Google's OnHub Is First WiFi Router To Support IFTTT

Slashdot - Fri, 29/04/2016 - 1:28am
An anonymous reader writes: The first router to feature IFTTT support is Google OnHub. IFTTT is an abbreviation of "If This Then That," a free web-based service that can allow users to create "recipes," which are triggered based on changes to other web services such as Gmail, Facebook, Instagram, etc. OnHub's smart features can now connect to the 300-plus programs and apps supported by IFTTT. Google provides some examples in its blog post. For example, you can automatically prioritize Wi-Fi to your Chromecast when it connects to your OnHub network after you plug it in to start binge watching your favorite TV show, or to your Nest Cam when it senses motion or sound after you've exhausted yourself from said binge watching and passed-out on your couch. There's a friendly little video Google put together to explain the feature in detail.

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Categories: Science

Who's Downloading Pirated Scientifc Papers? Everyone

Slashdot - Fri, 29/04/2016 - 12:45am
sciencehabit quotes a report from Science Magazine: In increasing numbers, researchers around the world are turning to Sci-Hub, the controversial website that hosts 50 million pirated papers and counting. Now, with server log data from Alexandra Elbakyan, the neuroscientist who created Sci-Hub in 2011 as a 22-year-old graduate student in Kazakhstan, Science addresses some basic questions: Who are Sci-Hub's users, where are they, and what are they reading? The Sci-Hub data provide the first detailed view of what is becoming the world's de facto open-access research library. Among the revelations that may surprise both fans and foes alike: Sci-Hub users are not limited to the developing world. Some critics of Sci-Hub have complained that many users can access the same papers through their libraries but turn to Sci-Hub instead -- for convenience rather than necessity. The data provide some support for that claim. Over the 6 months leading up to March, Sci-Hub served up 28 million documents, with Iran, China, India, Russia, and the United States the leading requestors.

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Categories: Science

Etsy Is Defying Tech’s Lousy Record on Gender Diversity

Wired News - Fri, 29/04/2016 - 12:11am
Etsy has crafted an identity for itself as an artisanal alternative to mainstream marketplaces. It's also going against the norm in other ways. The post Etsy Is Defying Tech's Lousy Record on Gender Diversity appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Microsoft Limits Cortana Search Box In Windows 10 To Bing and Edge Only

Slashdot - Fri, 29/04/2016 - 12:03am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Microsoft has announced a big change for how the Cortana search box in Windows 10 will work going forward: all searches will be powered by Bing and all links will open with the Edge browser. This is a server-side change going into effect today. Once it takes effect on your Windows 10 computer, Cortana will no longer be able to serve up results from third-party search providers, like Google or Yahoo, nor take you to a third-party browser, such as Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox. Ryan Gavin, Microsoft's general manager of search and Cortana, said in a Windows blog post announcing the change, "Unfortunately, as Windows 10 has grown in adoption and usage, we have seen some software programs circumvent the design of Windows 10 and redirect you to search providers that were not designed to work with Cortana. The result is a compromised experience that is less reliable and predictable. The continuity of these types of task completion scenarios is disrupted if Cortana can't depend on Bing as the search provider and Microsoft Edge as the browser. The only way we can confidently deliver this personalized, end-to-end search experience is through the integration of Cortana, Microsoft Edge and Bing -- all designed to do more for you."

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Categories: Science

Whoa, Amazon Isn’t Just Making Money. It’s Making More Than Ever

Wired News - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 11:37pm
Amazon has long favored growth over profits, dampening Wall Street's expectations for years. Today was a different story. The post Whoa, Amazon Isn't Just Making Money. It's Making More Than Ever appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Top Security Experts Say Anti-Encryption Bill Authors Are 'Woefully Ignorant'

Slashdot - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 11:19pm
blottsie writes from a report on the Daily Dot: In a Wall Street Journal editorial titled "Encryption Without Tears," Sens. Richard Burr and Dianne Feinstein pushed back on widespread condemnation of their Compliance with Court Orders Act, which would require tech companies to provide authorities with user data in an "intelligible" format if served with a warrant. But security experts Bruce Schneir, Matthew Green, and others say the lawmakers entirely misunderstand the issue. "On a weekly basis we see gigabytes of that information dumped to the Internet," Green told the Daily Dot. "This is the whole problem that encryption is intended to solve." He added: "You can't hold out the current flaws in the Internet as a justification for why the Internet shouldn't be made secure." "These criticisms of Burr and Feinstein's analogy emphasize an important point about digital security: The differences between the levels of encryption protecting certain types of data -- purchase records on Amazon's servers versus photos on an iPhone, for example -- lead to different levels of risk," writes Eric Geller of the Daily Dot.

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Categories: Science

North Korea Launches Two Midrange Missiles, Both Tests Fail

Slashdot - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 10:35pm
An anonymous reader writes: According to South Korean Defense Ministry officials, North Korea fired two midrange Musudan missiles Thursday, and both missiles appear to have failed. The military cannot confirm exactly when the missile exploded but said it "crashed shortly after it was launched," a Defense Ministry official said. U.S. military officials said the missiles traveled an estimated 200 meters from the launchpad. This past weekend, North Korea launched a ballistic missile from a submarine off the east cost of the Korean peninsula. It only traveled about 30 km, well short of the 300 km range that would be considered a successful test. A little more than a week prior to that launch, North Korea failed to launch an intermediate-range missile on the 104th anniversary of the birthday of the country's 'eternal president,' Kim II Sung.

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Categories: Science

India Installs 'Laser Walls' At Border With Pakistan

Slashdot - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 10:07pm
schwit1 writes: After experimenting with barbed wire, surveillance cameras and even cowbells and camels, India has now reportedly introduced "laser walls" at its border with archenemy Pakistan. Both New Delhi and Islamabad deploy more than half of their 1 million and 600,000-strong armies, respectively, on the border. India is setting up the laser walls to "plug the porous riverine and treacherous terrain and keep an effective vigil against intruders and terrorists" in Punjab state, the state-run Press Trust of India reported. According to the PTI report, around 45 laser walls will be installed in Punjab state. Lasers beamed over rivers and hills will set off an alarm and alert the Indian Border Security Force if someone attempts to pass by, it added.

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Categories: Science

NFL Sunday Ticket Adds Live Streaming to Its Base Package

Wired News - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 10:00pm
You'll still probably need a DirecTV satellite to stream live NFL games this year, but at least it's getting cheaper. The post NFL Sunday Ticket Adds Live Streaming to Its Base Package appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

More than just eyes and skin: Vitamin A affects the heart

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:40pm
Vitamin A is important for heart development in embryos, but whether it has a role in maintaining heart health is unclear. A new study finds that the heart is able to respond to vitamin A and the amount of vitamin A present has an effect. However, whether the effects are beneficial or harmful is still a mystery.
Categories: Science

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:33pm
Researchers have developed a new method to quickly and accurately determine the orientation of phosphorene, a promising material with potential application as a material for semiconducting transistors in ever faster and more powerful computers.
Categories: Science

A cell senses its own curves

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:33pm
Septin proteins in human and fungal cells can sense micron-scaled curves in the cell membrane, scientists discover.
Categories: Science

New gene testing technology finds cancer risks 'hiding in plain sight'

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:33pm
A new method for identifying mutations and prioritizing variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes, which will not only reduce the number of possible variants for doctors to investigate, but also increase the number of patients that are properly diagnosed.
Categories: Science

Nvidia GPU-Powered Autonomous Car Teaches Itself To See And Steer

Slashdot - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:33pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Network World discussing Nvidia's project called DAVE2, where their engineering team built a self-driving car with one camera, one Drive-PX embedded computer and only 72 hours of training data: Neural networks and image recognition applications such as self-driving cars have exploded recently for two reasons. First, Graphical Processing Units (GPU) used to render graphics in mobile phones became powerful and inexpensive. GPUs densely packed onto board-level supercomputers are very good at solving massively parallel neural network problems and are inexpensive enough for every AI researcher and software developer to buy. Second, large, labeled image datasets have become available to train massively parallel neural networks implemented on GPUs to see and perceive the world of objects captured by cameras. The Nvidia team trained a convolutional neural network (CNN) to map raw pixels from a single front-facing camera directly to steering commands. Nvidia's breakthrough is the autonomous vehicle automatically taught itself by watching how a human drove, the internal representations of the processing steps of seeing the road ahead and steering the autonomous vehicle without explicitly training it to detect features such as roads and lanes.

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Categories: Science

Personal cooling units on the horizon

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:32pm
Firefighters entering burning buildings, athletes competing in the broiling sun and workers in foundries may eventually be able to carry their own, lightweight cooling units with them, thanks to a nanowire array that cools, according to materials researchers.
Categories: Science

Genetic risk factors of disparate diseases share similar biological underpinnings

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:32pm
The discovery of shared biological properties among independent variants of DNA sequences offers the opportunity to broaden understanding of the biological basis of disease and identify new therapeutic targets, report scientists.
Categories: Science

Building on shells: Study starts unraveling mysteries of Calusa kingdom

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:32pm
Centuries before modern countries such as Dubai and China started building islands, native peoples in southwest Florida known as the Calusa were piling shells into massive heaps to construct their own water-bound towns.
Categories: Science

Gene therapy halts pulmonary hypertension progression in large animal pre-clinical study

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:32pm
Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure.
Categories: Science

Origin of Earth's oldest crystals

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:32pm
New research suggests that the very oldest pieces of rock on Earth -- zircon crystals -- are likely to have formed in the craters left by violent asteroid impacts that peppered our nascent planet, rather than via plate tectonics as was previously believed.
Categories: Science

HPV vaccination expected to reduce cancer in all races, may not eliminate all disparities

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 9:32pm
Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers occur more frequently among Hispanics, blacks, American-Indians, and Alaska Natives than among whites. A new study finds that HPV vaccination is expected to reduce the cancer burden across all racial/ethnic groups. However, some disparities in cancer burden may persist and widen in the years to come if their causes, such as lack of access to diagnoses and treatment, aren't addressed.
Categories: Science