Mapping the Mass of an Enormous Galaxy Cluster

Wired News - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 6:15pm
You are looking at the most precise gravity map ever made of a distant galaxy cluster. Using the map, astronomers have determined that the cluster is roughly 650,000 light-years across and contains enough matter to make 160 trillion suns. The cluster, known as MCS J0416.1–2403, is located about 4 billion light-years away and consists of […]






Categories: Science

Childhood friendships crucial in learning to value others

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 6:14pm
Friends play an extremely important role in a person’s life. From infancy on, we have a desire to connect and those early relationships help to mold and develop our adult character. Through interactions with one another, we learn to think beyond ourselves to understand the needs and desires of others.
Categories: Science

Astronauts Simulate Deep-Space Mission in Underwater Lab

Space.com - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:49pm
It's commonplace to practice spacewalks underwater, but the latest crew living in an underwater lab plans to introduce a twist: a 10-minute communications delay with mission control.
Categories: Science

Protein couple controls flow of information into brain's memory center

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:40pm
Neuroscientists have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works by analyzing tissue samples from mice to identify how two specific proteins, 'CKAMP44' and 'TARP Gamma-8', act upon the brain's memory center. Brain function depends on the active communication between nerve cells, known as neurons. For this purpose, neurons are woven together into a dense network where they constantly relay signals to one another.
Categories: Science

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:40pm
When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study, these 'surprised losers' often have less trust in government and democracy.
Categories: Science

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:40pm
Narcissism, considered by some as the 'dark side of the executive personality,' may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed by non-narcissistic executives, according to recent research.
Categories: Science

Artificial intelligence identifies the musical progression of the Beatles

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:40pm
Computer scientists have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, which they have used to study the musical progression of the Beatles.
Categories: Science

Black Holes Not Black After All, Theorize Physicists

Slashdot - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:38pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes Black holes are singularities in spacetime formed by stars that have collapsed at the end of their lives. But while black holes are one of the best known ideas in cosmology, physicists have never been entirely comfortable with the idea that regions of the universe can become infinitely dense. Indeed, they only accept this because they can't think of any reason why it shouldn't happen. But in the last few months, just such a reason has emerged as a result of intense debate about one of cosmology's greatest problems — the information paradox. This is the fundamental tenet in quantum mechanics that all the information about a system is encoded in its wave function and this always evolves in a way that conserves information. The paradox arises when this system falls into a black hole causing the information to devolve into a single state. So information must be lost. Earlier this year, Stephen Hawking proposed a solution. His idea is that gravitational collapse can never continue beyond the so-called event horizon of a black hole beyond which information is lost. Gravitational collapse would approach the boundary but never go beyond it. That solves the information paradox but raises another question instead: if not a black hole, then what? Now one physicist has worked out the answer. His conclusion is that the collapsed star should end up about twice the radius of a conventional black hole but would not be dense enough to trap light forever and therefore would not be black. Indeed, to all intents and purposes, it would look like a large neutron star.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

YOLO! Yelp’s New Data Tool Lets You Map Cultural Trends

Wired News - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:28pm
Called Yelp Trends, the tool scours Yelp’s 57 millions reviews for how often certain words have been used in various cities.






Categories: Science

A Beetle with a Raspberry Beret

Wired News - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 5:12pm
This beetle is fabulous and shiny. Also, purple.
Categories: Science

A Clever Parody That Somehow Makes Mao Zedong Funny

Wired News - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:57pm
In her new book, Cristina de Middel has taken the original text from Chairman Mao Zedong’s Little Red Book and redacted most of the words, creating new and often times biting quotes that mock the statements of this once powerful communist leader.






Categories: Science

Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

Slashdot - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:55pm
New submitter David Hames (3763525) writes Would you like to test drive the newest release of the Macintosh operating system? Apple is opening up the beta for Mac OS X Yosemite starting Thursday to the first million people who sign up. Beta users won't be able to access such promised Yosemite features such as the ability to make or receive your iPhone calls or text messages on your Mac, turn on your iPhone hotspot feature from your Mac, or "Handoff" the last thing you were doing on your iOS 8 device to your Mac and vice versa. A new iCloud Drive feature is also off-limits, while any Spotlight search suggestions are U.S.-based only. Don't expect all your Mac apps to run either. Ars has a preview of Yosemite.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Anomaly Archives Presents Rob Riggs on Bigfoot

Cryptomundo - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:47pm
Join us Saturday night, July 26th at the Austin Center for Spiritual Living. Doors open at 6:30 pm – Lecture begins promptly at 7 pm CST. Free Event – Donations Welcomed! Austin Center for Spiritual Living 5555 North Lamar Boulevard, Building D, Suite 115 Austin, Texas 78751-1073
Categories: Fortean

Attitudes, preferences toward post-Superstorm Sandy rebuilding explored

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:45pm
A yearlong study found that individual property owners in Superstorm Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions. 45 percent of 400-plus respondents are pessimistic their towns would be rebuilt better than they were before Sandy.
Categories: Science

New perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:45pm
To reduce fire hazard, wildland managers often utilize the silvicultural practice of mechanically cutting woody shrubs and suppressed trees. These cuttings and other post-logging debris are then burned during periods of low fire danger in order to dispose of the material. Managers often cover all or part of the debris pile with low-density polyethylene plastic, commonly referred to as agricultural plastic, in order to keep water out. Inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions, a new study indicates.
Categories: Science

Joblessness could kill you, but recessions could be good for your health

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:45pm
While previous studies of individuals have shown that employees who lose their jobs have a higher mortality rate, more comprehensive studies have shown, unexpectedly, that population mortality actually declines as unemployment rates increase. Researchers set out to better understand these seemingly contradictory findings.
Categories: Science

Fukushima accident underscores need for U.S. to seek out new information about nuclear plant hazards

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:44pm
A new congressionally mandated report concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants.
Categories: Science

Corn and soy insecticides similar to nicotine found widespread in midwest U.S. rivers

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:44pm
Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides in the Midwestern United States and one of the first conducted within the United States.
Categories: Science

A reward is valued more if you choose it yourself: New quirky byproduct of learning from reward

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:44pm
Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent. A new study provides evidence that this long-observed quirk of behavior is a byproduct of how the brain reinforces learning from reward.
Categories: Science

Cancer: Treatment that prevents tumor metastasis identified in animal study

Science Daily - Thu, 24/07/2014 - 4:42pm
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis. Managing to block the metastasis or, even better, prevent their formation would be a giant step towards the fight against cancer. Researchers successfully performed this on models of human tumors in mice.
Categories: Science