A topic about outer-space and everything in it, from little green men to big spirally galaxies

Abduction Animations

Trying to transmit the narrative of the abduction mythos in all its surreal, quasi-oneiric complexity to an outsider is an almost insurmountable task, due to both the limitations of language as much as the intrinsically personal nature of the experience itself.

Because of this the medium of classic, hand-drawn Animation seems to provide a more suitable approximation than other conventional methods of expression. It's not just about the cliched "a picture is worth a thousand words," though. To me there's something in creating the illusion of life and movement out of lines drawn into some canvas or piece of paper, that is nothing short of magical --and, perhaps, closer to the mystery of what's behind these liminal experiences.

The first clip, above, was produced in 1995, based on recorded interviews of some of the subjects researched by the late Budd Hopkins --a recognized visual artist on his own merit-- including a few sessions of hypnotic regression. The second one, below, is a sand animation created in 2009 by artist GingerAnne, to tell the story of what happened to her own mother in 1986. Both videos choose the approach the subject from a different perspective, both artistically and narratively, and both IMO make a very good job in communicating their message to the viewer in an honest, and almost visceral way.

Please note this is not about 'endorsing' the veracity or validity of these stories. As you may or may not know, by the end of his life Hopkins and his research methodology came under heavy attack by both skeptics and UFO advocates alike, particularly with regards to the controversial Linda Cortile/Napolitano case, which is featured in the video. Likewise we don't have ways to vet the account portrayed by GingerAnne, and the fact that it seems similar to the famous Hopkinsville 'goblin attack' of 1955 would be perceived to either corroborate or undermine the story, depending on your particular bias.

What I'm interested here is in how the medium shapes these narratives, which in my mind are the ultimate cultural paradox; because on the one hand the alien abduction mythos has penetrated every instance of our civilization, particularly when it comes to pop culture --what teenager in the Western world doesn't know what 'probing' is thanks to South park?-- yet on the other hand, not one of these mass-consumed artistic representations has ever done justice in capturing the TRUE alienness of these experiences.

The artists responsible for these videos came close, and for that they get my praise.


Thanks to 'Burnt State' for pointing out to these great vids.

Aliens Under the Scanner: Similarities Found in Brains of Alleged Abductees

I've never been to Hawaii, but since my days of watching Magnum P.I. on TV, I always thought of it as a true paradise --especially if you had a red Ferrari and an epic 'stache like Tom Selleck.

But even these tropical islands would seem like Hell on Earth, if you thought you were kidnapped by strange non-human creatures, subjecting you to all sorts of horrendous experiments.

This is exactly what Neurologist Dr. Michael B. Russo was hearing from his patients, who were been referred to him by their primary physicians after complaining about migraines or other problems, once they felt comfortable enough to share their terrible secret. Following the logical guidelines of his career, and armed with a powerful dense-array electroencephalography (DEEG) machine --the only one of its kind in Hawaii-- Dr. Russo scanned the heads of his patients, and instead of metallic implants left by their alien tormentors, what he found was certain consistent abnormalities in their parietal lobes, which is the area of the brain in charge of processing visual and auditory stimuli, and integrating them into higher thinking.

“The parietal areas process visual and auditory data, but they can intrinsically create it themselves and then send it to the prefrontal region, where you become aware of it. … Our thinking is that there’s something in the parietal areas that’s generating (the feeling that transmissions from aliens are being sent to the brain).”

The electrical brain wave activity of the alien abductee patients looks similar to that of patients who have experienced traumatic brain injury, he said.

Ahá! We finally found a purely biological explanation for abductions. Mystery solved.

Well, not so fast: Even Dr. Russo himself does not seem willing to dismiss the stories of their patients as pure fantasy-induced hallucinations:

“All I’m saying is that these areas of the brain are similar between patients. … Patients would not come to me if I did not take them seriously and their problems seriously. I don’t discount what they’ve said. I try to make the pain or discomfort or anxieties diminish.”

His patients are also responding well to both his diagnosis and treatment. After all, he's helping them cope with the pain.

This is not the first time researchers have tried to propose a biological mechanism behind the alien abduction experience. Before Russo's parietal abnormalities, there was the 'temporal lobe epilepsy' disorder which Dr. Michael Persinger thinks is responsible for a broad spectrum of 'mystical experiences.' He followed his research by producing what he nicknamed the 'God helmet' --which only caused a 'slight headache' in Richard Dawkins when he tried it on…

There's also the 'sleep paralysis' syndrome, a favorite among skeptics, because it seems to fit so nicely with the traditional stereotype of your typical abduction: Happening at night, when people are in their beds, coming right out of deep sleep. Never mind that MANY people have reported abductions on different circumstances, like driving on their cars or standing on their kitchen fully awake...

My own personal opinion is that I see no problem in trying to find out more about the possible biological components behind these experiences. After all, even the researchers who advocate for a non-conventional explanation --i.e. hybridization experiments performed by extraterrestrial geneticists-- also look into certain 'biological markers' or commonalities between people who claim to have been taken by alien beings: Rh-negative blood type, Celtic or Native American ancestry, etc. They are using different 'narratives' to substantiate their ideas, true, but they are still looking into the particulars of the abductees' physicality.

The fault I see in BOTH approaches is in stopping there, and not going further enough. A chemist will know the precise molecular composition of DMT; a botanist will know the exact taxonomical nature of the plants containing a high concentration of it in their tissue, and an anthropologist will record the particulars of an Ayahuasca ceremony performed by an Amazonian shaman.

But that will still NOT explain the nature, origin and potency of the rich imagery and sensory data 'downloaded' into the consciousness of the person who drinks the Ayahuasca brew. Likewise, we still don't know why a parietal abnormality found in different auto-proclaimed abductees, would end up rendering 'hallucinations' with such a persistent narrative.

Some people get banged on the head and become mathematical savants. Others, like the famous John Nash --who recently lost his life in a tragic car accident-- believed they were in contact with alien beings, just when they are at their peak of mathematical thinking. And others, like Chris Bledsoe, claimed to have had a close encounter experience, only to suddenly find their creativity has received a mysterious 'boost'.

Which example is more 'paranormal' than the other? And does the 'origin story' demerit the value of these people's achievements?

Let us look for commonalities, but do not let them diminish our sense of awe, nor should we confuse them for the REAL mystery.



Thanks to Mike Clelland and Stephen Miles Lewis.

Mr. Bolden (Head of NASA) Goes to Area 51

ETs exist, and so does Area 51.

That statement, which would have made the headlines of every single newspaper in the world 25 years ago, nowadays barely manages to captivate the attention of a child --"Duh! we know about Area 51, mister. We've seen it in the movies!"

During a Q&A with British school-children, NASA administrator Major Charles Bolden responded to the question of 10-year-old Carmen Dearing, who wanted to know whether he believed in aliens or not, with the customary answer every NASA representative gives: The Universe if ginormous, ergo they are out there… somewhere.

“Today we know that there are literally thousands, if not millions of other planets, many of which may be very similar to our own earth. So some of us, many of us believe that we're going to find...evidence that there is life elsewhere in the universe."

Mr. Bolden also mentioned Area 51, which until 2013 wasn't still officially recognized by the United States government --making it arguably the worst-kept secret in military history, and a stubborn remnant from the old Cold War mentality. Not only does Area 51 exist, Bolden, admitted to the children, but he's actually been there:

“There is an Area 51,” he said. “It’s not what many people think. I’ve been to a place called that but it’s a normal research and development place. I never saw any aliens or alien spacecraft or anything when I was there.

“It think because of the secrecy of the aeronautics research that goes on there it’s ripe for people to talk about aliens being there.”

Well now, Mr. Bolden: If it's such a 'normal' place of research, then why all the secrecy?

Let's all forget about Bob Lazar and his claims for a minute. What I would like to see is someone asking Bolden --or even president Obama-- whether some of the secret prototypes which have been tested in the Nellis Range complex are based on technologies so radical and unconventional, that they could easily be confused as alien vessels even by trained observers.

I wonder what Mr. Bolden would care to say about the leaks given to aerospace journalist James Goodall by several Area 51 insiders during the 1980s and 1990s. One of those contacts told Goodall "we have things in the Nevada desert that would make George Lucas envious." That same source, when asked by Goodall if he believed in UFOS, answered "absolutely, positively they exist" but wouldn't expand on his statement.

I also wonder if Mr. Bolden ever met Ben Rich, the so-called 'Father of Stealth' who run the Lockheed Skunk Works division for many decades, and oversaw the development of the F-117 Nighthawk stealth fighter. Rich was never explicit of how much he knew, but the sentence with which he close his lecture at the UCLA Schoold of Engineering in March 23, 1993 --"we now have the technology to take ET home"-- is suggestive that perhaps Mr. Bolden wasn't shown everything that's going on around the famous 'secret' base --perhaps so he wouldn't worry how one day he might be out of a job...


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Alien Cat Doesn't Even CARE About Your Leader

Meet Matilda, the 2-year-old Canadian kitten who will either make you go D'aww or cringe in horror, depending on whether the cover of Whitley Strieber's Communion gave you nightmares or not *raising hand*

Her other-worldly glassy eyes are the product of a congenital condition called 'spontaneous lens luxation', which has caused the lens in her eyes to detach. Their abnormal size is still a matter of some debate, though, and her veterinary suspects it's got "something to do with her collagen structure" --IMO I would fire up the MRI machine in search of metallic implants…

Despite the appearances, Matilda's illness does not bring her any pain, even though she's practically blind. I wonder if knowing she's become an overnight Internet celebrity would bring her any comfort.

All joking aside, though, this freaking-looking feline reminds me of how many people in our field believe cats and other animals, are able to perceive things with their acute sense than we humans are oblivious of. Fortean blogger and researcher Mike Clelland is among the many cat care-takers who have noticed their four-legged owners stare at a spot in the wall or an empty room with eerie fixation, as if they were aware of some invisible presence:

Last night I was alone in my little cabin sitting on the couch watching a DVD, my cat was sitting next to me, as always. Suddenly I was aware that she was acting really scared. She got into this really scrunched-up defensive pose and her tail poofed up huge. The hair along her back was sticking straight up. I tried to pet her to calm her down, but she didn’t respond at all. I could feel her back was rigid with tension. I leaned over and looked at her face and her eyes were entirely dilated and black.

She wasn’t moving, and she was entirely focused at an empty spot the center of the room just a few yards in front of the couch.

I saw nothing, and I sensed nothing. But my cat's overt display meant something.

I got up and walked around the house, and when I stood in the living room in front of the couch I could see right where she was focused. She stayed frozen in that anxious pose with her dilated eyes fixed on an empty spot right in the center of the room.

And there's even a few interesting anecdotes in which our furry overlords have become entangled with their alien counterparts. I already mentioned Strieber and Communion, which should be unquestionnably credited with inserting (or should that be 'probing'?) the stereotype of the Gray alien into the pop culture's psyche. In Transformation, the sequel to his best-selling book, Whitley mentions how once when he was about to be taken by the entities he call 'the Visitors' --he's never been comfortable with calling them 'aliens' or 'Et's'-- he grabbed one of their 2 cats --Sadie, a Birman-- with him as a sort of 'reality test'. When he found himself inside a normal-looking room, still holding the terrified cat between his arms and surrounded by 4 non-human entities, even though one appeared to be a 'blonde Nordic'; one of the entities asked him why he had brought the cat --the fact that these entities hadn't stopped him in the first place is interesting in itself. Forced somehow to provide the most honest answer by the overwhelming 'pressure' of their mere presence, Strieber replied that Sadie was part of his family, and as such she had the right to participate in family affairs.

The Visitors put Sadie to sleep --not permanently, as Whitley originally feared-- by pressing a strange metallic object on one of her thighs, which immediately caused her to collapse as if she had been anesthesyzed. The next day the poor cat stayed sleep curled in a ball until dinner time, when she drank a lot of water; she showed a stiffness in her leg until the next morning, in the exact place where the metallic object had been in contact with her skin.

Perhaps later ole Sadie took revenge by scratching her human's favorite armchair.

Is there indeed a parnormal connection between cats and 'the other side'? Is there a reason why ancient Egyptians showed such a huge veneration to them, other than the utilitarian benefit cats provided by eradicating vermin from their barns and grain mills?

If Matilda had the collar of Jake, the Cat from Outer Space perhaps she could tell us that, indeed, the Truth is Meow there.

Cats Are (Sneaky) Ancient Aliens.

UFOlogical Jam Session to Celebrate the Life and Work of Bruce Duensing

Earlier this year, when I downloaded the Radio Misterioso podcast in which my friend Greg Bishop had a guy by the name of Bruce Duensing as the guest, I knew nothing about him or his ideas --a big stain in my UFOlogical record, given how he'd been blogging about the phenomenon for many years. That day I ended up listening to that episode twice in a row, fascinated by the things Bruce was saying with regards to UAPs --his favored acronym-- which heavily resonated with my own thinking.

Since then I timidly started to have a little bit of online interaction with him, on Facebook and his blog posts, which were definitely not 'UFOlogy 101' material. Bruce's paragraphs were packed with content, and his writing style was often oblique and obscure in meaning, which was not done out of intellectual pedantry as much his most honest attempt to elucidate upon a mystery which is oblique and obscure in intention to begin with.

It nevertheless made me realize that when it comes to UFOs I'm still at the Kindergarten level, and I had much to learn from him.

On the morning of Thursday, June 4th, Greg read a message on the Facebook wall of Bruce's daughter, informing of the passing of his father after having gone through open-heart surgery on the previous Monday. The news hit me harder than I'd expected, seeing how I was just (barely) starting to know him. Perhaps it was because that same week I myself had gone through a different kind of personal transition, after being fired from the job I'd worked in for the last 15 years.

Transience. It's something we rarely notice because we're so focused on the trivial minutiae of our daily routine, yet it's always happening all around us. It's only when a certain critical mass is reached in our cognitive awareness --an accident, being fired from your job, the death of a loved one-- that we stop acting like automatons for a minute, take stock of our surroundings and we begin to pay attention.

(Maybe UFOs are meant to be a wake up call intended to shake us out of our dull complacency, before we fall off the cliff ahead)

Transience and Transition seemed to have been in Bruce's mind, even to the last. The name of his blog was 'A Transit of Contingencies' and the title of his last blog entry was 'The Voyages of the Dead', which of course caused me to speculate: Was the title a hint to his fears about the appointed surgery? An indication of depression? A premonition even?

The last paragraph in the post, which I urge you to read in its entirety, is not only a fitting way for a great intellectual to say adieu, but it also captures Bruce's love of art, literature and poetry, and perhaps his yearning to reconcile the oblique and obscure within himself:

In every fiction there is an element of truth and the same could be said by reading that statement in reverse order, and so this writer thinks on poetics as a series of observations that indirectly point to a reality not directly manifested in their sentences.

The same may apply to us.

After the sudden shock of the news, Greg asked me to come to the show the next Sunday to talk about Bruce and how he had began to influence the both of us in the way we look at UFOs, forcing us to adopt a broader, bolder scope of it and other phenomena. Robert Brandstetter, a brilliant friend of ours who uses the alias 'Burnt State' in the Paracast forums --and also shares with us a nascent kinship with Bruce and his ideas-- was also invited to join in, and even though I still felt a certain inadequacy in being part of this radiophonic eulogy --a close friend of him or one of the many people who discussed things with him online, would have been far more suited to speak with authority about his philosophy and who he was as a person-- I accepted the invitation; in the end I think we did an acceptable job, and the three of us conducted an amenable 'jamming session' in saying farewell to our departed peer --The lion's share of the credit should go to Robert, who did an outstanding job re-reading Bruce's blog, and researching additional info about his background, like his love for clockwork toys and model trains which IMO was very telling of his analytical albeit-whimsical character.

(The images above were the 'notes' I doodled to prepare myself prior to the radio show. "What am I?" is the answer Bruce once gave to Greg's question: 'If you ever met an alien being, what would you say or ask to it?')

We wrapped up the session by having Robert read the Thomas Wolfe quote Bruce had chosen as the intro for his last blog post, and after that I requested Greg to play Café Tacuba's 'Olita del Alta Mar' (Little Wave of the High Seas). Not only it's a song I loved the moment I first listened to it, but that Sunday morning --as I was getting ready for Radio Misterioso's nightly broadcast-- it was thanks to Bruce that I finally understood the true meaning behind the lyrics: A human life is like a wave in the sea; it's made of the same stuff as the sea, but for a little while it has a distinct shape and momentum; like all waves it reaches its peak at one point, breaks into the shore, and then recedes back.

You could say the wave ceased to exist, even though its water never left the sea. The fact the wave had a transitory existence is what gave it its shape and beauty, the force carrying it ashore waning and then gently returning that which formed the wave, to the immensity from whence it came.

Safe travels, Bruce. And godspeed.


Kurzgesagt: Solving the Fermi Paradox with Cartoon Birds

The German design studio Kurzgesagt --"in a nutshell"-- created these entertaining clips full of interesting infographics, to tackle at one of the most persistent logical quandaries in modern Science: The (in)famous Fermi Paradox --a.k.a. "where are all the bloody aliens?!"

The videos stick firmly with the accepted scientific parameters, while at the same time utilizing some of the latest far-out concepts proposed by the likes of Freeman Dyson and Nikolai Kardashev, who came up with a classification system for advanced civilizations depending on their energy consumption --ours is about level 0.75, while the Galactic empire in Star Wars is probably between 2 and 3 (though the matter would no doubt trigger an onslaught of rants from angry fanboys everywhere!)

What's interesting also is how our own technological advances dictate the differences in how we decide to interpret the paradox itself. In 1950, when Enrico Fermi first came up with the idea during an informal conversation, notions re. the vast distances between stars and the age of the Universe were only initially considered, whereas now that we live in the Information Age, new elements like the emergence of strong A.I. and Virtual Reality also have to be thrown into the mix --why risk your life in something as useless as conquering the Galaxy, when you could choose immortality inside a simulated Paradise catered to your every whim?

NASA and SETI keep insisting that evidence of intelligent ETs is 20 years in the horizon --though they keep repeating that every 10 years or so. The prediction will either come true or it won't, like so many other scientific broken promises (where's my god-damned jet pack?!) and if in 2035 we still hear nothing but apparent silence from the Great Beyond, I'm sure the Fermi Paradox will remain an inexhaustible fountain of creative ideas to explain our cosmic isolation.

...Maybe that's the point of it?

Inhabited Sky: Researchers Discuss Historical Sightings of UFOs

Last week in Spain a group of fantastic researchers into the UFO phenomenon came together for the 'Inhabited Sky' conference in Spain (three of whom I've had the honour of publishing, in Darklore and standalone books). Jacques Vallee, Chris Aubeck, Theo Paijmans and Nigel Watson discussed sightings of UFOs throughout history, and the various things we've learned in recent times about the phenomenon.

As many readers would know, Jacques Vallee's Passport to Magonia (re-released last year by Daily Grail Publishing) is the classic work in this field, but his more recent book with Chris Aubeck, Wonders in the Sky, updates the historical catalogue of sightings significantly. Nigel Watson and Theo Paijmans are also respected Fortean historical detectives, looking back at old sightings and stories and digging for the truth behind them. So the line-up was definitely an impressive one.

Luckily for us, their presentations at the 'Inhabited Sky' conference were captured on video (see the top of this post), so there's a full 3 hours of fascinating lectures and Q&A for interested readers to dig into. While the introductions and questions are in Spanish, the speakers themselves presented in English - see the timeline below if you're searching for something in particular:

3:30 - Theo Paijmans, ufologist, Dutch author and editor, examines the social impact of spaceships and aliens in comics and literature of the early twentieth century.

41:00 - Nigel Watson, author of the recent book UFOs of the First World War (2015), tell us how advances in aviation and space travel were published in the media and art and how it shapes our view of them.

1:17:30 - Jacques Vallée, astrophysicist, computer scientist and world-renowned ufologist, will talk about the importance and impact of anomalous phenomena observed since ancient times.

2:04:00 - Jacques Vallée and Chris Aubeck, questions and debate on anomalous phenomena observed since ancient times.

Related book: Passport to Magonia

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They Rode the Flying Saucers: Upcoming Documentary About Contactees

Right after Kenneth Arnold's sighting of 9 Chevron-shaped objects flying at great speed near mount Rainier in June of 1947, the American media was flooded with similar reports coming from all around the country. The modern era of UFOs had begun, and during the next decade civilian associations like NICAP and APRO were founded in an attempt to understand the nature and origin of these objects, as well as to demand transparency from the government which was suspect from the beginning of hiding what it knew about them to the public.

During their arduous struggles in trying to gather evidence which could prove the existence of what they believed were extraterrestrial craft visiting our planet, these investigative associations were consistently forced to change their expectations about what flying saucers could and couldn't do. When only reports of high-altitude objects were deemed credible, there soon came sightings at close range; when sightings at close range were finally accepted, they were followed by reports of actual landings; when landing cases were reluctantly deemed credible, there soon came sightings of the saucer occupants leaving their craft and interacting with the witnesses. As seasoned abduction researcher Dr. Leo Sprinkle once said to Mike Clelland during an audio interview, the phenomenon is forever one step ahead of us, and is always delighted to shatter whatever comfortable preconception we might have of it.

One preconception that has always been hard to accept --even to this day-- is the idea that UFO occupants would establish a long-lasting relationship with a particular witness, choosing him or her as their appointed ambassador to the rest of Humanity. And yet that's exactly what a few individuals claimed during the 1950's and 60's, speaking before amazed audiences --and suspicious government agencies-- about their regular encounters with these beings; these were not tentacled monsters coming to our planet with ill-intents, they said, but our (very human-like) brothers from outer space, bringing a message of love and universal peace to mankind.

Both NICAP and APRO always considered people like George Adamski and George Van Tassel, with their stories of mingling with angelic Venusians and etheric spacecraft, to be nothing but crackpots at best --or hucksters and attention-seekers at worst; and now that the tools of modern Science has shown Venus to be an inhospitable hell-hole, and the photos taken by Adamsky or others have been proven to be hoaxes, our opinion of the Contactees has only worsened.

But now comes a new documentary by film-maker Patrick Connelly, intended to take a fresh, new look at that fascinating moment in XXth century history, when the wounds of WWII were still fresh and the new threat of nuclear annihilation loomed menacingly above the seemingly tranquil suburban landscapes of America. A time when people looked to the sky searching for answers, yearning for someone who could save us from ourselves.

They Rode the Flying Saucers is still in production, and will feature interviews with scholars like historian Aaron Gulyas who wrote a book about the Contactee era, as well as my friend Greg Bishop who has always been enamored with the tales of the Space Brothers --Greg interviewed Patrick last year on his show Radio Misterioso, so if you wish to listen to the podcast click here.

To learn more about the film, visit its official website. And just to get you Urantians ready for a vibration-raising weekend full of interplanetary kinship, here's the Carpenter's 1970 classic Calling Occupants from Interplanetary Craft:

Are you ready for the transmission to commence?

The Roswell Slides: Chronicle of a Mummy Foretold

"It would be many years later, in front of the firing squad, when Col. Aureliano Buendía remembered that remote afternoon in which his father took him to see the ice..." ~Excerpt from the novel 'One Hundred Years of Solitude'.

2015 marks the first anniversary of Gabriel García Márquez's death. Without a doubt the most popular Latin American writer of his time, his literary style constitutes one of the best examples of the artistic movement known as 'Magical Realism', which is characterized by the insertion of fantastical events into common circumstances, thus transforming the extraordinary into ordinary and vice versa. It's no wonder the Colombian-born Nobel laureate ended up writing One Hundred Years of Solitude --his most famous novel-- during his stay in Mexico city; a place even more outlandish than Macondo, the fictitious Caribbean town he created as the setting of most of his stories. Salvador Dalí once said of Mexico, that he couldn't stand being in a country that was more surrealist than his own paintings.

I'm sure the eccentric Spanish artist would have felt vindicated, had he been present at the spectacle I attended on the night of May 5th. That evening UFOlogist Jaime Maussan --even though he keeps insisting he's merely a journalist-- invited the Mexican citizens along with the rest of the world to beWITNESS: The event that would "change history" by showing for the very first time "physical evidence" confirming the famous Roswell saucer crash of 1947, and the extraterrestrial presence in our planet. At the National Auditorium no less, the most illustrious public forum in the country with a total capacity of 10,000 seats, during a presentation which ended up being worthy of a García Márquez's novel.

But not for the reasons the organizers intended...

From the onset the whole thing seemed bizarre enough. After a couple of years of rumors concerning the recovery of 2 old Kodachrome slides purportedly showing a genuine corpse of an alien being, allegedly recovered after the Roswell crash --the be-all and end-all of all UFO cases according to American researchers, given their obsession with this particular 68-year-old mystery-- the story finally irrupted into the mainstream in early February of this year

More Than 1000 UFOs Were Sighted Over Canada in 2014

Canadian UFO

Since 1989, Ufology Research in Canada has collected UFO sighting data from active Canadian researchers, and each year has compiled it into an annual 'Canadian UFO Survey' and released it publicly "in an attempt to promote the dissemination of information across the field of ufology".

The 2014 report is now out, and it seems that - contrary to some media reports - UFOs are certainly not dead. 1021 UFO sighting reports were collected in Canada during 2014 - almost three a day - the third-highest number of UFO sightings recorded in the last 25 years.

Other interesting facts from the report summary:

  • The Top 5 metropolitan areas with the most UFO reports are (in order of highest): Toronto, Vancouver, Hamilton, Calgary and Montreal (tie), and Edmonton.
  • Although there has been a trend during the past 25 years of having more UFO reports received in the mid-summer months (corresponding to long nights and fair weather for observing UFOs in the night sky), 2014 was exceptional in that the was a marked peak in UFO reports in the early fall. In fact, almost 17 per cent of all reports in 2014 came in September, well above the average of 9.5 per cent for September during the past 25 years.
  • In 2014, the average Strangeness rating of UFO reports was 4.26, well above the 25-year average of 3.5 and above last year’s average of 3.67. Strangeness measures the degree to which a UFO report is comparatively unusual, for example a simple light in the sky being 2 or 3, and occupants observed outside a landed craft being about 8 or 9 on the Strangeness ratings scale. The average Reliability rating was similarly up in 2014, suggesting more cases were of higher quality or were better investigated. Most UFO sightings, unfortunately, are not well investigated, leaving the field wide open for speculation and sensationalism.
  • More than 47 per cent of all UFO sightings were of an object described as a “point source,” or starlike.
  • The typical UFO sighting lasted approximately 13 minutes in 2014, comparable with other years.

Head over to the Ufology Research website for more details, and follow the links to dig into the data.

(h/t Chris Rutkowski)