Team science critical to diagnosis, prevention, treatment of diseases

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:21pm
Tackling complex biomedical research increasingly requires the development of new approaches to facilitate innovative, creative and impactful discoveries. A group of scientists shows that a team science approach is critical to solving complex biomedical problems and advancing discoveries in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of human disease.
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New blood test may better predict gestational diabetes

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:21pm
Researchers have found that a single measurement of GCD59, a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of gestation identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, women who failed the glucose challenge test as well as women with gestational diabetes. It was also associated with the probability of delivering a large-for-gestational-age newborn.
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New eye test detects earliest signs of glaucoma

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:21pm
Researchers have developed a simple, inexpensive diagnostic tool DARC (Detection of Apoptosing Retinal Cells). In clinical trials it allowed for the first time visualization of individual nerve cell death in patients with glaucoma. Early detection means doctors can start treatments before sight loss begins. Ongoing trials are investigating the potential of the test for other neurodegenerative conditions.
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What Happens To Summer TV Binges If Hollywood Writers Strike

Slashdot - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:20pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: There also should be plenty of new video fare if Hollywood's writers and studios can't agree on a new contract by Monday. The beautiful thing about a contract is everyone knows when it ends. In this case, the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, which represents some 350 production companies, and the Writers Guild of America, which comprises 12,000 professionals in two chapters, have had three years to prepare for a standoff. In these situations, show makers typically rush to complete a pile of scripts before the deadline. Jerry Nickelsburg, an economist at the University of California at Los Angeles, calls this stockpiling "the inventory effect." This is precisely what happened the last time writers walked off the job, from November 2007 to February 2008. If the writers do, in fact, go through with the strike they approved on Monday, jokes and soaps will be the first things to take a hit. Late-night talk shows and soap operas are to entertainment writers what delis are to hungry New Yorkers -- a daily frenzy of high-volume production. If the sandwich makers don't show up, everybody gets hungry quickly.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Wanting more self-control could hinder our efforts to exert self-control, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:14pm
Ironically, wanting to have more self-control could actually be an obstacle to achieving it, suggests new research. It appears that the mere existence of a desire for self-control undermines one's confidence and brings one to disengage from self-control challenges (regardless of one’s actual level of self-control).
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What air travelers will tolerate for non-discriminatory security screening, study reveals

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:13pm
Mounting anti-terrorism security procedures and the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) screening processes have launched numerous debates about the protection of civil liberties and equal treatment of passengers. A new study has successfully quantified how much potential air passengers value equal protection when measured against sacrifices in safety, cost, wait time, and convenience.
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Bullies and their victims more likely to want plastic surgery

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:12pm
School bullies and their victims are more likely to want plastic surgery than other teens, according to new research. 11.5% of bullying victims have extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4% of bullies and 8.8% of teenagers who both bully and are bullied, compared with less than 1% of those who are unaffected by bullying, the study concludes.
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New evidence finds standardized cigarette packaging may reduce the number of people who smoke

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:12pm
Standardized tobacco packaging may lead to a reduction in smoking prevalence and reduces the appeal of tobacco, new research concludes.
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How state-of-the-art camera that behaves like the human eye could benefit robots and smart devices

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:09pm
Experts will explore how an artificial vision system inspired by the human eye could be used by robots of the future -- opening up new possibilities for securing footage from deep forests, war zones and even distant planets.
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Urban Water Atlas for Europe: 360° view on water management in cities

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:09pm
On 27 April 2017, the European Commission published the Urban Water Atlas for Europe. The publication – the first of its kind – shows how different water management choices, as well as other factors such as waste management, climate change and even our food preferences, affect the long-term sustainability of water use in our cities.
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Tropical Storms Create Gamma-Ray Flashes | Video

Space.com - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:08pm
When the conditions are just right, some tropical storms will fire off terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, which are some of the highest-energy light flashes naturally produced on Earth.
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Vignettes Invents a New Game Genre By Enchanting Your Phone

Wired News - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 3:00pm
The iOS game, and others like it, transforms your phone into a window to a more joyful plane of reality. The post Vignettes Invents a New Game Genre By Enchanting Your Phone appeared first on WIRED.
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Apple Wants To Turn Its Music App Into a One-Stop Shop For Pop Culture

Slashdot - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:40pm
Jimmy Iovine, one of the heads of Apple Music, has long expressed desires to make Apple Music "an entire pop cultural experience." The company, he has previously said, will do so partly by including original video content into its music app. Now, in an interview with Bloomberg, he added that the company plans to include original shows and videos with high-profile partners such as director J.J. Abrams and rapper R. Kelly. Iovine adds, from the interview: A music service needs to be more than a bunch of songs and a few playlists. I'm trying to help Apple Music be an overall movement in popular culture, everything from unsigned bands to video. We have a lot of plans. We have the freedom, because it's Apple, to make one show, three shows, see what works, see what doesn't work until it feels good. The article also sheds light on Iovine's personality: Iovine fidgets when he talks. As his mind wanders, he takes his jacket off, then puts it back on. He frequently clutches his legs, contorting himself into a ball. He's a font of ideas with industry contacts to help execute every one of them. He turned to Pharrell Williams and Gwen Stefani for help picking the model for Beats headphones. Some ideas get Iovine into trouble. He's taken meetings with artists and made arrangements to release music without telling anyone in advance, frustrating colleagues. He's persuaded artists to release music exclusively with Apple, frustrating record labels.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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How NASA Visualizes Stunning Worlds Without Really Seeing Them

Wired News - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:30pm
Making space seem real and beautiful isn't just marketing. It's good for science, too. The post How NASA Visualizes Stunning Worlds Without Really Seeing Them appeared first on WIRED.
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Closest Saturn Pics Yet Snapped During Daring Cassini Dive | Video

Space.com - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:29pm
NASA’s Cassini spacecraft’s ’Grand Finale’ has begun with the first of 22 planned dives between the Saturn's innermost rings and the planet itself.
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New fiber optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to the clinic

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:07pm
In an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fiber optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining.
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Flawed forensic science may be hampering identification of human remains

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:07pm
New research casts doubt on a method used in forensic science to determine whether skeletal remains are of a person who has given birth.
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Helping juvenile idiopathic arthritis sufferers

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:07pm
A drug combination that could help thousands of children with arthritis has been discovered by a team of researchers. Children and adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) are likely to develop uveitis, a condition that causes inflammation in the middle layer of the eye. The drug combination discovery will help preventing them from serious complications, including blindness.
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Looking for the quantum frontier

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:06pm
A new theoretical framework has been developed to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' - the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team demonstrates that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers.
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Cold-water corals: Acidification harms, warming promotes growth

Science Daily - Thu, 27/04/2017 - 2:06pm
The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is able to counteract negative effects of ocean acidification under controlled laboratory conditions when water temperature rises by a few degrees at the same time. Whether this will also be possible in the natural habitat depends on the degree of change in environmental conditions, researchers argue.
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