News Briefs 21-02-2008

The Eclipse is in progress and I’m just realizing how difficult it is to use a keyboard when your claws are growing and your skin turns furrier. I’d better finish soon, for I’m getting a bit hungry.

Gracias, Rick.

Quote of the day:

“The deep lesson is that, although science doesn’t know everything, it’s not ‘anything goes’ either. There are well-defined regimes of physical phenomena where we do know how things work, full stop. The place to look for new and surprising phenomena is outside these regimes. You don’t need to set up elaborate double-blind protocols to pass judgement on the abilities of purpoted psychics. Our knowledge of the laws of physics rules them out. Speculation to the contrary are not the provenance of bold visionaries, they are the dreams of crackpots.”

Sean Carroll,

Senior Research Associate in the Dept. of Physics at Caltech

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Rick MG's picture
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Interesting the US shoots down its rogue satellite on the same day as an eclipse. And no Anonymous, I'm not having a go at Americans, I'm just saying. ;-)

red pill junkie's picture
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Has the same letters as the french word 'rouge', which means RED.

And what do you see on a lunar eclipse?

... a RED MOON.

Coincidence?? :-)

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

Rick MG's picture
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Rogue > rouge > red > Red Pill Junkie. o_O

red pill junkie's picture
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REDRUM... REDRUM... REDRUM!! (LOL)

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

Bill's picture
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Of course, Rick. The US successfully shoots down a spy satellite on the same day as a lunar eclipse. It is widely suspected that the satellite contained the complete files on extraterrestrial activity on Earth including Stephenville, the name of the real JFK assassin, and proof that the Americans never went to the Moon. The connection couldn’t be more obvious.

Note that the Navy declared that area of the Pacific a “No Fly Zone” before the shot. Is it coincidence that this event was almost one exact lunar cycle from the sighting of the UFO over Stephenville, Texas? Is it coincidence that that UFO may have been sighted close to another restricted air space (sort of a “No Fly zone”) over President Bush’s ranch? Is it coincidence that the target satellite was orbiting at 130-miles, almost exactly 10-times the distance between the Bush ranch restricted airspace and Stephenville UFO?

BTW, and I’m bringing it home now, the reporter for the Stephenville Empire Tribune, Angelia Joiner, was subsequently fired for continuing to cover the story. Okay, wait for it – the owner of the Stephenville Empire Tribune is American Consolidated Media. American Consolidated Media is Australian.

Just saying ………

Bill

************

Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world.

Thomas Carlyle

Rick MG's picture
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I was joking Bill, the ;-) is obvious, so put a sock in it. I really don't appreciate your snarky sniping at me either.

Bill's picture
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I was joking as well, Rick. I thought it was obvious.

Bill

************

Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world.

Thomas Carlyle

Rick MG's picture
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Smiley faces do wonders to avoid misunderstandings Bill. ;-)

Anonymous's picture
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Funny how people sometimes miss the smiley, eh Rick?

--------------------------------------
My apologies go out to all who were just offended by this hostile, confrontational and completely unreasonable post.

Rick MG's picture
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Give me a break Anon, or tell me what you really think.

Anonymous's picture
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;-)

--------------------------------------
My apologies go out to all who were just offended by this hostile, confrontational and completely unreasonable post.

Rick MG's picture
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I don't know a smiley face for rolling my eyes, so I'll just type *rolls eyes*.

I'm having a bad week, leave me alone. ;-)

Anonymous's picture
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--------------------------------------
My apologies go out to all who were just offended by this hostile, confrontational and completely unreasonable post.

Rick MG's picture
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Looks just like me!

earthling's picture
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I have seen the two of you (Bill and Rick MG) have this misunderstanding a few times.

Often I walk into a place, a restaurant or a bar or a hotel, and I say things that are obviously false. In a snowstorm, I tell people that I love this weather. Primitive humor, we are all familiar with it. Occasionally someone doesn't get it, and assumes that I really enjoy walking in snowstorms. Having said that, actually I do when I have the right clothing. And when it is not too far, say 30 minutes or so.

But more seriously, I don't think that adding emoticons really helps that much. These things are often used to hide the real message.

----
I need a new quote here.

anthonynorth's picture
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:-(

Rick MG's picture
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:-P is all I can say to that, Earthling.

Bill's picture
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Rick, I really thought that adding a smiley-face to that absurd conspiracy theory I invented would be somewhat patronizing. But if you insist, here you go. ;o)

But now I’m miffed, vexed, and perhaps even flummoxed. Do you appreciate the thought that went into that ridiculous conspiracy theory, complete with hyperlinks, to blame the whole thing on Oz? :o) <-------- see that?

So what’s the emoticon for miffed, vexed, or flummoxed? :o~

I may have to borrow your signature line Anonymous. :))

Bill

************

Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world.

Thomas Carlyle

Kat's picture
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Somehow I doubt Rick will be replying any time soon. As he said somewhere above, he had a rough day -- and then a rough night. With any luck, he'll be asleep for the next 8 hours or so.

If it's any consolation, I liked your conspiracy theory. ;-)

Kat

Bill's picture
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I do find consolation that someone enjoyed it. It had potential. We could have had a ball fleshing it out to the conclusion that Oz is behind the UFO cover-up. ;>)

But conspiracy-opportunities like rogue spy-satellites being destroyed during a Hoodie-Hoo lunar eclipse one lunar cycle following a mile-long UFO sighting are once-in-a-eon events. This opportunity died an ugly death and we are the poorer for it. It is lost in time, like tears in rain.

:o( <---frowny face

Bill

************

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.


Batty (Bladerunner)

Kat's picture
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>>I do find consolation that someone enjoyed it. It had potential.

Maybe part of the problem was, I'd already exploited that potential. I emailed Rick this article back on Feb. 16th - with the subject-line 'The Australian connection to the Texas UFO case'. ;-)

New facts unfold in Texas UFO sightings: Police videotape, foreign-owned Texas newspapers

But hey -- we could still ponder this burning issue:

Where is the Rosa Parks of today´s cosmic rights movement?

I personally suspect she's been abducted by aliens.

Kat

Bill's picture
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No, on a stand-alone basis the Stephenville UFO story has no legs. That’s because there’s nothing to it. The AF was moving something that isn’t quite ready for prime time; they do it all the time. Throwing in the proximity to the Bush ranch into the mix doesn’t help; he wasn’t even there. An Australian-owned paper fired the reporter because she kept reporting a tired story. Yawn. No quality film, no stills - This story needs help.

So throw in a wounded spy-satellite and suggest that it could have had pictures of that UFO. This is perfect conspiracy fodder because one can claim anything was on that film. Ignore that it was never operational – we know that’s a cover-up. Maybe it had pictures of an alien UFO base on the Moon. Where’s Hoagland when you need him. The Moon landings were transmitted back to Australia. There’s our Australian tie.

Now, as for the eclipse ……………………

But our opportunity to create a bogus UFO conspiracy is gone, never to return. It’s no fun beating a dead horse.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. :o) <--- meaning non-confrontational, I suppose.

Bill

************

Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world.

Thomas Carlyle

anthonynorth's picture
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Bill, this is a damned conspiracy! I arrowed the smiley first :-)

...

The balanced adult retains an inner child

Anthony North

Bill's picture
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Put its picture on a milk carton. Maybe someone stole it.

>;o) <---- Devil smiley (Bwahahahahaaa)

No, it’s outright arrowed-smiley plagiarism, Anthony. But Obama and I don’t care. (I hope that’s not too obscure.)

;o) <------ see that?

Bill

************

Did you know there's a dictionary for these damned things?

Rick MG's picture
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The problem is I'm so used to receiving smug, sarcastic replies from Anonymous, I assumed the worst.

Greg's picture
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Quote:

Bill said:

Rick, I really thought that adding a smiley-face to that absurd conspiracy theory I invented would be somewhat patronizing.

Ah damn, now I realise that Dick Cheney just didn't want to patronize us with an emoticon when he kept throwing out that absurd "Mohammed Atta in Prague" conspiracy meme....
;P

Kind regards,
Greg
-------------------------------------------
You monkeys only think you're running things

Anonymous's picture
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It's also interesting that it happened on Hoodie-Hoo day. Awfully suspicious. But I'm just sayin'.

http://www.wellcat.com/february/northern...

--------------------------------------
My apologies go out to all who were just offended by this hostile, confrontational and completely unreasonable post.

anthonynorth's picture
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Hey, Anonymous, your byline is unreasonable :-) <--- Arrow to smiley

...

The balanced adult retains an inner child

Anthony North

earthling's picture
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What is the emoticon for being serious?

Suppose I want to say something, and I really mean it seriously, how do I indicate that?

Or perhaps, making a serious statement has neven happened on the internet.

?

----
If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure.

(Bill Clinton, and perhaps others)

Anonymous's picture
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--------------------------------------
My apologies go out to all who were just offended by this hostile, confrontational and completely unreasonable post.

Rick MG's picture
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Nice pic Anon, and it's where we're headed. Last year on a train I overheard some teenagers nearby. One made a joke and the other teen said "rofl" instead of laughing. I kid you not, "rofl". *facepalm* With a smiley face on Mars, there's no saving us.

Gwedd's picture
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Regarding Sean Carroll's comment in "qiote of the day"...

I imagine that his comments are of the same tone and substance as those used by Vatican witnesses against Gallileo. It seems to me that the shrillest voices are often those of folks who have a vested interest in their particular position, and usually a monetary one as well.

A couple of headlines spell "mystery" incorrctly, unless it was deliberate. I'm not all here this morning :)

Regarding the solar panel V redwood kerfuffle. I am squarely on the side of the tree owner. Hopefully, if he us ultimately forced to destroy them, he can cut them down in such a manner that they fall over and crush the solar panels. Either that, or burn them in place and let the smoke particulates F-up the solar array. The fellow with the array is, to my mind, one of those eco-posers with more money than sense, and an attirude to back it up. The earth needs fewer of those types of people and more trees.

respects,

Respects,
Gwedd

red pill junkie's picture
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*Thanks for pointing out the typos. I'll correct them immediately.

*We have to remember that Galileo's arguments to defend the heliocentric system were WRONG, for instance, he posited that tides were the result of the Earth moving around the sun, something we now know it's the effect of the Moon's gravitational pull.

No, I'm not trying to the defend the Church, but I think we shouldn't put Galileo in so high a pedestal. He was a great mind and made great scientific advances; but he was also merely human :-)

Overall though, I agree with your argument.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

X_O's picture
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Hi Red,

I had not read anything about Galileo's claims regarding tides, but if your comment is accurate, he was half right. It really is a combination of sun and moon that produce the tides. I would assume any seafaring culture would have the basics figured out even if the 'model' wasn't correct.

On a related note, unlike GW and local weather, the fact that tides are so well predicted in recent history has more to do with decades/centuries of highly repeatable data to fine tune the models than any particular brilliance on the part of the modelers.

Cheers,
Xavier Onassis

(my name is my tag line)

red pill junkie's picture
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Well, you know, I suppose he meant that the tides were a direct consequence of Earth's movement, like a the water of a bottle rocking back and forth inside a moving train; but looking it from your perspective, I think you may be right.

It wouldn't be the first time that a seemingly scientific "D'ouh!" moment later becames a "Wohoo!". Remember Einstein's 'Cosmological Constant'? ;-)

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

Michael H's picture
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It's amazing how "the laws of physics" are invoked to support whatever point of view one happens to be advocating.

I'm not a physicist, but Ulrich Mohrhoff, the editor as AntiMatters, is. Mohrhoff points out repeatedly that though quantum theory allows the most accurate predictions in the history of science, no one has ever been able to begin to explain the mechanism that allows that to be so. Perhaps Carroll would like to elucidate how to reconcile the deep contradictions at the heart of his "laws of physics" that have caused the best minds in the field to veer towards wildly esoteric mathematics and posit bizarre metaphysics for the last hundred years.

For Carrol to make such blanket statement displays nothing more than the degree his own intellect has blinded him. He's aa trapped in his worldview as Ahmadinejahd, and neither of them can see it.

The "deep lesson" Carrol needs has to do with humility.

red pill junkie's picture
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Funny how someone like Richard Feynman often said that the only people that claimed to understand quantum theory, were the people that didn't know quantum theory.

That's the same kind of humility we need in science.

Although, that being said, I do understand some scientists' frustration to see how any wise-guy who only seeks to con people, easily throw a few "quantic terms" here and there to make their claims more cryptic and plausible.

But that's what sites like The Grail are for: to inform the people and help them make THEIR OWN opinion.

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

Michael H's picture
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red pill junkie wrote:

That's the same kind of humility we need in science.

Although, that being said, I do understand some scientists' frustration to see how any wise-guy who only seeks to con people, easily throw a few "quantic terms" here and there to make their claims more cryptic and plausible.

I'm displaying my own lack of humility, as well as no little cynicism, when I point out that what you're referencing here is the core of "The Secret" that Rhonda Byrne and the 'manifest your reality' gurus have truly discovered.

So shoot me. :)

red pill junkie's picture
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That's why if I were to pick a "guru", I would pick someone like Anthony, who says "Pick your OWN path, but you should make sure it stays in the middle."

Plus, I doubt he would ask me to shave my head or something :-)

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

anthonynorth's picture
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Red, shave your head immediately for suggesting gurudom :-)

The problem with quantum theory is that it is based on math, which is based on logic, which is based on axiom, which is a fancy word for - you've guessed it - belief.
Hence, most of the pronouncements of quantum physicists are actually philosophy. Not only that, but philosophy with a 'holistic' bent.
If they don't like what 'crackpots' make of their ideas, they shouldn't have joined the club.

...

I'm fanatical about moderation

Anthony North

red pill junkie's picture
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At least shaving one's head is easier than saving one's scrotum, like Austin Power's Dr. Evil.

Less itchy, too :-)

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

anthonynorth's picture
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Red, you're reminding of the preamble to a hernia I once ...
Can't go on. Too painful :-)

...

The balanced adult retains an inner child

Anthony North

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The "mystery" of the Anasazi is solved easily by going to the Four Corners reservations. The word is Di'ne (Navajo) for "ancient ones". It refers to the Hopi, and always has. The De'ne (the branch of the Navajo who settled in northern Canada) use the same word to refer to the same people. I've heard other explanations by anthropologists and by people who've worked for the national parks department at the 'cliffs' site. I heard the above from a woman who is half Hopi and half Di'ne, and she says you can hear the same if you go to Four Corners and ask the people who live there.

This use of the word is 20,000 to 22,000 years old, which is how long it was determined it took the Di'ne to make their way to Four Corners from the Bering land bridge. They did come across it. They found the Anasazi/Hopi there, already on the other side, and having made their way there from the south.

It was apparently not a peaceful meeting. The Anasazi/Hopi word for the Di'ne/De'ne translates to "they who hit you on the head with rocks". Things have calmed down since the two groups made it to Four Corners.

No, I am not the brain specialist.....
YES. Yes I AM the brain specialist.

red pill junkie's picture
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I'm confused here. According to orthodox science, the Bering Strait is app. 15,000 years old, and the Clovis spear heads and tools (the "official" oldest paleo-indian cultural remains) are roughly 13,000 years old.

So where is the basis of this word being 20-22,000 years old?

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

Gwedd's picture
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The Clovis barrier has been broken by some 20,000 years by digs in the American southeast. Some scientists are still arguing all sorts of nonsense about the new data being "tainted" or "incorrectly dated", etc, and are clinging to the Clovis dating for the earliest humans in America. However, the tides are slowly shidting from underneath them.

No one knows for certain when the first humans came to America, but it was much earlier than the Bering dates, and most likely by ship.

Respects,
Gwedd

red pill junkie's picture
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That's why I expressed the Clovis dating as the "official" view of mainstream archeology ;-)

But yes, anyone doing a casual enquiry on current archeological data will find out that more and more data supports the notion that a)we don't really know how long ago the first american arrived here, and b)we don't know were they came from either.

Really bold archeologists would maybe through the number in 15-17,000 thousand years. Other people might use older figures, but they risk not being taken seriously: Take for instance what happened to a mexican anthropologist who started to investigate these mYsteryous (I finally learned! yay!) footprints discovered in Puebla, that seemed to be 50,000 years old! Obviosuly, most scholars scoffed at the data. Frankly I don't know what will take to make them change their minds.

So it seems I'm playing both sides of the argument, right? Well, guilty as charged I suppose ;-)

-----
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie

Bill's picture
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Implements much older than 50,000-years have been found in Mexico. For example, an excerpt from Forbidden Archeology: The Hidden History of the Human Race by Michael A. Cremo and Richard L. Thompson states the following:

In the 1960s, anthropologists uncovered advanced stone tools at Hueyatlaco, Mexico. Geologist Virginia Steen-McIntyre and other members of a U.S. Geological Survey team obtained an age of about 250,000 years for the sites implement-bearing layers. This challenged not only standard views of New World anthropology but also the whole standard picture of human origins. Humans capable of making the kind of tools found at Hueyatlaco are not thought to have come into existence until around 100,000 years ago in Africa.

Virginia Steen-McIntyre experienced difficulty in getting her dating study on Hueyatlaco published. "The problem as I see it is much bigger than Hueyatlaco," she wrote to Estella Leopold, associate editor of Quaternary Research. "It concerns the manipulation of scientific thought through the suppression of 'Enigmatic Data,' data that challenges the prevailing mode of thinking. Hueyatlaco certainly does that! Not being an anthropologist, I didn't realize the full significance of our dates back in 1973, nor how deeply woven into our thought the current theory of human evolution has become. Our work at Hueyatlaco has been rejected by most archaeologists because it contradicts that theory, period."

Forbidden Archeology: The Hidden History of the Human Race is available at Amazon US and UK. It’s not a new book but it is a terrific read as you can see from the introduction.

Bill

************

Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world.

Thomas Carlyle

Richard's picture
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"I didn't realize the full significance of our dates back in 1973, nor how deeply woven into our thought the current theory of human evolution has become."

Regardless of the precision of datation techniques, or the interpretation of stone chips being tools or the result of nature, thoughts, and the interpretation they carry, totally encapsulate civilization's consciousness.

No matter where you look, the way of thinking is always what is being protected.

It may be in politics, it may be in some branches of science, it may be in man - woman relationships, it may be in education, in religion, it is all over. Thoughts rule consciousness by ways of ideologies.

They are responsible for keeping humanity in its ignorance and at the same time they are responsible for the precise path civilizations have taken.

They are both the experiment and the parameters of the experiment.

It is only when we do not put value in a thought system that we can consider possible what otherwise would be accepted as impossible, because of the self-hypnosis that thoughts induce.

Unfortunately, as soon as we indulge in thoughts, that we give thoughts values, we reinforce ways of thinking and no matter how clearly the thoughts are wrong, we will do or die by their edict.

Man has always sought to find the nature of his reality, but he did it through his thoughts, why would the answers he got be more dependable than those that led him to believe that he was a new born monkey?

Michael H's picture
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Richard wrote:

No matter where you look, the way of thinking is always what is being protected.

I remember coming across an article about Central and South American dating techniques. The article referenced a 1923 publication of National Geographic that had dated certain megaliths in those regions to 8000 - 10000 BC. It was only after it became obvious that these dates didn't fit with the accepted story of the ascent of man that they were revised.

I don't get why it's so hard to just admit "we don't have a clue."

Richard's picture
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That is an aspect of thoughts.

There are personal thoughts that are fitted to common sense, the common way of being 'wise', so they think, and there are common thoughts that are supplied to maintain a specific collective mind frame that keep a civilization on its track.

Each instant someone mechanically thinks, he is given a data fitting solution as a personal theory that is adjusted to this common sense.

If the data does not fit, thought will either reject it or fix it to fit the programmed desires.

If an interpretation based on another thought set is brought forward by a person belonging to another common sense trend, the ideologies will clash thought the individuals acting as supports to those via their thoughts.

It matters not to thought to know but it matters greatly to predominate. And to predominate, anything may go, even the elimination of another character belonging to a competing common sense.

This phenomena is so constant and pervasive at every level of personal and collective life that it affects every aspects of the most mundane things, linked to personal experience, to the most sacred things, the center hubs of belief systems.

Intelligence begins where we have the intelligence to admit we don't have a clue. That supposes the capacity of not giving any value to memories and a certain capacity to not believe what we think.