Linux Voice is a New Magazine for Linux Users — On Paper (Video)

Slashdot - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:27pm
This is an interview with Graham Morrison, who is one of four people behind the shiny-new Linux Voice magazine, which is printed on (gasp) paper. Yes, paper, even though it's 2014 and a lot of people believe the idea of publishing a physical newspaper or magazine is dead. But, Graham says, when you have a tight community (like Linux users and developers) you have an opportunity to make a successful magazine for that community. This is a crowdfunded venture, through Indiegogo, where they hoped to raise £90,000 -- but ended up with £127,603, which is approximately $214,288 as of this video's publishing date. So they have a little capital to work with. Also note: these are not publishing neophytes. All four of the main people behind Linux Voice used to work on the well-regarded Linux Format magazine. Graham says they're getting subscribers and newsstand sales at a healthy rate, so they're happily optimistic about their magazine's future. (Here's an alternate video link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Linux Voice is a New Magazine for Linux Users — On Paper (Video)

Slashdot - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:27pm
This is an interview with Graham Morrison, who is one of four people behind the shiny-new Linux Voice magazine, which is printed on (gasp) paper. Yes, paper, even though it's 2014 and a lot of people believe the idea of publishing a physical newspaper or magazine is dead. But, Graham says, when you have a tight community (like Linux users and developers) you have an opportunity to make a successful magazine for that community. This is a crowdfunded venture, through Indiegogo, where they hoped to raise £90,000 -- but ended up with £127,603, which is approximately $214,288 as of this video's publishing date. So they have a little capital to work with. Also note: these are not publishing neophytes. All four of the main people behind Linux Voice used to work on the well-regarded Linux Format magazine. Graham says they're getting subscribers and newsstand sales at a healthy rate, so they're happily optimistic about their magazine's future. (Here's an alternate video link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

What’s Driving Google’s Wild Moonshots? Desperation

Wired News - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:13pm
A Google ad isn’t worth as much as it used to be. In its quarterly earnings report yesterday, the company said the “cost per click” of an ad on the site dropped again, a years-long trend that shows no sign of reversing. The decline contributed to Google missing Wall Street’s profit expectations. But it wasn’t the only factor.






Categories: Science

Your iPhone Will Be the Center Console in Volvo’s New Cars

Wired News - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:13pm
Today at the New York International Auto Show, Volvo provided a live demo of how Apple’s CarPlay system -- a newly developed in-car interface for the company’s iPhone 5, 5s, and 5c -- will work in the company’s upcoming vehicles.






Categories: Science

Meet the Inventors of a 3-D Printer for Hyper-Complicated Candy

Wired News - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:13pm
The only limitation is its build chamber, which can hold the equivalent of 4,200 sugar cubes or 105,000 calories.






Categories: Science

More, bigger wildfires burning western US over last 30 years

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:12pm
Wildfires across the western United States have been getting bigger and more frequent over the last 30 years. The total area these fires burned increased at a rate of nearly 90,000 acres a year -- an area the size of Las Vegas, according to the study. Individually, the largest wildfires grew at a rate of 350 acres a year, the new research says.
Categories: Science

Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease?

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:12pm
The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells.
Categories: Science

New Exoplanet Could Be Earth’s Cousin — Or Something Totally Alien

Wired News - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:57pm
Astronomers are one step closer to discovering Earth Two. They have found an exoplanet slightly larger than our own, orbiting a star at a distance where it could have liquid water on its surface.






Categories: Science

Science Graphic of the Week: 5.3 Million Years of Sea Level Change on One Cliff Face

Wired News - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:42pm
It's not often that we think about deep time. Lucky to live for a century, humans flitter like mayflies across Earth's surface, our own epoch an eyeblink in a planetary history that's largely hidden from everyday consciousness. Every now and then, though, that history punches right through into the present.






Categories: Science

The Yahoo Attacks!

Cryptomundo - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:31pm
When scouting territory, the A.I.M.S. team goes under attack from the Yahoo. This monster's scream is more powerful than the crew could ever imagine.
Categories: Fortean

Kepler-186f: Most 'Earth-Like' Alien World Discovered

Slashdot - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:27pm
astroengine (1577233) writes "About 500 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus lives a star, which, though smaller and redder than the sun, has a planet that may look awfully familiar. With a diameter just 10 percent bigger than Earth's, the newly found world is the first of its size found basking in the benign temperature region around a parent star where water, if it exists, could pool in liquid form (abstract). Scientists on the hunt for Earth's twin are focused on worlds that could support liquid surface water, which may be necessary to brew the chemistry of life. "Kepler-186f is significant because it is the first exoplanet that is the same temperature and the same size (well, ALMOST!) as the Earth," David Charbonneau, with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, wrote in an email to Discovery News. "Previously, the exoplanet most like Earth was Kepler-62f, but Kepler-186f is significantly smaller. Now we can point to a star and say, 'There lies an Earth-like planet.'""

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Loud talking, horseplay in car results in more serious incidents for teen drivers

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
Adolescent drivers are often distracted by technology while they are driving, but loud conversations and horseplay between passengers appear more likely to result in a dangerous incident, according to a new study. Researchers ecruited 52 North Carolina high-school age drivers to have in-vehicle cameras mounted in their cars and trucks to observe distracted driving behaviors and distracted conditions when teen drivers were behind the wheel. Young drivers were recorded in a variety of real-world driving situations over six months -- with parents in the car, with other teens in the car and alone.
Categories: Science

Fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers fail to cover all types of contaminants

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
Fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers are ineffective in reducing infant exposure to contaminants like persistent organic pollutants. The researchers' model estimates that women who stop eating fish shortly before or during their pregnancy may only lower their child's exposure to POPs by 10 to 15 per cent.
Categories: Science

First potentially habitable Earth-sized planet confirmed by Gemini and Keck observatories

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
The first Earth-sized exoplanet orbiting within the habitable zone of another star has been confirmed by observations with both the W. M. Keck Observatory and the Gemini Observatory. The initial discovery, made by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, is one of a handful of smaller planets found by Kepler and verified using large ground-based telescopes. It also confirms that Earth-sized planets do exist in the habitable zone of other stars.
Categories: Science

Thinnest membrane feasible has been produced

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
A new nano-membrane made out of the 'super material' graphene is extremely light and breathable. Not only can this open the door to a new generation of functional waterproof clothing, but also to ultra-rapid filtration. The new membrane just produced is as thin as is technologically possible.
Categories: Science

Alternative identification methods for threatened species urged

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
With global climate change and rapidly disappearing habitat critical to the survival of endangered species, there is a sense of urgency to confirm the return of animals thought to be extinct, or to confirm the presence of newly discovered species. Researchers want to change how biologists think about collecting 'voucher' specimens for species identification, suggesting current specimen collection practices pose a risk to vulnerable animal populations nearing extinction.
Categories: Science

First structural insights into how plant immune receptors interact

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
The first structural definition of how plant immune receptors interact has broad implications for understanding their function. "Before, we knew that proteins called RRS1 and RPS4 are required to recognize specific molecules from pathogenic bacteria, and then use this recognition as a cue to activate defense. However, we had no idea how they did it" said a co-corresponding author.
Categories: Science

Connecting sleep deficits among young fruit flies to disruption in mating later in life

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study, the lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well -- make more flies. To address whether sleep loss in young flies affects development of courtship circuits, the team investigated a group of neurons implicated in courtship. One particular subset of those neurons was smaller in sleep-deprived animals than normal flies, suggesting a possible mechanism for how sleep deprivation can lead to altered courting behavior.
Categories: Science

Fewer sources for self-cleaning air: Study overturns existing knowledge on nitrous acid, HONO

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:19pm
Up to now, nitrous acid, HONO, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals, OH, which is regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. Scientists have put an end to this conception. The new hypothesis is based on air measurements recorded by a Zeppelin NT.
Categories: Science

Boosting depression-causing mechanisms in brain increases resilience, surprisingly

Science Daily - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:18pm
New research uncovers a conceptually novel approach to treating depression. Instead of dampening neuron firing found with stress-induced depression, researchers demonstrated for the first time that further activating these neurons opens a new avenue to mimic and promote natural resilience.
Categories: Science