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Wallaby's perception of color is more similar to a dog than a quokka

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 3:20pm
Biologists have recently discovered that a wallaby's perception of color is more similar to a dog than a quokka, sparking questions as to why marsupial color vision has evolved so selectively. By developing a pokies-like game for the wallabies, the research was able to determine exactly what the animals saw and how their color perception differed from other species.
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Raining cats and dogs: The challenges of running for political office in the past

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:29pm
Modern politicians may feel they have it tough -- but they should thank their lucky stars they weren’t standing for election in the Westminster constituency in 1741. On that occasion, angry voters pelted the candidates and the tellers with dead cats and dogs, dirt, stones and sticks. 
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First report of management of pediatric trauma in England, Wales

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:29pm
Over 4,700 children in England and Wales under the age of 16 suffered significant injuries in 2012. The report looks at 737 children with the most severe injuries.
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Robot with a taste for beer? Electronic tongue can identify brands of beer

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:28pm
Researchers have managed to distinguish between different varieties of beer using an electronic tongue. The discovery is accurate in almost 82% of cases. Beer is the oldest and most widely consumed alcoholic drink in the world.
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Ambulance checklists, feedback improve emergency care for stroke, heart attack patients

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:28pm
The introduction of checklists and better feedback for ambulance crews as part of a national quality improvement project has significantly improved the standard of care for heart attack and stroke patients across England, a major new study has shown.
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Geranium extracts inhibit HIV-1

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:28pm
Extracts of the geranium plant Pelargonium sidoides inactivate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and prevent the virus from invading human cells. Scientists report that these extracts represent a potential new class of anti-HIV-1 agents for the treatment of AIDS.
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Mirror-image nucleic acids as molecular scissors in biotechnology and molecular medicine

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:28pm
Biochemist have now created mirror-image enzymes -- so-called Spiegelzymes -- out of nucleic acids. The Spiegelzymes can be used in living cells for the targeted cutting of natural nucleic acids.
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Photon recoil provides new insight into matter: New precision spectroscopy allows unprecedented accuracy

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:28pm
Quantum logic spectroscopy has now been significantly extended: the new method is called "photon-recoil spectroscopy" (PRS). In contrast to the original quantum logic technique, the new method enables the investigation of very fast transitions in atoms or molecules. With this new method, spectroscopic investigations will be possible on nearly any kind of particles.
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Gastric banding patients should closely monitor nutrition following surgery

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 2:14pm
Patients who have had bariatric surgery may need to take dietary supplements and pay closer attention to their nutritional intake, a study suggests.
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Disappearing snow increases risk of collapsing ice shelves in Antarctica

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 9:08am
A number of floating ice shelves in Antarctica are at risk of disappearing entirely in the next 200 years, as global warming reduces their snow cover. Their collapse would enhance the discharge of ice into the oceans and increase the rate at which sea-level rises. A rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions could save a number of these ice shelves, researchers say.
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Infants know plants provide food, but need to see they're safe to eat

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 9:08am
Infants as young as six months old tend to expect that plants are food sources, but only after an adult shows them that the food is safe to eat, according to new research.
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Blood and lymphatic capillaries grown for the first time in the lab

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 9:07am
Researchers have engineered skin cells for the very first time containing blood and lymphatic capillaries. They succeeded in isolating all the necessary types of skin cells from human skin tissue and engineering a skin graft that is similar to full-thickness skin. 
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Having a baby after fertility issues improves couples' chances of staying together

Thu, 30/01/2014 - 9:07am
New research reveals that women who have a child after experiencing fertility problems are more likely to remain with their partner following infertility evaluations. The findings indicate that after 12 years of follow-up, nearly 27% of women were no longer living with the partner, which they had at the time of fertility evaluation, if they did not have a child.
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Dinosaur fossils from China help researchers describe new 'Titan'

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:48pm
Paleontologists have characterized a new dinosaur based on fossil remains found in northwestern China. The species, a plant-eating sauropod named Yongjinglong datangi, roamed during the Early Cretaceous period, more than 100 million years ago. This sauropod belonged to a group known as Titanosauria, members of which were among the largest living creatures to ever walk the earth.
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Connectedness, human use of buildings shape indoor bacterial communities

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:48pm
Microbes drawn from the dust in a university building have provided clues that could inspire future architectural designers to encourage a healthy indoor environment.
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Slow reaction time linked with early death

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:48pm
Having a slow reaction time in midlife increases risk of having died 15 years later, according to new research. Researchers looked at data from more than 5,000 participants, over a 15 year period. A total of 378 (7.4 percent) people in the sample died, but those with slower reaction times were 25 percent more likely to have died (from any cause) compared to those with average reaction times.
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Deaths attributed directly to climate change cast pall over penguins

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:48pm
Climate change is killing penguin chicks from the world's largest colony of Magellanic penguins, not just indirectly -- by depriving them of food, as has been repeatedly documented for these and other seabirds -- but directly as a result of drenching rainstorms and, at other times, heat, according to new finding.
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Zebrafish use sunscreen also for camouflage

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:46pm
For diurnal animals like zebrafish embryos, which grow up in shallow pools and are practically see-through, exposure to the sun constitutes a major problem since ultraviolet (UV) radiation damages DNA. Neurobiologists set about investigating which mechanisms zebrafish embryos use to protect themselves against the aggressive UV radiation. Interestingly, scientists have found that the UV-protection mechanism also doubles as camouflage. 
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Concerned about the health risk of soda?

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:46pm
Toxicological insight into the science behind a recent report highlighting levels of a potential carcinogen in carbonated beverages. Scientists analyzed the data to identify whether or not the carcinogen poses a health risk for humans.
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A simple new way to induce pluripotency: Acid

Wed, 29/01/2014 - 11:44pm
An unusual reprogramming phenomenon by which the fate of somatic cells can be drastically altered through changes to the external environment is described in two new articles.
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