Celebrate May the 4th With WIRED’s Best Star Wars Videos

Wired News - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 7:00pm
This May the Fourth learn how to make a stormtrooper figurine breakdance, get the 411 on BB-8, and start saving for a custom-built fighting lightsaber. The post Celebrate May the 4th With WIRED's Best Star Wars Videos appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

$3,000 Guitar Made of ‘Solid Linen’ Looks and Plays Like Wood

Wired News - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:50pm
Blackbird's El Capitan Guitar looks and sounds like it's made from wood, but it's a totally different material. The post $3,000 Guitar Made of 'Solid Linen' Looks and Plays Like Wood appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Aging and Bloated OpenSSL Is Purged of 2 High-Severity Bugs

Slashdot - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:40pm
An anonymous reader cites a story on Ars Technica: Maintainers of the OpenSSL cryptographic library have patched high-severity holes that could make it possible for attackers to decrypt login credentials or execute malicious code on Web servers. The updates were released Tuesday morning for both versions 1.0.1 and 1.0.2 of OpenSSL, which a large portion of the Internet relies on to cryptographically protect sensitive Web and e-mail traffic using the transport layer security protocol. OpenSSL advisories labeled the severity of both vulnerabilities "high," meaning the updates fixing them should be installed as soon as possible. The fixes bring the latest supported versions to 1.0.1t and 1.0.2h. The decryption vulnerability is the result of what cryptographers call a padding oracle weakness, which allows attackers to repeatedly probe an encrypted payload for clues about the plaintext content inside. According to TLS expert Filippo Valsorda, the bug allows for only 16 bytes of encrypted traffic to be recovered, and even then only when an end user sends it repeatedly.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Our brain uses statistics to calculate confidence, make decisions

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:21pm
The brain produces feelings of confidence that inform decisions the same way statistics pulls patterns out of noisy data. This feeling of confidence is central to decision making, and, despite ample evidence of human fallibility, the subjective feeling relies on objective calculations.
Categories: Science

Scientists find root cause of appetite loss during illness

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:16pm
Loss of appetite during illness is a common and potentially debilitating phenomenon—in cancer patients, especially, it can even shorten lifespan. The research also points to possible drug targets to reduce appetite and possibly support weight loss for those with metabolic disorders.
Categories: Science

New method allows first look at key stage of human development, embryo implantation

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:14pm
Almost nothing is known about the stage of human development called implantation, when the developing embryo attaches to the uterus. Now scientists have devised a method that replicates implantation in an experimental setting, providing a revolutionary system capable of answering basic questions about our own development.
Categories: Science

Discovery of cancer gene may predict survival in patients with mouth cancers

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:14pm
A newly discovered tumor gene may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. If the gene is expressed (turned on), patients are 4.6 times more likely to die at any given time. The finding could help guide treatment, researchers say.
Categories: Science

How tree crickets tune into each other's songs

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:14pm
As temperature changes, tree crickets can adjust their ears at a cellular and therefore mechanical level to match the changing frequency of each others song.
Categories: Science

How migrants' traditional cuisines cost them calories

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:14pm
When migrants move, they often try to keep eating their native cuisine. But a new study reveals an economic tension underneath this practice: Migrants who hang on to their old cuisines often pay more to eat, because they tend to move to places where their familiar foods are more expensive. In turn, poor migrants on tight budgets must reduce the amount of calories they can consume.
Categories: Science

Simple arm test accurately identifies markers of frailty in older adults facing surgery

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:14pm
A simple arm test that employs a novel wearable technology can rapidly and accurately identify physiological frailty in older adults, according to new study results.
Categories: Science

Parental roles matter in fostering relationships between children, stepgrandparents

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:13pm
Researchers are shedding new light on what happens within a family when the stepgrandparent had no active role in raising the parent of the stepgrandchild. Their findings indicate that how a parent behaves toward the stepgrandparent determines the relationship between their child and the stepgrandparent.
Categories: Science

Phoney protection for passwords: Honeywords provide additional password security

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:13pm
Corporate data breaches seem to be on the rise, rarely a week passes without a company revealing that its database has been hacked and regrettably usernames, passwords, credit card details and its customers' personal information has been leaked on to the open internet. A new protection, nicknamed Phoney, may help.
Categories: Science

Ketamine lifts depression via a byproduct of its metabolism

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:11pm
A chemical byproduct, or metabolite, created as the body breaks down ketamine likely holds the secret to its rapid antidepressant action. This metabolite singularly reversed depression-like behaviors in mice without triggering any of the anesthetic, dissociative, or addictive side effects associated with ketamine. The discovery fundamentally changes scientists' understanding of how this rapid antidepressant mechanism works and holds promise for improved treatments.
Categories: Science

'Bugs' as drugs: Harnessing novel gut bacteria for human health

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:11pm
Scientists have grown and catalogued more than 130 bacteria from the human intestine. Imbalances in our gut microbiome can contribute to complex conditions and diseases such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and allergies. This research will enable scientists to understand how our bacterial 'microbiome' helps keep us healthy and start to create tailor-made treatments with specific beneficial bacteria.
Categories: Science

Star with different internal driving force than the sun

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:11pm
A star like the sun has an internal driving in the form of a magnetic field that can be seen on the surface as sunspots. Now astrophysicists have observed a distant star in the constellation Andromeda with a different positioning of sunspots and this indicates a magnetic field that is driven by completely different internal dynamics.
Categories: Science

Equilibrium modeling increases contact lens comfort

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:11pm
Researchers have designed an equilibrium model to demonstrate the elastic stresses and suction pressure distribution between a soft hydrogel contact lens and an eye. The model allows arbitrary (radially-symmetric) lens shapes, eye shapes, and thickness profiles, and illustrates the dependence of pressure distribution on lens and eye shape.
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Humans have faster metabolism than closely related primates, enabling larger brains

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:11pm
Researchers have found humans have a higher metabolism rate than closely related primates, which enabled humans to evolve larger brains. The findings may point toward strategies for combating obesity.
Categories: Science

Inheritable bacterium controls Aedes mosquitoes' ability to transmit Zika

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:11pm
Aedes mosquitoes carrying the bacterium Wolbachia -- found inside the cells of 60 percent of all insect species -- are drastically less able to transmit Zika virus, say researchers.
Categories: Science

Venus flytrap exploits plant defenses in carnivorous lifestyle

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:08pm
Venus flytraps have fascinated biologists for centuries, however, the molecular underpinnings of their carnivorous lifestyle remain largely unknown. Researchers have now characterized gene expression, protein secretion, and ultrastructural changes during stimulation of Venus flytraps and discover that common plant defense systems, which typically protect plants from being eaten, are also used by Venus flytraps for insect feeding.
Categories: Science

High-fructose diet during pregnancy may harm placenta, restrict fetal growth

Science Daily - Wed, 04/05/2016 - 6:08pm
Research in mice and women found that consuming a high-fructose diet during pregnancy may cause defects in the placenta and restrict fetal growth, potentially increasing a baby's risk for metabolic health problems later in life. However, the generic drug allopurinol, frequently prescribed to treat gout and kidney stones, appears to mitigate the negative maternal and fetal effects.
Categories: Science