Syndicate content News -- ScienceDaily
Updated: 13 min 2 sec ago

Fish integration: Nature adores a hybrid

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:15pm
After a few generations of breeding and natural selection, hybrid fish are genetically as robust as their purely wild forefathers, new research shows. The team transplanted combinations of wild, domesticated and hybridized populations of Algonquin Park vbrook trout to new environments. The researchers then compared survival rates and physical characteristics to determine whether hybridization affects a fish's potential to adapt after multiple generations of natural selection in the wild.
Categories: Science

Future family, career goals evident in teenage years

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:15pm
Career and family, often seen as competing parts of life, can actually complement each other, and when young people's goals for the future encompass family and career, the outcome is more likely to be success in both arenas, according to researchers.
Categories: Science

Autism spectrum disorder: Ten tips guidance article

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:15pm
A Clinical Perspectives article proposes a tool to empower stakeholders, guide caregivers, and provide a rationale for advocates, when considering the systems of support offered to people with an autism spectrum disorder.
Categories: Science

Hermit thrush or humans: Who sets the tone?

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:15pm
The songs of the hermit thrush, a common North American songbird, follow principles found in much human music -- namely the harmonic series. Researchers are the first to demonstrate note selection from the harmonic series in a non-human animal using rigorous analytical methods.
Categories: Science

Coffee tree genome sequenced

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:14pm
The coffee tree genome has been sequenced. By using several sequencing technologies, researchers coordinated the mapping of the DNA sequence for the coffee tree, assembled in large fragments able to be used in various types of analysis. The team then anchored these sequence fragments to a high-density genetic card to reconstruct the pseudo-chromosomes. A catalogue of genes and repeated sequences was then created and validated, allowing for a comparison with other plants.
Categories: Science

Climate, emerging diseases: Dangerous connections found

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:14pm
Climate change may affect human health directly or indirectly. In addition to increased threats of storms, flooding, droughts, and heat waves, other health risks are being identified. In particular, new diseases are appearing, caused by infectious agents until now unknown, or that are changing, especially under the effect of changes in the climate. These are so-called "emerging" or "re-emerging" infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis, West Nile fever, etc. According to the WHO, these diseases are causing one third of deaths around the world, and developing countries are on the front line.
Categories: Science

Vaccine-resistant polio strain discovered

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:14pm
The global initiative to eradicate poliomyelitis through routine vaccination has helped reduce the number of cases by more than 99% in 30 years. However, major epidemics are still occurring today. Researchers have identified the virus responsible for deadly and recent outbreaks, and have sequenced its genetic material. The genetic sequence shows two mutations, unknown until now, of the proteins that form the "shell" (capsid) of the virus. On the face of it, this evolution complicates the task for the antibodies produced by the immune system of the vaccinated patient as they can no longer recognize the viral strain.
Categories: Science

Improving taste of alcohol-free beer with aromas from regular beer

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:14pm
Consumers often complain that alcohol-free beer is tasteless, but some of the aromas it is lacking can be carried across from regular beer. Researchers have developed the technique and a panel of tasters has confirmed its effectiveness. The alcohol in beer acts as a solvent for a variety of aromatic compounds; therefore, when it is eliminated, as in non-alcoholic beers, the final product loses aromas and some of its taste. It is difficult to recover these compounds, but researchers have done just this using a pervaporation process.
Categories: Science

Hot flashes going unrecognized, leaving women vulnerable

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:14pm
Hot flashes are one of the most distressing conditions faced by women who have been treated for breast cancer, but they are not being adequately addressed by healthcare professionals and some women consider giving up their post cancer medication to try and stop them, a new study has shown More than 70 per cent of women who have had breast cancer experience menopausal problems, and hot flashes in particular, which are among the most prevalent and potentially distressing problems following breast cancer treatment.
Categories: Science

Helping Pacific islanders eat more 'greens'

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:12pm
Research is helping indigenous Pacific Island and Torres Strait Islander people eat more “greens” to improve their diet and help combat disease. "People in these regions have too high consumption of high-energy, low-nutrient foods such as a polished rice, white flour and sugar," says one researcher. "This has led to high rates of metabolic diseases -- obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers. We wanted to help them make easy nutritional changes to their diet that would have a significant impact in the short-term."
Categories: Science

Elderly face no added risk from cosmetic surgery, study finds

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:12pm
Senior citizens are at no higher risk for complications from cosmetic surgery than younger patients, according to a recent study by plastic surgeons. The doctors analyzed data from more than 129,000 patients during a five-year period and found no significant difference in the rate of complications for individuals older or younger than 65.
Categories: Science

Radiation a risk factor for brain tumors in young people, study finds

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:11pm
In people under age 30, radiation is a risk factor for a type of brain tumor called a meningioma, a study has found. Researchers analyzed records of 35 patients who were diagnosed with meningiomas before age 30. Five had been exposed to ionizing radiation earlier in their lives. They include two patients who received radiation for leukemia at ages 5 and 6; one who received radiation at age 3 for a brain tumor known as a medulloblastoma; and one who received radiation for an earlier skull base tumor that appeared to be a meningioma. The fifth patient had been exposed at age 9 to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in Ukraine.
Categories: Science

Service members diagnosed with chronic insomnia may face increased risk of type II diabetes, high blood pressure

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:11pm
Service members diagnosed with chronic insomnia had a two times higher risk of developing hypertension and type II diabetes than military personnel who had not been diagnosed with the condition, according to a newly released health surveillance report of a study of the associations between these diseases.
Categories: Science

Hydrogel: Patent issued for substance with medical benefits

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:11pm
A U.S. patent has been awarded to a novel jelly-like substance called a hydrogel. This substance may be used for biomedical applications, ranging from cell culture and drug delivery to repairing and replacing tissue, organs and cartilage.
Categories: Science

Little evidence that conservation organizations respond to economic signals

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:11pm
Nonprofit organizations aiming to protect biodiversity show little evidence of responding to economic signals, which could limit the effectiveness of future conservation efforts, experts say.
Categories: Science

Physicists narrow search for solution to proton spin puzzle

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 4:11pm
Results from recent experiments reveal new insights about how quarks and gluons, the subatomic building blocks of matter, contribute to proton “spin.”
Categories: Science

Outsmarting thermodynamics in self-assembly of nanostructures

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 2:11pm
Researchers have achieved symmetry-breaking in a bulk metamaterial solution for the first time, a critical step game toward achieving new and exciting properties in metamaterials.
Categories: Science

Drug proves safe, efficacious to treat children in Africa with malaria

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 2:11pm
Results of a multi-centre clinical trial in Africa, launched in 2008, to test the efficacy and tolerability of Artesunate-Mefloquine fixed-dose combination in children under 5 years of age with uncomplicated falciparum malaria showed that ASMQ FDC is as safe and efficacious as Artemether-Lumefantrine FDC -- Africa's most widely adopted treatment.
Categories: Science

Ebola, Marburg viruses edit genetic material during infection

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 2:11pm
Filoviruses like Ebola 'edit' genetic material as they invade their hosts, according to a study. The findings reported could lead to a better understanding of these viruses, paving the way for new treatments down the road.
Categories: Science

Undiagnosed, undertreated Chagas disease emerging as U.S. public health threat

Tue, 04/11/2014 - 2:11pm
Across a broad swath of the southern United States, residents face a tangible but mostly unrecognized risk of contracting Chagas disease -- a stealthy parasitic infection that can lead to severe heart disease and death -- according to new research.
Categories: Science