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Stroke patients receiving better, more timely care

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:41pm
One in four acute ischemic stroke patients receiving the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator were transferred to a facility with expertise in stroke care. Those transferred to a certified stroke center were more likely to be younger, male and white. Hospitals that accepted transferred stroke patients were more common in the Midwest and more likely to be larger or academic medical centers.
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Elementary teachers' depression symptoms related to students' learning

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:41pm
A new study has found that teachers who report having more symptoms of depression had classrooms that were of lesser quality, and that students in these classrooms had fewer performance gains. Researchers looked at 27 teachers and their 523 third-grade students in a Florida school district. Teachers reported the frequency of their symptoms of clinical depression, and students' basic reading and math skills were assessed throughout the year.
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New evidence on risks of advanced maternal age

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:40pm
Many of the risk factors associated with pregnancy are more harmful when the expectant mother is over 35. According to an extensive, register-based study, the risks associated with overweight, smoking, gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia are higher in advanced maternal age than in younger expectant mothers. dvanced maternal age refers to women giving birth at the age of over 35.
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Dynamic side of the early universe: Only 380,000 years after the Big Bang

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:40pm
The Planck collaboration has released data from four years of observation by the European Space Agency's Planck spacecraft. The aim of the Planck mission is to study the Cosmic Microwave Background, the light left over from the Big Bang. The measurements, taken in nine frequency bands, were used to map not only the temperature of the radiation but also its polarization, which provides additional information about both the very early Universe (when it was 380,000 years old) and our Galaxy's magnetic field.
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Light shed on defense systems of human body: Sieve-like structure in lymph nodes

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:32pm
Researchers have uncovered a sieve-like structure in lymph nodes that regulates the transport of proteins and migration of white blood cells into lymph nodes. The discovery will provide new insights into rapid defense responses in the human immune system.
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Scientists take first X-ray portraits of living bacteria

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:29pm
Researchers have captured the first X-ray portraits of living bacteria. This milestone is a first step toward possible X-ray explorations of the molecular machinery at work in viral infections, cell division, photosynthesis and other processes that are important to biology, human health and our environment.
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Want to save the planet? Neighbors better allies than family

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:29pm
Socializing with neighbors leads to more planet-friendly behaviors than spending time with friends or family, research finds. That's due to the diversity of neighbors and overwhelming similarity of loved ones, researchers say. So be kind to your neighbors: they may hold the secret to greater action on climate change.
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Smashing polarized protons to uncover spin and other secrets

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:29pm
If you want to unravel the secrets of proton spin, put a “twist” in your colliding proton beams. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only facility in the world with the ability to collide such spin-polarized protons. The latest round of these collisions has just begun and will continue for approximately the next nine weeks.
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How Health Authorities Might Improve Communication about Vaccinations

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:29pm
Fatalists trump rational thought: A new study by a political scientist examines perceptions of U.S. citizens about the benefits and risks of immunizations.
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Unwanted impact of antibiotics broader, more complex than previously known

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:26am
Researchers have discovered that antibiotics have an unwanted impact on the microorganisms that live in an animal's gut that's more broad and complex than previously known. A study has helped to explain these processes, which are now believed to affect everything from the immune system to glucose metabolism, food absorption, obesity, stress and behavior.
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New therapeutic principle for Parkinsonian dyskinesia shows clinical effect

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:26am
Involuntary dyskinetic movements induced by treatment with levodopa are a common problem for people with Parkinson's disease. Now, however, researchers seem to be close to a novel therapy to this distressing side effect.
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Predicting plant responses to drought

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:26am
A new study shows how plants' vulnerability to drought varies across the landscape; factors such as plant structure and soil type where the plant is growing can either make them more vulnerable or protect them from declines.
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Advent of geoengineering may help lower temperature of debate over climate change

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:26am
Geoengineering, an emerging technology aimed at counteracting the effects of human-caused climate change, also has the potential to counteract political polarization over global warming, according to a new study.
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Crocodiles just wanna have fun, too

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:20am
Crocodilians engage in all three main types of play distinguished by behavior specialists: locomotor play, play with objects and social play. Crocodiles have also been seen playing with other animals. In rare cases, individual crocodilians have been known to bond so strongly with people that they become playmates for years.
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Novel non-stick material joins portfolio of slippery surface technologies

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:20am
The technology leverages the molecular structure of polymers, which makes them highly capable of taking up and storing considerable volumes of lubricating liquids in their molecular structure, like sponges. This allows for absorption of a large reservoir of lubricant, which can then travel to the surface and render it continuously slippery and repellent -- creating an environment that challenges bacteria's ability to colonize.
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Power efficiency in the violin: Key design features boost violins' acoustic power

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:20am
Some of the most prized violins in the world were crafted in the Italian workshops of Amati, Stradivari, and Guarneri -- master violinmaking families from the 17th and 18th centuries who produced increasingly powerful instruments in the renaissance and baroque musical eras. These violins, worth millions of dollars today, represent the Cremonese period -- what is now considered the golden age of violinmaking. Now acousticians and fluid dynamicists, along with violinmakers, have analyzed measurements from hundreds of Cremonese-era violins, identifying key design features that contribute to these particular violins' acoustic power, or fullness of sound.
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Caution concerning the possible health benefits of alcohol: Beneficial only for women over 65?

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:20am
Any health benefits from alcohol may be limited to women aged 65 and over -- and even then may have been exaggerated by existing studies. High alcohol consumption has been associated with more than 200 acute and chronic conditions. Globally, more than three million deaths each year are attributed to alcohol.
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Protein linked to longevity and enhanced cognition protects against Alzheimer's symptoms in mice

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:20am
Scientists report that raising levels of the life-extending protein klotho can protect against learning and memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.
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One in five suicides is associated with unemployment

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 2:18am
Every year, around 45,000 people take their own lives because they are out of work or someone close to them is affected by unemployment, as a new study reveals. It includes data of 63 countries and demonstrates that during the 2008 economic crisis the number of all suicides associated with unemployment was nine times higher than previously believed.
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Methane emissions vary at natural gas gathering and processing facilities

Wed, 11/02/2015 - 1:59am
A new study found wide variations in the amount of methane being emitted at U.S. natural gas gathering facilities and processing plants. Their findings indicate facility-level methane emissions ranged from less than 1 kilogram per hour to 698 kilograms per hour, while loss rates ranged from less than 0.01 percent to greater than 10 percent.
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