Scientists remove reliance on seasonality in new lines of broccoli, potentially doubling crop production

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:19pm
Scientists are developing a new line of fast-growing sprouting broccoli that goes from seed to harvest in 8-10 weeks. It has the potential to deliver two full crops a season in-field or it can be grown all year round in protected conditions, which could help with continuity of supply, as growers would no longer be reliant on seasonal weather conditions.
Categories: Science

Legal marijuana sales creating escalating damage to the environment

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:17pm
Marijuana sales have created an economic boom in U.S. states that have fully or partially relaxed their cannabis laws, but is the increased cultivation and sale of this crop also creating escalating environmental damage and a threat to public health?
Categories: Science

Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:17pm
Autonomous driving, automatic speech recognition, and the game Go: Deep Learning is generating more and more public awareness. Scientists have now used it to determine the development of hematopoietic stem cells in advance. In a new article, they describe how their software predicts the future cell type based on microscopy images.
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A novel principle to mobilize neurons for brain repair

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:17pm
Restorative neuroscience is a rapidly advancing scientific field considering our progressively aging society. Redirecting immature neurons that reside in specific brain areas towards the sites of brain damage is an appealing strategy for the therapy of acute brain injury or stroke. A collaborative effort has revealed that some mature neurons are able to reconfigure their local microenvironment such that it becomes conducive for adult-born immature neurons to extensively migrate. Thus, a molecular principle emerges that can allow researchers to best mobilize resident cellular reserves in the adult brain and guide immature neurons to the sites of brain damage.
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New approach to measure fluid drag on the body during swimming

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:17pm
A key factor to improve swimming performance is reducing resistance that water exerts on the moving body. This resistance, known as drag, is influenced by factors including the stroke rate, swimmer's size, and swimming speed. The range of factors, along with the motion of the swimmer, have made it difficult to measure drag accurately. Researchers have now developed a method for accurately determining drag during front-crawl swimming.
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New behavioral therapy to support Japanese mothers of children with ADHD

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:17pm
Researchers have successfully adapted a parent-training program for ADHD for use with families in Japan, where ADHD-specific behavioral interventions are limited.
Categories: Science

News Briefs 21-02-2017

Underground Stream - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:10pm

Nothing to see here, move along...

Thanks @thePumamama and @MattStaggs..

Quote of the Day:

This is where we are at right now, as a whole. We are experiencing a reality based on a thin veneer of lies and illusions. A world where greed is our God and wisdom is sin, where division is key and unity is fantasy, where the ego-driven cleverness of the mind is praised, rather than the intelligence of the heart.

Bill Hicks

Zika may cause miscarriages, thin brain tissue in babies carried to term

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
In early pregnancy in mice with complete immune systems, Zika virus can cross the placenta -- intended to protect the developing fetus -- and appears to lead to a high percentage of miscarriages and to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells, report scientists.
Categories: Science

Longevity-promoting superstar gets revealed in Caenorhabditis reproducibility project

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
The amyloid dye Thioflavin T emerged as the superstar when age researchers in three independent laboratories tested ten already-promising pro-longevity chemicals across a range of distinctive strains and species of tiny nematode worms known as Caenorhabditis. The project, dubbed the Caenorhabditis Intervention Testing Program (CITP), tackled reproducibility, which has been a lingering problem in age research, given that some of the field's most prominent research findings cannot be replicated by other labs.
Categories: Science

Listeria may be serious miscarriage threat early in pregnancy

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
Listeria, a common food-borne bacterium, may pose a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy than appreciated, according to researchers studying how pathogens affect fetal development and change the outcome of pregnancy.
Categories: Science

Teens with PTSD, conduct disorder have difficulty recognizing facial expressions

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
Adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are more likely to misidentify sad and angry faces as fearful, while teens with symptoms of conduct disorder tend to interpret sad faces as angry, finds a study.
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Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
A central tenet of biology may need updating given new measurements of start codons.
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Seven new species of night frogs from India including four miniature forms

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
Scientists from India have discovered seven new frog species belonging to the genus Nyctibatrachus, commonly known as Night Frogs. This find is a result of five years of extensive explorations in the Western Ghats global biodiversity hotspot in India. Four out of seven of the new species are miniature-sized frogs (12.2-15.4 mm), which can comfortably sit on a coin or a thumbnail. These are among the smallest known frogs in the world.
Categories: Science

6,600 spills from fracking in just four states

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:05pm
Each year, 2 to 16 percent of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill hydrocarbons, chemical-laden water, hydraulic fracturing fluids and other substances, according to a new study. The analysis identified 6,648 spills reported across Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania during a 10-year period.
Categories: Science

Brain-computer interface advance allows fast, accurate typing by people with paralysis

Science Daily - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:04pm
A brain-to-computer hookup can enable people with paralysis to type via direct brain control at the highest speeds and accuracy levels reported to date, a clinical research publication has demonstrated.
Categories: Science

If AI Can Fix Peer Review in Science, AI Can Do Anything

Wired News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 1:00pm
Reading a scientific paper is not the same as understanding Shakespeare. The post If AI Can Fix Peer Review in Science, AI Can Do Anything appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

When Apps Get Too Human, They Tumble into the Uncanny Valley

Wired News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 12:00pm
The more personalized apps get, the more people like them—until they got too personalized. Then they seem freaky. The post When Apps Get Too Human, They Tumble into the Uncanny Valley appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Motorcycle Sleds + Vodka = A Very Russian Bike Rally

Wired News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 12:00pm
Once a year, thousands of riders come together to race DIY motorcycles on the ice and get drunk. It's great. The post Motorcycle Sleds + Vodka = A Very Russian Bike Rally appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Virtual Singapore Looks Just Like Singapore IRL—But With More Data

Wired News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 12:00pm
The island city-state's simulated version of itself is scheduled to be up and running by the end of the year. The post Virtual Singapore Looks Just Like Singapore IRL—But With More Data appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

How is The New York Times Really Doing?

Slashdot - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 12:00pm
Wired magazine did a profile on The New York Times in its this month's issue. Talking about the paper's transition from print to more digital-focus than ever, author Gabriel Snyder wrote, "It's to transform the Times' digital subscriptions into the main engine of a billion-dollar business, one that could pay to put reporters on the ground in 174 countries even if (OK, when) the printing presses stop forever." Veteran journalist Om Malik analyzes the numbers: -> The company reported revenue of nearly $1.6 billion in 2016 -- remarkably consistent with prior years. -> Print advertising revenue dipped by $70 million year-over-year to $327 million in 2016. -> Digital advertising revenue, while a meaningful portion of the Times' revenue, did not grow enough to offset vanishing print ad dollars. -> Total digital ad revenue in 2016 was $206 million, up only 6% from the prior year. -> The key revenue driver for the New York Times has been its digital subscription business, which added more than half a million paid subscribers in 2016. Thanks in part to interest around the presidential election, the newspaper added 276,000 new digital subscribers in Q4, the single largest quarterly increase since 2011 (the year the pay model was launched). The Times' digital success is hinged upon two major drivers: affiliate revenues from services like the Wirecutter and digital subscriptions. Advertising might be a good short term bandaid, but the company needs to focus on how to evolve away from it even more aggressively. The Times needs to simplify their sign-up experience and make it easier for people to pay for the subscriptions. As of now, it is like the sound you hear when scratching your nails on a piece of glass.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science