Android Is 'Fair Use' As Google Beats Oracle In $9 Billion Lawsuit

Slashdot - 1 hour 29 min ago
infernalC writes: Ars Technica is reporting that the verdict is in, and that the jury decided that Google's duplication of several Java interfaces is fair use. Ars Technica writes that Google's Android OS does not infringe upon Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by "fair use." The jury unanimously answered "yes" in response to whether or not Google's use of Java APIs was a "fair use" under copyright law. The trial is now over, since Google won. "Google's win somewhat softens the blow to software developers who previously thought programming language APIs were free to use," Ars Technica writes. "It's still the case that APIs can be protected by copyright under the law of at least one appeals court. However, the first high-profile attempt to control APIs with copyright law has now been stymied by a "fair use" defense." The amount Oracle may have asked for in damages could have been as much as $9 billion.

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Categories: Science

Consumer Campaigners Read T&C Of Their Mobile Phone Apps To Prove a Point

Slashdot - 2 hours 14 min ago
From a BBC report: Norwegians have spent more than 30 hours reading out terms and conditions from smartphone apps in a campaign by the country's consumer agency. The average Norwegian has 33 apps, the Norwegian Consumer Council says, whose terms and conditions together run longer than the New Testament. To prove the "absurd" length, the council got Norwegians to read each of them out in real time on their website. The reading finished on Wednesday, clocking in at 31:49:11. Some of the world's most popular apps were chosen, including Netflix, YouTube, Facebook, Skype, Instagram and Angry Birds. Finn Myrstad from the Norwegian Consumer Council, said: "The current state of terms and conditions for digital services is bordering on the absurd."

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Categories: Science

A Third Of New Cellular Customers Last Quarter Were Cars

Slashdot - 2 hours 54 min ago
Ina Fried, reporting for Recode: With the U.S. smartphone market saturated, most of the growth in the cellular industry is actually coming from other kinds of devices including tablets, machine-to-machine connections and lots and lots of cars. In the first quarter, for example, the major carriers actually added more connected cars (Editor's note: amounting to a 32 percent capture) as new accounts than they did phones.

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Categories: Science

How do you kill a malaria parasite? Clog it with cholesterol

Science Daily - 2 hours 56 min ago
Drexel scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two antimalarial drugs kill Plasmodium parasites. Amidst growing concerns about drug resistance, these findings could help to develop more effective drugs against the disease.
Categories: Science

Early-life stress causes digestive problems and anxiety in rats

Science Daily - 2 hours 56 min ago
Traumatic events early in life can increase levels of norepinephrine -- the primary hormone responsible for preparing the body to react to stressful situations -- in the gut, increasing the risk of developing chronic indigestion and anxiety during adulthood, a new study reports.
Categories: Science

First discovery in United States of colistin resistance in a human E. coli infection

Science Daily - 2 hours 58 min ago
The Multidrug Resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research characterized a transferrable gene for colistin resistance in the United States that may herald the emergence of truly pan-drug resistant bacteria.
Categories: Science

Doubling down on Schrödinger's cat

Science Daily - 2 hours 58 min ago
Physicists have given Schrödinger's famous cat a second box to play in, and the result may help further the quest for reliable quantum computing.
Categories: Science

Targeting metals to fight pathogenic bacteria

Science Daily - 2 hours 59 min ago
Researchers have discovered a unique system of acquisition of essential metals in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This research represents a new potential target for the design of antibiotics.
Categories: Science

Evidence of ice age at Martian north pole

Science Daily - 2 hours 59 min ago
Using radar data scientists found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars. Ice ages on Mars are driven by processes similar to those responsible for ice ages on Earth, that is, long-term cyclical changes in the planet's orbit and tilt, which affect the amount of solar radiation it receives at each latitude.
Categories: Science

Peter Thiel’s Gawker Suit Is Another Free Speech Debacle for Facebook

Wired News - 3 hours 3 min ago
The last thing the company now needs is a board member funding revenge lawsuits against news outlets he believes have done him wrong. The post Peter Thiel's Gawker Suit Is Another Free Speech Debacle for Facebook appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Watch SpaceX Try to Land Another Rocket On An Ocean Barge

Wired News - 3 hours 17 min ago
The latest launch in Elon Musk's quest for a reusable rocket will thrust towards a supersynchronous transfer orbit after attempting another high-speed landing. The post Watch SpaceX Try to Land Another Rocket On An Ocean Barge appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

ExxonMobil: Climate Change Is Real, But ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Wired News - 3 hours 21 min ago
At its annual shareholder meeting yesterday, ExxonMobil turned down eight of nine investor proposals to address climate change. The post ExxonMobil: Climate Change Is Real, But ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Slashdot Asks: Should It Be Legal To Resell E-Books, Software, and Other Digital Goods?

Slashdot - 3 hours 34 min ago
There's no one stopping you from selling the CDs and DVDs that you buy, so why can't you do the same with e-books, music albums, movies, and other things you've downloaded? Ars Technica reports about a Dutch second-hand e-book platform called Tom Kabinet which has been "at a war" with Dutch Publishers Association (NUV) over this issue. This is seen as a threat to the entire book industry. German courts have suggested that the practice of reselling e-books should be stopped, whereas Dutch courts don't necessarily see it as an issue. What's your view on this?

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Categories: Science

Soon You’ll Swallow Origami Pills and Get Magnetic Colonoscopies

Wired News - 3 hours 38 min ago
An origami pill is a fascinating glimpse into the future of incision-free surgery, one propelled in large part by magnets. The post Soon You'll Swallow Origami Pills and Get Magnetic Colonoscopies appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Song Exploder: Busdriver Embraces Cacophony on ‘Worlds to Run’

Wired News - 3 hours 48 min ago
The Los Angeles rapper picks apart his 2015 track 'Worlds To Run,' featuring vocals from Anderson .Paak and Milo. The post Song Exploder: Busdriver Embraces Cacophony on 'Worlds to Run' appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Microsoft and Facebook Building Underwater Transatlantic 'MAREA' Data Cable

Slashdot - 4 hours 14 min ago
An anonymous reader writes: On Thursday, Microsoft and Facebook announced a partnership to build a transatlantic subsea data cable. Called 'MAREA' (Editor's note: it is Spanish for "tide"), it will connect the United States to Europe. More specifically, it will connect the State of Virginia to the country of Spain. The project will begin this August, with a targeted completion date of October 2017.Microsoft says: "MAREA will be the highest-capacity subsea cable to ever cross the Atlantic -- featuring eight fiber pairs and an initial estimated design capacity of 160Tbps. The new 6,600 km submarine cable system, to be operated and managed by Telxius, will also be the first to connect the United States to southern Europe: from Virginia Beach, Virginia to Bilbao, Spain and then beyond to network hubs in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. This route is south of existing transatlantic cable systems that primarily land in the New York/New Jersey region. Being physically separate from these other cables helps ensure more resilient and reliable connections for our customers in the United States, Europe, and beyond." The fact that these two giants felt the need to have their own cables indicates how much data they intend to move. Wired has an in-depth piece on it (though the publication blocks users with adblockers).

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Categories: Science

E-Cigs Are Exploding In Vapers' Faces At An Alarming Rate

Slashdot - 4 hours 54 min ago
E-cigs are becoming increasingly popular, but are they safe enough? BuzzFeed News is reporting about accidents where e-cigs have exploded in vapers' faces. The report claims that these incidents are occurring at an alarming rate. From the report (condensed): Across the country, defective e-cigarettes -- the nicotine delivery machines that have taken over every strip mall and sidewalk, seemingly overnight -- are creating hundreds of victims like Cavins (a 63-year-old Orange, California-based family therapist who lost an eye after an e-cig device exploded in his face), people whose lives are suddenly and horrifyingly changed when their devices blow up. They are people like Thomas Boes, whose vape exploded while he was driving outside San Diego and struck him with such force that two of the three teeth he lost lodged in his upper palate; Kenneth Barbero, whose exploding device ripped a hole in his tongue; and Marcus Forzani, a 17-year-old whose left leg was charred from his calf to his thigh after a vape battery exploded in his pocket. An unpublished FDA analysis found 66 reports of e-cigarette overheating, fires, and explosions in 2015 and the first month of 2016, a number the agency calls "an underestimate of actual events."

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Categories: Science

Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic

Wired News - 5 hours 18 min ago
Internet giants are starting to build enormous networks of their own, taking over the role traditionally played by telecom companies. The post Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Another reason to stay active as we age

Science Daily - 5 hours 26 min ago
Researchers found that individuals who maintain an active jogging habit into their senior years are spending nearly the same amount of metabolic energy as a 20-year-old.
Categories: Science

Brain picks up the beat of music automatically

Science Daily - 5 hours 28 min ago
A sense of rhythm is a uniquely human characteristic. Music cognition scientists discovered that the sense of rhythm – also known as the beat – is so fundamental to humans that we recognize patterns in music even without paying any attention or receiving any training.
Categories: Science