Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:56pm
Engineers have determined, for the first time, the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart, and have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier, making it possible to reach a large number of people and even infants.
Categories: Science

Ammonium source in open ocean tracked by researchers

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:56pm
To understand the extent to which human activities are polluting Earth's atmosphere and oceans, it's important to distinguish human-made pollutants from compounds that occur naturally. A new study finds that deposition of ammonium, a source of nitrogen pollution, over the open ocean comes mostly from natural marine sources, and not from human activity.
Categories: Science

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:56pm
Scientists have created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube "porins" have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications.
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Teeth, sex and testosterone reveal secrets of aging in wild mouse lemurs

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:56pm
Mouse lemurs can live at least eight years in the wild -- twice as long as some previous estimates, a long-term longitudinal study finds.
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Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:56pm
Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory -- creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes. Scientists used human pluripotent stem cells -- which can become any cell type in the body -- to grow a miniature version of the stomach.
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New frog discovered inhabiting I-95 corridor from Connecticut to North Carolina

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:54pm
More than a half century after claims that a new frog species existed in New York and New Jersey were dismissed, a team of scientists has proven that the frog is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina and are naming it after the ecologist who first noticed it.
Categories: Science

DARPA amplifier circuit achieves speeds of 1 trillion Hz, enters Guinness World Records

Kurzweil AI - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:50pm

Terahertz Monolithic Integrated Circuit (earlier version) (credit: Northrop Grumman Corp.)

Officials from Guinness World Records have recognized DARPA’s Terahertz Electronics program for creating the fastest solid-state amplifier integrated circuit ever measured: one terahertz (1012 GHz), or one trillion cycles per second — 150 billion cycles faster than the existing world record set in 2012.

“This breakthrough could lead to revolutionary technologies such as high-resolution security imaging systems, improved collision-avoidance radar, communications networks with many times the capacity of current systems, and spectrometers that could detect potentially dangerous chemicals and explosives with much greater sensitivity,” said Dev Palmer, DARPA program manager.

Developed by Northrop Grumman Corporation, the Terahertz Monolithic Integrated Circuit (TMIC) exhibits power gains (amplification) several orders of magnitude beyond the current state of the art by using a super-scaled 25 nanometer gate-length indium phosphide high electron mobility transistor.

The TMIC showed a measured gain (on the logarithmic scale) of nine decibels at 1.0 terahertz and eight decibels at 1.03 terahertz. “Nine decibels of gain is unheard of at terahertz frequencies” said Palmer. “This opens up new possibilities for building terahertz radio circuits.”

By contrast, current smartphone technology operates at one to two gigahertz and wireless networks at 5.7 gigahertz.

For years, researchers have been looking to exploit the high-frequency sub-millimeter-wave spectrum beginning above 300 gigahertz. Current electronics using solid-state technologies have largely been unable to access the sub-millimeter band of the electromagnetic spectrum due to insufficient transistor performance.

To address the “terahertz gap,” engineers have traditionally used frequency conversion—converting alternating current at one frequency to alternating current at another frequency—to multiply circuit operating frequencies up from millimeter-wave frequencies.

This approach, however, restricts the output power of electrical devices and adversely affects signal-to-noise ratio. Frequency conversion also increases device size, weight and power supply requirements.

 

Categories: Science

YouTube Considering an Ad-Free, Subscription-Based Version

Slashdot - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:39pm
Walking The Walk writes YouTube is looking at creating a paid-subscription model that would allow users to skip the ads on their videos. (A more condensed summary from CBC.) No firm date has been announced, and it sounds like tentative steps right now, but YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki did mention that ad-enabled music videos would still be offered.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NASA's Asteroid-Capture Mission Won't Help Astronauts Reach Mars: Scientist

Space.com - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:14pm
NASA should scrap its bold asteroid-capture mission idea and instead launch a comprehensive search for near-Earth asteroids to visit in their native orbits, MIT professor Richard Binzel says.
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How Planets Get Multiple Suns Like 'Star Wars'' Tatooine

Space.com - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:13pm
A planet may be forming in a star system with more than one sun, making it sort of like an early Tatooine, the fictional home world of Luke Skywalker in "Star Wars," new research shows.
Categories: Science

Combing the atmosphere to measure greenhouse gases

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
By remotely 'combing' the atmosphere with a custom laser-based instrument, researchers have developed a new technique that can accurately measure -- over a sizeable distance -- amounts of several of the major 'greenhouse' gases implicated in climate change.
Categories: Science

Clean smell doesn't always mean clean air

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Scientists are taking a closer look at aerosol formation involving an organic compound -- called limonene -- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. This research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors.
Categories: Science

Dozens of genes associated with autism in new research

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Two major genetic studies of autism, involving more than 50 laboratories worldwide, have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms that govern whether, when, and how genes are activated overall.
Categories: Science

Planet-forming lifeline discovered in a binary star system

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Scientists have detected a streamer of dust and gas flowing from a massive outer disk toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disk of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago.
Categories: Science

In autoimmune diseases affecting millions, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans -- ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma -- mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments.
Categories: Science

Scientists make enzyme that could help explain origins of life

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Mimicking natural evolution in a test tube, scientists have devised an enzyme with a unique property that might have been crucial to the origin of life on Earth.
Categories: Science

Contamination likely explains 'food genes in blood' claim

Science Daily - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:12pm
Laboratory contaminants likely explain the results of a recent study claiming that complete genes can pass from foods we eat into our blood, according to a molecular biologist who re-examined data from the controversial research paper.
Categories: Science

Two Years After Sandy, See How Much It Changed the Neighborhoods It Hit

Wired News - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:09pm

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy two years ago, shocking photos showed the huge extent of the destruction caused by the storm. Only days after the storm struck, before and after satellite images from Google revealed the widespread damage to coastal areas of New York and New Jersey. Last year, before and after photos showed progress but still a lot of work to be done.

The post Two Years After Sandy, See How Much It Changed the Neighborhoods It Hit appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

US Air Force Launches Military GPS Satellite on 50th Atlas 5 Rocket

Space.com - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:03pm
The U.S. Air Force launched a 19-story rocket from the coast of Florida today to carry a next-generation GPS satellite into space.
Categories: Science

Photos: Atlas 5 Rocket Launches Military GPS 2F8 Satellite

Space.com - Wed, 29/10/2014 - 6:03pm
An Atlas 5 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Wednesday to loft a military GPS satellite into space.
Categories: Science