Saturn Moon's Weird Ridge Rained Down from Space

Space.com - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:41pm
Saturn certainly has some oddball moons and astronomers think they're close to explaining how a weird feature formed on one of them. New 3D maps are giving scientists an idea of how Iapetus' strange moons actually formed.
Categories: Science

Your T-shirt's ringing: Printable tiny flexible cell phones for clothes?

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:28pm
A new version of 'spaser' technology being investigated could mean that mobile phones become so small, efficient, and flexible they could be printed on clothing. A spaser is effectively a nanoscale laser or nanolaser. It emits a beam of light through the vibration of free electrons, rather than the space-consuming electromagnetic wave emission process of a traditional laser.
Categories: Science

Take notes by hand for better long-term comprehension

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:28pm
Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks: research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. "Our new findings suggest that even when laptops are used as intended -- and not for buying things on Amazon during class -- they may still be harming academic performance," says a psychological scientist involved in the study.
Categories: Science

Leaders call for expanded use of medications to combat opioid overdose epidemic

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:28pm
A national response to the epidemic of prescription opioid overdose deaths was outlined by leaders of agencies in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The commentary calls upon health care providers to expand their use of medications to treat opioid addiction and reduce overdose deaths, and describes a number of misperceptions that have limited access to these potentially life-saving medications.
Categories: Science

Using antineutrinos to monitor nuclear reactors

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:28pm
When monitoring nuclear reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has to rely on input given by the operators. In the future, antineutrino detectors may provide an additional option for monitoring. However, heretofore the cumulative antineutrino spectrum of uranium 238 fission products was missing. Physicists have now closed this gap using fast neutrons.
Categories: Science

Bake your own droplet lens: Cheap, high-quality lenses made from droplets of transparent silicone

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:28pm
Researchers have created a new type of lens that costs less than a penny to make, and can be used in a 3-D printed attachment that turns a Smartphone into a dermascope, a tool to diagnose skin diseases like melanoma. Normal dermascopes can cost $500 or more, but this version costs a mere $2 and is slated to be commercially available in just a few months.
Categories: Science

New ultrasound device may add in detecting risk for heart attack, stroke

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:26pm
A new ultrasound device that could help identify arterial plaque that is at high risk of breaking off and causing heart attack or stroke has been developed by researchers. The prototype device has performed well in laboratory testing, but the researchers say they are continuing to optimize the technology. They hope to launch pre-clinical studies in the near future.
Categories: Science

Hydrothermal vents: How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:26pm
Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, the so-called 'black smokers,' are fascinating geological formations. They are home to unique ecosystems, but are also potential suppliers of raw materials for the future. They are driven by volcanic 'power plants' in the seafloor. But how exactly do they extract their energy from the volcanic rock?
Categories: Science

Palliation is rarely a topic in studies on advanced cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:24pm
Randomized controlled trials only rarely consider end-of-life aspects and often fail to name superordinate patient-relevant treatment goals. Instead of quality of life, survival is in the foreground, research shows.
Categories: Science

Boring cells could hold the key to heart disease

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:24pm
Fibroblasts, cells long thought to be boring and irrelevant, could offer an alternative to heart transplants for patients with heart disease. "Heart disease is still one of the major killers in our society and so far no effective therapeutic options are available. Our laboratory aims to understand how the various cell types present in a heart can improve the outcome of heart failure,' said the lead researcher.
Categories: Science

Motor skill deficiencies linked to autism severity, reseearch says

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:24pm
A relationship between motor skill deficiencies and the severity of the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder has been found in very young children. The findings indicate that development of motor skills should be included in treatment plans for young children with autism. Most autism treatment plans for young children focus on social communication because the disability has such a significant effect in that area. Incorporating fine and gross motor skill development into early interventions could provide a similar boost, the researchers say.
Categories: Science

When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:24pm
School children learn the difference between liquids and gases, but centuries of scholarship have failed to produce consensus about how to categorize glass. Now, combining theory and numerical simulations, researchers have resolved an enduring question in the theory of glasses, showing that their energy landscapes are far rougher than previously believed. The new model shows that molecules in glassy materials settle into a fractal hierarchy of states.
Categories: Science

Critical vulnerabilities in TLS implementation for Java

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:23pm
In January and April 2014, Oracle has released critical Java software security updates. They resolve vulnerabilities that affected the "Java Secure Socket Extension" (JSSE), a software library implementing the "Transport Layer Security" protocol (TLS). TLS is used to encrypt sensitive information transferred between browsers and web servers, such as passwords and credit card data, for example.
Categories: Science

How do liquid foams completely block sound?

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:22pm
Liquid foams have a remarkable property: they completely block the transmission of sound over a wide range of frequencies. Physicists have studied how sound is attenuated in liquid foams. Their findings open the way to the development of tools called acoustic probes that could be used to monitor the quality of foams used in industry, especially in the mining and petroleum sectors.
Categories: Science

Asteroids made easy: 'Patch of asteroid' being built inside a satellite

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:21pm
A dozen astronauts have walked on the moon, and several rovers have been piloted on Mars, giving us a good understanding of these off-world environments. But when it comes to asteroids, scientists enter uncharted territory. Landing on an asteroid is notoriously difficult. Scientists are now looking to mitigate risk involved in landing on an asteroid by building a "patch of asteroid" inside of a small, spinning satellite.
Categories: Science

Virtual artificial heart implantation: Advances made by scientists

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:21pm
The first virtual implantation of a pioneering artificial heart has been performed. The artificial heart was implanted into an undersized adolescent, and supported the boy for 11 days before he underwent a heart transplant. "3-D heart models and performance of virtual heart implantations are no longer the inventions of science fiction. They are happening and they are impacting medicine, medical education and quality of life right now," one expert says.
Categories: Science

How a plant beckons bacteria that will do it harm

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:20pm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat’s molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe and host.
Categories: Science

Two new river turtle species described

Science Daily - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:20pm
The alligator snapping turtle is the largest river turtle in North America, weighing in at up to 200 pounds and living almost a century. Now researchers have discovered that it is not one species -- but three. By examining museum specimens and wild turtles, the scientists uncovered deep evolutionary divisions in this ancient reptile.
Categories: Science

Build Your Own Mini Mars Rover With These Brilliant, NASA-Approved Blocks

Wired News - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:15pm
Space Kit is a little box filled with Lego-eque components that allow anyone to conduct NASA-approved experiments.






Categories: Science

Anonymous' Airchat Aim: Communication Without Need For Phone Or Internet

Slashdot - Thu, 24/04/2014 - 2:11pm
concertina226 (2447056) writes "Online hacktivist collective Anonymous has announced that it is working on a new tool called Airchat which could allow people to communicate without the need for a phone or an internet connection — using radio waves instead. Anonymous, the amorphous group best known for attacking high profile targets like Sony and the CIA in recent years, said on the project's Github page: 'Airchat is a free communication tool [that] doesn't need internet infrastructure [or] a cell phone network. Instead it relies on any available radio link or device capable of transmitting audio.' Despite the Airchat system being highly involved and too complex for most people in its current form, Anonymous says it has so far used it to play interactive chess games with people at 180 miles away; share pictures and even established encrypted low bandwidth digital voice chats. In order to get Airchat to work, you will need to have a handheld radio transceiver, a laptop running either Windows, Mac OS X or Linux, and be able to install and run several pieces of complex software." And to cleanse yourself of the ads with autoplaying sound, you can visit the GitHub page itself.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science