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Updated: 3 hours 10 min ago

Weather history 'time machine' created

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:32pm
A software program that allows climate researchers to access historical climate data for the entire global surface (excluding the poles) has been developed. This software include the oceans, and is based statistical research into historical climates.
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New mechanism that can lead to blindness discovered

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:32pm
Scientists report an important scientific breakthrough: that a protein found in the retina plays an essential role in the function and survival of light-sensing cells that are required for vision. These findings could have a significant impact on our understanding of retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness.
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Riddle of the rock pools: How tiny fish camouflage themselves

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:31pm
Researchers have revealed that the rock goby (Gobius paganellus), an unassuming little fish commonly found in rock pools around Britain, southern Europe, and North Africa, is a master of camouflage and can rapidly change color to conceal itself against its background.
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Light pollution contributing to fledgling 'fallout': Turning street lights off decreased number of grounded fledglings

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:31pm
Turning the street lights off decreased the number of grounded fledglings, according to a new study. Thousands of birds are attracted to lights-sometimes referred to as light-pollution-every year worldwide during their first flights from their nests to the open ocean, a phenomenon called 'fallout.'
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Risking your life without a second thought: Extreme altruism may be motivated by intuitive process

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:31pm
People who risk their lives to save strangers may do so without deliberation.
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These roos were 'made' for walking, study suggests of extinct enigmas

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:31pm
Based on a rigorous comparative analysis of kangaroo anatomy, researchers posit that the ancient family of sthenurine kangaroos that lived until 30,000 years ago likely preferred walking to hopping.
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Simple steps can lead to safe sleep for infants

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:30pm
The number of infants who die each year from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) has decreased in recent decades as awareness of safe sleeping habits has increased. Yet each year, babies still die from sudden, unexplained causes.
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Potential Kuiper belt targets for new horizons Pluto mission

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:28pm
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered three Kuiper Belt objects that the agency's New Horizons spacecraft could potentially visit after it flies by Pluto in July 2015.
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Boosting heart's natural ability to recover after heart attack

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:28pm
Researchers have discovered that fibroblasts, which normally give rise to scar tissue after a heart attack, can be turned into endothelial cells, which generate blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients to the injured regions of the heart, greatly reducing the damage done following heart attack.
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Researchers develop world's thinnest electric generator

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:28pm
Researchers have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide, resulting in a unique electric generator and mechanosensation devices that are optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable.
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Global natural gas boom alone won't slow climate change

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 6:28pm
A new analysis of global energy use, economics and the climate shows that expanding the current bounty of inexpensive natural gas alone would not slow the growth of global greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Recent advances in gas production technology based on horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing -- also known as fracking -- have led to bountiful, low-cost natural gas. Because gas emits far less carbon dioxide than coal, some researchers have linked the natural gas boom to recent reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. But could these advanced technologies also have an impact on emissions beyond North America and decades into the future?
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Product placement can curb TV commercial audience loss by more than 10 percent

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 5:19pm
Coordinating product placement with advertising in the same television program can reduce audience loss over commercial breaks by 10 percent, according to a new study.
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Precision printing: Unique capabilities of 3-D printing revealed

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 5:06pm
Researchers have demonstrated an additive manufacturing method to control the structure and properties of metal components with precision unmatched by conventional manufacturing processes.
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Treating sleep apnea in cardiac patients reduces hospital readmission

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:24pm
A study of hospitalized cardiac patients is the first to show that effective treatment with positive airway pressure therapy reduces 30-day hospital readmission rates and emergency department visits in patients with both heart disease and sleep apnea. The results underscore the importance of the 'Stop the Snore' campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project.
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A brighter design emerges for low-cost, 'greener' LED light bulbs

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:23pm
The phase-out of traditional incandescent bulbs in the U.S. and elsewhere, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given light-emitting diode lighting a sales boost. However, that trend could be short-lived as key materials known as rare earth elements become more expensive. Scientists have now designed new materials for making household light-emitting diode bulbs without using these ingredients.
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Discarded cigarette ashes could go to good use -- removing arsenic from water

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:23pm
Arsenic, a well-known poison, can be taken out of drinking water using sophisticated treatment methods. But in places that lack the equipment or technical know-how required to remove it, it still laces drinking water and makes people sick. To tackle this problem, scientists have come up with a new low-cost, simple way to remove arsenic using leftovers from another known health threat -- cigarettes.
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Dolphin 'breathalyzer' could help diagnose animal and ocean health

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:23pm
Alcohol consumption isn't the only thing a breath analysis can reveal. Scientists have been studying its possible use for diagnosing a wide range of conditions in humans -- and now in the beloved bottlenose dolphin. One team describes a new instrument that can analyze the metabolites in breath from dolphins, which have been dying in alarming numbers along the Atlantic coast this year.
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Study questions 21-day quarantine period for Ebola

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:23pm
One of the tenets for minimizing the risk of spreading Ebola Virus has been a 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the virus. But a new study suggests that 21 days might not be enough to completely prevent spread of the virus. Experts say there could be up to a 12 percent chance that someone could be infected even after the 21-day quarantine.
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Climate change not responsible for altering forest tree composition, experts say

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:23pm
Change in disturbance regimes -- rather than a change in climate -- is largely responsible for altering the composition of Eastern forests, according to a researcher. Forests in the Eastern United States remain in a state of "disequilibrium" stemming from the clear-cutting and large-scale burning that occurred in the late 1800s and early 1900s, he contends.
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Researchers look to exploit females' natural resistance to infection

Wed, 15/10/2014 - 3:23pm
Researchers have linked increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice to an enzyme activated by the female sex hormone estrogen. An international team of scientists has shown that increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice is linked to the enzyme nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3). They also show that this enzyme is ultimately activated by the release of the female sex hormone estrogen.
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