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Updated: 10 hours 57 min ago

Technology using microwave heating may impact electronics manufacturing

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:47pm
A continuous flow reactor can produce high-quality nanoparticles by using microwave-assisted heating -- essentially the same forces that heat up leftover food with such efficiency. This may finally make it possible for this technology to move into large scale manufacturing and usher in an electronics revolution.
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Coho salmon: Pinks' and chums' eating cousin

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:47pm
Juvenile coho salmon benefit from dining on the distant remains of their spawning pink and chum cousins. While juvenile coho salmon feed directly on spawning pink and chum salmon carcasses and eggs, even coho with no direct contact with spawning pink and chum benefit from their nutrient contributions to stream ecosystems.
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The whole truth: Children can tell when a teacher commits 'sins of omission'

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:47pm
Children can figure out when someone is lying to them, research shows, but cognitive scientists recently tackled a subtler question: Can children tell when adults are telling them the truth, but not the whole truth? Determining whom to trust is an important skill to learn at an early age because so much of our knowledge about the world comes from other people.
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Geologists confirm oxygen levels of ancient oceans

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:46pm
Geologists have discovered a new way to study oxygen levels in the Earth's oldest oceans. New research approach may have important implications for the study of marine ecology and global warming.
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Earth is around 60 million years older than previously thought -- and so is the moon, new research finds

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:46pm
The timing of the giant impact between Earth's ancestor and a planet-sized body occurred around 40 million years after the start of solar system formation. This means that the final stage of Earth's formation is around 60 million years older than previously thought, according to new research.
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Towards new cancer therapies

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:44pm
In 2012, about 8.2 million people died of cancer making the disease a major cause of death worldwide. According to the WHO World Cancer Report 2014, this figure is expected to rise within the next two decades. But new drugs are already in the pipeline. The genetics of fruit flies helps researchers to identify new targets for cancer therapy and to develop more individualised treatments.
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New permafrost is forming around shrinking Arctic lakes, but will it last?

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:44pm
Researchers, more used to measuring thawing permafrost than its expansion, have made a surprising discovery. There is new permafrost forming around Twelvemile Lake in the interior of Alaska. But they have also quickly concluded that, given the current rate of climate change, it won’t last beyond the end of this century.
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New field guide for Africa's mammalian eden

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:43pm
From the kipunji -- a secretive primate species first discovered by WCS in 2003 -- to the Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin, Tanzania is known for its staggering variety of large mammals including the largest diversity of primates in mainland Africa. A new field guide documents this dazzling array of mammals.
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New formula assigns dollar value to natural resources

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 6:43pm
A first-of-its-kind, interdisciplinary equation to measure the monetary value of natural resources has been developed by researchers. The equation uses principles commonly used to value other capital assets. In assigning natural capital monetary value, the approach will have widespread implications for policymakers and various stakeholders, and will also advocate for the creation of robust asset markets for natural capital, a much-needed advance.
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Limiting carbs could reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with positive IGF1 receptor

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:20pm
Reducing carbohydrate intake could reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence among women whose tumor tissue is positive for the IGF-1 receptor, researchers report. Using an unusual approach, this study assessed the combined association of two factors implicated in tumor growth -- carbohydrate intake and IGF1 receptor status -- to test whether activating the insulin/insulin-like growth-factor axis can impact breast cancer.
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Innovative millimeter wave communications introduced

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:20pm
Wireless data connections that exploit millimeter wave radio spectrum (30GHz to 300GHz) are expected to be used in worldwide 5G networks from 2020. Millimeter wave radios use much higher carrier frequencies than those in current systems, such as 4G and Wi-Fi.
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A life well spent: Consume now (in case you die early)

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:20pm
An early death constitutes a serious loss that should imply compensation to the deceased person. But how – when the person is dead? A team of economists argues that a 'life well spent' might entail consuming more and working less earlier in life. They construct a mathematical model to measure the economic losses associated with an early death.
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New biometric watches use light to non-invasively monitor glucose, dehydration, pulse

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:20pm
Two new wearable devices have been developed that use scattered light to monitor biometrics: one tracks glucose and dehydration, and the other monitors pulse. The glucose sensor is the first wearable device that can measure glucose concentration directly but noninvasively. The new pulse monitor is an improvement over current watches in that it will be less sensitive to errors when the wearer is in motion.
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Soldiers who kill in combat less likely to abuse alcohol, study finds

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:20pm
New research documents the impact of combat experiences on alcohol use and misuse among National Guard soldiers. Whereas much research regarding combat personnel is based on post-experience data, this study's design uses both pre- and post-deployment data to identify the association between different types of combat experiences and changes in substance use and misuse.
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A plan to share carbon budget burden

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:20pm
For 20 years, the international community has been unable to agree on a coordinated way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A four-step compromise toward emissions reduction that offers 'effectiveness, feasibility, and fairness has now been published.
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Perennial corn crops? It could happen with new plant-breeding tool

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:19pm
Since the first plant genome sequence was obtained for the plant Arabidopsis in 2000, scientists have gene-sequenced everything from cannabis to castor bean. They have now unveiled a new tool that will help all plant scientists label genes far more quickly and accurately and is expected to give a big boost to traditional and nontraditional plant breeders.
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Internet not responsible for dying newspapers, new study finds

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:19pm
We all know that the Internet has killed the traditional newspaper trade, right? After all, until the general population started interacting with the web in the mid-90s, the newspaper business was thriving -- offering readers top notch journalism and pages of ads. A new study finds assumptions about the decline of newspapers are based on three false premises.
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Law and order for juveniles: Study urges altering police interrogations

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:19pm
Confrontational and deceptive interrogation techniques are inappropriate for the developing adolescent mind, according to a psychology study. Such techniques purport to detect deception in criminal suspects and use methods to heighten suspects' anxiety during interviews, with the goal of obtaining an admission of guilt. Such psychologically manipulative interrogation techniques are considered contentious by critics because they can result in false confessions.
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Lead abatement a wise economic, public health investment

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:18pm
Childhood lead exposure costs Michigan residents an estimated $330 million annually, and a statewide remediation program to eliminate the source of most lead poisoning would pay for itself in three years, according to a new report.
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High strength cellular aluminium foam for the automotive industry

Tue, 10/06/2014 - 4:18pm
Aluminum foam is used for applications that requires high level of energy and sound absorption characteristics. Researchers have developed an innovative process to make high strength cellular aluminum foam with help from some salt.
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