The eyes are the window into the brain

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:34pm
Insight into how neurons in the cerebellum respond to rapid eye movements may provide clues for modern medical technology.
Categories: Science

Genetic profiling increases cancer treatment options, study finds

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:34pm
Genetic profiling of cancer tumors provides new avenues for treatment of the disease, according to a study. In this research, the investigators used next-generation gene sequencing technology to analyze tumor samples for more than 100 patients. More than 90 percent of those patients had gene mutations that could impact their treatment.
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Improving safety of neutron sources

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:34pm
There is a growing interest in the scientific community in a type of high-power neutron source that is created via a process referred to as spallation. The issue here is that scientists do not always understand the mechanism of residue nuclei production. Scientists have now presented findings which contribute to improving the risk assessment of future high-power spallation neutron beam facilities.
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New catalyst for hydrogen production

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:34pm
The mineral pentlandite is a potential new catalyst for hydrogen production. It works just as efficient as the platinum electrodes commonly used today. In contrast to platinum, pentlandite is affordable and found frequently on Earth.
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Goodbye Philae: Comet Lander Comm Link Switched Off

Space.com - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:28pm
The first-ever spacecraft to land on a comet has been cut off from the Earth forever. Today (July 27), the European Space Agency (ESA) shut down communications between its Rosetta probe and the Philae lander on Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
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Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome patients who smoke, are obese have poorer quality of life

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:08pm
A new study of patients who survive the once-nearly fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome finds their subsequent quality of life has more to do with lifestyle factors than how sick they were in the hospital.
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Monitoring cell fates

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:08pm
Scientists have been studying the factors influencing the development of different blood cells. Their research shows that certain molecular mechanisms are not as relevant as previously assumed. This finding helps to improve our understanding of diseases such as leukemia and anemia.
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New Zealand wren DNA analysis reshapes geological theory

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:08pm
A DNA analysis of living and extinct species of mysterious New Zealand wrens may change theories around the country's geological and evolutionary past.
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Faces aren't always to be believed when it comes to honesty

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:08pm
Researchers have determined that certain facial features, not the expression, influence whether people think someone is trustworthy. Two studies have determined that people often make judgments of trustworthiness based solely on the face.
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Vitamin D levels predict risk of brain decline in Chinese elderly

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:08pm
Low vitamin D levels has been associated with increased subsequent risk of cognitive decline and impairment in the Chinese elderly, a new study shows.
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World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:08pm
Researchers have fabricated the first magneto-optical (MO) Q-switched laser. Unlike electro-optic (EO) and acousto-optic (AO) effects, MO effects had not previously been used in Q-switched lasers, even though they are also very well-known phenomena. The fabricated MO Q-switched laser contributes to the development of compact high-power lasers.
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LastPass Accounts Can Be 'Completely Compromised' When Users Visit Sites

Slashdot - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 2:00pm
Reader mask.of.sanity writes: A dangerous zero-day vulnerability has been found in popular cloud password vault LastPass, which can completely compromise user accounts when users visit malicious websites. The flaw is today being reported to LastPass by established Google Project zero hacker Tavis Ormandy who says he has found other "obvious critical problems". Interestingly, Mathias Karlsson, a security researcher has also independently found flaws in LastPass. In a blog post, he wrote that he was able to trick LastPass into believing he was on the real Twiter website and cough up the users' credentials of a bug in the LastPass password manager's autofill functionality. LastPass has fixed the bug, but Karlsson advises users to disable autofill functionality and use multi-factor authentication. At this point, it's not clear whether Ormandy is also talking about the same vulnerability.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Here’s What We Know About Russia and the DNC Hack

Wired News - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:30pm
Russia was very likely responsible for the hack that has upended the DNC. The post Here’s What We Know About Russia and the DNC Hack appeared first on WIRED.
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How do pesticides protect crops?

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:07pm
New research could lead to the fine-tuning of pesticide formulations to further increase crop yield. The findings also show a way to develop advanced performance formulations which will interact reversibly with plant surfaces and will leave their protective cuticles unharmed.
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Two neonicotinoid insecticides may have inadvertent contraceptive effects on male honey bees

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:07pm
Male honey bees, called drones, can be affected by two neonicotinoid insecticides by reducing male honey bee lifespan and number of living sperm. Both insecticides are currently partially banned in Europe. Now researchers are calling for more thorough environmental risk assessments of these neonicotinoids.
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Saharan dust: Reliable forecasts for photovoltaic output

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:06pm
A hazy sky and dirty cars are well-known consequences of Saharan dust carried to Europe by air currents. As part of the “PerduS” project, researchers are currently examining how dust – as haze in the atmosphere and deposited on solar panels – affects the output of photovoltaic systems. The aim is to provide a more reliable forecast for the output of photovoltaic systems through a better prediction of the spread of dust.
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Watering solar cells makes them grow in power

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:06pm
Perovskite solar cells are the rising star in the photovoltaic landscape. Since their invention, less than ten years ago, their efficiency has doubled twice and it is now over 22% -- an astonishing result in the renewable energy sector. Researchers have now clarified the relationship between air exposure and enhanced electric proprieties in perovskite solar cells.
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Cuttable display sheets developed

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:06pm
New display sheets that can be cut into any shape with scissors have been developed by researchers. As you can cut this display into any shape you like, and attach it on the surfaces of things that has complex shapes such as clothing and buildings, the display is expected to meet diverse display needs, which cannot be achieved by conventional display technologies, say the developers.
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New approach for environmental test on livestock drugs

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:05pm
Drugs for livestock can harm beneficial organisms that break down dung. Therefore newly developed medical substances need to be tested on single species in the lab. An international research group has been scrutinizing the reliability of such laboratory tests, evaluating the implementation of a field test based on the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin at four climatically different locations. The scientists have now presented a novel approach for more advanced environmental compatibility tests.
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Study uncovers novel genetic alterations contributing to development of leukemia

Science Daily - Wed, 27/07/2016 - 1:05pm
Novel genetic alterations contributing to development of leukemia have been discovered by a team of scientists. The findings from the international study involving about 220 newly diagnosed and relapse patient samples pave the way for development of new therapies, they say.
Categories: Science