To improve global health, experts call for a standard list of essential diagnostic tests

Science Daily - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 2:17am
A team of experts has put together a list of the key diagnostic tests that every country should have available, with high quality standards, in order to make the best use of the World Health Organization's list of essential medicines. Many developing countries will need help with establishing high-quality labs to use them, but in the end it may be cost effective.
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It's not easy being green: What colors tell us about galaxy evolution

Science Daily - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 2:17am
Scientists may have answered why green galaxies are rare in our universe and why their color could reveal a troubled past.
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Breakthrough in brain cancer research

Science Daily - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 2:17am
Scientists have made a pioneering breakthrough in the understanding of how a fatal brain tumor grows -- which could lead to improved treatments for patients.
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Surface of Mercury arose from deep inside the planet

Science Daily - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 2:17am
Researchers have found that several volcanic deposits on Mercury's surface require mantle melting to have started close to the planet's core-mantle boundary, which lies only 400 km below the planets surface and making it unique in the solar system.
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DMCA Notices Remove 8,268 Projects On Github In 2015

Slashdot - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 1:25am
An anonymous reader writes: Github's transparency report for 2015 shows that the site received many DMCA notices that removed more than 8,200 projects. "In 2015, we received significantly more takedown notices, and took down significantly more content, than we did in 2014," Github reports. For comparison, the company received only 258 DMCA notices in 2014, 17 of which responded with a counter-notice or retraction. In 2015, they received 505 takedown notices, 62 of which were the subject of counters or withdrawals. TorrentFreak reports: "Copyright holders are not limited to reporting one URL or location per DMCA notice. In fact, each notice filed can target tens, hundreds, or even thousands of allegedly infringing locations." September was a particularly active month as it took down nearly 5,834 projects. "Usually, the DMCA reports we receive are from people or organizations reporting a single potentially infringing repository. However, every now and then we receive a single notice asking us to take down many repositories," Github explains. They are called 'Mass Removals' when more than 100 repositories are asked to be removed. "In all, fewer than twenty individual notice senders requested removal of over 90% of the content GitHub took down in 2015."

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Google's 'FASTER' 9000km, 60Tbps Transpacific Fiber Optics Cable Completed

Slashdot - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 12:45am
An anonymous reader writes from a report via 9to5Google: Google and an association of telecom providers have announced that the FASTER broadband cable system that links Japan and the United States is now complete. The system is the fastest of its kind and stretches nearly 9,000 km across the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, starting in Oregon and ending in two landing spots in Japan. The association consists of Google, China Mobile International, China Telecom Global, Global Transit, KDDI, Singtel, and supplier NEC Corporation. The estimated construction cost of the project was $300 million in 2014. At 60 terabits per second, FASTER will help "support the expected four-fold increase in broadband traffic demand between Asia and North America." The system uses a six-fiber pair cable and the latest 100Gbps digital coherent optical transmission technology. The service is scheduled to start on June 30, 2016, and will help increase the connectivity between Google's data centers scattered around the globe.

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FCC Says TV Airwaves Being Sold For Wireless Use Are Worth $86.4 Billion

Slashdot - Thu, 30/06/2016 - 12:05am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: The U.S. Federal Communications Commission said on Wednesday the price of 126 MHz of television airwaves taken from broadcasters to be sold for wireless use in an ongoing auction is $86.4 billion. The FCC disclosed the price in a statement after completing the first part of an auction to repurpose low-frequency wireless spectrum relinquished by television broadcasters. The so-called "broadcast incentive" spectrum auction is one of the commission's most complex and ambitious to date. In this round, called a reverse auction, broadcasters competed to give up spectrum to the FCC for the lowest price. In the next stage, the forward auction, wireless and other companies will bid to buy the airwaves for the highest price. If wireless companies are unwilling to pay $86.4 billion, the FCC may have to hold another round of bidding by broadcasters and sell less spectrum than had been expected, analysts said. The Wall Street Journal points out that $86.4 billion is more than the market cap of T-Mobile and Spring combined. It's roughly double the amount raised in the last FCC auction, where ATT spent $18.2 billion and Verizon spent $10.4 billion. It's highly likely we'll see multiple rounds stretching into 2017 that will eventually match the supply with the demand.

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Congressional Report Is the Latest to Slam a Bad Crypto Bill

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 11:55pm
A research paper from the House Subcommittee on Homeland Security puts another nail in the coffin of a Senate bill to effectively ban strong encryption. The post Congressional Report Is the Latest to Slam a Bad Crypto Bill appeared first on WIRED.
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Tesla Admits Defeat, Quietly Settles Model X Lawsuit Over Usability Problems

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 11:20pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from BGR: We can talk about how innovative Tesla is for days on end. Indeed, there's no disputing the fact that the company, in injecting a bit of Silicon Valley ingenuity into the tried and true auto design process, has completely turned the auto industry on its head. At the same time, Tesla helped kickstart the EV revolution, even causing traditional automakers like Porsche and BMW to start taking electric cars more seriously. But in Tesla's zeal to move extraordinarily quickly, problems have inevitably begun to creep in. Specifically, quality control issues still seem to be plaguing the Model X. According to a recent report, avowed Tesla fan named Barrett Lyon recently returned his Model X and filed a lawsuit against Tesla arguing that the Model X was "rushed" and released before it was ready for sale. Now comes word that Tesla has since quietly settled the lawsuit. "In Lyon's lawsuit," Fortune writes, "he claimed the cars doors opened and closed unpredictably, smashing into his wife and other cars, and that the Model X's Auto-Pilot feature posed a danger in the rain. He also shared a video that shows the car's self-parking feature failing to operate successfully." Tesla's response: "We are committed to providing an outstanding customer experience throughout ownership. As a principle, we are always willing to buy back a car in the rare event that a customer isn't completely happy. Today, the majority of Model X owners are loving their cars."

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UK Has Fastest Mobile Internet While US Lags Behind, Says Report

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 10:40pm
An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Verge: Content delivery network Akamai says the UK has the best average mobile connection speeds in the world. The State of the Internet report claims that British mobile users were able to get average speeds of 27.9 Mbps when connecting to Akamai's HTTP/S platform in Q1 2016, beating most countries in Europe by an average of more than 10 Mbps, and the United States' average speed by more than 20 Mbps. For comparison, the U.S. had an average connection speed of 5.1 Mbps, which was lower than Turkey, Kenya, and Paraguay, and on par with Thailand. Many European countries more than doubled the average U.S. speed, including Slovakia with 13.3 Mbps, France with 11.5 Mbps, and Germany with 15.7 Mbps. Algeria was only 2.9 Mbps slower than the United States' average with 2.2 Mbps, and they had the lowest average speed of countries included in the report. Akamai says its data shows that regular internet connections have continued to increase in speed, jumping 12 percent from Q4 2015 to 6.3 Mbps in Q1 2016, which is a year-on-year boost of 23 percent. Peak connection speed also rose to 34.7 Mbps, a 6.8 percent increase from the last quarter, and a 14 percent increase year-on-year. In addition, mobile data traffic is rising from just over 3,500 petabytes per month in Q1 2015 to more than 5,500 petabytes per month in the same period this year.

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The Ethics of Why You Should Definitely Watch Shark Week

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 10:25pm
You should be watching Shark Week. The post The Ethics of Why You Should Definitely Watch Shark Week appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

ACLU Lawsuit Challenges Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 10:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has filed a lawsuit with the U.S. Department of Justice contending that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act's criminal prohibitions have created a barrier for those wishing to conduct research and anti-discrimination testing online. The ACLU have pursued the matter on behalf of a group of academic researchers, computer scientists and journalists seeking to remove that barrier to allow for third-party testing and research into potential online discrimination. In a public statement the ACLU contend: "The CFAA violates the First Amendment because it limits everyone, including academics and journalists, from gathering the publicly available information necessary to understand and speak about online discrimination."

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Your Facebook Echo Chamber Just Got a Whole Lot Louder

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 9:50pm
A News Feed update will put friends and family first---and diverse opinions way behind. The post Your Facebook Echo Chamber Just Got a Whole Lot Louder appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google's My Activity Reveals How Much It Knows About You

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 9:20pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has released a new section to Google's account settings, called My Activity, which lets users review everything that Google has tracked about their online behavior -- search, YouTube, Chrome, Android, and every other Google service. Best of all, users can edit or delete their tracked behaviors. In addition, the My Activity tools come with new ad preferences. Google is now offering to use its behavioral information to tailer ads shown across the wider non-Google internet and Google's search pages, which until now was purely done through the use of cookies. The difference between Google and other companies that offer ads like Facebook is that Google is making this interest-based advertising extension optional, or opt-in, not opt-out. There are two separate behavioral advertising settings for users to switch on or off: signed in ads and signed out ads. Signed in ads are those on Google services, and signed out ads are those served by Google on third-party sites. However, if you're conscious about your privacy, you'll probably want to stay opted out.

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AMD RX 480 Offers Best-in-Class Performance For $199/$239

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 9:00pm
Reader Vigile writes: It's been a terribly long news cycle, but today is finally the day reviews and sales start of the new AMD Radeon RX 480 graphics card based on the company's latest Polaris architecture and built on 14nm FinFET process technology. With a starting price tag of $199 for the 4GB model and $239 for the 8GB, the RX 480 has some interesting performance characteristics. Compared to the GeForce GTX 970, currently selling for around $280, the RX 480 performs +/- 5-10% in DX11 games but PC Perspective found that the RX 480 was as much as 40% faster in DX12 titles like Gears of War, Hitman and Rise of the Tomb Raider. Compared to previous AMD products, the RX 480 is as fast as a Radeon R9 390 but uses just 150 watts compared to 275 watts for the previous generation. Chances are that NVIDIA will have a competing product based on Pascal available sometime in July, so AMD's advantage may be short-lived; but in the meantime, the Radeon RX 480 is clearly the best GPU for $200.AnandTech has more details.

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New neuroendovascular technique shows promise in stroke patients with large-vessel clots

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:59pm
Scientists report promising 90-day outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots who underwent thrombectomy or clot removal using the direct-aspiration, first pass technique (ADAPT). Approximately 58 percent of stroke patients with a large-vessel clot removed using the technique achieved a good outcome at 90 days, defined as a Modified Rankin Score (mRS) of 0 to 2.
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Ocean acidification affects predator-prey response

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:59pm
Ocean acidification makes it harder for sea snails to escape from their sea star predators, according to a study. The findings suggest that by disturbing predator-prey interactions, ocean acidification could spur cascading consequences for food web systems in shoreline ecosystems.
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Fire discovery sheds new light on 'hobbit' demise

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:59pm
Crucial new evidence has revealed modern humans (Homo sapiens) were likely using fire at Liang Bua 41,000 years ago, narrowing the time gap between the last hobbits (Homo floresiensis) and the first modern humans at this site on the Indonesian island of Flores.
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Men may face high lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:59pm
One in nine men may be at higher risk of premature death due to sudden cardiac death - usually with no warning. One in 30 women may face the same risk. A new study offers the first lifetime estimates for sudden cardiac death among Americans. High blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors were associated with a higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death -- a finding which could lead to screening methods for sudden cardiac death.
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Genetically inherited high cholesterol increases long-term risks of coronary heart disease, stroke

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:59pm
People who inherit a genetic disorder from one of their parents that results in high cholesterol may be five times more likely to develop coronary heart disease. These patients also may be more likely to have hardening of the arteries, including an accelerated onset of coronary heart disease by up to 30 years.
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