Hitching a ride: Misfiring drugs hit the wrong targets

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
Researchers have shown how anti-HIV protein inhibitor drugs can bind to the wrong protein, causing unwanted side effects.
Categories: Science

Looking to saliva to gain insight on evolution

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
There's no need to reinvent the genetic wheel. That's one lesson of a new study that looks to the saliva of humans, gorillas, orangutans, macaques and African green monkeys for insights into evolution. The work shows that adaptation isn't just about creating new tools for survival -- it's also about tweaking the ones we have.
Categories: Science

Sustainable alternative to methyl bromide for tomato production

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
Field studies in two Florida locations evaluated and compared anaerobic soil disinfestations (ASD) and chemical soil fumigation (CSF) performance on weed and nematodes control, and on fruit yield and quality of fresh-market tomato. Results indicated that ASD (applied using a mixture of composted poultry litter and molasses as carbon source) may be a potentially sustainable alternative to conventional CSF for controlling plant-parasitic nematodes and weeds without causing negative effects on fruit yield and quality.
Categories: Science

Purslane production practices enhance nutritional value

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
A study evaluated the influence of nitrogen fertility levels on biomass and concentrations of nutritionally important carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments in purslane. Two purslane cultivars were grown in nutrient solution culture under four nitrogen concentrations. Results showed no influence of nitrogen treatment concentration on purslane shoot tissue fresh weight accumulation. Nitrogen treatment significantly influenced purslane shoot tissue beta-carotene, lutein, neoxanthin, total carotenoids, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, and the chlorophyll a to b ratio.
Categories: Science

Scientists solve puzzle of converting gaseous carbon dioxide to fuel

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
Every year, humans advance climate change and global warming by injecting about 30 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Scientists believe they've found a way to convert all these emissions into energy-rich fuel in a carbon-neutral cycle that uses a very abundant natural resource: silicon. Readily available in sand, it's the seventh most-abundant element in the universe and the second most-abundant element in the earth's crust.
Categories: Science

Underground radar used to locate post-Katrina damage

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
An innovative underground radar technology is helping the City of Slidell in south Louisiana to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina.
Categories: Science

Well-wrapped feces allow lobsters to eat jellyfish stingers without injury

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:32pm
Lobsters eat jellyfish without harm from the venomous stingers due to a series of physical adaptations. Researchers examined lobster feces to discover that lobsters surround their servings of jellyfish in protective membranes that prevent the stingers from injecting their venom. The results are vial for aquaculture efforts to sustainably farm lobsters for diners around the world.
Categories: Science

Uber Loses At Least $1.2 Billion In First Half of 2016

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:31pm
An anonymous reader writes: The ride-hailing giant Uber Technologies Inc. is not a public company, but every three months, dozens of shareholders get on a conference call to hear the latest details on its business performance from its head of finance, Gautam Gupta. On Friday, Gupta told investors that Uber's losses mounted in the second quarter. Even in the U.S., where Uber had turned a profit during its first quarter, the company was once again losing money. In the first quarter of this year, Uber lost about $520 million before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, according to people familiar with the matter. In the second quarter the losses significantly exceeded $750 million, including a roughly $100 million shortfall in the U.S., those people said. That means Uber's losses in the first half of 2016 totalled at least $1.27 billion. "It's hardly rare for companies to lose large sums of money as they try to build significant markets and battle for market share," said Joe Grundfest, professor of law and business at Stanford. "The interesting challenge is for them to turn the corner to become profitable, cash-flow-positive entities."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Why Do We Send Animals to Space?

Space.com - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:00pm
Humans have been sending animals to space for almost 70 years, but the questions they hope to answer have evolved in that time.
Categories: Science

Happy Anniversary, Voyager 2! NASA Probe Flew by Saturn 35 Years Ago

Space.com - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 3:00pm
Thirty-five years ago today, NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft got an up-close look at beautiful, enigmatic Saturn.
Categories: Science

Singapore Launches World's First 'Self-driving' Taxi Service

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:50pm
Days before ride-hailing service Uber debuts its self-driving car in Pittsburgh, a company in Singapore has beaten Uber to the race. The Guardian reports: The world's first "self-driving" taxi service has been launched in Singapore -- albeit with a human backup driver and co-pilot on board for the time being. Members of the public selected to take part in the trial would be able to hail a free ride through their smartphones, said nuTonomy, an autonomous vehicle software startup. The cars -- modified Renault Zoe and Mitsubishi i-MiEV electrics -- had a driver in the front prepared to take back the wheel and a researcher in the back watching the car's computers, the company said. Each was fitted with Lidar, a laser-based detection system like radar. An Associated Press reporter taking a ride on Wednesday observed that the safety driver had to step on the brakes once, when a car was obstructing the test car's lane and another vehicle, which appeared to be parked, suddenly began moving in the oncoming lane. The service would start with six cars, growing to a dozen by the end of the year, said nuTonomy, adding that it aimed to have a fully self-driving taxi fleet in Singapore by 2018.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Sea temperature and the lunar cycle predict the arrival of jellyfish in Israel

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:23pm
Large swarms of jellyfish reach the coast of Israel when the sea temperature ranges between 28.2 and 30 degrees Celsius and during the full moon, according to a new study. The study reveals, for the first time, the link between sea temperature and the lunar cycle and the arrival of swarms of Jellyfish s along the coast of Israel.
Categories: Science

Going green is for girls, but branding can make men eco-friendly

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:23pm
Studies show that men are not as environmentally friendly as women. But could men be persuaded to go green? New research indicates the answer is yes — and it’s all about branding.
Categories: Science

Unexpected trove of gas discovered around larger stars

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:23pm
Astronomers using ALMA surveyed dozens of young stars -- some Sun-like and others approximately double that size -- and discovered that the larger variety have surprisingly rich reservoirs of carbon monoxide gas in their debris disks. In contrast, the lower-mass, Sun-like stars have debris disks that are virtually gas-free.
Categories: Science

Western diet increases Alzheimer's risk

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:21pm
Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer’s disease are rising worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterize a Western Diet. The evidence of these risk factors, which come from ecological and observational studies, also shows that fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish are associated with reduced risk.
Categories: Science

Fateful evolution: New study improves accuracy of cancer diagnosis

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
Researchers use evolutionary theory to make predictions about which Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients will go on to develop cancer. The results point the way toward more accurate medical assessments for patients with BE and the development of early-warning beacons of disease known as biomarkers.
Categories: Science

Smokers with newly discovered genetic markers have higher lung cancer risk

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
Researchers discovered new genetic markers associated with a fast rate of nicotine metabolism, which potentially leads smokers to smoke more, thereby, increasing their risk for lung cancer.
Categories: Science

Mapping pluripotency differences between mice, monkeys, and humans

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
New research shows that certain primate stem cells have pluripotency superior to some types derived from mice. The study maps how pluripotency differs among mice, monkeys, and humans, and illustrates for the first time the characteristics unique to primate stem cells.
Categories: Science

New method in synthesis and development for pharmaceuticals

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
Scientists have developed a new synthetic methods that facilitate the design and synthesis of bioactive compounds and chemical tools for pharmacological studies, the team reports.
Categories: Science

Is prehospital stroke treatment associated with better outcomes?

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
When treating a patient with stroke, every minute counts. A specialized stroke ambulance allows physicians to start specific treatment, such as thrombolysis, at scene. A recent study investigated whether this earlier response time leads to an improved prognosis.
Categories: Science