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Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused widespread marsh erosion, study shows

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 4:42pm
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill six years ago caused widespread marsh erosion that may be permanent in some places, according to a new analysis of 270 miles of the Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama coasts. At the hardest-hit of 103 Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) sites, where oil covered more than 90 percent of plants' stems, widespread die-off of grasses at the marsh edge occurred, followed by up to two years of accelerated erosion as dying plant roots lost their grip on marsh soil.
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Record for perovskite/CIGS tandem solar module

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 4:23pm
Thin-film technologies can dramatically reduce the cost of next-generation solar modules, say scientists. Whereas their production cost is low, it is in particular the combination of complementary absorber materials in a tandem solar module that increases the power conversion efficiency. Researchers demonstrate that a perovskite/CIGS tandem thin-film solar module that achieves 17.8 percent in efficiency, surpassing for the first time the efficiency of separate perovskite and CIGS solar modules.
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First quantum photonic circuit with an electrically driven light source

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 4:21pm
Whether for use in safe data encryption, ultrafast calculation of huge data volumes or so-called quantum simulation of highly complex systems: Optical quantum computers are a source of hope for tomorrow's computer technology. For the first time, scientists now have succeeded in placing a complete quantum optical structure on a chip. This fulfills one condition for the use of photonic circuits in optical quantum computers.
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Quantum computing a step closer to reality

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 4:19pm
Physicists have brought quantum computing a step closer to reality by stopping light in a new experiment. Researchers report that controlling the movement of light is critical to developing future quantum computers, which could solve problems too complex for today's most advanced computers.
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Suffering from headaches? You may be at increased risk for a thyroid condition

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:46pm
Sufferers of migraines, cluster headaches, tension headaches or other headache disorders are at greater risk of developing a thyroid condition called hypothyroidism, according to a new study.
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Surprising findings on deadly diarrhea suggest ways to save children's lives

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:44pm
New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens has been vastly underestimated.
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Experimental imaging agent reveals concussion-linked brain disease in living brain

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:44pm
A protein tracer shows a distinctive pattern of brain protein deposition specific to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a disease typically confirmed after death. A link between brain injury and long-term health has been gaining attention in recent years.
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Outrageous heads led to outrageously large dinosaurs

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:17pm
Theropod dinosaur species with bony crests, horns and knobs evolved to giant body sizes 20 times faster than those species lacking such embellishments, new research has concluded.
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Single-blind vs double-blind peer review and effect of author prestige

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:17pm
Scientists have examined if bias with single-blind peer review might be greatest in the setting of author or institutional prestige. The authors found that reviewers were more likely to recommend acceptance when the prestigious authors' names and institutions were visible (single-blind review) than when they were redacted (double-blind review), and also gave higher ratings for the methods and other categories. There was no difference in the number of errors detected.
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Earlier treatment with surgery to remove blood clot linked with less disability following stroke

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:16pm
In an analysis that included nearly 1,300 patients with large-vessel ischemic stroke, earlier treatment with endovascular thrombectomy (intra-arterial use of a micro-catheter or other device to remove a blood clot) plus medical therapy (use of a clot dissolving agent) compared with medical therapy alone was associated with less disability at 3 months, according to a study.
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Creating antimatter via lasers?

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:16pm
Intriguing calculations explain the production and dynamics of electrons and positrons from ultrahigh-intensity laser-matter interactions. In other words: They've calculated how to create matter and antimatter via lasers.
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Young people need help in understanding a parent's suicide

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:14pm
Talking about suicide is associated with such strong stigma that young people whose parents have taken their own life must turn to strangers, for example people they meet on the internet, to ventilate their grief, a new doctoral thesis concludes.
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Researchers uncover the skin barrier

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:14pm
Researchers can now explain how the properties of the skin change depending on the environment. The new findings explain, among other things, why people don’t dehydrate in dry air. The research results can also be used in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to make substances penetrate the skin more effectively.
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New switch decides between genome repair, death of cells

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:14pm
The genetic information of every cell is encoded in the sequence of the DNA double helix. Double strand breaks in the DNA, which can be induced by radiation, are a dangerous threat to the cells, and if not properly repaired can lead to cancer. Damaged cells need to decide whether the breaks can be fixed or whether they should be removed by a cellular suicide program called “apoptosis” before initiating cancer.
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High-tech future early warning system for hurricanes, tornados and volcanic eruptions

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 3:14pm
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has been able to detect a gravity wave wafting through space from two colliding black holes billions of years ago. Now a group has built a much smaller ring laser interferometer to explore how it could detect geophysical effects such as earthquake-generated ground rotation and infrasound from convective storms and have demonstrated the technology's potential as an early-warning system for natural disasters.
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Climate change will see some males get sexier

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 12:33pm
A common marine crustacean has shown researchers that it's all set to beat climate change -- the males will get more attractive to the females, with a resulting population explosion.
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Longest record of continuous carbon flux data is now publicly available

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 12:33pm
The FLUXNET collaboration's most recent data release includes some of the longest continuous records of ecosystem data ever taken. The information has undergone extensive quality checks and is now publicly available for download.
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'Missing link' found in the development of bioelectronic medicines

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 12:29pm
A nanoscale device, called a memristor, could be the 'missing link' in the development of implants that use electrical signals from the brain to help treat medical conditions, researchers have found.
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Nanotech could give us safer, greener diapers and sanitary products

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 12:29pm
Nanofibers are more absorbent and better for the environment, say researchers, who note that their new material would have less of an environmental impact and be safer for humans than existing materials.
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Crosstalk analysis of biological networks for improved pathway annotation

Tue, 27/09/2016 - 12:29pm
A new computer algorithm for analyzing gene function called BinoX has been developed by researchers. The method associates experimentally derived gene lists and known pathways. It does this in a new way, by employing a large gene network and determining if a gene list and a pathway has more network links than expected, using the binomial distribution. This is a significant advance over previous methods, and as a result BinoX yields substantially better accuracy.
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