Midweek Roundup 07-06-2005

A varied list of readings to get you through the week...

Enjoy!

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ianxristie's picture
Member since:
26 January 2005
Last activity:
5 days 12 hours

where's the proper link??

Greg's picture
Member since:
30 April 2004
Last activity:
6 hours 40 min

Fixed now, thanks for the heads-up.

Peace and Respect
Greg
-------------------------------------------
You monkeys only think you're running things

Kat's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
6 days 6 hours

In fact, the researcher couldn't even force happy rats to become addicts!

toxilogic's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
2 years 39 weeks

Hi Kat,

Well who decided to criminalise drugs in the first place ? Wasn't this government trying too find yet another way to justify their oppressive and costly control agencies. And as a boon more conditioning of the man in the street.
Btw, the easier going attitude of the dutch towards drugs has meant a stable user base, border region excesses stem from the influx of oppressed foreigners.

Its a general misfit of our societies that the government lays down rules , to justify their control. The only justyfiablee role should be to support the individual exorcising his/her right to live free and to punish those that infringe. Besides, there's a role to organise and arrange cost sharing of communal needs.

" do unto others as you would have them do unto you "

bladerunner's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
26 weeks 6 days

Why move mica 2000 miles when you have your own mica? What were the not so ancients doing building the same thing all over the planet? Is it right in front of our noses? Or something so weird we can't even think of it?

A medical maryjane moment. The Declaration of Independence is written on paper made from hemp. Roll me a big toke of freedom baby!

Tronicus's picture
Member since:
24 January 2005
Last activity:
4 years 40 weeks

A great article! I don’t know how true it is, but I do know real deep unhappiness and unrelenting bullshit factors can gradually tear a person down. I have realized for years that one or two basic key factors in my own life has a very detrimental effect on every aspect of my being.
Anyway, if the story of this article is true, then it has profound implications regarding the psychology of well being. Though I have never suffered a chemical dependency, I do have other difficulties. And I realize that people really do need to be at least nominally happy. When there is a serious, long term lack of emotional gratification, people will seek remedies any way they can. Some find chemicals, some gambling, some sex, or who knows what else; maybe ego-power trips. Of course, we are a little higher than rats and we can exercise choice and will. My drug of choice is escape into the world of deep and comprehending thought. Prolonged deep thought, leading to greater insight, actually gives me an endorphin fix. We don’t help people by slamming them. But, on the other hand, one implication of the study is that dependencies are ultimately futile dead end detours. Yet, the ultimate point is that people don’t just need to suck up their will power and kick their habits. The real remedy is that people need to find real genuine wholesome good in their lives. Maybe it is deeper than that. Maybe the real result of this study is that we all need to keep doing our part to make the world a good and kind and pleasant place. In other words, “love thy neighbor”. In doing so, we spread good health, and help rescue people from evil. At the very minimal least - do unto others as you would have done to you.

tronicus

Kat's picture
Member since:
1 May 2004
Last activity:
6 days 6 hours

The article also offers a bit of insight into the crack cocaine epidemic that began it's sweep through low-income urban areas in the '80s, especially in the mostly black-occupied "projects", as publicly subsidized housing is called in the U.S.

Of course, it also makes me wonder about the subjective life of a noted (or is that, notorious?) radio personality in the U.S. who became addicted to prescription pain killers.

It also doesn't negate the research showing that some have a genetic predisposition to addiction. But many alcoholics who have those genes eventually do exactly what the rats did -- willingly endure withdrawal and then abstain from future use. Perhaps the difference between those who do manage to abstain long-term and those who don't is that the former have a more fulfilling life to attend to after they quit.