering — especially in situations where you want to go beyond the limits placed on you by a certain tool. This is where Build Your Own Website: A comic guide to HTML, CSS and Wordpress comes into the picture. Its aim is to enable people new to web development to learn the subject by teaching the fundamentals of HTML and CSS first and only then describing how to use a Content Management System (CMS) — in this case Wordpress. While Wordpress might not be everyone's kettle of fish it's a good choice as an example of a modern CMS that is easily accessible and very popular. The concepts presented are simple enough that it should be easy enough for a reader to apply them to a different CMS should they want to. Read below for The rest of MassDosage's review.

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Categories: Science

European Comet Lander May Wake Up from Space Slumber

Space.com - 1 hour 54 min ago
It's now approaching summer in the presumed location of Europe's Philae lander on a comet, so the washing-machine-size probecould soon access enough energy to open its eyes and start working again, Rosetta mission scientists said.
Categories: Science

Satellites measure increase of Sun's energy absorbed in the Arctic

Science Daily - 2 hours 4 min ago
NASA satellite instruments have observed a marked increase in solar radiation absorbed in the Arctic since the year 2000 -- a trend that aligns with the steady decrease in Arctic sea ice during the same period.
Categories: Science

49 percent of patients withhold clinically sensitive information

Science Daily - 2 hours 4 min ago
In the first real-world trial of the impact of patient-controlled access to electronic medical records, almost half of the patients who participated withheld clinically sensitive information in their medical records from some or all of their health care providers.
Categories: Science

Satellite sees holiday lights brighten cities

Science Daily - 2 hours 5 min ago
Even from space, holidays shine bright. With a new look at daily data scientists have identified how patterns in nighttime light intensity change during major holiday seasons -- Christmas and New Year's in the United States and the holy month of Ramadan in the Middle East.
Categories: Science

Lens-free microscope can detect cancer at cellular level

Science Daily - 2 hours 5 min ago
A lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes, has been developed by researchers. The invention could lead to less expensive and more portable technology for performing common examinations of tissue, blood and other biomedical specimens. It may prove especially useful in remote areas and in cases where large numbers of samples need to be examined quickly.
Categories: Science

Surprising theorists, stars within middle-aged clusters are of similar age

Science Daily - 2 hours 5 min ago
An examination of middle-aged star clusters reveals an unexpectedly narrow age range among their stars, suggesting that large groups of stars evolve differently than previously understood.
Categories: Science

Policy action urgently needed to protect Hawaii's dolphins

Science Daily - 2 hours 5 min ago
Tourism is increasing pressure on Hawaii's spinner dolphins. A new study shows that long-proposed federal regulations to limit daytime access to bays where the dolphins rest are greatly needed, but local, community-based conservation measures tailored to each individual bay will speed their acceptance. A one-size-fits-all approach will not work, authors say.
Categories: Science

Australia's coastal observation network may aid in understanding of extreme ocean events

Science Daily - 2 hours 5 min ago
A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas.
Categories: Science

Short-necked Triassic marine reptile discovered in China

Science Daily - 2 hours 5 min ago
A new species of short-necked marine reptile from the Triassic period has been discovered in China.
Categories: Science

Microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale

Science Daily - 2 hours 6 min ago
Scientists have used advanced microscopy to carve out nanoscale designs on the surface of a new class of ionic polymer materials for the first time.
Categories: Science

Relive Curiosity's '7 Minutes Of Terror' On Discovery Channel | Video Clip

Space.com - 2 hours 18 min ago
Adam Steltzner and the rest of the Mars Science Laboratory team eagerly anticipate the rover's landing on Mars in this exclusive clip from "Red Planet Rover". The show premieres on the Discovery Channel on Dec. 18th, 2014 at 10pm EST/PST.
Categories: Science

Research Highlights How AI Sees and How It Knows What It's Looking At

Slashdot - 2 hours 30 min ago
anguyen8 writes Deep neural networks (DNNs) trained with Deep Learning have recently produced mind-blowing results in a variety of pattern-recognition tasks, most notably speech recognition, language translation, and recognizing objects in images, where they now perform at near-human levels. But do they see the same way we do? Nope. Researchers recently found that it is easy to produce images that are completely unrecognizable to humans, but that DNNs classify with near-certainty as everyday objects. For example, DNNs look at TV static and declare with 99.99% confidence it is a school bus. An evolutionary algorithm produced the synthetic images by generating pictures and selecting for those that a DNN believed to be an object (i.e. "survival of the school-bus-iest"). The resulting computer-generated images look like modern, abstract art. The pictures also help reveal what DNNs learn to care about when recognizing objects (e.g. a school bus is alternating yellow and black lines, but does not need to have a windshield or wheels), shedding light into the inner workings of these DNN black boxes.

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Categories: Science

Manufacturer's Backdoor Found On Popular Chinese Android Smartphone

Slashdot - 2 hours 51 min ago
Trailrunner7 writes that researchers at Palo Alto Networks have found a backdoor in Android devices sold by Coolpad. "A popular Android smartphone sold primarily in China and Taiwan but also available worldwide, contains a backdoor from the manufacturer that is being used to push pop-up advertisements and install apps without users' consent. The Coolpad devices, however, are ripe for much more malicious abuse, researchers at Palo Alto Networks said today, especially after the discovery of a vulnerability in the backend management interface that exposed the backdoor's control system. Ryan Olson, intelligence director at Palo Alto, said the CoolReaper backdoor not only connects to a number of command and control servers, but is also capable of downloading, installing and activating any Android application without the user's permission. It also sends phony over-the-air updates to devices that instead install applications without notifying the user. The backdoor can also be used to dial phone numbers, send SMS and MMS messages, and upload device and usage information to Coolpad."

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Categories: Science

What Will Microsoft's "Embrace" of Open Source Actually Achieve?

Slashdot - 3 hours 9 min ago
Nerval's Lobster writes Back in the day, Microsoft viewed open source and Linux as a threat and did its best to retaliate with FUD and patent threats. And then a funny thing happened: Whether in the name of pragmatism or simply marketing, Microsoft began a very public transition from a company of open-source haters (at least in top management) to one that's embraced some aspects of open-source computing. Last month, the company blogged that .NET Core will become open-source, adding to its previously open-sourced ASP.NET MVC, Web API, and Web Pages (Razor). There's no doubt that, at least in some respects, Microsoft wants to make a big show of being more open and supportive of interoperability. The company's even gotten involved with the .NET Foundation, an independent organization designed to assist developers with the growing collection of open-source technologies for .NET. But there's only so far Microsoft will go into the realm of open source—whereas once upon a time, the company tried to wreck the movement, now it faces the very real danger of its whole revenue model being undermined by free software. But what's Microsoft's end-goal with open source? What can the company possibly hope to accomplish, given a widespread perception that such a move on its part is the product of either fear, cynicism, or both?

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Categories: Science

Colorado River Delta greener after engineered pulse of water

Science Daily - 3 hours 34 min ago
The engineered spring flood that brought water to previously dry reaches of the lower Colorado River and its delta resulted in greener vegetation, the germination of new vegetation along the river and a temporary rise in the water table, according to new results from the binational team of scientists studying the water's effects.
Categories: Science

Ancient, hydrogen-rich waters deep underground around the world: Waters could support isolated life

Science Daily - 3 hours 34 min ago
A team of scientists has mapped the location of hydrogen-rich waters found trapped kilometers beneath Earth's surface in rock fractures in Canada, South Africa and Scandinavia. Common in Precambrian Shield rocks -- the oldest rocks on Earth -- the ancient waters have a chemistry similar to that found near deep sea vents, suggesting these waters can support microbes living in isolation from the surface.
Categories: Science

Multiple allergic reactions traced to single protein

Science Daily - 3 hours 35 min ago
A single protein has been identified as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, researchers say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV.
Categories: Science