Many young cancer patients do not receive adequate fertility information and support

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:27pm
All cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation, researchers urge.
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Helping robots correct errors on-the-fly and learn from each other

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:27pm
New stochastic separation theorems have demonstrated how mathematicians could enhance capabilities of artificial intelligence.
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Newly developed nomograms provide accurate predictions for patients with oropharyngeal cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:27pm
Researchers recently developed and validated a nomogram that can predict 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with local-regionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated primarily with radiation-based therapy.
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Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:27pm
Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. A new study has instead targeted the interactive side of imitation directly, and finds that the divide between humans and chimpanzees is less clear cut.
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Peer influence doubles smoking risk for adolescents

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:27pm
Having friends who smoke doubles the risk that youth ages 10 to 19 will pick up the habit, finds new meta-analysis of 75 longitudinal teen smoking studies. This influence is more powerful in collectivistic cultures than in individualistic ones.
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Spaser can detect, kill circulating tumor cells to prevent cancer metastases, study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:27pm
A nanolaser known as the spaser can serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of finding metastasized cancer cells in the blood stream and then killing these cells, according to a new research study.
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The Windows App Store is Full of Pirate Streaming Apps

Slashdot - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 2:00pm
Ernesto Van der Sar, reporting for TorrentFreak: When we were browsing through the "top free" apps in the Windows Store, our attention was drawn to several applications that promoted "free movies" including various Hollywood blockbusters such as "Wonder Woman," "Spider-Man: Homecoming," and "The Mummy." Initially, we assumed that a pirate app may have slipped past Microsoft's screening process. However, the 'problem' doesn't appear to be isolated. There are dozens of similar apps in the official store that promise potential users free movies, most with rave reviews. Most of the applications work on multiple platforms including PC, mobile, and the Xbox. They are pretty easy to use and rely on the familiar grid-based streaming interface most sites and services use. Pick a movie or TV-show, click the play button, and off you go. The sheer number of piracy apps in the Windows Store, using names such as "Free Movies HD," "Free Movies Online 2020," and "FreeFlix HQ," came as a surprise to us. In particular, because the developers make no attempt to hide their activities, quite the opposite.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

'Electronic skin' takes wearable health monitors to the next level

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:43pm
Researchers have developed a new, electronic skin which can track heart rate, respiration, muscle movement and other health data. The electronic skins offers several improvements over existing trackers, including greater flexibility, portability, and the ability to stick the self-adhesive patch.
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Systematically studying slippery surfaces

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:43pm
Polymer brushes are polymers grown on surfaces, and are attractive for use in lubrication and anti-fouling applications. Researchers varied the length of the chain separating negatively and positively charged functional groups in polymer brushes to investigate how chain length affected the interaction of the polymer brushes with water. They found that the chain length influenced the ionic strength sensitivity for the hydration of the polymer brushes in water but not their water uptake or hydration structure.
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Before the flood: What drives preparedness?

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:42pm
More targeted efforts are needed from both the public and private insurance sectors in order to encourage people to take action to reduce their risk of flood damage, according to a new study of three European countries.
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Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:42pm
New research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, researchers have identified a long non-coding ribonucleic acid (ncRNA) that regulates genes controlling the ability of heart cells to undergo repair or regeneration. This novel RNA, called 'Singheart,' may be targeted for treating heart failure in the future.
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Smart label could one day let you know when to toss food and cosmetics

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:42pm
Detecting food and cosmetic spoilage and contamination. Identifying new medicinal plants in a remote jungle. Authenticating tea and wine. Scientists have developed a low-cost, portable, paper-based sensor that can potentially carry out all of these functions with easy-to-read results.
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The Solar Eclipse Is Visible in NYC Today (Aug. 21), Starting at 1:23 p.m.

Space.com - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:30pm
New York City isn't in the "path of totality," but millions of New Yorkers will be able to see a partial solar eclipse on Aug. 21 — and it's totally worth checking out, says astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.
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Image of the Day

Space.com - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:03pm
High school students in Madras, Oregon, gathered at a Total Eclipse Star Party Sunday night, just a matter of hours before the moon will block out the sun during today's Great American Solar Eclipse.
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Machines Learn a Biased View of Women

Wired News - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 1:00pm
Image recognition software showed a tendency to associate women with shopping and men with shooting.
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People who 'hear voices' can detect hidden speech in unusual sounds

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 12:57pm
People who hear voices that other people can't hear may use unusual skills when their brains process new sounds, according to new research.
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Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medications

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 12:57pm
Licorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications.
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Remarkable artistry hidden in ancient Roman painting revealed

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 12:57pm
Molten lava, volcanic ash, modern grime, salt, humidity. The ancient painting of a Roman woman has been through it all, and it looks like it. Scientists now report that a new type of high-resolution X-ray technology is helping them discover just how stunning the original portrait once was, element-by-element, which could help them restore the painting.
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Avocado seed husks could be a gold mine of medicinal and industrial compounds

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 12:56pm
In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists report that avocado seed husks, which are usually discarded along with the seed, contain a plethora of useful chemical compounds. They say these compounds could eventually be used to treat a host of debilitating diseases, as well as to enhance the allure of cosmetics, perfumes and other consumer goods.
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Sopping up sunblock from oceans to save coral reefs

Science Daily - Mon, 21/08/2017 - 12:56pm
Coral reefs can't seem to catch a break. Not only are rising temperatures wreaking havoc with their environment, but emerging evidence suggests that a certain sunblock component is a coral killer. Now, researchers have developed a biodegradable bead that can soak up the sunblock ingredient, oxybenzone, like a thirsty sea sponge.
Categories: Science