Could a new proposed particle help to detect Dark Matter?

Science Daily - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:41pm
Researchers have proposed a new fundamental particle which could explain why no one has managed to detect 'Dark Matter', the elusive missing 85 per cent of the Universe's mass. Dark Matter is thought to exist because of its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing (the bending of light rays) around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (the afterglow of the Big Bang). Despite compelling indirect evidence and considerable experimental effort, no one has managed to detect Dark Matter directly.
Categories: Science

Astronomers gain a new view of galaxy M 82

Science Daily - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:41pm
Astronomers have used the giant radio telescope Lofar to create the sharpest astronomical image ever taken at very long radio wavelengths. A new image shows the glowing center of the galaxy Messier 82 -- and many bright remnants of supernova explosions. A supernova remnant is a shining shell of shock waves from an exploded star, ploughing into its surroundings.
Categories: Science

Ebola leads to hunger in Africa's rice belt

Science Daily - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:41pm
It was Christmas Eve, but the streets of Freetown – the capital of Sierra Leone – were eerily silent. Families and friends did not meet for the traditional dinner to feast on Jollof Rice, a national dish that is served in all the ceremonies across the country. In December 2014, the government of Sierra Leone banned all public celebrations to prevent the further spread of Ebola in the worst-affected country. But even before this drastic step was taken, people living in the countries hit hardest by the deadly virus – Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea –had little to cheer about. Although there was a glimmer of hope for an end in sight to the Ebola epidemic, these countries were reported to be on the brink of a major food crisis.
Categories: Science

3D printing makes heart surgery safer for children

Science Daily - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:39pm
A cardiac surgeon in the United States recently used a 3D printed heart as a model to plan a life-saving procedure for his young patient. The 3D printed heart was used as a model to plan a life-saving procedure for the patient who was born with a rare, life-threatening cardiac defect.
Categories: Science

Child maltreatment not a clear path to adult crime

Science Daily - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:39pm
Research has long made a connection between childhood abuse and neglect and crime in adulthood. But a new study found that when other life factors are considered, that link all but disappears.
Categories: Science

Gender roles: Men and women are not so different after all

Science Daily - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:38pm
Gender is a large part of our identity that is often defined by our psychological differences as men and women. But a researcher says in reality men and women are more alike than we may think.
Categories: Science

Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers Bridge the Airgap

Slashdot - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 2:01pm
An anonymous reader writes Hacked has a piece about Georgia Institute of Technology researchers keylogging from a distance using the electromagnetic radiation of CPUs. They can reportedly do this from up to 6 meters away. In this video, using two Ubuntu laptops, they demonstrate that keystrokes are easily interpreted with the software they have developed. In their white paper they talk about the need for more research in this area so that hardware and software manufacturers will be able to develop more secure devices. For now, Farraday cages don't seem as crazy as they used to, or do they?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

A Closer Look at Slow Motion Video on the iPhone 6

Wired News - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 1:37pm

How does the iPhone handle this transition from real speed to slow motion speed? In other words, what is the time rate of change of the frame rate during the transition.

The post A Closer Look at Slow Motion Video on the iPhone 6 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Brooklyn is Bigfoot’s Backyard?

Cryptomundo - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 1:24pm
A Sasquatch Sighting in an unlikely location?
Categories: Fortean

Why ATM Bombs May Be Coming Soon To the United States

Slashdot - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 1:07pm
HughPickens.com writes Nick Summers has an interesting article at Bloomberg about the epidemic of 90 ATM bombings that has hit Britain since 2013. ATM machines are vulnerable because the strongbox inside an ATM has two essential holes: a small slot in front that spits out bills to customers and a big door in back through which employees load reams of cash in large cassettes. "Criminals have learned to see this simple enclosure as a physics problem," writes Summers. "Gas is pumped in, and when it's detonated, the weakest part—the large hinged door—is forced open. After an ATM blast, thieves force their way into the bank itself, where the now gaping rear of the cash machine is either exposed in the lobby or inside a trivially secured room. Set off with skill, the shock wave leaves the money neatly stacked, sometimes with a whiff of the distinctive acetylene odor of garlic." The rise in gas attacks has created a market opportunity for the companies that construct ATM components. Several manufacturers now make various anti-gas-attack modules: Some absorb shock waves, some detect gas and render it harmless, and some emit sound, fog, or dye to discourage thieves in the act. As far as anyone knows, there has never been a gas attack on an American ATM. The leading theory points to the country's primitive ATM cards. Along with Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, and not many other countries, the U.S. doesn't require its plastic to contain an encryption chip, so stealing cards remains an effective, nonviolent way to get at the cash in an ATM. Encryption chip requirements are coming to the U.S. later this year, though. And given the gas raid's many advantages, it may be only a matter of time until the back of an American ATM comes rocketing off.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Sequencing Foods’ DNA Could Help Us Prevent Diseases

Wired News - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 1:00pm

Scientists from the IBM Research and Mars Incorporated today announced the Sequencing the Food Supply Chain Consortium, a collaborative food safety platform aiming to leverage advances in genomics and analytics to further our understanding of what makes food safe.

The post How Sequencing Foods’ DNA Could Help Us Prevent Diseases appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Cape Watch: Joss Whedon May Abandon the Avengers as Fantastic Four Gets a Trailer

Wired News - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 12:00pm

Whether or not we'll get a Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice trailer for the Super Bowl, at least we finally got to see some Fantastic Four footage.

The post Cape Watch: Joss Whedon May Abandon the Avengers as Fantastic Four Gets a Trailer appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Dazzling Comet Lovejoy Stars in Slooh Webcast Today: How to Watch

Space.com - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:54am
Comet Lovejoy will make its closest approach to the sun on Jan. 30. To mark the occasion, the Slooh Community Observatory is hosting a live webcast Thursday, beginning at 5:30 p.m. EST (2030 GMT). Watch it here at Space.com.
Categories: Science

Asteroid Miners May Get Help from Metal-Munching Microbes

Space.com - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:47am
The asteroid-mining firm Deep Space Industries (DSI) is investigating the feasibility of injecting microbes into space rocks far from Earth, to get a jump on processing their valuable resources.
Categories: Science

NASA Launching New Earth-watching Satellite Today: Watch It Live

Space.com - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:47am
NASA is scheduled to launch its next Earth-observing satellite today (Jan. 29) from California, and you can watch the liftoff live online.
Categories: Science

How NASA's Soil Moisture Satellite Works (Infographic)

Space.com - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:45am
SMAP, or the Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite, will measure groundwater content and frozen/thawed state, all over the world every three days.
Categories: Science

Rosetta's Odd Comet Covered in 'Goose Bumps,' Pits, Cracks (Photos)

Space.com - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:41am
The surface of a comet flying through deep space is pockmarked with weird features that are keeping curious scientists working with Europe's Rosetta comet mission busy.
Categories: Science

Facebook Dominated Mobile App Downloads in 2014

Wired News - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:30am

According to a new report about 2014 mobile app usage, iOS and Android users downloaded Facebook's mobile apps more often than any other apps, both in the US and globally.

The post Facebook Dominated Mobile App Downloads in 2014 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

14 Goofy Gadgets You Might Find in Pawn Shops in 2050

Wired News - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:30am

These products don’t exist, at least not yet.

The post 14 Goofy Gadgets You Might Find in Pawn Shops in 2050 appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

I Love You, Grim Fandango, Even Though You’re Broken

Wired News - Thu, 29/01/2015 - 11:30am

Despite how many modern games are driven by the engine of nostalgia, it can often be difficult to go back and replay the games of your youth -- not just emotionally, but technologically.

The post I Love You, Grim Fandango, Even Though You’re Broken appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science