Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tracking a Bitcoin Thief, Part II: Illustrating the Issue of Trust In Altcoins

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:59pm
An anonymous reader writes The team over at the BITCOMSEC (Bitcoin Community Security) project released a second part to their 'Tracking a Bitcoin Thief' series in which they disclose what happened to a once-rising alternate crypto currency project that promised to place guaranteed value of its MidasCoins by backing it with actual Gold. Dealing with the reality of user compromise, the projects founder ups and runs away with all of the communities coins; cashing them out at an exchange for Bitcoins. A sobering tale of trust issues within the alternate crypto currency community. (The first part is interesting, too.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Planning Thumb-Sized PCs For Next Year

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 10:17pm
angry tapir (1463043) writes Intel is shrinking PCs to thumb-sized "compute sticks" that will be out next year. The stick will plug into the back of a smart TV or monitor "and bring intelligence to that," said Kirk Skaugen, senior vice president and general manager of the PC Client Group at Intel, during the Intel investor conference in Santa Clara, California. They might be a bit late to the party, but since Skaugen mentioned both Chromecast and Amazon's Fire TV Stick, hopefully that means Intel has some more interesting and general-purpose plans.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Amnesty International Releases Tool To Combat Government Spyware

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 9:34pm
New submitter Gordon_Shure_DOT_com writes Human rights charity Amnesty International has released Detekt, a tool that finds and removes known government spyware programs. Describing the free software as the first of its kind, Amnesty commissioned the tool from prominent German computer security researcher and open source advocate Claudio Guarnieri, aka 'nex'. While acknowledging that the only sure way to prevent government surveillance of huge dragnets of individuals is legislation, Marek Marczynski of Amnesty nevertheless called the tool (downloadable here) a useful countermeasure versus spooks. According to the app's instructions, it operates similarly to popular malware or virus removal suites, though systems must be disconnected from the Internet prior to it scanning.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Google’s New Service Kills Ads on Your Favorite Sites for a Monthly Fee

Wired News - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 9:31pm

Google Contributor asks people to pay a tiny amount to support the websites they love. But will it work?

The post Google’s New Service Kills Ads on Your Favorite Sites for a Monthly Fee appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Does Being First Still Matter In America?

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:46pm
dcblogs writes At the supercomputing conference, SC14, this week, a U.S. Dept. of Energy offical said the government has set a goal of 2023 as its delivery date for an exascale system. It may be taking a risky path with that amount of lead time because of increasing international competition. There was a time when the U.S. didn't settle for second place. President John F. Kennedy delivered his famous "we choose to go to the moon" speech in 1962, and seven years later a man walked on the moon. The U.S. exascale goal is nine years away. China, Europe and Japan all have major exascale efforts, and the government has already dropped on supercomputing. The European forecast of Hurricane Sandy in 2012 was so far ahead of U.S. models in predicting the storm's path that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was called before Congress to explain how it happened. It was told by a U.S. official that NOAA wasn't keeping up in computational capability. It's still not keeping up. Cliff Mass, a professor of meteorology at the University of Washington, wrote on his blog last month that the U.S. is "rapidly falling behind leading weather prediction centers around the world" because it has yet to catch up in computational capability to Europe. That criticism followed the $128 million recent purchase a Cray supercomputer by the U.K.'s Met Office, its meteorological agency.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

This 200-MPH Electric Hyperbike Is Coming to American Streets

Wired News - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:45pm

Last year, a man named Carlin Dunne raced an electric motorcycle in the Pikes Peak International Hillclimb. He reached the summit in a blistering 10 minutes flat, handily beating his closest competitor through the mountain's 156 curves by 21 seconds. That kind of time is impressive for a gasoline-powered superbike. It is downright amazing for an electric motorcycle.

The post This 200-MPH Electric Hyperbike Is Coming to American Streets appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Longer work hours for moms mean less sleep, higher BMIs for preschoolers

Science Daily - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:39pm
A link between moms' employment and overweight/obesity in preschoolers has been found by researchers. The study investigated links between mothers' employment status and their children's weight over time, exploring the impact of potential mediators, such as children's sleep and dietary habits, the amount of time they spent watching TV and family mealtime routines.
Categories: Science

Improved nanomaterials: Understanding surface structure of quantum dots will aid design of new solar devices

Science Daily - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:39pm
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has just emerged.
Categories: Science

Evolutionary principles used to model cancer mutations, discover potential therapeutic targets

Science Daily - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:38pm
Researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.
Categories: Science

What’s Missing from the Industrial Internet of Things Conversation? Software

Wired News - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:14pm

These days, you can hardly have a technology conversation without talking about the Internet of Things (IoT). And when that conversation shifts its focus to the industrial sector, including energy, Oil & Gas, Power & Utilities, and petrochemicals, among others, the discussion changes to what is being called the “Industrial Internet of Things” (IIoT). So […]

The post What’s Missing from the Industrial Internet of Things Conversation? Software appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

A Brilliant Mind: SUSE's Kernel Guru Speaks

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 8:03pm
An anonymous reader writes The man who in every sense sits at the nerve centre of SUSE Linux has no airs about him. At 38, Vojtch Pavlík is disarmingly frank and often seems a bit embarrassed to talk about his achievements, which are many and varied. He is every bit a nerd, but can be candid, though precise. As director of SUSE Labs, it would be no exaggeration to call him the company's kernel guru. Both recent innovations that have come from SUSE — patching a live kernel, technology called kGraft, and creating a means for booting openSUSE on machines locked down with secure boot, have been his babies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Workaday Software For BSD On the Desktop?

Slashdot - Thu, 20/11/2014 - 7:53pm
An anonymous reader writes So for a variety of reasons (some related to recent events, some ongoing for a while) I've kinda soured on Linux and have been looking at giving BSD a shot on the desktop. I've been a Gentoo user for many years and am reasonably comfortable diving into stuff, so I don't anticipate user friendliness being a show stopper. I suspect it's more likely something I currently do will have poor support in the BSD world. I have of course been doing some reading and will probably just give it a try at some point regardless, but I was curious what experience and advice other slashdot users could share. There's been many bold comments on slashdot about moving away from Linux, so I suspect I'm not the only one asking these questions. Use-case wise, my list of must haves is: Minecraft, and probably more dubiously, FTB; mplayer or equivalent (very much prefer mplayer as it's what I've used forever); VirtualBox or something equivalent; Firefox (like mplayer, it's just what I've always used, and while I would consider alternatives, that would definitely be a negative); Flash (I hate it, but browsing the web sans-flash is still a pain); OpenRA (this is the one I anticipate giving me the most trouble, but playing it is somewhat of an obsession). Stuff that would be nice but I can live without: Full disk encryption; Openbox / XFCE (It's what I use now and would like to keep using, but I could probably switch to something else without too much grief); jackd/rakarrack or something equivalent (currently use my computer as a cheap guitar amp/effects stack); Qt (toolkit of choice for my own stuff). What's the most painless way to transition to BSD for this constellation of uses, and which variety of BSD would you suggest?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science