Recent Nobel Prize Winner Revolutionizes Microscopy Again

Slashdot - 39 min 24 sec ago
An anonymous reader writes: Eric Betzig recently shared in the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work on high-resolution microscopy. Just yesterday, Betzig and a team of researchers published a new microscopy technique (abstract) that "allows them to observe living cellular processes at groundbreaking resolution and speed." According to the article, "Until now, the best microscope for viewing living systems as they moved were confocal microscopes. They beam light down onto a sample of cells. The light penetrates the whole sample and bounces back. ... The light is toxic, and degrades the living system over time. Betzig's new microscope solves this by generating a sheet of light that comes in from the side of the sample, made up of a series of beams that harm the sample less than one solid cone of light. Scientists can now snap a high-res image of the entire section they're illuminating, without exposing the rest of the sample to any light at all."

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Categories: Science

Decades-old Scientific Paper May Hold Clues To Dark Matter

Slashdot - 1 hour 23 min ago
sciencehabit writes: Here's one reason libraries hang on to old science journals: A paper from an experiment conducted 32 years ago may shed light on the nature of dark matter, the mysterious stuff whose gravity appears to keep the galaxies from flying apart. The old data put a crimp in the newfangled concept of a 'dark photon' and suggest that a simple bargain-basement experiment could put the idea to the test. The data come from E137, a "beam dump" experiment that ran from 1980 to 1982 at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. In the experiment, physicists slammed a beam of high-energy electrons, left over from other experiments, into an aluminum target to see what would come out. Researchers placed a detector 383 meters behind the target, on the other side of a sandstone hill 179 meters thick that blocked any ordinary particles.

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Categories: Science

Hands-On: OBERWERK MARINER 8x40 Binoculars for Sky-Watching

Space.com - 1 hour 45 min ago
Massing 37oz, with a wide 8.4° field of view and 5mm of exit pupil, these are excellent ‘grab and go’ binoculars for anything outdoors. Space.com’s @DavidSkyBrody shows you the good and not-so-good features.
Categories: Science

Hands-On: CELESTRON COMETRON 7x50 Binoculars for Sky-Watching

Space.com - 1 hour 47 min ago
Massing 27oz, with a 6.8° field of view and 7.1mm of exit pupil, these binoculars are great for young astronomers. Space.com’s @DavidSkyBrody shows you the good and not-so-good features.
Categories: Science

Hands-On: CELESTRON SKYMASTER 8x56 Binoculars for Sky-Watching

Space.com - 1 hour 48 min ago
Massing 35oz, with a 5.8° field of view and 7mm of exit pupil, these binoculars are fine for astronomy but can be used in daytime for other hobbies and sports. Space.com’s @DavidSkyBrody shows you the good and not-so-good features.
Categories: Science

How to Choose Binoculars for Astronomy and Skywatching

Space.com - 1 hour 50 min ago
A good pair of binoculars can help stargazers get the most out of the night sky. Find out which type of binoculars you need in our Buyer's Guide.
Categories: Science

Oberwerk Mariner 8x40 Binoculars Review: 2014 Edition

Space.com - 1 hour 50 min ago
The Oberwerk Mariner 8x40 is our Editors' Choice for best small binoculars for astronomy. Read our full review and find more top picks here.
Categories: Science

Celestron SkyMaster 25x100 Binoculars Review: 2014 Edition

Space.com - 1 hour 50 min ago
Celestron's Skymaster 25x100 is our Editors' Choice for best large astronomy binoculars. These binoculars are an immersive space-time machine. But large binoculars must be mounted on a tripod, or the view will be very shaky and your arms very quickly exha
Categories: Science

Celestron SkyMaster 8x56 Binoculars Review: 2014 Edition

Space.com - 1 hour 50 min ago
Celestron’s Skymaster 8x56 is our Editors’ Choice for best medium-sized binoculars for astronomy. Read our full review and find more top picks here.
Categories: Science

Hands-On: OBERWERK ULTRA 15x70 Binoculars for Sky-Watching

Space.com - 1 hour 50 min ago
Massing 88oz, with a 4.4° field of view and 4.6mm of exit pupil, these optically wonderful binoculars deliver the universe at night and the sunlit world in daylight. Space.com’s @DavidSkyBrody shows you the good and not-so-good features.
Categories: Science

Hands-On: CELESTRON SKYMASTER 25x100 Binoculars for Sky-Watching

Space.com - 1 hour 55 min ago
Massing 156oz, with a 3° field of view and 4mm of exit pupil, these optically sweet monsters belong on a tripod. They are actually 2 side-by-side refractor telescopes. Space.com’s @DavidSkyBrody shows you the good and not-so-good features.
Categories: Science

Hands-On: ORION ASTRONOMY 20x80 Binoculars for Sky-Watching

Space.com - 1 hour 58 min ago
Massing 76oz, with a 3.2° field of view and 4mm of exit pupil, these rubber-coated binoculars, plus a sturdy tripod, will bring you close to the night sky, plus animals and sports in daylight. Space.com’s @DavidSkyBrody shows you around.
Categories: Science

PCGamingWiki Looks Into Linux Gaming With 'Port Reports'

Slashdot - 2 hours 6 min ago
AberBeta writes: PCGamingWiki contributor Soeb has been looking into the recent larger budget game releases to appear on Linux, including XCOM: Enemy Unknown and Borderlands: The Pre–Sequel produced by Mac porting houses Feral and Aspyr. Soeb reports that while feature parity is high, performance could be a bit better. Performance differences aside, the games are finally arriving on Linux — now the userbase needs to expand to make a virtuous cycle.

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Categories: Science

How To Beat Online Price Discrimination

Slashdot - 2 hours 49 min ago
New submitter Intrepid imaginaut sends word of a study (PDF) into how e-commerce sites show online shoppers different prices depending on how they found an item and what the sites know about the customer. "For instance, the study found, users logged in to Cheaptickets and Orbitz saw lower hotel prices than shoppers who were not registered with the sites. Home Depot shoppers on mobile devices saw higher prices than users browsing on desktops. Some searchers on Expedia and Hotels.com consistently received higher-priced options, a result of randomized testing by the websites. Shoppers at Sears, Walmart, Priceline, and others received results in a different order than control groups, a tactic known as “steering.” To get a better price, the article advises deleting cookies before shopping, using your browser's private mode, putting the items in your shopping cart without buying them right away, and using tools like Camelcamelcamel to keep an eye out for price drops.

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Categories: Science

Automation Coming To Restaurants, But Not Because of Minimum Wage Hikes

Slashdot - 3 hours 31 min ago
dcblogs writes: McDonald's this week told financial analysts of its plans to install self-ordering kiosks and mobile ordering at its restaurants. This news prompted the Wall Street Journal to editorialize, in " Minimum Wage Backfire," that while it may be true for McDonald's to say that its tech plans will improve customer experience, the move is also "a convenient way...to justify a reduction in the chain's global workforce." Minimum wage increase advocates, the Journal argued, are speeding along an automation backlash. But banks have long relied on ATMs, and grocery stores, including Walmart, have deployed self-service checkouts. In contrast, McDonald's hasn't changed its basic system of taking orders since its founding in the 1950s, said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Technomic, a research group focused on the restaurant industry. While mobile, kiosks and table ordering systems may help reduce labor costs, the automated self-serve technology is seen as an essential. It will take the stress out of ordering (lines) at fast food restaurants, and the wait for checks at more casual restaurants. It also helps with upselling and membership to loyalty programs. People who can order a drink refill off a tablet, instead of waving down waitstaff, may be more inclined to do so. Moreover, analysts say younger customers want self-service options.

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Categories: Science

Automation Coming To Restaurants, But Not Because of Minimum Wage Hikes

Slashdot - 3 hours 31 min ago
dcblogs writes: McDonald's this week told financial analysts of its plans to install self-ordering kiosks and mobile ordering at its restaurants. This news prompted the Wall Street Journal to editorialize, in " Minimum Wage Backfire," that while it may be true for McDonald's to say that its tech plans will improve customer experience, the move is also "a convenient way...to justify a reduction in the chain's global workforce." Minimum wage increase advocates, the Journal argued, are speeding along an automation backlash. But banks have long relied on ATMs, and grocery stores, including Walmart, have deployed self-service checkouts. In contrast, McDonald's hasn't changed its basic system of taking orders since its founding in the 1950s, said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Technomic, a research group focused on the restaurant industry. While mobile, kiosks and table ordering systems may help reduce labor costs, the automated self-serve technology is seen as an essential. It will take the stress out of ordering (lines) at fast food restaurants, and the wait for checks at more casual restaurants. It also helps with upselling and membership to loyalty programs. People who can order a drink refill off a tablet, instead of waving down waitstaff, may be more inclined to do so. Moreover, analysts say younger customers want self-service options.

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Categories: Science

FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips

Slashdot - 4 hours 14 min ago
New submitter weilawei writes: Last night, FTDI, a Scottish manufacturer of USB-to-serial ICs, posted a response to the ongoing debacle over its allegedly intentional bricking of competitors' chips. In their statement, FTDI CEO Fred Dart said, "The recently release driver release has now been removed from Windows Update so that on-the-fly updating cannot occur. The driver is in the process of being updated and will be released next week. This will still uphold our stance against devices that are not genuine, but do so in a non-invasive way that means that there is no risk of end user's hardware being directly affected." This may have resulted from a discussion with Microsoft engineers about the implications of distributing potentially malicious driver software. If you design hardware, what's your stance on this? Will you continue to integrate FTDI chips into your products? What alternatives are available to replace their functionality?

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Categories: Science

FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips

Slashdot - 4 hours 14 min ago
New submitter weilawei writes: Last night, FTDI, a Scottish manufacturer of USB-to-serial ICs, posted a response to the ongoing debacle over its allegedly intentional bricking of competitors' chips. In their statement, FTDI CEO Fred Dart said, "The recently release driver release has now been removed from Windows Update so that on-the-fly updating cannot occur. The driver is in the process of being updated and will be released next week. This will still uphold our stance against devices that are not genuine, but do so in a non-invasive way that means that there is no risk of end user's hardware being directly affected." This may have resulted from a discussion with Microsoft engineers about the implications of distributing potentially malicious driver software. If you design hardware, what's your stance on this? Will you continue to integrate FTDI chips into your products? What alternatives are available to replace their functionality?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - 4 hours 56 min ago
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

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Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - 4 hours 56 min ago
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

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Categories: Science