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Fossil record should help guide conservation in a changing world

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 7:25pm
A group of biologists, paleobiologists, lawyers, policymakers and writers is urging conservationists not only to save species, but also to preserve a diverse array of ecosystem structures and functions in the face of rising populations and changing climate. This could include allowing some species to disappear from some areas if that means a more resilient environment able to respond to warming temperatures and habitat loss, according to researchers.
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Older adults embracing 'living apart together'

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:42pm
Since 1990, the divorce rate among adults 50 years and older has doubled. This trend, along with longer life expectancy, has resulted in many adults forming new partnerships later in life. A new phenomenon called 'Living Apart Together' (LAT)--an intimate relationship without a shared residence--is gaining popularity as an alternative form of commitment. Researchers say that while the trend is well understood in Europe, it is lesser known in the U.S. This means that challenges, such as how LAT partners can engage in family caregiving or decision-making, could affect family needs.
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Genetic study identifies a new form of congenital muscular dystrophy

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:41pm
A new form of congenital muscular dystrophy has been discovered which is caused by mutations in a previously un-linked gene.
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Endangered African penguins are falling into an 'ecological trap'

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:35pm
As the climate changes and fisheries transform the oceans, the world's African penguins are in trouble. Young penguins aren't able to take all the changes into account and are finding themselves 'trapped' in parts of the sea that can no longer support them even as better options are available.
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How some insulin-producing cells survive in type 1 diabetes

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:35pm
Medical researches have identified how insulin-producing cells that are typically destroyed in type 1 diabetes can change in order to survive immune attack. The finding may lead to strategies for recovering these cells in diabetic patients, said the researchers.
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Bacteria fed synthetic iron-containing molecules turn into electrical generators

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:35pm
The bacterial world is rife with unusual talents, among them a knack for producing electricity. In the wild, 'electrogenic' bacteria generate current as part of their metabolism, and now researchers have found a way to confer that ability upon non-electrogenic bacteria. This technique could have applications for sustainable electricity generation and wastewater treatment.
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Sticky gels turn insect-sized drones into artificial pollinators

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:35pm
As bees slip onto the endangered species lists, researchers in Japan are pollinating lilies with insect-sized drones. The undersides of these artificial pollinators are coated with horse hairs and an ionic gel just sticky enough to pick up pollen from one flower and deposit it onto another. The drones' designers are hopeful that their invention could someday help carry the burden that modern agricultural demand has put on colonies.
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Genetic 'switch' in animals offers clues to evolutionary origins of fine motor skills

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Researchers have identified a genetic signature found exclusively in the nerve cells that supply, or innervate, the muscles of an organism's outermost extremities: the hands and feet. The findings suggest that the evolution of the extremities may be related to the emergence of fine motor control, such as grasping -- one of biology's most essential adaptations.
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Assembly of micro-/meso-/macroporous carbon optimized for Li-S batteries

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
High volume ratio of carbon micropores combined with the assembly of meso-/macropores remarkably improve the capabilities of Li-S batteries, which relieve shuttle effect by strong physical absorption from micropores, increase sulfur content and supply abundant avenue for electrolyte infiltration and ion transportation by meso-/macropores.
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Deeper origin of gill evolution suggests 'active lifestyle' link in early vertebrates

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Fish embryo study indicates that the last common ancestor of vertebrates was a complex animal complete with gills -- overturning prior scientific understanding and complementing recent fossil finds. The work places gill evolution concurrent with shift to self-propulsion in our earliest ancestors.
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New research to help preserve the benefits people receive from nature

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Humans rely on things that come from nature -- including clean air, water, food, and timber. But how can we tell if these natural services that people rely on, are at risk of being lost, potentially permanently?
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Subsea mining moves closer to shore

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Mining in the deep sea is technically very challenging and at present not economically feasible. However, deposits in coastal areas beneath the shallow, more accessible continental shelf could help to meet the growing demand for mineral resources, conclude researchers.
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Meta-lenses bring benchtop performance to small, hand-held spectrometer

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Physicists have developed new hand-held spectrometers capable of the same performance as large, benchtop instruments. The researchers' innovation derives from their groundbreaking work in meta-lenses. The hand-held spectrometers offer real promise for applications ranging from health care diagnostics to environmental and food monitoring.
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Infectious outbreak in critically ill children leads to recall of contaminated medication

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Infection prevention and control experts halted a 24-patient outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia in critically ill children after identifying docusate, a liquid stool softener, as the underlying source of the bacteria. Details of the six-month investigation led to a national recall of all liquid products manufactured by PharmTech.
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Brain damage is not always damaging

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:34pm
Strokes are usually, but not always, debilitating. This case report documents the extraordinary resilience of a woman in Argentina who endured multiple strokes. Despite these traumas her daily functioning continued in many ways as though nothing had happened. In addition to being an inspiring individual story of resilience, this episode highlights how much we still have to learn about the way the adult brain functions.
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Words can sound 'round' or 'sharp' without us realizing it

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:33pm
Our tendency to match specific sounds with specific shapes, even abstract shapes, is so fundamental that it guides perception before we are consciously aware of it, according to new research.
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Computer trained to predict which AML patients will go into remission, which will relapse

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:33pm
Researchers have developed the first computer machine-learning model to accurately predict which patients diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia, or AML, will go into remission following treatment for their disease and which will relapse.
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Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:33pm
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. The radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used, as scientists now report. The replacement of chelator-based labeling by intrinsic labeling significantly enhances the bioimaging accuracy and reduces biases.
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Infection defense: Call for support by the killer cells

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:33pm
A few days after a viral infection, countless killer cells swarm out to track down and kill infected body cells. In this way, they are highly effective at preventing pathogens from being able to spread further. An international research team has now explained an important mechanism behind building this army.
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Two investigational antitumor agents work better together against MPNST and neuroblastoma

Thu, 09/02/2017 - 6:33pm
A new study demonstrates that the combined usage of Aurora A kinase inhibitor (alisertib) and HSV1716 results in significantly increased antitumor efficacy in models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and neuroblastoma.
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