Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:50pm
BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Einstein's Gravity Waves Could Be Found with New Method

Space.com - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:34pm
Gravitational waves, invisible ripples in the fabric of space and time, might be detected by looking for the brightening of stars, researchers say.
Categories: Science

Partial Solar Eclipse Wows Skywatchers Across North America (Photos, Video)

Space.com - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:32pm
A partial solar eclipse darkened the skies above much of North America this evening.
Categories: Science

Visualizing Our Tech Worship With Giant Webs of Circuitry

Wired News - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:30pm

For Italian artist Leonardo Ulian, this is our universe. At its center: a microchip. Beyond: resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors. Ulian’s “technological mandalas”—webs of circuitry in the form of the Hindu or Buddhist symbolic diagrams of the cosmos—are icons for an electronic age, and he’ll be exhibiting them this fall in Milan. Each mandala, the biggest […]

The post Visualizing Our Tech Worship With Giant Webs of Circuitry appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Physics of the Hendo Hoverboard

Wired News - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:27pm

The Hendo hoverboard probably uses electromagnetic repulsion for lift off. America's physics teacher explains how it might work.

The post The Physics of the Hendo Hoverboard appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Mothman Over England?

Cryptomundo - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:26pm
"Pilots on a holiday jet were left stunned when a 'flying man' whizzed past their aircraft at 3,500 feet. The mystery man flew within 100 meters of the plane and left the pilots baffled as to how he was moving through the air, as neither could see a canopy suspending him."
Categories: Fortean

For brain hemorrhage, risk of death lower at high-volume hospitals

Science Daily - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:26pm
For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of subarachnoid hemorrhage cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a new study.
Categories: Science

Global boom in hydropower expected this decade

Science Daily - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:26pm
An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global electricity production from hydropower, it could reduce the number of our last remaining large free-flowing rivers by about 20 percent and pose a serious threat to freshwater biodiversity.
Categories: Science

Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent

Science Daily - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:26pm
Scientists have succeeded in creating a large metamaterial, up to 4 mm x 4 mm2 in size, that is essentially isotropic, using a type of metamaterial element called a split-ring resonator.
Categories: Science

Liquid helium offers a fascinating new way to make charged molecules

Science Daily - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:25pm
Chemists have developed a completely new way of forming charged molecules which offers tremendous potential for new areas of chemical research.
Categories: Science

New methods for maintaining the quality of minimally processed potatoes for 14 days, without the use of sulphites

Science Daily - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:25pm
Researchers have proposed alternatives to the use of sulphites in potatoes, one of the main preservatives currently used and which, among other properties, prevents the browning that appears after peeling and/or cutting certain foods.
Categories: Science

Intense heat causes health problems among sugar cane workers

Science Daily - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:25pm
Hard work under hot sun causes health problems for sugar cane workers in Costa Rica, such as headache, nausea, and renal dysfunction. The presence of symptoms is also expected to increase in line with ongoing climate changes, according to research.
Categories: Science

Detritus From Cancer Cells May Infect Healthy Cells

Slashdot - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 12:07pm
bmahersciwriter writes Tiny bubbles of cell membrane — called exosomes — are shed by most cells. Long thought to be mere trash, researchers had recently noticed that they often contain short, regulatory RNA molecules, suggesting that exosomes may be one way that cells communicate with one another. Now, it appears that RNA in the exosomes shed by tumor cells can get into healthy cells and 'transform' them, putting them on the path to becoming cancerous themselves.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Future of Adobe’s App Interaction Looks Pretty Awesome

Wired News - Fri, 24/10/2014 - 10:30am

Adobe recently released a video in which it showed off forward-looking features for its suite of apps on the tablet.

The post The Future of Adobe’s App Interaction Looks Pretty Awesome appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science