A password will be e-mailed to you.


Science needs to get over itself. And by ‘science’, I mean those people who see science as some all-powerful entity containing all the answers; those self-proclaimed members of the ‘reality-based community’ keen to expurgate the threatening breeze of woo-woo bearing down upon the candle of rationality.

Because science itself is just a method, not a position…right?

This post has been brewing some time, but I finally decided to get some thoughts out of my head and on to your screen after seeing this tweet yesterday by the most excellent science journalist Alok Jha, regarding the ‘Yeti DNA study‘ that’s been making news this week:

It’s not much, I know. But it continues a series of remarks I’ve seen in recent times where any stories with the sulphurous smell of the paranormal, or at the very least the strange scent emitted by the fringes of science, are seen as taking up important column space that could be devoted to more serious science. And even worse, perhaps spreading dangerous ideas.

Another example: Back in April, we posted a story about anomalous ‘lights’ on Mars. NBC science journalist Alan Boyle – whom we have known and loved here at TDG for many years for his fun coverage of science, both serious and strange – covered the story as well, in a blog post titled “Bright Blips on Mars Pictures Spark a Buzz Among UFO Fans“. The response from some was not so enthusiastic:

My intention here is not to demonise Emily Lakdawalla or Alok Jha – I’m a big fan of their work, and others who are working in science and/or science journalism. What I am trying to point out is an increasing trend with otherwise intelligent and eloquent science lovers to decry or demean anything that even seems remotely associated with the fringes of science, such as ufology, parapsychology or cryptozoology. Not only is it supercilious, but in some cases it may not serve science so well either – for instance with the ‘Mars light’ story, myself and a few others pointed out there were in fact two images with anomalous lights, but we were shouted down quickly by those who cleave to Occam; the ‘light’ was just a cosmic ray artefact on the camera, and the two lights were just ‘a coincidence that was going to happen sometime’. A day later though, and many of those same people began excitedly back-tracking, wondering whether the ‘light’ was actually a reflected flash from a shiny rock. In this case, by rushing to remove any hint of an anomaly, those that love science could well have ended up failing science.

But in many ways too, such a response is understandable. There is no shortage of truly crazy theories about Mars, and anything like the ‘Mars light’ would no doubt bring some flaky individuals out of the woodwork, claiming it as proof of an intelligent alien civilisation on the Red Planet. Even milder responses, such as suggestions that the Curiosity rover should immediately take a detour and drive over to find out what the ‘light’ actually was, could be rather annoying – every movement of the rover is planned carefully and must take into consideration both dangers to the vehicle, and the science it is tasked to carry out – and some of the replies to those suggestions were indeed short and sharp.

But here’s the thing: responding with annoyance, anger and resentment to these stories was a major fail.

Science educators, who are you trying to reach? Scientists, who is funding your work? If the answer to either question is the general public, then the simple fact is that the weird and the strange are your friends, not your enemies.

Alan Boyle knows that. His story about the Mars ‘light’ was perfect. It began by pointing out an anomaly, a curiosity, something that any normal reader would respond to with “whoah, a strange light on Mars…what the hell is that?” He then guided the reader into the science of Mars research by pointing out the likely rational explanation. Instant win for science-lovers: educating people as well as bringing focus to what is an amazing scientific endeavour, the robotic exploration of another planet.

Rather than quickly trotting out the first rational ‘explain-away’ they could come up with, both NASA and others could have used this story as a springboard for so much more. Thousands, maybe millions of people’s eyeballs are upon you, do you know how much some people pay for that? “We think the light might just be a camera artifact, but we sure are open to other ideas! It’s difficult for us drive the rover in that direction on short notice, but if we get the chance you can be sure we’ll be checking out this folks. Keep a close eye on the next round of images we’ll be releasing on our website and let us know if you see anything else”. There, it’s not that hard is it?

Another example: I have always wondered about what damage SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) did to their cause by strongly aligning themselves with the pseudo-skeptical group CSICOP around a decade ago. Two of the organisation’s most public faces openly derided the UFO phenomenon, and those interested in it, in blog postings and interview appearances. This seems insane to me…there is vast interest in the general public on this topic, a perfect ‘way in’ for SETI to use to attract interest in their projects and/or raise funding, and instead they took a dump on their own dinner plate. Most of those truly interested in the UFO topic ended up seeing SETI as the opposition. Fail.

Another factor contributing to the issue is that for those intimately involved in science, the minutiae are important. Those things that might seem boring to others are important. But, members of the reality-based community, here’s the reality of the situation: Joe Public out there is coming home from a long day of (often mindless) work, looking for a combination of entertainment and education in the one or two hours they might have to spare before going to bed and then wading through the same shit all over again. Would you like to listen to a bricklayer bemoaning the lack of understanding in the general public about the finer points of a good mortar? That’s what you sound like folks. People’s time is valuable, and they don’t want to spend it hearing you whining about how everyone else doesn’t invest enough time in what you find valuable.

So get out of your echo chamber, stop being so stodgy and pretentious about what you do, and entertain the punters while you educate them! Bring out your Bigfoot, kick-start your UFO, do what you need to get the story across and have some goddamn fun while you do it! And you know what, in the process, you might even find that some of those weird anomalies you’re using to educate people have some interesting science to them as well and could be worth a closer look…