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Updated: 4 hours 56 min ago

Marching in unison may increase risk of use of excessive force in policing protests

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 2:14pm
What if the simple act of marching in unison -- as riot police commonly do -- increases the likelihood that law enforcement will use excessive force in policing protests? That's the suggestion of a new study that examined the judgments of men who were asked to walk in step with other men.
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Prescription for better stroke care: Prescription at discharge improves outcomes

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 2:14pm
Stroke patients are 70 percent more likely to continue taking their stroke prevention medications one year later if they have a prescription in hand when discharged, according to researchers. After having a stroke or minor stroke, the risk of having another stroke is greater. The risk of recurrence, however, can be reduced by more than 80 per cent by following stroke prevention strategies such as rehabilitation and taking medications.
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Why Listeria bacterium is so hard to fight

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 2:02pm
The harmful and potentially deadly bacterium Listeria is extremely good at adapting to changes. Now research uncovers exactly how cunning Listeria is and why it is so hard to fight. The discovery can help develop more efficient ways to combat the bacteria.
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Measurement at Big Bang conditions confirms lithium problem

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 2:02pm
The field of astrophysics has a stubborn problem and it's called lithium. The quantities of lithium predicted to have resulted from the Big Bang are not actually present in stars. But the calculations are correct -- a fact which has now been confirmed for the first time.
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Leading scientists call for a stop to non-essential use of fluorochemicals

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 2:02pm
A number of leading international researchers recommend that fluorochemicals are only used where they are absolutely essential, until better methods exist to measure the chemicals and more is known about their potentially harmful effects. Fluorochemicals are synthetically produced chemicals, which repel water and oil and are persistent towards aggressive physical and chemical conditions in industrial processing. These characteristics have made the fluorochemicals useful in numerous processes and products, such as coatings for food paper and board.
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Fighting prostate cancer with tomato-rich diet

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 2:02pm
Men who eat over 10 portions a week of tomatoes have an 18 percent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, new research suggests. With 35,000 new cases every year in the UK, and around 10,000 deaths, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Rates are higher in developed countries, which some experts believe is linked to a Westernised diet and lifestyle.
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Soda tax for adolescents, exercise for children best strategies for reducing obesity

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 1:58pm
Childhood obesity in the United States remains high. A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, sweet teas, and sports drinks would reduce obesity in adolescents more than other policies, such as exercise or an advertising ban, and would also generate significant revenue for additional obesity prevention activities, say researchers.
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Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 1:21pm
Century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees -- and the news is not good. "Recent studies found that scale insect populations increase on oak and maple trees in warmer urban areas, which raises the possibility that these pests may also increase with global warming," says the lead author of the paper.
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What lit up the universe?

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 1:21pm
New research shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built. The study by cosmologists shows how forthcoming astronomical surveys will reveal what lit up the cosmos.
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Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, new research finds

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 1:21pm
Gamblers show the same tendencies as pigeons when they make risky decisions, new research has shown. Researchers conducted tests that found that both human gamblers and pigeons were 35% more likely to gamble for high-value than low-value rewards.
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Specialization: Choosy wasps survive better, study shows

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 1:21pm
Specialized parasitic wasps, such as those using only a few host species, have a greater chance of establishing stable populations than generalist species, a new study shows. These results help with understanding the appearance of specialists in the history of animal evolution and could improve the effectiveness of biological control programs against insect pests.
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Sorting cells with sound waves

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 12:57am
Researchers have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel. Their device, about the size of a dime, could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients' blood, helping doctors predict whether a tumor is going to spread.
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Animals first flex their muscles: Earliest fossil evidence for animals with muscles

Wed, 27/08/2014 - 12:54am
A new fossil discovery identifies the earliest evidence for animals with muscles. An unusual new fossil discovery of one of the earliest animals on earth may also provide the oldest evidence of muscle tissue -- the bundles of cells that make movement in animals possible. The fossil, dating from 560 million years ago, was discovered in Newfoundland, Canada.
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What can 14th century Venice teach us about Ebola, other emerging threats?

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 7:28pm
The way in which the Italian city of Venice dealt with the outbreak of the plague in the 14th century holds lessons on how to even mitigate the consequences of today's emerging threats, like climate change, terrorism, and highly infectious or drug-resistant diseases, says one researcher.
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Composition of Earth's mantle revisited

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 7:28pm
The makeup of Earth's lower mantle, which makes up the largest part of the Earth by volume, is significantly different than previously thought, research suggests. This should shed light on unexplained seismic phenomena.
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Glucose meter of a different color provides continuous monitoring

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 7:28pm
Engineers are bringing a touch of color to glucose monitoring. The researchers developed a new continuous glucose monitoring material that changes color as glucose levels fluctuate, and the wavelength shift is so precise that doctors and patients may be able to use it for automatic insulin dosing -- something not possible using current point measurements like test strips.
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Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 7:28pm
A study on large-scale rural sanitation programs in India highlights challenges in achieving sufficient access to latrines and reduction in open defecation to yield significant health benefits for young children.
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Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could increase childhood survival in Africa

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:25pm
Expanding the age of eligibility for measles vaccination from 12 to 15 months could have potentially large effects on coverage in Africa, according to a new report. If combined with improvements to the vaccination process itself, such a change could help the country inch closer to the national coverage levels required for measles eradication.
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Competition for graphene: Researchers demonstrate ultrafast charge transfer in new family of 2-D semiconductors

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:25pm
The first experimental observation of ultrafast charge transfer in photo-excited MX2 materials, the graphene-like two-dimensional semiconductors, has been conducted. Charge transfer time clocked in at under 50 femtoseconds, comparable to the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics.
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100 recent fetal surgeries for spina bifida performed at one American hospital

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:25pm
Reporting on 100 recent cases of fetal surgery for spina bifida, specialists at a premier fetal surgery program achieved results similar to those published three years previously in a landmark clinical trial that established a new standard of care for prenatal repair of this birth defect.
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