An Overview Of The Significance Of Obama's Win In The U..S. Presidential Election!

Obama's win made me very happy; because, he might surprise everyone. None the less, Obama was by far the lesser of two bad choices!

The main reason that he won is that he got 70% of the Latino vote and he got 70% of the Jewish vote which was a vote against Israel! Furthermore, many Representatives and Senators that were opposed to Islam lost there bids for reelection! It is the dawning of a bright new day in U.S. politics and Israel will have to go it alone!

First of all, Obama won relatively big primarially because of the Latino vote! So, migrant workers and other Latinos are going to be getting much better treatment! Red Pill and other Latinos on TDG need to make their wish lists and send them to both the Democrats and the Republicans! I'm certain that a constitutional ammendment that would make Spanish the Official Second Language of the U.S. could easily be passed. Besides, Spanish has been the unofficial second language of the U.S. for decades.

If Obama had atleast split the Latino vote, the 70% of the Jewish vote was probably enough for Obama to win. But, the Jewish, anti-Israel, vote did not win this election for Obama! The Latino vote proved that the Jewish vote isn't very important! Attention TDG Latinos, Remember this!!!

Now, Obama can be fair and support Islamic interests and oppose the crimes against humanity that are being committed against the long suffering peace loving Palestinians by the Israelis!!!

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Inannawhimsey's picture
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red pill junkie is a Latino???

i thought he was a human being...

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

cnnek's picture
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Inannawhimsey,

Red Pill ie an Ethnic Latino Human Being and I'm an Ethnic German Human Being!

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}

Inannawhimsey's picture
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Ah, I think I get your BS:

Isn't Latino a political term?

Because there aren't any in Canada...

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

cnnek's picture
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Inannawhimsey

Latino refers anyone from south of Texas and many of the Carribian Islands or whose ancestors are from these places, i.e. Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, etc.. In other words, Latino is a general catch all term; but, in the U.S., Latinos are a very important voting block!

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}

Inannawhimsey's picture
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i hoid that the concept of 'Latino' was created in the US to get a powerful voting bloc together -- it seems that it has worked :3

Yay creating tribes to get things done!

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

cnnek's picture
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Inannawhimsey

As I recall, I first heard the term Latino in the 1950s or early 1960s, between about 1954 and about 1962.

At a later time, it may have been born again as a political term!

E-mail Pepe Escobar at The Asian Times On Line. http://www.asiantimesonline.com
He will know the answer. Pepe is one of the best newspaper columnists in the world!!! Everybody should read Pepe in my opinion!!!

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}

Inannawhimsey's picture
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ty cnnek :3

ps here`s something unrelated for you to drool over

See video

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

cnnek's picture
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Inannawhimsey

I really do enjoy your posts; because, they are usually a supprise!

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}

Inannawhimsey's picture
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here's another one for you

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

Inannawhimsey's picture
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side note: I LOVE JAPAN: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/01...

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

emlong's picture
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I too love Japanese culture and collect "kashigata." I can never get over the paradoxes of Japanese culture. In one way they are stiff and formal, yet in other ways they are more liberal than western culture. Essentially, I think the Japanese are a more mature culture and have come to understand the need for both rigid discipline and release.

red pill junkie's picture
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Yo soy quen soy, y no me parezco a naiden!

See video

PS: The irony is that now the Repubs are gonna be the ones to push for a new Immigration reform. They need to prove they can be our BFFs ;)

It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie
_______________
@red_pill_junkie

Inannawhimsey's picture
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ps here's a documentary of a very young Randi having to deal with some terrible purveyors of woo ;3

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LW8gr-BgU...

(i think pretty much all of us are in there)

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

emlong's picture
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Has anyone ever done a cultural study on why computers in old movies blink like pinball machines?

Inannawhimsey's picture
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if anyone would know, the collective freaks of thedailygrail would know :3

(i can hear red pill junkie composing a post...)

---------
All that lives is holy, life delights in life.

--William Blake

emlong's picture
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Well, of course the first Univac type computers used tubes that lit up in jumpy ways, so I suppose they were in bounds to assume that future devices would be using the same tubes. I love watching the various goofy permutations of "computer" in movies preceding the silicon revolution.

cnnek's picture
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red pill junkie wrote:

The irony is that now the Repubs are gonna be the ones to push for a new Immigration reform. They need to prove they can be our BFFs ;)

Red Pill

The Republicans are going to introduce Immigration Reform; but, the Democrats are going to vigorously support Immigration Reform! Furthermore, if the Republicans aren't careful, the Democrats will introduce Immigration Reform before the Republicans introduce it! In any case, Immigration Reform is going to be a defacto Bipartisan goal!!!

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}

red pill junkie's picture
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Don't forget the GOP still controls the House of Representatives. They'll need to learn how to work together.

It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me...
It's all the rabbit SH*T you stumble over on your way down!!!

Red Pill Junkie
_______________
@red_pill_junkie

cnnek's picture
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Red Pill

They are the same! They act differently to fool the sheeple. The political theater is interesting. The Bush family and the Clinton family are very good friends!

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}

emlong's picture
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The Presidential Election Exposed, Again, the Death of the Liberal Class
Monday, 12 November 2012 11:00 By Chris Hedges, Truthdig | Op-Ed

President Barack Obama waves after giving his victory speech during his election night event at the McCormick Place Lakeside Center in Chicago, following Election Day, early Wednesday morning, November 7, 2012. (Photo: Doug Mills / The New York Times) The presidential election exposed the liberal class as a corpse. It fights for nothing. It stands for nothing. It is a useless appendage to the corporate state. It exists not to make possible incremental or piecemeal reform, as it originally did in a functional capitalist democracy; instead it has devolved into an instrument of personal vanity, burnishing the hollow morality of its adherents. Liberals, by voting for Barack Obama, betrayed the core values they use to define themselves—the rule of law, the safeguarding of civil liberties, the protection of unions, the preservation of social welfare programs, environmental accords, financial regulation, a defiance of unjust war and torture, and the abolition of drone wars. The liberal class clung desperately during the long nightmare of this political campaign to one or two issues, such as protecting a woman’s right to choose and gender equality, to justify its complicity in a monstrous evil. This moral fragmentation—using an isolated act of justice to define one’s self while ignoring the vast corporate assault on the nation and the ecosystem along with the pre-emptive violence of the imperial state—is moral and political capitulation. It fails to confront the evil we have become.

“The American Dream has run out of gas,” wrote the novelist J.G. Ballard. “The car has stopped. It no longer supplies the world with its images, its dreams, its fantasies. No more. It’s over. It supplies the world with its nightmares now. …”

Liberals have assured us that after the election they will build a movement to hold the president accountable—although how or when or what this movement will look like they cannot say. They didn’t hold him accountable during his first term. They won’t during his second. They have played their appointed roles in the bankrupt political theater that passes for electoral politics. They have wrung their hands, sung like a Greek chorus about the evils of the perfidious opponent, assured us that there is no other viable option, and now they will exit the stage. They will carp and whine in the wings until they are trotted out again to assume their role in the next political propaganda campaign of disempowerment and fear. They will, in the meantime, become the butt of ridicule and derision by the very politicians they supported.

The ineffectiveness of the liberal class, as I saw in the former Yugoslavia and as was true in Weimar Germany, perpetuates a dangerous political paralysis. The longer the paralysis continues, the longer systems of power are unable to address the suffering and grievances of the masses, the more the formal mechanisms of power are reviled. The liberal establishment’s inability to defy corporate power, to stand up for its supposed liberal beliefs, means its inevitable disappearance, along with the disappearance of traditional liberal values. This, as history has amply pointed out, is the road to despotism. And we are further down that road than many care to admit.

Any mass movement that arises—and I believe one is coming—will be fueled, like the Occupy movement, by radicals who have as deep a revulsion for Democrats as they do for Republicans. The radicals who triumph, however, may not be progressive. Populist movements, from labor unions to an independent press to socialist third parties, have been destroyed in the United States. A protofascist movement that coalesces around a mystical nationalism, that fuses the symbols of the country with those of Christianity, that denigrates reason and elevates mass emotions will have broad appeal. It will offer to followers a leap from the deep pit of despair and frustration to the heights of utopia. It will speak in the language of violence and demonize the vulnerable, from undocumented workers to homosexuals to people of color to liberals to the poor. And this force, financed by the most retrograde elements of corporate capitalism, could usher in a species of corporate fascism in a period of economic or environmental instability.

The historian Fritz Stern in “The Politics of Cultural Despair,” his book on the rise of fascism in Germany, warns repeatedly of the danger of a bankrupt liberalism. Stern, who sees the same dark, irrational forces at work today that he watched as a boy in Nazi Germany, argues that the spiritually and politically alienated are the prime recruits for a politics centered around cultural hatreds and personal resentments.

“They attacked liberalism,” Stern writes of the fascists emerging at the time in Germany, “because it seemed to them the principal premise of modern society; everything they dreaded seemed to spring from it; the bourgeois life, Manchesterism, materialism, parliament and the parties, the lack of political leadership. Even more, they sense in liberalism the source of all their inner sufferings. Theirs was a resentment of loneliness; their one desire was for a new faith, a new community of believers, a world with fixed standards and no doubts, a new national religion that would bind all Germans together. All this, liberalism denied. Hence, they hated liberalism, blamed it for making outcasts of them, for uprooting them from their imaginary past, and from their faith.”

I am not sure when I severed myself irrevocably from the myth of America. It began when I was a seminarian, living for more than two years in Boston’s inner city on a street that had more homicides than any other in the city. I had to confront in the public housing projects the cruelty of white supremacy, the myriad institutional mechanisms that kept poor people of color trapped, broken and impoverished, the tragic squandering of young lives and the fatuous liberals who spoke in lofty language about empowering people they never met. The ties unraveled further during the five years I spent as a war correspondent in El Salvador and Nicaragua. I stood in too many mud-walled villages looking at the mutilated bodies of men, women and children, murdered by U.S.-backed soldiers, death squads and paramilitary units. I heard too many lies spewed out by Ronald Reagan and the State Department to justify these killings. And by the time I was in Gaza, looking at the twisted limbs of dead women and children and listening to Israeli and U.S. officials describe an Israeli airstrike as a “surgical” hit on Islamic militants, it was over. I knew the dark heart of America. I knew who we were, what we did, what we actually stood for and the terrifying and willful innocence that permits most Americans to think of themselves as good and virtuous when they are, in reality, members of an efficient race of killers and ruthless profiteers.

I was sickened and repulsed. My loyalty shifted from the state, from any state, to the powerless, to the landless peasants in Latin America, the Palestinians in Gaza or the terrified families in Iraq and Afghanistan. Those who suffer on the outer reaches of empire, as well as in our internal colonies and sacrifice zones, constitute my country. And any action, including voting, that does not unequivocally condemn and denounce their oppressors is a personal as well as a moral betrayal.

“We talk of the Turks and abhor the cannibals; but may not some of them go to heaven before some of us?” Herman Melville wrote. “We may have civilized bodies and yet barbarous souls. We are blind to the real sights of this world; deaf to its voices; and dead to its death.”

For a poor family in Camden, N.J., impoverished residents in the abandoned coal camps in southern West Virginia, the undocumented workers that toil in our nation’s produce fields, Native Americans trapped on reservations, Palestinians, Iraqis, Afghans, those killed by drones in Pakistan, Yemen or Somalia, or those in the squalid urban slums in Africa, it makes no difference if Mitt Romney or Obama is president. And since it makes no difference to them, it makes no difference to me. I seek only to defy the powers that orchestrate and profit from their misery.

The oppressed, the more than half of the world’s population who survive on less than $2 a day, will be the first to be sacrificed because of our refusal to halt fossil fuel’s degradation of the natural world and the assault of globalization. They already hate us with a righteous fury. They see us for who we are. They also grasp that for power to be threatened it must be confronted by another form of power. They know that the only way to effect change is to make the powerful fear their ability to retaliate. And the oppressed, inside and outside empire, are methodically building that power. We saw it at work on 9/11. We see it every day in Iraq and Afghanistan. And we will see it, although I pray it will be nonviolent, on our own city streets.

The corporate state, faced with rebellion from within and without, does not know how to define or control this rising power, from the Arab Spring to the street protests in Greece and Spain to the Occupy movement. Rebellion always mystifies the oppressor. It appears irrational. It does not make sense. The establishment asks: What are their demands? Why do they hate us? What do they want? The oppressor can never hear the answer, for the answer is always the same—we seek to destroy your power. The oppressor, blind to the brutality and injustice meted out to sustain dominance and prosperity, escalates the levels of force employed to protect privilege. The crimes of the oppressor are seen among the elite as the administering of justice—law and order, the war on terror, the natural law of globalization, the right granted by privilege and power to shape and govern the world. The oppressor cannot see the West’s false humanism. The oppressor cannot, as James Baldwin wrote, understand that our “history has no moral justification, and the West has no moral authority.” The oppressor, able to speak only in the language of force and increasingly lashing out like a wounded animal, will be consumed in the inferno.

“People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction,” Baldwin wrote, “and anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead turns himself into a monster.

This piece was reprinted by Truthout with permission or license.

cnnek's picture
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Emlong

Entitlements, like social welfare programs, have caused most of the sovereign debt problem in the world; because, socialism is both a financial catastrophy and self defeating. Privately owned and/or controled central banks like the Federal Reserve Bank, the Third Bank of the United States, have created huge debts and devalued currencies which makes the debt problem much worse by charging nations banking fees for printing money and bailing out banks! It is time for too big to fail corporations to fail; because, too big to fail corporations are too big to properly manage!!! Glass-steegel type laws that separate commercial banks and investment banks that never should have been repealed must be implimented!

The size of companies should be limited. Conglomerates should be outlawed. Companies should have to form joint ventures for large projects. Medium sized and small sized companies should be encouraged. This will creat tens of thousands of jobs. Too big to fail corporations destroy tens of thousands of jobs. Social welfare should be handled by communities creating doable jobs. In Japan, physically and mentally disabled persons don't have a problem with being employed and many of them have their own small businesses. If you want to taste some great cooking, get someone with autism to cook for you! If a person is too disabled, they are taken care of; but, the vast majority of disabled people want to work and feel worth while! Very many Japanese have a small family business in their homes. They live upstairs and they have their businesses on street level. This also provides jobs for many Japanese families and disabled family members,too.

What do you think?

cnnek

{You Can Teach People How To Think Critically Or What To Think; But, You Can't Do Both! It Is Better To Teach People How To Think Critically!!!}