Outbreak of rare respiratory virus could be linked with paralysis in 12 Colorado children

Science Daily - 7 hours 41 min ago
A cluster of children from Colorado in the USA have been treated for muscle weakness or paralysis that may be connected to a nationwide outbreak of a usually rare respiratory virus called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses, experts report.
Categories: Science

Can synesthesia be taught? Colored letters, tasty sounds?

Science Daily - 7 hours 41 min ago
Can synesthesia have cognitive benefits and can it be taught? There are over 60 known types of synesthesia, a condition in which stimulation of one sense, such as taste, leads to automatic, involuntary experience in a second sense. People with synesthesia tend to perform better on memory tasks, particularly involving color, abstract patterns or words and this can also be transferred to creative disciplines such as music.
Categories: Science

Vehicle body made from cotton, hemp, and wood

Science Daily - 7 hours 41 min ago
Carbon and glass fibers reinforce synthetics so that they can be used for vehicle body construction. But in this regard, there is an abundance of potential found in natural fibers -- obtained from hemp, cotton, or wood. If you combined bio-based textile and carbon fibers, you can obtain extremely light yet very sturdy components.
Categories: Science

Ultrasound technology made to measure

Science Daily - 7 hours 41 min ago
The range of uses for ultrasound is gigantic; the applied technologies are just as diverse. Researchers are now covering a wide range of applications with a new modular system: From sonar systems to medical ultrasound technologies and all the way to the high frequency range – such as for materials testing.
Categories: Science

Solar chip monitors windows

Science Daily - 7 hours 41 min ago
A new kind of radio chip is intended to warn when windows are left open. This way, you can avoid having the heat go out the window on cold days. The sensor also detects break-in attempts early on. The key: This maintenance-free chip powers up with energy supplied by solar power.
Categories: Science

School failure linked to higher use of computers at home, Spanish study shows

Science Daily - 7 hours 41 min ago
Researchers have analyzed the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) by secondary school students, by using a sample of 5,538 students. The study, based on surveys taken in the 2010/2011 academic year, finds links between school failure and an elevated use of computers at home.
Categories: Science

She thinks friends, he thinks sex

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
Men and women constantly misunderstand each other when it comes to the difference between being friends or sexual partners. But is that also true in a sexually liberal country where gender equality is strong -- like Norway? The answer, surprisingly, is yes.
Categories: Science

Love and intimacy in later life: Active sex lives common in the over 70s

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
Older people are continuing to enjoy active sex lives well into their seventies and eighties, according to new research. More than half (54%) of men and almost a third (31%) of women over the age of 70 reported they were still sexually active, with a third of these men and women having frequent sex.
Categories: Science

Globalization doesn't automatically make countries better off, experts say

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
Only a small number of countries benefitted from the first wave of globalisation around 150 years ago, while the majority of nations ended up worse-off, a new study has revealed.
Categories: Science

Nanomedicines of the future will build on quantum chemistry

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs, experts say.
Categories: Science

Could a new proposed particle help to detect Dark Matter?

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
Researchers have proposed a new fundamental particle which could explain why no one has managed to detect 'Dark Matter', the elusive missing 85 per cent of the Universe's mass. Dark Matter is thought to exist because of its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing (the bending of light rays) around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (the afterglow of the Big Bang). Despite compelling indirect evidence and considerable experimental effort, no one has managed to detect Dark Matter directly.
Categories: Science

Astronomers gain a new view of galaxy M 82

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
Astronomers have used the giant radio telescope Lofar to create the sharpest astronomical image ever taken at very long radio wavelengths. A new image shows the glowing center of the galaxy Messier 82 -- and many bright remnants of supernova explosions. A supernova remnant is a shining shell of shock waves from an exploded star, ploughing into its surroundings.
Categories: Science

Ebola leads to hunger in Africa's rice belt

Science Daily - 7 hours 42 min ago
It was Christmas Eve, but the streets of Freetown – the capital of Sierra Leone – were eerily silent. Families and friends did not meet for the traditional dinner to feast on Jollof Rice, a national dish that is served in all the ceremonies across the country. In December 2014, the government of Sierra Leone banned all public celebrations to prevent the further spread of Ebola in the worst-affected country. But even before this drastic step was taken, people living in the countries hit hardest by the deadly virus – Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea –had little to cheer about. Although there was a glimmer of hope for an end in sight to the Ebola epidemic, these countries were reported to be on the brink of a major food crisis.
Categories: Science

3D printing makes heart surgery safer for children

Science Daily - 7 hours 44 min ago
A cardiac surgeon in the United States recently used a 3D printed heart as a model to plan a life-saving procedure for his young patient. The 3D printed heart was used as a model to plan a life-saving procedure for the patient who was born with a rare, life-threatening cardiac defect.
Categories: Science

Child maltreatment not a clear path to adult crime

Science Daily - 7 hours 44 min ago
Research has long made a connection between childhood abuse and neglect and crime in adulthood. But a new study found that when other life factors are considered, that link all but disappears.
Categories: Science

Gender roles: Men and women are not so different after all

Science Daily - 7 hours 44 min ago
Gender is a large part of our identity that is often defined by our psychological differences as men and women. But a researcher says in reality men and women are more alike than we may think.
Categories: Science

Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers Bridge the Airgap

Slashdot - 8 hours 22 min ago
An anonymous reader writes Hacked has a piece about Georgia Institute of Technology researchers keylogging from a distance using the electromagnetic radiation of CPUs. They can reportedly do this from up to 6 meters away. In this video, using two Ubuntu laptops, they demonstrate that keystrokes are easily interpreted with the software they have developed. In their white paper they talk about the need for more research in this area so that hardware and software manufacturers will be able to develop more secure devices. For now, Farraday cages don't seem as crazy as they used to, or do they?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

A Closer Look at Slow Motion Video on the iPhone 6

Wired News - 8 hours 46 min ago

How does the iPhone handle this transition from real speed to slow motion speed? In other words, what is the time rate of change of the frame rate during the transition.

The post A Closer Look at Slow Motion Video on the iPhone 6 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Brooklyn is Bigfoot’s Backyard?

Cryptomundo - 8 hours 59 min ago
A Sasquatch Sighting in an unlikely location?
Categories: Fortean

Why ATM Bombs May Be Coming Soon To the United States

Slashdot - 9 hours 16 min ago
HughPickens.com writes Nick Summers has an interesting article at Bloomberg about the epidemic of 90 ATM bombings that has hit Britain since 2013. ATM machines are vulnerable because the strongbox inside an ATM has two essential holes: a small slot in front that spits out bills to customers and a big door in back through which employees load reams of cash in large cassettes. "Criminals have learned to see this simple enclosure as a physics problem," writes Summers. "Gas is pumped in, and when it's detonated, the weakest part—the large hinged door—is forced open. After an ATM blast, thieves force their way into the bank itself, where the now gaping rear of the cash machine is either exposed in the lobby or inside a trivially secured room. Set off with skill, the shock wave leaves the money neatly stacked, sometimes with a whiff of the distinctive acetylene odor of garlic." The rise in gas attacks has created a market opportunity for the companies that construct ATM components. Several manufacturers now make various anti-gas-attack modules: Some absorb shock waves, some detect gas and render it harmless, and some emit sound, fog, or dye to discourage thieves in the act. As far as anyone knows, there has never been a gas attack on an American ATM. The leading theory points to the country's primitive ATM cards. Along with Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, and not many other countries, the U.S. doesn't require its plastic to contain an encryption chip, so stealing cards remains an effective, nonviolent way to get at the cash in an ATM. Encryption chip requirements are coming to the U.S. later this year, though. And given the gas raid's many advantages, it may be only a matter of time until the back of an American ATM comes rocketing off.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science