Convenience, workplace incentives may increase use of public transit

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:10pm
Transit stops close to home and workplace incentives are associated with higher likelihood that commuters will choose public transportation, according to research.
Categories: Science

First steps in basic process could be harnessed to make therapeutic cells

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:10pm
Understanding the molecular signals that guide early cells in the embryo to develop into different types of organs provides insight into how tissues regenerate and repair themselves. By knowing the principles that underlie the intricate steps in this transformation, researchers will be able to make new cells at will for transplantation and tissue repair in such situations as liver or heart disease.
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Tumors prefer the easy way out

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:10pm
Researchers describe a new way that cancer cells invade other parts of the body, identifying a new treatment target that may be more effective than current drugs. "We are looking for novel ways of preventing cancer cells of the primary tumor from spreading to other parts of the body. Our study points to potential therapeutic targets that could be inhibited to halt tumor cell movement," says the study's principal investigator.
Categories: Science

Intense magnetic field close to supermassive black hole

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:10pm
Astronomers have revealed an extremely powerful magnetic field, beyond anything previously detected in the core of a galaxy, very close to the event horizon of a supermassive black hole.
Categories: Science

The 10 Most Walkable Cities in America

Wired News - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:08pm

History isn't all that matters: Cities can change to cater to pedestrians instead of, or at least in addition to, cars.

The post The 10 Most Walkable Cities in America appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Colossal Ancient Galaxies Die from the Inside Out

Space.com - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:05pm
The largest ancient galaxies stopped forming stars in their cores about three billion years after the Big Bang, with this end of star birth spreading from the inside out in so-called 'dead' galaxies, scientists say.
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California Senate Votes to Honor Astronaut Sally Ride with Statue in US Capitol

Space.com - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 6:02pm
A statue honoring astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, could one day stand in the U.S. Capitol, if a California lawmaker's resolution continues to advance. The statue would replace the monument for a controversial Spanish missionary.
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Dwarf planet Ceres color map reveals surface diversity

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:56pm
A new color map of dwarf planet Ceres, which NASA's Dawn spacecraft has been orbiting since March, reveals the diversity of the surface of this planetary body. Differences in morphology and color across the surface suggest Ceres was once an active body.
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LA Schools Seeking Refund Over Botched iPad Plan

Slashdot - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:38pm
SternisheFan sends news that Los Angeles Unified School District is asking Apple for a refund of the district's effort to equip students with iPads. The project was budgeted at around $1.3 billion to equip its 650,000 students, though only about 120,000 iPads have been purchased so far. After the program went bad, the FBI launched an investigation into their procurement practices. The iPads weren't standalone education devices — they were supposed to work in conjunction with another device carrying curriculum from a company named Pearson. But the district now says the combined tech didn't meet their needs, and they want their money back. Lawyers for the local Board of Education are looking into litigation options. They've also notified Apple and Pearson they won't pay for any new products or services.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Zinc deficiency linked to activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:26pm
Zinc deficiency -- long associated with numerous diseases, e.g., autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers -- can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research.
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Major advance in artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:26pm
By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, a potentially game-changing new artificial photosynthesis system offers a win/win situation for the environment: solar-powered green chemistry using sequestered carbon dioxide.
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Fish type, body size can help predict nutrient recycling rates

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:26pm
The nutrients excreted by fish in their 'pee' may be critical to the health of coastal ecosystems. But knowing whether generalizations can be made about how to predict these nutrient levels in various ecosystems has vexed researchers -- until now.
Categories: Science

Socioeconomic factors affect odds of death after a lung cancer operation

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:26pm
People with limited education and low income have higher odds of death within 30 days after undergoing an operation for lung cancer than those who are more educated and financially better off, according to new research.
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Housework keeps older adults more physically, emotionally fit, researcher finds

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:26pm
Older adults who keep a clean and orderly home -- because of the exercise it takes to get the job done -- tend to feel emotionally and physically better after tackling house chores, according to new findings.
Categories: Science

Electronic micropump to deliver treatments deep within the brain

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:23pm
For a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. For this reason, a team of researchers has developed an organic electronic micropump which, when combined with an anti-convulsant drug, enables localized inhibition of epileptic seizure in brain tissue in vitro.
Categories: Science

More individuals discussing end-of-life wishes with loved ones

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:23pm
Discussing end-of-life wishes with loved ones can be difficult, but new research shows more individuals are engaging in advance care planning. Advance care planning includes discussing end-of-life care preferences, providing written end-of-life care instructions and appointing a durable power of attorney for health care.
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Encountering a wall corrects 'GPS' in mouse brains, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:22pm
By analyzing the activity of 'GPS' neurons in mice, researchers have discovered that the mental maps created by these cells accumulate errors, which are corrected when the animal encounters a wall. The findings support the theory that these cells, called grid cells, use an animal's perceived speed and direction to help it navigate familiar places.
Categories: Science

Morphing octopuses have unique way to control their 'odd' forms

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:22pm
The body plan of octopuses is nothing if not unique, with a sophisticated brain in a soft, bilaterally symmetrical body, encircled by eight radially symmetrical and incredibly flexible arms. Now, researchers reporting the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling show that the animals have a unique motor control strategy to match their 'odd' form.
Categories: Science

For men, online generosity is a competition

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:21pm
If you are looking to raise money online for your favorite cause, listen up. A real-world analysis of human behavior shows that men treat online giving as a competitive enterprise. Men will donate four times more money to an attractive female fundraiser in response to the contribution of another male.
Categories: Science

Studying how climate affects biodiversity

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 5:20pm
A key question in the climate debate is how the occurrence and distribution of species is affected by climate change. But without information about natural variation in species abundance it is hard to answer. In a major study, researchers can now for the first time give us a detailed picture of natural variation.
Categories: Science