'First in human' trial defines safe dosage for small molecule drug ONC201 for solid cancer tumors

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:49pm
A ‘first in human’ clinical trial examining the small molecule drug ONC201 in cancer patients with advanced solid tumors shows that this investigational drug is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose. That’s according to investigators whose research also showed early signs of clinical benefit in patients with advanced prostate and endometrial cancers.
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A new web of life: First full family tree of the world's spiders

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:44pm
For the first time biologists have made a full family tree of the world's spiders, giving us knowledge about venoms that can be useful in medicine. And we might be able to develop silk just as good as the spider's.
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Patents Are A Big Part Of Why We Can't Own Nice Things

Slashdot - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:40pm
An anonymous reader shares an EFF article: Today, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that could allow companies to keep a dead hand of control over their products, even after you buy them. The case, Impression Products v. Lexmark International, is on appeal from the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, who last year affirmed its own precedent allowing patent holders to restrict how consumers can use the products they buy. That decision, and the precedent it relied on, departs from long established legal rules that safeguard consumers and enable innovation. When you buy something physical -- a toaster, a book, or a printer, for example -- you expect to be free to use it as you see fit: to adapt it to suit your needs, fix it when it breaks, re-use it, lend it, sell it, or give it away when you're done with it. Your freedom to do those things is a necessary aspect of your ownership of those objects. If you can't do them, because the seller or manufacturer has imposed restrictions or limitations on your use of the product, then you don't really own them. Traditionally, the law safeguards these freedoms by discouraging sellers from imposing certain conditions or restrictions on the sale of goods and property, and limiting the circumstances in which those restrictions may be imposed by contract. But some companies are relentless in their quest to circumvent and undermine these protections. They want to control what end users of their products can do with the stuff they ostensibly own, by attaching restrictions and conditions on purchasers, locking down their products, and locking you (along with competitors and researchers) out. If they can do that through patent law, rather than ordinary contract, it would mean they could evade legal limits on contracts, and that any one using a product in violation of those restrictions (whether a consumer or competitor) could face harsh penalties for patent infringement.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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How do metals interact with DNA?

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:37pm
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. Scientists have now developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA.
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After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:37pm
A new article explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome.
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Sea urchin spines could fix bones

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:37pm
More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines.
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'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:37pm
There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-on-a-glove.'
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Minitablets help medicate picky cats

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:37pm
Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavors or flavor coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.
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Stephen Hawking Fears He's Not Welcome in Trump's US

Space.com - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:37pm
Hawking also said climate change is "one of the greatest dangers we face."
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Diabetes researchers discover way to expand potent regulatory cells

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:36pm
For parents, storing their newborn baby's umbilical cord blood is a way to preserve potentially lifesaving cells. Now, a group of researchers has found a way to expand and preserve certain cord-blood cells as a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes.
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Premature infants in NICUs do better with light touch, study affirms

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:36pm
When premature infants were given more 'supportive touch' experiences, including skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding, their brains responded more strongly to light touch, according to new research.
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Sinking of seal beach wetlands tied to ancient quakes

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:08pm
When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.
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New cell membrane fusion model challenges dogma

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:08pm
Membrane fusion lies at the heart of many cell functions—from the secretion of antibodies to the release of neurotransmitters. For more than two decades, one view of the process by which membrane fusion occurs has been accepted as dogma; now recent studies indicate that fusion is more complex. These discoveries are being regarded by at least one leading cell biologist as “textbook changing” and could alter how we develop drugs that affect membrane fusion activities.
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The global tobacco control treaty has reduced smoking rates in its first decade, but more work is needed

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:07pm
Despite worldwide progress since the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC) came into effect in 2005, not all key demand-reduction measures have been fully implemented at the same pace, but doing so could reduce tobacco use even further, say researchers.
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Good News: Android’s Huge Security Problem Is Getting Less Huge

Wired News - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:00pm
According to Google's own stats, only half of Android devices received a security update any time in 2016. The post Good News: Android’s Huge Security Problem Is Getting Less Huge appeared first on WIRED.
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Google Maps Supercharges Location Sharing, Begins Drooling Over Your Data

Wired News - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:00pm
With a new feature, the mapping market heats up. The post Google Maps Supercharges Location Sharing, Begins Drooling Over Your Data appeared first on WIRED.
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Amazon To Expand Counterfeit Removal Program in Overture To Sellers

Slashdot - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 2:00pm
Amazon.com is expanding a program to remove counterfeit goods from its website this spring as part of a broader push to assure brand owners that the online retailer is an ally rather than a threat. From a report: As early as next month, any brand can register its logo and intellectual property with Amazon so the e-commerce company can take down listings and potentially seller accounts when counterfeits are flagged, Peter Faricy, vice president of Amazon Marketplace, said in an interview on Monday. The so-called brand registry, which had been in a test phase, will be widely available for free in North America, Faricy said ahead of his presentation at the Shoptalk commerce conference in Las Vegas.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Consumption of 'cannibal drug' in adolescence has prejudicial effects on adulthood

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 1:49pm
Consumption of the synthetic drug MDPV – a powerful psychostimulant known as ‘cannibal drug’- in adolescence, can increase vulnerability of cocaine addiction during adulthood, according to a study carried out with laboratory animals. 
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Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 1:49pm
Egyptologists have discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture. The discovery earned the scientists the award for one of the current ten most important archeological discoveries in Egypt from the Minister of Antiquities in Cairo.
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Salmon with side effects: Aquacultures are polluting Chile's rivers with a cocktail of dissolved organic substances

Science Daily - Wed, 22/03/2017 - 1:45pm
Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? Scientists are working to answer this question by examining the dissolved organic compounds which enter Chile’s rivers from salmon farms. They warn that these substances are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changing entire biological communities.
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