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Hidden subpopulation of melanoma cells discovered

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 12:41pm
A subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells has been discovered in the blood vessels of tumors, researchers report. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies.
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NASA Webb's heart survives deep freeze test

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 1:07am
After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
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Unsteady on your feet? Little touches could make all the difference

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 1:07am
When a toddler takes their first steps we observe an uncertain sway in their walking. Being unsteady on our feet is something we can experience throughout life -- and a new study has shown how even the lightest fingertip touch can help people to maintain their balance.
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Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 1:07am
Those who self-harm as teenagers are more at risk of developing mental health and substance misuse problems as adults, new research from the biggest study of its kind in the UK has revealed.
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Does exercise slows the onset of type 1 diabetes in children, adults?

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 1:07am
Rates of type 1 diabetes -- the autoimmune form of the condition that often begins in childhood and eventually results in lifelong dependency on insulin -- are increasing in almost all nations worldwide. However, while it appears possible from research in other forms of diabetes that physical exercise could slow the progression of this disease, there have been no studies to date that explore this in patients with type 1 diabetes.
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New feather findings get scientists in a flap

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 1:06am
Scientists have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fiber, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses of flight. Since their appearance over 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest and most fatigue resistant natural structures.
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Osteoporosis screening guidelines miss many younger post-menopausal women

Wed, 22/10/2014 - 1:06am
The United States Preventive Services Task Force strategy to predict the risk of osteoporotic fractures among women aged 50 to 64 failed to detect nearly 75 percent of those who went on to experience major fractures within 10 years, a study has found.
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Special microscope captures defects in nanotubes

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges. Carbon nanotubes have been touted as exceptional materials with unique properties that allow for extremely efficient charge and energy transport, with the potential to open the way for new, more efficient types of electronic and photovoltaic devices. However, these traps, or defects, in ultra-thin nanotubes can compromise their effectiveness.
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Competition keeps health-care costs low, U.S. researchers find

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study. The study, based on U.S. health-care data from 2010, provides important new information about the effects of competition on prices for office visits paid by preferred provider organizations, known more commonly as PPOs. PPOs are the most common type of health insurance plan held by privately insured people in the United States.
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Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Researchers know that alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC) sustain neurocognitive impairment even after detoxification. A new study examines specific domains of cognitive recovery in conjunction with smoking status. Findings show that smoking status influenced the rate and level of neurocognitive recovery during eight months of abstinence in the ALC group.
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Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
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Understanding drinking behaviors among women with unwanted pregnancies

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:22pm
Most women reduce or stop drinking alcohol upon discovery of pregnancy. A new study looks at changes in alcohol use, and factors contributing to these changes, among women with unwanted pregnancies. Findings indicate that most women with unwanted pregnancies quit or reduce alcohol consumption once they discover their pregnancies, and that some may be substituting alcohol for drugs once they discover their pregnancies.
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Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:21pm
Substance abuse is the fastest growing health concern for older adults. New findings show that drinking levels are high enough to be concerning and tend to spike around the times older adults receive their social security checks. These results may have prevention implications for social workers working with low-income seniors.
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Diet for your DNA: Novel nutrition plan sparks debate around data protection

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:21pm
Personalized nutrition based on an individual's genotype - nutrigenomics - could have a major impact on reducing lifestyle-linked diseases such as obesity, heart disease and Type II diabetes, experts say. However, a study of more than 9,000 volunteers reveals that strict regulations need to be put in place before nutrigenomics becomes publicly acceptable due to people's fears around personal data protection.
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Overweight women lose in the labor market, study finds

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:20pm
Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs, less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public, and make less money in either case compared to average size women and all men, according to a new study.
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How troubled marriage, depression history promote obesity

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 8:20pm
The double-whammy of marital hostility and a history of depression can increase the risk for obesity in adults by altering how the body processes high-fat foods, according to new research.
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Fighting Spread of Ebola: U.S. army lab plays key role

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 6:53pm
Researchers at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center have invented a novel and potent disinfectant system that kills the Ebola virus on surfaces. The center transferred the process to a private company, which is manufacturing the portable “no power required” chemical compound and supplying it worldwide, including the front lines of West Africa.
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Scientists disprove theory that reconstructed boron surface is metallic

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 6:53pm
Scientific inquiry is a hit and miss proposition, subject to constant checking and rechecking. Recently, a new class of materials was discovered called topological insulators—nonmetallic materials with a metallic surface capable of conducting electrons. The effect, based on relativity theory, exists only in special materials -— those with heavy elements —- and has the potential to revolutionize electronics.
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Immersed in violence: How 3-D gaming affects video game players

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 6:53pm
Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real – and that may have troubling consequences for players, a new study reveals. Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems -- even those with large screens.
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Genome editing technique advanced by researchers

Tue, 21/10/2014 - 6:17pm
Customized genome editing -- the ability to edit desired DNA sequences to add, delete, activate or suppress specific genes -- has major potential for application in medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture. Now researchers examine six key molecular elements that help drive this genome editing system, which is known as CRISPR-Cas.
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