News Briefs 11-05-2004

No mention of four thousand holes in Blackburn, Lancashire - but here's the news today anyhow (oh boy)...

  • Robert E. Fulton dies aged 95 - considering he was there when King Tut's tomb was opened, motorcycled through 32 countries as he travelled around the world, and invented a flying car, we can assume he lived a full life.
  • Bad blood flows between the Medici family as plans progress to exhume their illustrious ancestors.
  • When trees go bad - scientists find evidence of chemicals leading to toxic ozone production.
  • But you can always rely on those goody-two-shoes cabbages and sprouts, with their chemical which fights cancer.
  • Zookeeper says Ohio 'lion tracks' are probably actually those of a dog.
  • Mathematicians study strange prime number obsession of cicadas.
  • The mystery of the underwater man-made islands of Orkney.
  • Searching for other Earths.
  • Nancy Reagan tells Bush Administration to support stem cell research. Just say yes.
  • Researchers teleport information to multiple recipients.
  • The fairy circles of Africa baffle scientists. Set up a few fairy traps, you're bound to bag one of the little blighters soon enough.
  • Possibly the first photo of an extrasolar planet taken.
  • Drug zaps fat cells...at least in those little obese mice anyhow.
  • Delusional parasitosis. Not the sort of thing you want much to do with.
  • Europe's space shuttle passes early test. Nice to see they've named a spacecraft after my little boy.
  • Remains of famous ancient poet Petrarch are actually from two different people.
  • Record number of entries for popular science book prize.
  • Ghosthunters get shut out of UK historical site.
  • US chemists take molecular robot for a stroll around the petri dish.
  • Russian space agency chief backs plan for manned mission to Mars within a decade.
  • As if the snakes, spiders, jellyfish and crocodiles aren't enough, researchers say Australia once had its fair share of large mammalian carnivores.
  • Historic castle to go to highest bidder. Ghosts thrown in for free.
  • The Milky Way gets another arm.
  • A group of virgins and an evangelist from the US to tour the UK urging teenagers to remain celibate.

Quote of the Day:



Stoop not down into the darkly splendid World; wherein continually lieth a faithless depth, and Hades wrapped in clouds...stay not on the precipice with the dross of Matter, for there is a place for thy Image in a realm ever splendid



Chaldaean Oracles

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Sceptique's picture
Member since:
5 May 2004
Last activity:
8 years 52 weeks

So the American taxpayer is paying for some evangilist and a bevy of virgins to tour Britain. And there was silly old me thinking that there was a seperation of church and state...

Being older and wiser, I look back on my days as a teenager and student. Caught up in all sorts of out-dated religious ideas, I stayed celibate untill I got married. I will not want to give up my wife for any other woman/en, but I feel sad about all the lost opportunities of getting to know other women more intimately when I was young and single.

I'm married now, and that's for keeps. But I just feel so stupid about turning down all those lovely leggy girls when I was still living single on campus...

If you want to stay a virgin, do it like Britney! :)


-------------------------------------
"To die for patriotism is pointless; dead people don't care."

archdake's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
3 years 38 weeks

Ah great, there's been a rise in sexually transmitted deseases among teenagers and the solution is no sex?
Reminds me of the old saying "Head's aching so head gets cut".

P.S: Sceptique, I thought it was mostly women that stayed sex-free until marriage! I'm amazed that you got through! Congrats mate!

Lee's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
4 years 50 weeks

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/natur...

The above article implies that trees can sometimes be bad, but it relies on the widespread assumption that ozone is bad. But isn't this a case of bad science? Ozone and oxygen have been demonized by environmental chemists who do not understand aerobic biology.

I believe that ozone is beneficial to health and does not cause free radical damage, only NO2 does.

If isoprenes and turpenes convert NO2 to ozone, then maybe that's a good thing.

This is important. Bad science in this case might lead to the cutting down of trees.

imclay's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
9 years 37 weeks

I think that any mission to Mars should come after using missions to the Moon to perfect as far as possible the technology that will have to function nearly perfectly on Mars, where a quick rescue would be impossible.
A lunar base at the Moon's south pole would allow astronauts to test and operate equipment to get oxygen and water from ice that is believed to be at the bottom of craters at the south pole. Also, no matter what price we are quoted by the NASA, the Russians,and the ESA,the only way that any long-term mission off this planet will be successful is if it is undertaken by all of the above mentioned agencies. And why is everyone ignoring the Chinese space program? The more involved would benefit all,and spread out the steep costs involved in developing all of the new technology needed for our first steps off of the planet Earth.