Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Trailer: Travel Back in Wizarding Time

Wired News - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 3:07pm
Newt Scamander tracks down escaped dangerous creatures in a magical 1920s New York. The post Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Trailer: Travel Back in Wizarding Time appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

55 Percent Of Online Shoppers Start Their Product Searches On Amazon

Slashdot - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 2:45pm
Another year, another data point showing Amazon has surpassed Google as the default search engine for shopping, a report on Recode reads. Fifty-five percent of people in the U.S. now start their online shopping trips on Amazon.com, according to results from a 2,000-person survey commissioned by the e-commerce startup BloomReach. That stat marks a 25 percent increase from the same survey last year, when 44 percent of online shoppers said they turned to Amazon first. From the report: Over the same time, the percentage of shoppers who start product searches on search engines like Google dropped from 34 percent to 28 percent. The number of online shoppers who check out a retailer's website (other than Amazon) first also shrunk, from 21 percent to 16 percent.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Study of North Atlantic Ocean reveals decline of leaded petrol emissions

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 2:16pm
A new study of lead pollution in the North Atlantic provides strong evidence that leaded petrol emissions have declined over the past few decades. For the first time in around 40 years, scientists have detected lead from natural sources in samples from this ocean. In the intervening period, the proportion of lead in the ocean from humanmade sources, most importantly leaded petrol emissions, had been so high that it was not possible to detect any lead from natural sources.
Categories: Science

Depression in pregnancy increases risk of mental health problems in children

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 2:11pm
Depression in pregnancy increases the risk of behavioral and emotional problems in children, says a new review.
Categories: Science

Rosetta Probe's 'Death Dive' Into Comet 67P Visualized

Space.com - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 2:08pm
The European Space Agency's Rosetta probe will meet its demise on September 30, 2016 when a maneuver is performed to make it crash into Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. This visualization shows the descent, but stops short of it crashing.
Categories: Science

What’s Your Ideal Running Speed to Conserve Energy?

Wired News - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 2:00pm
Clearly running faster uses more energy. But at what speed does a human use the least amount of energy? Here is a model with estimates. The post What’s Your Ideal Running Speed to Conserve Energy? appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

BlackBerry Says It's Done Designing and Building Its Own Phones

Slashdot - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 2:00pm
BlackBerry today reported its fiscal second-quarter sales and said that it will stop making its iconic smartphones and focus on its software business. The Verge adds: BlackBerry has announced that it plans to stop making its own phones as the struggling company continues to focus on its software and security products. This is far from the end of BlackBerry devices, the production of which will be outsourced to third-party manufacturers -- as was the case with the company's recent DTEK 50, a clone of Alcatel's Idol 4 with BlackBerry branding. "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners," said CEO John Chen in a statement. Elsewhere he stated: "We are reaching an inflection point with our strategy. Our financial foundation is strong, and our pivot to software is taking hold." This isn't surprising news considering BlackBerry's ongoing struggle in the mobile market. According to estimates from Gartner, the company claimed just 0.1 percent of the market in the second quarter, equating to sales of some 400,400 units. The last BlackBerry phone manufactured by the company was the Priv, the company's first Android-powered device, released November last year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Mechanical behavior of tiny structures is affected by atomic defects

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 1:44pm
Scientists have measured the mechanics of tiny crystalline ceramics. Materials are made of atoms, and if they are arranged periodically, they are called crystalline structures. If the size of these crystalline structures is 1,000 times smaller than a single human hair diameter, then they are called nano-structures such as nano-rods, nano-wires, nano-ribbons, nano-belts etc.
Categories: Science

Americas declared free of measles

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 1:35pm
The Region of the Americas is the first in the world to have eliminated measles, a viral disease that can cause severe health problems, including pneumonia, blindness, brain swelling and even death. This achievement culminates a 22-year effort involving mass vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella throughout the Americas.
Categories: Science

Toward 'greener,' inexpensive solar cells

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 1:22pm
Solar panels are proliferating across the globe to help reduce the world's dependency on fossil fuels. But conventional panels are not without environmental costs, too. Now scientists report a new advance toward more practical, "greener" solar cells made with inexpensive halide perovskite materials. They have developed low-bandgap perovskite solar cells with a reduced lead content and a power conversion efficiency of 15 percent.
Categories: Science

The War on City Parking Just Got Serious

Wired News - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 1:00pm
The White House deals a (symbolic) blow to neighborhoods hoping to keep precious spots all to themselves. The post The War on City Parking Just Got Serious appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Vladimir Putin Is Replacing Microsoft Programs With Domestic Software

Slashdot - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 1:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Moscow city will replace Microsoft Corp. programs with domestic software on thousands of computers in answer to President Vladimir Putin's call for Russia's authorities to reduce dependence on foreign technology amid tensions with the U.S. and Europe. The city will initially replace Microsoft's Exchange Server and Outlook on 6,000 computers with an e-mail system installed by state-run carrier Rostelecom PJSC, Artem Yermolaev, head of information technology for Moscow, told reporters Tuesday. Moscow may expand deployment of the new software, developed by Russia's New Cloud Technologies, to as many as 600,000 computers and servers, and may also consider replacing Windows and Office, Yermolaev said. Putin is urging state entities and local companies to go domestic amid concerns over security and reliability after U.S. firms shut down paid services in Crimea following Russia's 2014 annexation. The plan poses a challenge to the likes of Microsoft, SAP SE and Oracle Corp. in the country's $3 billion software market. Adding to pressure, Putin's internet czar German Klimenko wants to raise taxes on U.S. technology companies to help Russian competitors such as Yandex NV and Mail.ru Group Ltd.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Elon Musk Wants to Make Humans a Multiplanetary Species, in Our Lifetime

Underground Stream - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:40pm

Tech billionaire Elon Musk is a man who has set his sights on transforming our world, from his push towards a future of electric cars (through his company Tesla) and solar power, through to him taking the lead on 'corporate space vehicles' with SpaceX. And today, he set out perhaps the grandest vision of space exploration heard since John F. Kennedy issued his challenge for the U.S. to travel to the Moon before the 1960s had ended.

"What I really want to try and achieve here is to make Mars seem possible...Make it seem as though it's something we can do in our lifetimes, and that you can go.", he noted in his speech today at the 67th International Astronautical Congress, in Guadalajara, Mexico. He then went on to discuss the 'long-term technical challenges that need to be solved to support the creation of a permanent, self-sustaining human presence on Mars'. (His hour-long presentation is embedded below, as well as a shorter 'highlights' package created by The Verge.)

For me, as a child of the 1970s who - after viewing the amazing images of of the Viking probes - thought that we'd be traveling to the Red Planet before the next decade was done, Musk's vision is seductive. Maybe I will one day get to venture to Mars myself! On the other hand, the technical challenges are not trivial - from getting off this planet, to staying safe and sane on the journey there, and then landing and setting up a settlement.

But, when you consider the success of JFK's challenge, perhaps what Musk is doing here is exactly what is needed. Stop talking in increments, in absolute safety, and instead have a grand vision and set yourself a timeline to try and do the near-impossible.

What do you think of Musk's vision of space travel?

Below are some links to news coverage of the announcement:

And, for a view from a completely different angle, remember that m1k3y has covered Musk's plans previously in his Nightmares of the Future series right here on the Grail.

Diabetes in children is a chronic, but treatable, disease

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:34pm
For those people living with diabetes, every day requires around-the-clock monitoring and management, explain experts. This daily monitoring can be a particular challenge for young people who also have to be attentive to when and what they eat and drink, as well as their activities at home, in school or while hanging out with friends. Even a minor ailment like a cold may require changes in the medical regimen because of the effect inflammation has on the blood sugar.
Categories: Science

Time window to help people who have had a stroke longer than previously shown

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:34pm
Time is of the essence when getting people stricken with acute ischemic strokes to treatment. Current professional guidelines recommend that stent retrievers be used to remove blood clots from stroke patients within six hours for people to benefit. But new research finds that the procedure has benefits for people up to 7.3 hours following the onset of a stroke.
Categories: Science

Fungus makes mosquitoes much more likely to become infected with malaria

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:33pm
A fungus that compromises the immune system of mosquitoes, making them more susceptible to infection with the parasite that causes malaria, has been discovered by scientists. Because environmental microorganisms can vary greatly from region to region, the researchers say the findings may help explain variations in the prevalence of malaria in different geographic areas.
Categories: Science

New steel for better electric motors under development

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:33pm
A new kind of steel for the motors in electric vehicles is now under development. The new steel would help make the motors smaller, lighter, more powerful and more cost effective.
Categories: Science

Tracking the amount of sea ice from the Greenland ice sheet

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:32pm
By analyzing ice cores drilled from deep inside the Greenland ice sheet, researchers have started to calculate how much Arctic sea ice there was in the past.
Categories: Science

Heart disease exercise program could work for bowel cancer patients

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:32pm
Could rehabilitation programs for heart disease patients be used to help people recovering from bowel cancer get back on their feet? That’s the question cancer care experts have been exploring.
Categories: Science

One fly to rule them all: Flies are the key pollinators of the High Arctic

Science Daily - Wed, 28/09/2016 - 12:32pm
Forget the view of the Arctic as an icy desert devoid of life. The Arctic summer is buzzing with insects -- and here as everywhere else, plants rely on them for pollination. But who are the insects driving the pollination services across the Arctic? A new study finds the biggest heroes among the most modest of animals: small flies related to our common house fly. This finding offers cause for concern, as arctic fly abundances are declining as the Arctic continues to warm.
Categories: Science