Cuba Has Withstood the Storm of American Imperialism

CUBA HAS WITHSTOOD THE STORM OF AMERICAN IMPERIALISM

By Fahim A. Knight-EL

The United States for almost five decades has been on the wrong side of history relative to Cuba and the recent political initiatives that President Barack Obama and the United States Government have implemented toward this island nation shouldn’t just be viewed as a gesture of America's good humanity to its neighbor to the south, which sits just ninety (90) miles off the coast of Florida. However, the uplifting of some of the travel restrictions and ability to transfer some U.S. currency to Cuba; still does not resolve the long standing sanctions and embargoes that have served as an economic blockade for almost five decades and are still in tact as I write this article—this is the real issue impeding U.S. and Cuban relations. So lets not completely fool ourselves over President Obama’s so-called olive branch toward Cuba.

But nevertheless, the U.S. Government has come to the realization that, if the United States is to survive as a capitalist empire in the 21st Century, it can no longer afford to continue practicing isolationism toward Cuba and no other nation that possess exploitable markets. President Obama is slowly trying to reverse the backwards foreign policy axiom of his predecessor George Bush who labeled certain nations as part of what he called the "Axis of Evil" and the "Rogue Nations" paradigm. This was the foreign policy mindset that capitulated the Bush theory—either you were with us or against us, which resembled the old Cold War political era and President Obama is working to create more of a diplomatic atmosphere of international tolerance. (Reference: Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Damien Cave; On-line article titled, "Obama Opens Door to Cuba, but Only a Crack;" New York Times; April 14, 2009: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/15/world/...)/

The United States is a declining nation and it is economically bankrupt and the Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Shalom Bernanke and U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner (look at who is running the money system of our nation, do I need to say anymore) understand that capitalism will not survive, if it can not continue to expand and produce. Cuba can no longer be viewed as being politically and economically expendable because as the United States dollar continues to weaken and decline and our international debt continues to mount with Europe, China, and other Eastern bloc nations. It is requiring that the U.S. become more economically and politically innovative. (Reference: William Greider; “Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country”).

The U.S. has no other choice but to economically engage and work to create new markets that must prove to be economically sustainable in order for our nation to survive beyond 2009 and into the near future. For example, the United States automobile industry is suffering and the Cubans have been forced since the early 1960s to import European and Asian automobiles due to the trade embargoes. Thus, when you travel to Havana and you will see all these antique and classic automobiles of the 1950s and early 1960s models being driven by the Cuban citizens. This is not necessarily an indication that the Cuban people love old vintage classic U.S. made automobiles, but it is a visual indication of the political effects of a Cold War where Cuba was not allowed to import/export United States goods and services for almost fifty years due to the United States imposed economic sanctions and embargoes.

This could have been a viable automobile market (as well as a potential market for other tradable goods and services) for the United States for the last fifty (50) years—United States based General Motors, Chrysler, Ford, etc. Perhaps this small market could have allowed the U.S. to export thousands of U.S. automobiles to our Latin American neighbor and know telling what the auto industry residual effect this would have had on the spin off market of the automobile industry (automobile parts and technology).

The Cuban Government and the Cuban people have been resilient and great improvisers, simultaneously in order to have withstood United States aggression and the gamut of propaganda spewed by the western media against Cuba. President Barack Obama and the United States Government have made more of a business decision than a political decision to slowly bring Cuba back into the full diplomatic community. This is not to suggest that many of the United States staunch European and Asian allies did not ignore the imposed U.S. Embargoes and continued to trade and do international business with Cuba for over forty years, in spite of the political antagonistic relationship between the U.S. and Cuba.

Western European Governments recognized a long time ago that Cuba had economic markets and based on its long diplomatic relations with the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR)possessed tradable commodities, pesos and other viable currencies which to purchase goods and services (the Europeans have always kept the Cuban Tourism industry afloat during these lean embargo years). Most of the United States, European Allies in private viewed the U.S. sanctions and embargoes against Cuba as reactionary, senseless and nonproductive. The United States Government in reality had no legitimate gripe with Cuba, other than they chose to live as a Socialist Government because in all reality, Cuba hadn't committed any crimes against the United States. What are they guilty of other than their right to exercise self-determination?

Many Americans even in 2009 do not have a clue what socialism is and/or is not. The ignorant will say that the Cubans had aligned themselves with the Communist USSR for close to forty years (yet at the same time the United States was trading with the "good communist" and still yet, what crime did Cuba commit?) and perhaps would arrogantly state “we could not have this type of military threat in our backdoor”; in particular the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis incident, which was perceived by the United States as a compromise of international law and a threat to U.S. national security and stability. The United States has controlled foreign nations intervention into the Caribbean Sea and region based on the signing of the 1823 Monroe Doctrine which prohibits foreign powers and authorities of having any military jurisdiction in this vital and strategic region. (Reference: Don Munton and David A. Welch;”The Cuban Missile Crisis: A Concise History").

The Soviet Union so-called collapsed in 1989, which brought an abrupt end to Russian style communism and Cold War politics which had divided the world into two camps Warsaw Pact Nations and NATO for close to fifty years. But President Fidel Castro and the Cuban people had internalized true socialist principles and did not budge, although its biggest political and economic supporter the Soviet Union stood up before the world announcing its betrayal of Socialism. (Reference: Stephen A. Resnick; "Class Theory and History: Capitalism and Communism in the USSR").

Castro and the Cuban people did not embrace the socialist ideology because they were following the former USSR; they weighed the scientific principles based on Cuban history, world history, other modes of economic systems and they saw the human contradictions in capitalism based on it being a vicious system of exploitation that gave way to classism and this served as an antagonistic contradiction in human development. Castro and Cuba in 1989 came to understand that the USSR was always a capitalist nation who had disguised its reactionary political and economic ideological principles in Socialist theories and at the same time betraying many of its Warsaw Pact Nations allies in pursuit of capitalist interest. Many pundits and political scientist expected Cuba too politically and economically collapse after the former Soviet Union deceptions was exposed, which proved they were enemies of Socialism. (Reference: Ernesto Guevara; "Che Guevara, Cuba, and the Road to Socialism").

Castro taught the people to embrace the revolution and to inculcate the principles in their lives (the revolution was not based on any perfect socialist model nor was it rooted in charismatic style leadership) and this is why twenty years later Cuba has been able to withstand a powerful Capitalist country like the United States and even overcome Russia's deception. However, after Cuba's abandonment by the former Soviet Union in 1989 they were left with many strategic challenges—politically, economically and socially, but their courage, determination and optimism have proven greater than the betrayal of their chief political and economic ally. This writer has been saying this for over thirty years that the Cuban people had the right to self-determination and that included the right to choose socialism or communism as their form of government. Why has this right kept the United States from having constructive and normalize relations with the Cuban Government for so long? Reference: Ariana Hernandez-Reguant; "Cuba in the Special Period: Culture and Ideology in the 1990s (New Concepts in Latino American Cultures)’ “.

The United States government has imposed unjustified sanctions and embargoes against Cuba since the early 1960s and former President Fidel Castro has been the target of many Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) covert plots and assassination attempts because he refused to bow to American imperialism. His legacy has to be considered as one of defiance and longevity and his tenure has outlasted at least eight United States Presidents. President Castro should have received a Nobel Peace Prize for his revolutionary work and Cuba’s ability to politically, economically, and socially sustain itself against one the world’s foremost superpowers—the United States.

This writer has always respected President Fidel Castro and Cuba for opening up its country to so many revolutionaries and political prisoners and most all their commitment in supporting revolutionary struggles around the world. Cuba stood with the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) under the leadership of the late Yasser Arafat; Cuba stood with the Irish Republican Army (IRA); Cuba stood with the freedom fighters of the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) in Namibia, Africa who had been fighting for centuries for their freedom and independence from the vicious racist regime of the South African Government; Cuba stood with Steven Biko and Nelson Mandela and African National Congress (ANC) and their fight against the white Afrikaner Government and Apartheid regime of South Africa (Azania) who had been vicious and oppressive since the Dutch arrive 1652.

Cuba stood in the early 1980s with the tiny Caribbean nation of Grenada and its Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and the New Jewel Movement who was later betrayed by one of his top lieutenants Bernard Coard; Cuba stood with Colonel Muammar Qaddafi and the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya and their quest for a United States of Africa ; Cuba stood in the 1980s with Nicaraguan Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) and its controversial leader Daniel Ortega; Cuba in the 1970s stood with Angola, Africa and their struggle for independence from the Portuguese; Cuba and President Fidel Castro in the early 1960s visited Harlem, New York and stood in solidarity with the Nation of Islam and Minister Malcolm X. (Reference: Fidel Castro; "Fidel Castro Speeches 1984-85; three volumes).

Perhaps one of the most controversial positions Cuba has taken was granting political asylum to a United States prisoner of war named Assata Shakur formally known as Joanne Chesimard of the Black Liberation Army (BLA). She was accused and convicted of killing a New Jersey State Trooper on the New Jersey Turnpike in the early 1970s and was sentenced to life in prison without parole within the U.S. Federal Prison system. But after serving five years in FCI Morgantown, West Virginia; Shakur escaped to Cuba where she received political asylum from the Cuban Government. Shakur is still considered a fugitive of justice on the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Most Wanted List and on the U.S. Marshal's Most Wanted List (there is now a million dollar bounty over her head) and I am quite sure she has been upgraded to the Homeland Security top criminals priority listing. (Reference: Assata Shakur; "Assata: An Autobiography").

Shakur has now lived in Cuba for over three decades in which many rightwing U.S. politicians over the years have tried to issue extradition warrants (of course these actions were non-binding) and in an attempt to pressure Cuba to releasing her into United States custody. But Cuba has refused to capitulate to U.S. pressure and this also has been a thorn in the side of U.S. and Cuba relations. Cuba and the U.S. do not have an agreed extradition treaty. Many believe to this day that Assata Shakur was innocent of all charges and was a mere victim of the former FBI director J. Edgar Hoover and his counter intelligence program called Cointelpro which was aimed at radical militant and not so radical black leadership during the 1960s and 1970s. (Reference: Assata Shakur; "Assata: An Autobiography").

Hoover used a gamut of dirty tricks to destabilize, neutralize, assassinate, incarcerate, imposed illegal wiretapping, spied, sent paid informants to disrupt progressive black organizations, placed agent provocateurs in strategic leadership positions within some of the most militant black organizations in America, etc., which to closely monitor the leadership and the organizations. Shakur has maintained her innocence and she outlined her legal case and personal history in her autobiography titled, "Assata" and chronicled her side of the story relative to the events that led to a N.J. State Trooper being murdered on the New Jersey Turnpike in 1973. (Reference: Elaine Brown; "A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story").

The United States Judicial system has not always provided its political prisoners with a fair and impartial legal process—this was seen in cases of Black Panther Party members such as George Jackson, Geronimo Pratt, Mumia Abu Jamal, Huey P. Newton, Imam Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin etc., so from that perspective Assata Shakur presents a credible argument relative to how she was treated within the U.S. judicial system, as well as within the penal institutions of America. This writer believes that she could never receive a fair trial within the United States based on racism and the case being a high profile case of killing a white police officer. Now! If President Barack Obama wants to do something honorable and noble, why do not he commute Assata Shakur's criminal sentence and issue her a presidential pardon? What would be the difference in lieu of President Bill Clinton issuing a presidential pardon to a criminal like Marc Rich? (Reference: Dhoruba Bin Wahad, Assata Shakur, and Mumia Abu-Jamal; "Still Black, Still Strong").

This writer believes that the Cuban Government was right in granting Shakur political asylum and they too believe that she was a United States political prisoner and met the international legal criteria to be considered as a political prisoner. This new so-called goodwill political approach that President Obama is offering in U.S. and Cuban relations, it essentially has to be viewed as a good step and will prove to be a positive refreshing new era in the area of U.S./Cuba international diplomacy. In spite of it being a politically opportunistic maneuver on behalf of the United States (Cuba needs the United States and United States needs Cuba).

The political awkwardness between the two nations could be partially blamed on the petite bourgeoisie Cubans who left Cuba in 1959 as a class of self-imposed exiles after Fulgencio Batista y Zaldívar was deposed and setup a defacto exile Cuban Government in Miami, Florida—acculturated and assimilated somewhat into American life—this wealthy and well educated class of Cubans who once lived privilege lives in Havana worked to create strong and effective Cuban-American political lobby groups inside the boarders of the U.S. and for fifty (50) years have garnished their influence to shape public policy and direct U.S. Foreign relations relative to Cuba. (Reference: Martha Harnecker; "Fidel Castro's Political Strategy").

Thus, U.S. politicians often took their lead from the Miami based Cuban-American community who had become very thrifty business people; in particular in the areas of finance and banking. Cuban-Americans were politically savvy enough to leverage their economic prosperity, which to make large financial contributions to the Republican Party and the Democratic Party (they had learned and master the political game). So American policy makers did not make any decisions on Cuba without being in direct consultation with the Cuban-Americans on all matters concerning their homeland and carried out the political aspirations of these well financed and organized Cuban-American political action groups. (Reference: Patrick Haney and Walt Vanderbush; "Cuban Embargo: Domestic Politics of American Foreign Policy").

The Cuban-American position toward President Fidel Castro often made the case for reactionary and racist U.S. politicians such as the former Republican Senator of North Carolina Jesse Helms (a tobacco chewing redneck that constantly spewed rightwing propaganda against President Castro and the nation of Cuba) this made room for strange bedfellows because the United States reactionary foreign policy toward Cuba was being driven by the Miami Cuban-Americans and United States Politicians had their biggest ally, which to justify demonizing Castro and isolating Cuba. (Reference: Jeffrey Elliot; "Nothing Can Stop the Course of History").

The Cuban-Americans have been relentless in their uncompromising and unwillingness to pursue a calmer and gentler political strategy with Castro for the greater good of both sides. This writer believes after almost fifty (50) years they have finally come to their senses and to the realization that it benefits both sides by working to ease the political tension and suspicion. Thus, by the U.S. uplifting of some of the travel restrictions, if nothing else allows Cuban-American family members to visit their relatives in Cuba which has to be considered a positive step in the right direction. This common sense approach will benefit the spirit and booster the psychological morale of both nations.

This writer must say the Cuban-Americans for many years sold—shaped and molded the American polity that the Cubans who left Cuba on poorly built rafts and fishing boats were so-called escaping political persecution (the minute they illegally left Cuba and entered international waters they were deemed political prisoners) at the hands of a repressive Cuban dictator and this made them entitled to U.S. political asylum, as well as other diplomatic status.

Yet, also many have argued for years that the Haitians were escaping political tyranny from Port-au-Prince, but they were met with hostility and political opposition from the United States Government and were denied the diplomatic status of political asylum which was often granted unconditionally to the so-called fleeing Cuban refugees. There were no goodwill ambassador and open arms policy shown to the Haitian refugees. Many of the Haitian refugees were criminalized and placed in federal detention camps and were eventually deported back to Haiti. (Reference: Randall Robinson; "Quitting America: Departure of a Black Man From His Native Land").

Perhaps this was an example of the influence and the political power that the Cuban-Americans had in swaying the U.S. Judicial system and manipulating U.S. extradition laws and deportation policies to their benefit. This immediately put the Cuban refugees on track to become United States citizens and the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) granted them rights and privilege and resources. But others argued that the Haitians were black and African in which at the root of the Haitian refugee issue was American style racism and this was the driving force behind this political double standard. No doubt the Haitian community in the United States did not have the political clout and the financial wither all, which to influence United States foreign policy like their Caribbean counterparts the Cubans. (Reference: Carol Bohmer and Amy Shuman; "Rejecting Refugees: Political Asylum in the 21st Century").

Haiti is considered the poorest nation in the western hemisphere and essentially is a powerless people in comparison to the Cuban-Americans. This writer believes that the Europeans are still punishing Haiti for the historical events of 1803 where Haiti became the first independent black nation in the western hemisphere due to Toussaint L'Overture defeating the powerful French military that was led by Napoleon Bonaparte. These events have haunted the island nation of Haiti for over two hundred years. (Reference: Paul Farmer; "The Use of Haiti").

However, in 1999 a little Cuban boy refugee named Elian Gonzalez was rescued off the coast of Florida by some deep sea fishermen and Elian Gonzales relatives in Miami declared the boy was a political refugee escaping the tyranny of a Castro led government. The Cuban-American lobbies had immediately turned this incident into a political football; hoping to further exposed President Fidel Castro as a ruthless and repressive dictator and this innocent little boy and others (Elian mother was one of the fleeing Cubans to lose her life in this allege escape attempt) would risk their lives to escape to freedom by any means necessary. They thought they had the right political ammunition by using Elian Gonzalez as the poster child to contest international human brutality coming out of Cuba. However, this strategy and tactic would later backfire in their faces. (Reference: Michael John; "Betrayal of Elian Gonzalez").

Elian Gonzalez's father traveled to the United States and legally declared parental rights to his son and petitioned the United States Courts and lawmakers to declare him the right to take his minor child back to Cuba where he was a citizen. The State Department eventually sided with Mr. Gonzalez—he was granted the legal right to take his son from U.S. soil back to Cuba. This legal decision devastated the powerful Cuban-American lobby in Miami and even after the legal decision was rendered the American Gonzalez family and Cuban-Americans refused to relinquish the little boy back to his father. But the United States Attorney General Janet Reno and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Marshals, INS, ATF, etc., with power and force and in no uncertain terms demonstrated to the Cuban-Americans that they were not above reproach and the law. The United States Government could not allow any arm group inside the U.S. to dictate their own law and to publically defy a U.S. Court order to relinquish Elian Gonzalez. If they hadn't respond the way that they did, perhaps this would have sent the wrong message to other political renegades. (Reference: Michael John; "Betrayal of Elian Gonzalez").

The Cuban-Americans felt betrayed by Reno and the Clinton administration and perhaps in the 2000 U.S. presidential election, it would be Florida after much political confusion and debate that would decide the United States presidency for the Republican candidate George W. Bush. This writer used to work in the field of international commodity trading and import/export and were in talks with Cuban officials over ten years ago relative to the U.S. and Cuba import/export markets; I believe under the Clinton administration and later under President George W. Bush, Black farmers in the United States had convinced the U.S. State Department in allowing them to export some of their agriculture products to Cuba and not be penalized or effected by the sanctions and embargoes laws and policies.

Kwesi Mfume, the former president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) led a U.S. Delegation of mainly African Americans to Cuba to explore this new economic open door policy created by the Clinton and Bush administrations. Cuba was prepared to engage the African American farmers in an import agriculture agreement, but Mfume and the other Black intelligentsia were out of their league and none of them had any real expertise in import/export business procedures and we witness a golden opportunity end in blunder. (Reference: Zamgba J. Browne; "U.S. Black farmers to supply Cuba" on-line http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1-79492632... New York Amsterdam News; November 27, 2002).

This was ashamed and yet the group this writer was associated with had the expertise and knowledge to consummate the deal, but due to politics and the crabs in the barrel mentality; these high level talks seven years ago never amounted to anything. U.S. Black Farmers have been discriminated against and many of the their farms are being foreclosed on—they are the last to receive governmental subsidies, as far as low interest loans and grants and they do not receive the assistance from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). (Reference: John Boyd Link National Black Farmers Association http://www.blackfarmers.org/ (click icon that says media).

Some of the Black Farmers activists have filed federal law suits against the U.S. Government. These small farmers have legitimate legal grips and yet there is a double standard where the large commercial farms are constantly receiving bailout money and USDA incentives, but the small U.S. black farmers are in a fight for their economic survival. This is why this writer views Mfume and the Black leadership with contempt and disgust because they are part cause of the predicament black farmers are in 2009.

Many have yearned for this day when United States citizens could freely travel and engage Cuba in its rich social and cultural history. However, many Americans have been traveling to Cuba in spite of the U.S. Embargoes by way of Mexico and Canada and the Mexican/Cuban Customs Officials understood the political complexity of U.S. and Cuban relations; they often took the liberty not to officially stamp U.S. Passports and not documenting U.S. citizens travel to Cuba based on the prior travel restrictions and economic sanctions and embargoes imposed on Cuba. This non-passport action also protected United States citizens from being legally prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney's office; (Reference: Helen Osieja; "Economic Sanctions As an Instrument of U.S. Foreign Policy: The Case of the U.S. Embargo Against Cuba").

But others found loopholes in the policy and laws outlined by the United States Treasury Department relative to U.S. citizens traveling to Havana. They often brought back firsthand accounts relative to the political, economic, and social condition of the people on this Caribbean Island nation. But this only furthered my curiosity and it was difficult for me to reason that because these people were Socialist, it led the United States toward a policy of isolationism for almost fifty years toward Cuba. Our foreign policy toward Cuba even to date just does not make any sense.

The United States once served as a colonial master of Cuba and Cuba was once a lucrative slave port where African slaves (Cuba in the 1920s was ninety percent black) were brought into work the massive sugar plantations from the 15th Century to 19th Century known as the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The Spanish and the British exploited Cuba—raping and robbing the land and the indigenous people of their wealth and resources for European economic gain. (Reference: Eric Williams; Capitalism and Slavery").

This was a great criminal act and it created a system of economic, political and social inequality and classism that has haunted this nation until 1959 when Fidel Castro overthrew the repressive regime of Fulgencio Batista y Zaldívar. Batista had turned Cuba into a den of inequity—gambling casinos, prostitution houses, drugs, organized crime, etc., it was the play island for wealthy Europeans who looked to bathe in the Caribbean sun and all rules were negotiable. This writer has always agreed with Comrade Fidel Castro and the political positions he took against the United States. He nationalized the Cuban sugar industry which gave the Cuban people more economic control over this and other cash crops commodities. Bloodsucking capitalist companies such as ConAgra, Archer Daniel Midland, Cargill. etc., have also played a huge part in United States and Cuban relations because Cuba would not allow them to exploit its people and resources.

The citizens of the United States should demand that President Barack Obama and the United States Congress rescind and overturn all the embargoes and economic sanctions against Cuba and work to reverse this devastating foreign policy that has created so much political tension for the last fifty years. Perhaps President Obama will seize the moment and not be swayed by the politics of yesteryear and work to completely change U.S. relations toward Cuba for the better. We know the blockades and embargoes have been ineffective and this writer believes that the people on both sides will welcome normalize relations between the two sovereign governments. The time is now.

Fahim A. Knight-EL Chief Researcher for KEEPING IT REAL THINK TANK located in Durham, NC; our mission is to inform African Americans and all people of goodwill, of the pending dangers that lie ahead; as well as decode the symbolisms and reinterpreted the hidden meanings behind those who operate as invisible forces, but covertly rules the world. We are of the belief that an enlightened world will be better prepared to throw off the shackles of ignorance and not be willing participants for the slaughter. Our MOTTO is speaking truth to power. Fahim A. Knight-EL can be reached at fahimknight@yahoo.com.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

Comments

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
red pill junkie's picture
Member since:
12 April 2007
Last activity:
7 hours 58 min
Quote:

The United States government has imposed unjustified sanctions and embargoes against Cuba since the early 1960s and former President Fidel Castro has been the target of many Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) covert plots and assassination attempts because he refused to bow to American imperialism. His legacy has to be considered as one of defiance and longevity and his tenure has outlasted at least eight United States Presidents. President Castro should have received a Nobel Peace Prize for his revolutionary work and Cuba’s ability to politically, economically, and socially sustain itself against one the world’s foremost superpowers—the United States.

A Nobel Peace prize for a man who incarcerates opposition leaders and has many political prisoners behind bars?

Fahim, you make Castro look like he was a gentle emperor of Cuba. He is not. He controlled the island with an iron grip; perhaps it was his fate due to the circumstances of the times he lived. But the fact remains: the Cuban system is an authoritarian regime. Since Castro came to power there have never been free elections in Cuba.

Does that mean I approve the stupid embargo? Of course not. In fact, the biggest ally Castro has to remain in power for so many decades was precisely the embargo. The imperialist gringos were Castro's BFF; had the American Politicians been smarter and looked outside ideologies, they would have permitted full economic trade with the island many years ago. And Castro would have lost his authority before I was born.

Quote:

Yet, also many have argued for years that the Haitians were escaping political tyranny from Port-au-Prince, but they were met with hostility and political opposition from the United States Government and were denied the diplomatic status of political asylum which was often granted unconditionally to the so-called fleeing Cuban refugees. There were no goodwill ambassador and open arms policy shown to the Haitian refugees. Many of the Haitian refugees were criminalized and placed in federal detention camps and were eventually deported back to Haiti. (Reference: Randall Robinson; "Quitting America: Departure of a Black Man From His Native Land").

I agree with you completely that the second standard given to escaping Cubans is completely unfair.

Quote:

He nationalized the Cuban sugar industry which gave the Cuban people more economic control over this and other cash crops commodities. Bloodsucking capitalist companies such as ConAgra, Archer Daniel Midland, Cargill. etc., have also played a huge part in United States and Cuban relations because Cuba would not allow them to exploit its people and resources.

He nationalized the sugar all right. But he ended up selling the sugar and the meat to the Russians in exchange for oil; so the Cubans remained exactly the same —economically— as they were with Batista.

But let's be fair: Castro gave them schools and hospitals. I grant them that. I only wish the schools weren't used as conditioning centers for the little kids, that are raised to believe the Che Guevara was the re-incarnation of Christ —he was a great man, but he was also pretty stupid in any things; as an Economic secretary he was an idiot, that's why Castro was so glad to see him leave to propagate the Revolution to the Congo and Colombia; had he stayed, it would have become a serious problem for Fidel.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

Thank you Red Pill for your comments, but I view the term authoritative as being relative because I see the United States Government as being authoritative (just disagree with their politics and you will see how authoritative they will become ). They have a Nazi style agency called Homeland Security.

For example, many anti-war advocates and social activist of the 1960s and the 1970s became victims of some of the United States Government reactionary legal and prosecution arm. Many of them committed no crimes other than disagreeing with U.S. Foreign and domestic policies.

Thus, even after 9/11 many Muslims and believers in Islam have been unjustly prosecuted and incarcerated just because the United States disagrees with their religious politics, but many of them are mere victims and are not “terrorist.” For example, the U.S. Government has denied many of them the right to come under international law and the Geneva Convention (rules and laws that governs prisoners of war), or having the legal benefit of the United States Constitution, in particular the legal and jurisprudence language given in the 14th Amendment—due process.

Thus, many have been denied even being formally charged, denied access to bail, denied legal representation, tortured, etc. My friend Red Pill these are examples of an authoritative governmental tactics. But in the United States we do not call it Communism, we call it Democracy.

Many activist still languish in prisons of America—they are guilty of nothing other than disagreeing with the United States Government. The United States Patriot Act is another example of authoritative policy and there are all kinds of restrictive goodies aimed at controlling the U.S. citizens with an iron claw.

I could cite many more examples of the same thing you accused President Fidel Castro and the Cuban Government (you see authoritative is in the eyes of the beholder).

I think many have read the U.S. propaganda and formulated unjust opinions of President Castro and the Cuban Government. Do not believe the HYPE.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

red pill junkie's picture
Member since:
12 April 2007
Last activity:
7 hours 58 min

Fahim, i agree with you that the United States also uses authoritative practices and repression. Guantanamo and the CIA memos are just the tip of a very massive iceberg.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

Sure, Cuba does not have the luxury of making money by trading with the US.

However, Cuba trades with the whole rest of the world. I can get Cuban products in Canada, and I can travel there whenever I want.

But the Cuban government does not know how to run their economy, consequently the people there live in poverty.

Or do they know how to run their economy? It is easier to control poor people. I believe that is the most likely explanation.

You see Fahim, when people have some money, the travel, they get independent ideas and such troubling things. Then they question the government. The Castro family won't have that.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

The Cuban people and its government have been resilient, since they overthrew the reactionary government of Batista in 1959. The United States imposed harsh and unjust economic embargoes and sanctions against the Cuban Government because they chose to exercise sovereignty by aligning themselves with the former Soviet Union. This course was an act of Cuba’s right to self-determination.

This is what makes your point not valid. Cuba has some of the most well educated people anywhere to be found within a developing nation. Cuba’s university trains some of finest medical doctors and medical professionals in the world and they attract students from around the world who comes to Havana to study medicine. Cuba was training doctors in Grenada before the United States instigated the overthrowing and murder of its former Prime Minister Maurice Bishop in 1983.

Cuba sent medical doctors to Angola and Namibia, Africa to assist the sick and ill during their revolutionary struggles and after. Cuba has managed a developing nation economy by not allowing the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) to stifle and control its economic, political and social development.

Yet, at the same time the Cuban economy has survived over fifty years with no engagement from the United States Government; perhaps one of the most powerful governments in the history of humanity. This fact alone speaks volumes of the economic resilient of the Cuban Government and its people.

Also, after the collapse of the Cold War politics and USSR betrayal of Socialism many thought that would indicate the doom of Cuba and twenty years later Cuba made the economic adjustment and transition to even survive after its chief political and economic ally betrayed them.

However, the United States is crumbling economically and we have had all sought of U.S. Governmental bailouts and we have over an 11 trillion dollar deficit; millions are unemployed, U.S. based industry are closing their doors, the U.S. Dollar has become devalued; suicide rate is up, etc.

Someone has our government in a chokehold. You better start listening to the "conspiracy theorists" because they can see the handwriting on the wall. Perhaps the United States should take its lessons from Cuba and learn something about being economic resilient.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

From what I have heard from people who have actually visited Cuba, they are stuck in the 1950s. Yes they provide good medical care, and they know how to deal with hurricanes.

But the government, which is the Castro family, has no interest other than staying in control.

This is not socialism, it is the local Mafia. Plain and simple.

And again, Maurice Bishop was not murdered by agents of the US. He was murdered by agents of Cuba. Stop repeating those lies Fahim.

My parents knew Maurice personally. He was a good man.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

red pill junkie's picture
Member since:
12 April 2007
Last activity:
7 hours 58 min

Cuba has very good doctors, who compensate for the lack of medicines and medical equipment. They have one of the highest ratings of literacy in the world —it even puts the United States to shame. The Cubans are indeed a great people; despite their government, that is.

Because Earthling is right, the Castros behave like the Mafia. They think ideology can compensate for good government planning, and they've always been wrong. Fidel Castro once tried to create a breeding program for a milk cow that would yield I don't know how many liters of milk a day (a super cow); it was a complete failure, but obviously he would never accept his mistake.

The Cuban government repress their people and they censor the Internet. If you want to know what the Cuban younger generation thinks, you should read Yoani Sánchez's blog Generation Y.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

I had the opportunity to study under a profound intellectual and academician named Dr. Jeffrey Elliot who has perhaps authored over 250 books and has written hundreds of scholarly articles.

Dr. Elliot is a political scientist and has interviewed many world leaders and Statesmen, but in 1985 he had the opportunity to travel to Cuba and interview President Fidel Castro, which is one of the most profound books I have ever read titled, "Nothing Can Stop the Course of History".

Dr. Elliot is a Caucasian Jew and perhaps one of the most brilliant intellectual that I have ever sat under. But even he had to admit in his book, the brilliance of Fidel Castro and I consider his research as being very objective.

Western propaganda has always tried to paint President Castro and the Cuban Government as the boogie man and most of our perceptions of Cuba have been shaped by the U.S. media who has had a political axe to grind since 1960. How can we trust them?

Also, former United States Congressman Mervyn Dymnally (D-Cal) co-authored the book and he too was impressed by Cuba’s resilient political disposition.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day
earthling wrote:

From what I have heard from people who have actually visited Cuba, they are stuck in the 1950s. Yes they provide good medical care, and they know how to deal with hurricanes.

But the government, which is the Castro family, has no interest other than staying in control.

This is not socialism, it is the local Mafia. Plain and simple.

And again, Maurice Bishop was not murdered by agents of the US. He was murdered by agents of Cuba. Stop repeating those lies Fahim.

My parents knew Maurice personally. He was a good man.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

No Cuba is not stuck in the 1950s; yes granted the U.S. economic embargoes and sanctions have had a tremendous impact on the political, economic and social reality of this nation, but Cuba has had access to the western European, eastern European and the Pacific realm markets for decades in spite of U.S. sanctions and has been privy to some of the same goods and services that you have in Canada and that I have in the United States.

Michael Moore's documentary movie titled, "Sicko" gave us a brief glimpse into Cuba and its humane health care system (kudos to the revolution). The Nation of Islam and Minister Farrakhan have taken many delegations to Cuba and brought back firsthand accounts of the Cuban predicament and all the testimony spoke to them being survivors (I personally find Minister Farrakhan’s testimony as being credible).

Many African Americans have had long standing relationships with the large Afro-Cuban community in Cuba and they too have brought back firsthand accounts of Cuban life, i.e., some good and some bad, but more good than bad. Cuba has always reached out to black activist and those who have fought for African/African-American liberation.

Yes, Prime Minister Bishop was targeted by the C.I.A. because of the potential of Socialism spreading throughout the Caribbean region and the C.I.A. used an agent provocateur named Bernard Coard against Bishop.

The United States Government is ran and controlled by a Cabal (the real international Mafia) and this Cabal has a powerful family lineage—the Rockefellers, DeBeers, Rothschilds, Oppenhemiers, etc., Castro family do not compare to the type of control and dictatorial politics that these vipers have played on all of humanity.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

Once again you (Fahim) are quoting sources, while I use personal accounts. Some of your sources are credible. Michael Moore is not, he is one of the least honest people on the planet.

I personally know people who have been to Cuba in the last few years. I personally have been to Grenada, a place which is dear to my heart. I personally know Cuban people.

No Fahim, things are not good in Cuba, and it is not because of the US embargo. It is because of idiotic mismanagement by the Cuban government.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

red pill junkie's picture
Member since:
12 April 2007
Last activity:
7 hours 58 min

That professor who wrote that book might be a very respected scholar; but you should have also the accounts of people who live in Cuba for balance. Hasn't it occurred to you that Fidel showed the good professor only what he wanted to show? In that light, the professor's book is as reliable as the news reports during the First Gulf War, when the US heavily censored what the networks could show.

The thing is, the minute the embargo is lifted, it's not going to be this magic wand that immediately improves the lives of Cubans. On the contrary, I think it's going to be a very rough time for them to adjust.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

Now! If I accepted your logic and reasoning relative to Cuba's economic situation then that does not say very much about the United States Government and the idiots (President and Congress) who have economically mortgaged off the future of five U.S. generations.

We so-called have one of the best higher learning educational systems in the world, yet we can not solve the economic crisis of our own first world government. Thus, your argument is invalid and I do not think using words to insult the Cuban leadership renders much credibility to your argument.

Cuba has had less to work with based on the economic embargo and have created more of an economic stability than the United States, which is one of the most resourceful governments in the world and we can not balance our national and international deficit.

Yet, poor people who represent the masses of the people in the U.S. are suffering and our democracy is an illusion and the sad thing about this reality, is we do not even know that we are suffering.

How can you logically and with reason dismiss the U.S. imposed embargo and economic sanctions as not being one of the foremost economic impediments to Cuba's success?

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

My last comment is an answer to Earthling's comments.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

Well, logially and with reason, I say this:

Every planned economy system has ruined the country, wherever it was. Cuba does the same. You can't ignore the fact that there is a market.

People in the western democracies are not suffering. There is a serious recession now, but people live well, relative to most Asians and Africans.

I don't think the US embargo actually hurts Cuba right now. It may have had effect in the 1960s, when the Cuban economy was still used to trading with the US. But that was more than 40 years ago, they should have adjusted by now. After all, nobody else is embargoing Cuba.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

red pill junkie's picture
Member since:
12 April 2007
Last activity:
7 hours 58 min

To say that the embargo does not affect Cuba right now might be going too far. I think the embargo does have a tangible effect with many ramifications, probably most noticeable in the social and political discourse of the island.

Other non-American companies can trade with Cuba, but then that puts you in the black list of the US Foreign Relations Secretary. If you visit Cuba and then want to apply for an American Visa, you're bound to be asked about what was the purpose of your travel; it's something that could at least slow the approval of your Visa, to be sure.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

I'm not so sure about those negative side-effects.

Many Canadians visit Cuba. The Canadian government does business with Cuba - I see Cuban rum in the local liquor stores (owned by the provincial government), and it seems to sell at a good rate. The same organization does plenty of business with the US. Lots of airlines fly to Cuba, no blacklisting there either.

Having said all that, I don't think the embargo does any good, except perhaps for the Florida sugar industry, or for Puerto Rican sugar and rum. That's why it is still in place.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

There is no way to overlook the embargo and the past and present effect it has had on the political, economic and social stability of the Cuban nation.

The U.S. is a powerful nation and so much evolves around who we lend credibility to and who we shun.

The United States and Cuba sits 90 miles apart from each other and we have one of the largest Gross National Products (GNP) indexes in the world and there is little doubt in my mind that Cuba has been economically hurt in this fifty (50) year of political and economic non-engagement policy with the United States.

The United Nations and the United States do not impose embargoes against a nation just to flex their muscles.

But sanctions and embargoes are imposed to economically punish and hurt a nation, in particular those nations that are deemed a detriment to the stability and general welfare of the international community (the embargo and sanctions against Cuba was imposed as a foreign policy tool to hurt President Fidel Castro and the Cuban Government).

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

My friend, I see your point and I agree it makes perfect sense. So the last comment I made applies to your remarks.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

It looks like our respective opinions have been made clear, so there is not all that much to add.

I don't support the embargo, and I have nothing against Cubans. I do have something against the Castro brothers.

Earlier tonight, I bought a bottle of Havana Club Anejo Reserva. It is a quality product, if you like spirits. Better than a lot of French brandy, and it goes well with all kinds of mixed drinks.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

red pill junkie's picture
Member since:
12 April 2007
Last activity:
7 hours 58 min

I'm curious, can you buy Cohiba cigars in Canada? And how much are they costing right now —the Churchill size, for example?

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

Cigars, I would not know about that. I don't smoke anything :)
Really.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

Enjoy! We can not get Cuban made products in the United States at least not legally, but the black market is always flourishing. I grew up around the black market and ordinarily there was not anything that you could not acquire if you had the right amount money. You are drinking that good Cuban spirits up in Canada and this damn embargo and sanctions are ruining my ability to share in a good drink (lol). Please enjoy my friend.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

This has nothing to do with this discussion, but I am 1/16th Cuban. Never met that great-grandmother, and by looking at me, you would not guess this. Except that my eyes are blue, my hair is blond and straight, and by beard is black and curly. Go figure.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

At least you have a way of knowing your gene pool, but Africans who were robbed and kidnapped from Africa, they arrived to Cuba in the hulls of slave ships, and thus, often you are given a picture of the mulatto Cuban as a representation of the ethnic and racial identity of the Cuban people.

But the Afro Cuban, which is the majority of the Cuban population, is very seldom promoted other than during the Olympic Games and you can not tell the Cuban athlete from the Nigerian athlete.

Chattel slavery was a human tragedy of great proportion and magnitude. There were no ancestral records kept on the millions of Africans who were transferred via the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the Middle Passage to Cuba.

Yet, without a doubt African blood runs deep in the veins of the Cuban people.

Stay Away Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

The great-grandmother that I never knew, simply because of ager difference - well we don't really know.

I don't know what the Afro or Spanish or whatever else was her DNA heritage. She was the child of one of my ancestors, or so he said. Then she was adopted by some of my great-great grandparents, and it looked sort of funny to the Nazis. So my family stopped looking, lest they were all found to be less than pure Arians. To be found to less than pure was bad news at the time.

Obviously, I am not a pure Arian. And you know what? I am proud of being a mongrel.

Suppose that these possibilities:
- I might be 1/32nd Carib Indian,
- or 1/64th African,

We all have slave blood in us.

I am a member of the human race, and everyone is in me.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

The system of racial determination really has some serious house cleaning to do relative to racial identification and classification standards that were previously established in the United States (more prevalent during the Jim Crow Era 1896-1954).

The 1/8 rule was a standard racial assessment that the white status quo used to determine who would be classified as being black and white, which was based on the variable of a person having 1/8 percent of African blood flowing through their veins, this was enough evidence to consider a person black within the United States.

This writer does not think the 1/8 RULE has ever been appealed and rescinded by the United States Government and the scholars who used it to create HIS—STORY. This flawed classification of race designation be it de facto/de jure practice has never been officially recognized as being wrong and immoral.

Moreover, THE 1/8 RULE CLASSIFICATION MUST BE DEEMED RACIST and faulty and most of all unscientific. (Reference: Floyd B McKissick; “Three-fifths of a Man’)

Thus, these racist advocates of past and present, owe an apology to all of those that were adversely affected and denied Freedom, Justice and Equality because of the 1/8 Rule and this writer is old enough too have heard about this.

We shall perhaps never know the total implications and the affect of this unjust racial classification system, had socially, politically and economically on people living in the United States, in particular and the world in general, who were granted or denied rights and privileges because of this racial variable.

Based on what you described about your ethnic and racial make-up you would have been classified in the U.S. as being black.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

I agree that this classification method is unproductive. It is worse than that, it perpetuates the old problems.

I don't know what the solution is, but classifying people as being of 1 race or another is not it. For one thing, it is not realistic - practically nobody in the US is of only one race. Well, perhaps some people who just arrived from the interior of China.

But mainly, the classification by itself is an instrument of racism.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

Haiti is a completely different topic of course.

I find it to be really sad - there is a country that threw out the slave drivers, the French in this case. Any reasonable person would say more power to them.

Yet the Haitians have made a complete mess of themselves, consistently. They were victims, got rid of the oppressors, and started doing it to themselves. Really a sad case.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

No, I was pointing out the double standard in U.S. asylum policy and how the Cubans have been met with open arms, and I do not think any people in the western hemisphere can claim political repression and be more justified than the Haitians.

But the Cubans have garnished more political and economic clout within the United States Government than the poor and loosely organized Haitian-Americans in the U.S.

The Cuban political lobby is extremely powerful and influential and they carry a big stick. I do not think the Haitians have made a mess of themselves, but they have not received the economic assistance from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund as getting the necessary assistance to build a sustainable economic infrastructure.

The international community for the most part has turned their backs on Haiti and resources are very scares and United States agents like François "Papa Doc" Duvalier and Jean-Claude "Bebe" Doc Duvalier were CIA agent provocateurs who oppressed and repressed the people of Haiti for more than a half of a century.

But the United States ignored these atrocities because the Duvalier allowed the United States to set-up military bases in and around Haiti.

The United States President George W. Bush and the United States Government turned on the democratic elected government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 2004 and sent him into exile while they sought a more complicit puppet.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

earthling's picture
Member since:
22 November 2004
Last activity:
5 days 20 hours

To clarify, if ti was not already clear:

I feel sad for the people in Haiti. They don't know what they are doing, are being oppressed by Haitians, and nobody is helping them. They don't need foreign oppressors. Nobody cares about them, and apparently they don't care themselves.

----
It is not how fast you go
it is when you get there.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

I think the Haitian people have been a resilient people without possessing the proper financial aid and assistance; they have tried to work with scarce resources in which to try to overcome poverty.

The United States is a very spoiled and wasteful nation and what we throw away as garbage the people of Haiti would love to have.

I blame Haiti's isolation and predicament on two variables. 1). The effect of Chattel Slavery, which disconnected and scattered African people that led to a cultural disunity--this people in Haiti could be my kith and kin, but due to the devastation of this criminal act; I have no way of knowing perhaps my kindred of African dissent in Haiti. 2). We have enough African American members in the United States Congress (in particular in the Congressional Black Congress) and other high levels in government which to lobby on the side of Haiti and the Haitian people.

This relatively non-action toward Haiti is inexcusable, but psychological slavery haunts us and interferes with our ability to champion African causes around the world like other civilized nations and cultures do.

The Jews wherever they may be on the planet it does not matter because their loyalty to Israel and the Jewish cause is un-daunting. The Jews rally around an adopted culture that is steeped in the Torah and Talmud tradition with a motive to see Israel survive and defend the Jews right to exist (they put their money behind their politics).

Haiti essential is our (African People) responsibility and we need look a Haiti no different than the Jews view Israel.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL

Cookiee's picture
Member since:
6 April 2009
Last activity:
5 years 7 weeks

I have to agree on most of the issues you have raised, But.. There are always two sides to a coin. You failed to mention the heinous crimes committed by The Cuban Government/Fidel Castro,for decades against the poor cuban people. Lets not also forget a FACT well known in certain circles, that Castro was part of the plot to assassinate Che Guevara.

fahim knight's picture
Member since:
22 December 2007
Last activity:
11 weeks 1 day

I am not portraying President Fidel Castro as an angel, but as you stated there are a lot you agree with me on, as far as what I have offered in this discussion.

But I have to caution our assessment because many of our media reports relative to Cuba were being instigated by the CIA and the FBI and it falls in the realm of propaganda.

I would rather read an impartial report being generated by Amnesty International or some other human rights agency that serve as a watchdog and monitors repressive abuses and international crimes against humanity.

Thus, when President Castro took office in 1959; I am quite sure he was faced with dissention and levels of treason that had to be suppressed by any means necessary.

But look at Guantanamo Bay where our United States Government has violated international law, the Geneva Convention Rules in dealing with a perceived enemy the so-called Arab Terrorist.

The atrocities against the Muslim prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay sounds like something you expected to come from the former dictator of Zaire (Congo) Mobutu Sese Seko.

However, these criminal acts against the Muslims had been sanctioned by the United States Government., a first world government.

Stay Awake Until We Meet Again,
Fahim A. Knight-EL