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Phages transducing antibiotic resistance detected in chicken meat

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:23pm
Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria poses a global threat to public health. Common antibiotics are often ineffective in treating infectious diseases because pathogens acquire resistance genes. These antimicrobial resistance genes are obtained in different ways.
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Study questions beneficial effects of a Nordic diet on cardiovascular events

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:23pm
Although individual components of a healthy so-called Nordic diet previously have been linked to beneficial effects on cardiovascular health, as well as to other health effects, there is no evidence of an association with cardiovascular events in a general population, a study concludes. The study was conducted in in over 40,000 Swedish women.
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Obesity, weight loss change splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:23pm
Alternative splicing of obesity and type 2 diabetes related genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity, according to research. Obesity leads to changes in the splicing pattern of metabolically relevant genes such as TCF7L2 and INSR, resulting in impaired insulin action. However, weight loss, induced by either obesity surgery or a very low-calorie diet, reverses these changes. The findings increase our understanding of splicing dysregulations in obesity and can result in a new, more targeted treatment and more accurate diagnostics of metabolic disorders.
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Designing microwave devices from scratch using computer simulations

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:22pm
For decades, the fundamental design of microwave devices, such as antennas for mobile communication and waveguides used in radars, has essentially relied on the inventiveness of a professional designer. Computer simulations are usually used only in final design stages to fine-tune details in the design. This classical approach to microwave device design has now been challenged.
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Modern alchemy: Chemists devise synthesis of valuable exotic compounds

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:22pm
A broad and strikingly inexpensive method for synthesizing “amines,” a class of organic compounds prominent in drugs and other modern products, has been discovered by a group of chemists. The new reaction is particularly useful for synthesizing complex amines that would be highly valuable in pharmaceuticals, but are impractical -- or impossible -- to make with standard methods.
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Top 10 new species for 2015

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:16pm
A cartwheeling spider, a bird-like dinosaur and a fish that wriggles around on the sea floor to create a circular nesting site are among the species identified as the Top 10 New Species for 2015. Two animals -- a frog that gives birth to tadpoles and a wasp that uses dead ants to protect its nest -- are unusual because of their parenting practices. Also on the list are an animal that might surpass the new species distinction to be an entirely new phylum, a 9-inch walking stick and a photogenic sea slug. Rounding out the top 10 are a coral plant described as endangered almost as soon as it was discovered and a red-and-green plant used during Christmas celebrations in Mexico.
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Helping doctors predict what's next for patients diagnosed with hepatitis C

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:16pm
As more Baby Boomers are screened for hepatitis C, a patient risk prediction model may help doctors target costly medications to those most likely to develop serious liver issues. The model uses routine lab values and machine-learning methods to help doctors predict the health outlook of patients diagnosed with hepatitis C.
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Flexible electronics harvest energy from natural motions of human body

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:16pm
Researchers created thin, flexible electronic devices that efficiently harvest the mechanical energy from natural motions of the human body. In addition to advances in materials processing to enable creating these devices, accurate analytical models were developed to predict the electrical output.
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Shining light on the fleeting interactions of single molecules

Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:16pm
Scientists have devised a way of directly detecting and visualizing biomolecules and their changing association states in solution by measuring their size and charge characteristics while confined in a single-molecule trap.
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Nicotinoid, fungal disease team up to break down termites' tough defenses

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:41pm
A small amount of nicotinoid pesticide substantially weakens termites' ability to fight off fungal diseases, researchers report. This is a finding that could lead to more effective methods of pest control, they say.
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Common mutation linked to heart disease

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:40pm
A common mutation in a gene that regulates cholesterol levels may raise the risk of heart disease in carriers up to 49 percent, particularly among men and African Americans, according to a new study.
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Metabolic abnormalities may increase cardiovascular risk more in black women than white women

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:39pm
Large waistline, cholesterol disorders and other metabolic abnormalities may increase the relative risk of cardiovascular disease more among black women than among white women. Black women who were overweight or obese had elevated cardiovascular risk compared with normal weight black women even when they did not have metabolic abnormalities. White women who were overweight or obese, but did not have the metabolic syndrome had a cardiovascular risk similar to that of normal weight white women without the metabolic syndrome.
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Support group, home exercise improves mobility for peripheral artery disease patients

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:39pm
Group therapy that encourages walking at home improves and prevents mobility loss among patients with clogged arteries in the legs, a study concludes. Clogged arteries in the legs can cause pain and fatigue while walking. Maintaining mobility is integral to preserving functional independence, social interactions and daily activities.
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Seeing without eyes: Octopus's skin possesses the same cellular mechanism for detecting light as its eyes do

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:39pm
The skin of the California two-spot octopus can sense light even without input from the central nervous system. The animal does so by using the same family of light-sensitive proteins called opsins found in its eyes -- a process not previously described for cephalopods.
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Galaxy’s snacking habits revealed

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:38pm
Astronomers have caught a greedy galaxy gobbling on its neighbors and leaving crumbs of evidence about its dietary past.
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Cold weather kills far more people than hot weather

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:38pm
Cold weather kills 20 times as many people as hot weather, according to an international study analyzing over 74 million deaths in 384 locations across 13 countries. The findings also reveal that deaths due to moderately hot or cold weather substantially exceed those resulting from extreme heat waves or cold spells.
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People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:35pm
People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a large study.
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Surviving harsh environments becomes a death-trap for specialist corals

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 11:35pm
The success of corals that adapt to survive in the world's hottest sea could contribute to their demise through global warming, according to new research.
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Online safety: If you want something done right, do it yourself

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 8:03pm
The end-user is often the 'weakest link' in the Internet safety chain according to experts. The team's conclusion: Internet users have to take personal responsibility for their safety and security. This includes taking the necessary steps to learn how it can be done.
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Arctic ducks combine nutrients from wintering, breeding grounds to grow healthy eggs

Wed, 20/05/2015 - 8:03pm
It takes a lot of nutrients to build an egg. One of the big questions among researchers who study the eggs of migratory birds is where those nutrients come from -- does the mother make the egg directly out of what she eats during the breeding season, or does she save up nutrients consumed on her wintering grounds? The answer appears to be both for Common Eiders, large, sea-going ducks that breed in the Arctic.
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