Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tech Looks To Obama To Save Them From 'Just Sort of OK' US Workers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 2:12pm
theodp writes Following up on news that the White House met with big biz on immigration earlier this month, Bloomberg sat down with Joe Green, the head of Mark Zuckerberg's Fwd.US PAC, to discuss possible executive actions President Obama might take on high tech immigration (video) in September. "Hey, Joe," asked interviewer Alix Steel. "All we keep hearing about this earnings season though from big tech is how they're actually cutting jobs. If you look at Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Hewlett-Packard, why do the tech companies then need more tech visas?" Green explained why tech may not want to settle for laid-off U.S. talent when the world is its oyster. "The difference between someone who's truly great and just sort of okay is really huge," Green said. "Culture in tech is a very meritocratic culture," he added. "The vast, vast majority of tech engineers that I talked to who are from the United States are very supportive of bringing in people from other countries because they want to work with the very best."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:42pm
Are young people losing the ability to read emotions in our digital world? Scientists report that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other screen did substantially better at reading emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who, as usual, spent hours each day looking at their smartphones and other screens.
Categories: Science

Citizen scientists saving lives around deadly 'Throat of Fire' volcano

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:41pm
Citizen scientists are saving the lives of people living in the shadow of deadly volcanoes according to research. A report reveals the success of a volunteer group set up to safeguard communities around the 'Throat of Fire' Tungurahua volcano in the Ecuadorian Andes. The research shows that living safely in dangerous areas can depend on effective communication and collaboration between volcanologists, risk managers and vulnerable communities.
Categories: Science

Proteins: New class of materials discovered

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:41pm
Scientists have characterized a new class of materials called protein crystalline frameworks. Thanks to certain helper substances, in PCFs proteins are fixated in a way so as to align themselves symmetrically, forming highly stable crystals.
Categories: Science

Creating pomegranate drug to stem Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:41pm
Research will look to produce compound derivatives of punicalagin for a drug that would treat neuro-inflammation and slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease, scientists report. The onset of Alzheimer's disease can be slowed and some of its symptoms curbed by a natural compound that is found in pomegranate. Also, the painful inflammation that accompanies illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and Parkinson's disease could be reduced, according to the findings of the two-year project.
Categories: Science

Epigenetic changes in children with Crohn's disease seen in study

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:40pm
A wide range of epigenetic changes -— alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures -— in children with Crohn's disease (CD), has been observed and reported in a new study. Crohn's disease is a painful, medically incurable illness that may attack anywhere along the digestive system. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which involves only the large intestine (colon), are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease.
Categories: Science

Study Identifies Challenges Faced by NYU Langone Nurses in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:40pm
The post-Sandy deployment of nurses to help address patient surge in eight local hospitals and health facilities had an impact that has not been well studied since the storm. A new research study is one of only a few to evaluate the psychological toll on nurses working in such rapidly changing, uncontrolled, and potentially dangerous circumstances.
Categories: Science

Voyager map details Neptune's strange moon Triton

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:35pm
NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first close-up look at Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. Like an old film, Voyager's historic footage of Triton has been "restored" and used to construct the best-ever global color map of that strange moon. The map, produced by Paul Schenk, a scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, has also been used to make a movie recreating that historic Voyager encounter, which took place 25 years ago, on August 25, 1989.
Categories: Science

A Gadget Designed to Finally Make Doctors Wash Their Hands Enough

Wired News - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:32pm
75,000 patients died last year from healthcare-associated infections (HAI) in the United States. The culprit is usually unwashed hands.






Categories: Science

NSA Agents Leak Tor Bugs To Developers

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 1:29pm
An anonymous reader writes: We've known for a while that NSA specifically targets Tor, because they want to disrupt one of the last remaining communication methods they aren't able to tap or demand access to. However, not everybody at the NSA is on board with this strategy. Tor developer Andrew Lewman says even as flaws in Tor are rooted out by the NSA and British counterpart GCHQ, other agents from the two organizations leak those flaws directly to the developers, so they can be fixed quickly. He said, "You have to think about the type of people who would be able to do this and have the expertise and time to read Tor source code from scratch for hours, for weeks, for months, and find and elucidate these super-subtle bugs or other things that they probably don't get to see in most commercial software." Lewman estimates the Tor Project receives these reports on a monthly basis. He also spoke about how a growing amount of users will affect Tor. He suggests a massive company like Google or Facebook will eventually have to take up the task of making Tor scale up to millions of users.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

Slashdot - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 12:47pm
An anonymous reader notes coverage of research from the University of Michigan into the ease with which attackers can hack traffic lights. From the article: As is typical in large urban areas, the traffic lights in the subject city are networked in a tree-type topology, allowing them to pass information to and receive instruction from a central management point. The network is IP-based, with all the nodes (intersections and management computers) on a single subnet. In order to save on installation costs and increase flexibility, the traffic light system uses wireless radios rather than dedicated physical networking links for its communication infrastructure—and that’s the hole the research team exploited. ... The 5.8GHz network has no password and uses no encryption; with a proper radio in hand, joining is trivial. ... The research team quickly discovered that the debug port was open on the live controllers and could directly "read and write arbitrary memory locations, kill tasks, and even reboot the device (PDF)." Debug access to the system also let the researchers look at how the controller communicates to its attached devices—the traffic lights and intersection cameras. They quickly discovered that the control system’s communication was totally non-obfuscated and easy to understand—and easy to subvert.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

A University Can Pick Two of These Three Things

Wired News - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 12:46pm
A recent trend seems to be the evaluation of higher education institutions. I’m not sure about other states, but in Louisiana the state funding each university receives is partly based on “performance metrics”. Personally, I think all of these things are just silly. At one point or another, I have heard administrators and politicians saying […]






Categories: Science

The Monster of Wasdale Valley

Cryptomundo - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 12:46pm
"In the Wasdale Valley Cumbria is Wastwater, a deep and mysterious lake..."
Categories: Fortean

Playing hunger games: Are gamified health apps putting odds in your favor?

Science Daily - Fri, 22/08/2014 - 12:42pm
For many people, finding motivation to exercise is a challenge. Thankfully, there are Zombies chasing you. At least that's the approach of Zombies, Run! -- one of more than 31,000 health and fitness apps on the market today, and one of the growing number of apps that use games to increase physical activity. Gamification is currently the popular trend for mobile fitness apps, but whether or not it's the best way to exercise remains to be seen.
Categories: Science