News Briefs 28-05-2015

Wait, is it "Charlie Charlie Challenge" or "Chale Chale Chale!"?

Thanks Charles.

Quote of the Day:
"If you tried to doubt everything you would not get as far as doubting anything. The game of doubting itself presupposes certainty"~Ludwing Wittgenstein

Crowdfunder: Translation of Fascinating Book on Near-Death Experiences

Near Death Experience

The International Association for Near-Death Studies (IANDS) has put out a call for donations to enable them to translate into English and publish an important addition to the NDE research literature: a recent Dutch book by NDE researchers Titus Rivas, Anny Dirven and Rudolf Smit that details 78 cases of veridical perceptions and other verified paranormal aspects of NDEs.

This book is a scholarly treatise on the main evidence from case reports of parapsychological or paranormal phenomena connected to Near-Death Experiences and its theoretical implications. It is the end product of a joint project of Athanasia Foundation, Merkawah Foundation/Netwerk Nabij-de-doodervaring and Limen/IANDS Flanders.

The book concentrates on paranormal phenomena, in which consciousness or the mind, spirit or soul of a patient seems to transcend the physical boundaries of the brain. It contains summaries of 78 cases [the English version will contain several more, i.e. over 80 cases] in which the patient's experiences were independently verified for a researcher or author by someone else, such as a physician, surgeon, nurse, partner, relative or friend. The cases have been derived from a thorough study of the available literature, a compilation of cases by Jan Holden, and the authors' own empirical studies.

Through early contributions from various sources, IANDS have raised around half of the $17,500 estimated cost of publication, and are now seeking help from the public to get the project over the line. You can donate here.

Personally I think a better approach would have been to offer a limited edition for backers (say 200 copies at $100 each), which might have raised the funds easily (I would have bought one for that) and also offered an investment for backers. But I can't argue with the fact that this book is a very worthy project - I covered some of the 'veridical' material in my own book Stop Worrying! There Probably is an Afterlife (available in paperback and Kindle ebook editions), and it's an absolutely fascinating area. I can't wait to read the English translation - so I'm throwing in some cash.

You can find out more information about the book itself (synopsis, chapter breakdown) at the IANDS website.

Link: IANDS: Donate to Book Translation and Publication Project!

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News Briefs 27-05-2015

Is there a land beyond exhausted? I think my boat has pushed against its golden sands...

Thanks @grailseeker.

Quote of the Day:

The mind is not a vessel that needs filling, but wood that needs igniting.

Plutarch

News Briefs 26-05-2015

Here's your dose of curated awe for today:

Quote of the Day:

Spaceship Earth was so extraordinarily well invented and designed that to our knowledge humans have been on board it for two million years not even knowing that they were on board a ship.

Buckminster Fuller

The Roswell Slides: Chronicle of a Mummy Foretold

"It would be many years later, in front of the firing squad, when Col. Aureliano Buendía remembered that remote afternoon in which his father took him to see the ice..." ~Excerpt from the novel 'One Hundred Years of Solitude'.

2015 marks the first anniversary of Gabriel García Márquez's death. Without a doubt the most popular Latin American writer of his time, his literary style constitutes one of the best examples of the artistic movement known as 'Magical Realism', which is characterized by the insertion of fantastical events into common circumstances, thus transforming the extraordinary into ordinary and vice versa. It's no wonder the Colombian-born Nobel laureate ended up writing One Hundred Years of Solitude --his most famous novel-- during his stay in Mexico city; a place even more outlandish than Macondo, the fictitious Caribbean town he created as the setting of most of his stories. Salvador Dalí once said of Mexico, that he couldn't stand being in a country that was more surrealist than his own paintings.

I'm sure the eccentric Spanish artist would have felt vindicated, had he been present at the spectacle I attended on the night of May 5th. That evening UFOlogist Jaime Maussan --even though he keeps insisting he's merely a journalist-- invited the Mexican citizens along with the rest of the world to beWITNESS: The event that would "change history" by showing for the very first time "physical evidence" confirming the famous Roswell saucer crash of 1947, and the extraterrestrial presence in our planet. At the National Auditorium no less, the most illustrious public forum in the country with a total capacity of 10,000 seats, during a presentation which ended up being worthy of a García Márquez's novel.

But not for the reasons the organizers intended...

From the onset the whole thing seemed bizarre enough. After a couple of years of rumors concerning the recovery of 2 old Kodachrome slides purportedly showing a genuine corpse of an alien being, allegedly recovered after the Roswell crash --the be-all and end-all of all UFO cases according to American researchers, given their obsession with this particular 68-year-old mystery-- the story finally irrupted into the mainstream in early February of this year

News Briefs 25-05-2015

Udderly amazing...

Quote of the Day:

Spaceship Earth was so extraordinarily well invented and designed that to our knowledge humans have been on board it for two million years not even knowing that they were on board a ship.

Buckminster Fuller

News Briefs 22-05-2015

“There are some oddities in the perspective with which we see the world.”

Quote of the Day:

“We don't have to save the world. The world is big enough to look after itself. What we have to be concerned about is whether or not the world we live in will be capable of sustaining us in it.”

Douglas Adams

News Briefs 21-05-2015

Why do ISP's still think 72 hours is a reasonable amount of time for them to do their effing job and fix your connection? Imagine if the plumber asked you to wait *3 days* until you could take a shower again!

Big thanks to Grail-seeker!

Quote of the Day:

"Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself."

~Rumi.

Osama Bin Laden's Bookshelf: MK-ULTRA, the Illuminati, Manly Hall's 'Secret Teachings of all Ages', and 9/11 Conspiracy Literature

Bin Laden's Bookshelf

The U.S. Government this week released a list of the books and documents that were found on Osama Bin Laden's 'bookshelf' (a number were actually digital) when special forces soldiers killed the terrorist leader at his Pakistan hideout in 2011.

Surprisingly, among the 39 English-language books in Bin Laden's possession were a number of 9/11 conspiracy books and other books about powerful secret cabals, including:

Also in this tranche of documents was a webpage discussing how game designer Steven Jackson (the American one, not the British one) seemed to have predicted the Twin Towers catastrophe in his game Illuminati: New World Order (which took its inspiration from the Illuminatus! trilogy by Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shae). Not to mention also in OBL's collection were documents about the CIA's 'mind control' project MK-ULTRA!

Perhaps the book that surprised me most to see was Manly P. Hall's classic of esoterica, The Secret Teachings of All Ages, the content of which seems very much at odds with Al-Qaeda's terrorist agenda. Perhaps Bin Laden's interest was simply in the chapter on Islam, in which Mohammed is described as having "a knowledge of that secret doctrine which must needs constitute the core of every great philosophical, religious, or ethical institution". Or was his interest once again in the idea of secret groups steering history and religion from behind the scenes?

What do we make of all this? Basically, we have the (alleged?) mastermind behind 9/11, reading about how his attack was predicted before it happened in a game about the Illuminati; reading Manly Hall's masterwork about secret teachings and esoteric societies; reading other books about the Illuminati and powerful secret cabals; and also reading 9/11 'truther' material about how *he* didn't actually commit the crime!

Was he simply fascinated by the weird things people saw in the attack? Was he wondering how to take advantage of the multiple mythoses growing around 9/11 and the Bush 'New World Order'? Was he just setting us all up for a massive troll when he did eventually get caught? Or did he not actually do it and thought it may truly have been an Illuminati conspiracy?

How deep does this rabbit hole get?!

Link: Bin Laden's Bookshelf