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Updated: 45 min 21 sec ago

Gas-charged fluids creating seismicity associated with a Louisiana sinkhole

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 11:34pm
In August 2012, the emergence of a very large sinkhole at the Napoleonville Salt Dome in Louisiana offered scientists the opportunity to detect, locate and analyze a rich sequence of 62 seismic events that occurred one day prior to its discovery.
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ACP recommends against pelvic exam in asymptomatic, average risk, non-pregnant women

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 11:34pm
ACP's new evidence-based guideline finds that harms of screening pelvic examination outweigh any demonstrated benefits. ACP's guideline is based on a systematic review of the published literature on human subjects in the English language from 1946 through January 2014.
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DNA analysis reveals that queen bumblebees disperse far from their birthplace before setting up home

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 11:33pm
Researchers are closer to understanding patterns of family relatedness and genetic diversity in bumblebees. The findings could help farmers, land managers and policy makers develop more effective conservation schemes for these essential pollinators.
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Research team pursues techniques to improve elusive stem cell therapy

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:46pm
Transplanting mesenchymal stem cells along with blood vessel-forming cells naturally found in circulation improves transplantation results, researchers report. The research has immediate translational implications, as current mesenchymal clinical trials don't follow a co-transplantation procedure.
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Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:45pm
By confining colonies of human embryonic stem cells to tiny circular patterns on glass plates, researchers have for the first time coaxed them into organizing themselves just as they would under natural conditions.
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Alzheimer's linked to brain hyperactivity

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:45pm
The precise molecular mechanism that may trigger elevated neuronal activity in Alzheimer's patients has been pinpointed by researchers. This mechanism subsequently damages memory and learning functions. With the understanding of this, the potential for restoring memory and protecting the brain is greatly increased.
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Adults can undo heart disease risk by changing lifestyle

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:45pm
The heart is more forgiving than you may think -- especially to adults who try to take charge of their health, a new study has found. When adults in their 30s and 40s decide to drop unhealthy habits that are harmful to their heart and embrace healthy lifestyle changes, they can control and potentially even reverse the natural progression of coronary artery disease, scientists found.
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Shock wave from explosives causes significant eye damage

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:45pm
The unseen effects that can occur as a result of a blast injury have been studied by researchers who have concluded that the shock wave alone created by an IED, even in the absence of shrapnel or other particles, can cause significant damage to the eyes that could lead to partial or total blindness.
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Ancient Arctic sharks tolerated brackish water 50 million years ago

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:43pm
Sharks were a tolerant bunch some 50 million years ago, cruising an Arctic Ocean that contained about the same percentage of freshwater as Louisiana's Lake Ponchatrain does today, says a new study. The study indicates the Eocene Arctic sand tiger shark, a member of the lamniform group of sharks that includes today's great white, thresher and mako sharks, was thriving in the brackish water of the western Arctic Ocean back then. In contrast, modern sand tiger sharks living today in the Atlantic Ocean are very intolerant of low salinity, requiring three times the saltiness of the Eocene sharks in order to survive.
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Oil palm plantations threaten water quality, scientists say

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:42pm
Indonesia pays a price for a lucrative crop used in many household products. Palm plantations damage freshwater streams that supply drinking water to millions of people. Found in thousands of products, from peanut butter and packaged bread to shampoo and shaving cream, palm oil is a booming multibillion-dollar industry.
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All the world's oceans have plastic debris on their surface

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:42pm
The Malaspina Expedition, led by the Spanish National Research Council, has demonstrated that there are five large accumulations of plastic debris in the open ocean that match with the five major twists of oceanic surface water circulation. In addition to the known accumulation of plastic waste in the North Pacific, there are similar accumulations in the central North Atlantic, the South Pacific, the South Atlantic and the Indian Ocean.
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Ancient baby boom holds a lesson in over-population

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:41pm
Researchers have sketched out one of the greatest baby booms in North American history, a centuries-long 'growth blip' among southwestern Native Americans between 500 to 1300 A.D. It was a time when the early features of civilization -- including farming and food storage -- had matured to where birth rates likely 'exceeded the highest in the world today,' the researchers write. A crash followed, offering a warning sign to the modern world about the dangers of overpopulation.
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Body odor reveals malarial infection

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:40pm
An infection with malaria pathogens changes the scent of infected mice, making those infected more attractive to mosquitoes, according to a new study. Researchers show that whether mosquitoes find the right victim to bite is not left to chance by the pathogen. Instead, the plasmodium parasite appears to manipulate its host by changing the characteristics of the infected individual's body odour, which makes the carrier more attractive to hungry mosquitoes.
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'Microbe sniffer' could point way to next-generation bio-refining

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:40pm
A new biosensor could help optimize bio-refining processes that produce fuels, fine chemicals and advanced materials. It works by sniffing out naturally occurring bacterial networks that are genetically wired to break down wood polymer. "Nature has already invented microbial processes to degrade lignin--the tough polymer in wood and plant biomass that currently stymies industrial bio-refining," says a microbiologist researcher.
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New method to grow zebrafish embryonic stem cells

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:40pm
Zebrafish, a model organism that plays an important role in biological research and the discovery and development of new drugs and cell-based therapies, can form embryonic stem cells (ESCs). For the first time, researchers report the ability to maintain zebrafish-derived ESCs for more than two years without the need to grow them on a feeder cell layer.
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Study of animal urination could lead to better-engineered products

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:40pm
A new study investigated how quickly 32 animals urinate. It turns out that it’s all about the same. Even though an elephant’s bladder is 3,600 times larger than a cat’s (18 liters vs. 5 milliliters), both animals relieve themselves in about 20 seconds.
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Evolution of life’s operating system revealed in detail

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:40pm
The evolution of the ribosome, a large molecular structure found in the cells of all species, has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a new study.
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Study helps unlock mystery of high-temp superconductors

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 8:39pm
Physicists say they have unlocked one key mystery surrounding high-temperature superconductivity. Their research found a remarkable phenomenon in copper-oxide (cuprate) high-temperature superconductors.
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Surgical treatment for metastatic melanoma of the liver increases overall survival

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 6:14pm
Surgical resection markedly improves survival among metastatic melanoma patients whose disease is isolated to a few areas in the liver, according to a new study. The bottom line, according the researchers, is that surgeons should discuss surgical resection for the treatment of melanoma liver metastases with their patients if their disease is limited to a few areas in the liver, their overall health status is good, and the disease is indolent or the patients are responding to systemic therapy.
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In human evolution, changes in skin's barrier set northern Europeans apart

Mon, 30/06/2014 - 6:08pm
The popular idea that northern Europeans developed light skin to absorb more UV light so they could make more vitamin D -- vital for healthy bones and immune function -- is questioned by researchers in a new study. Ramping up the skin’s capacity to capture UV light to make vitamin D is indeed important, however, researchers concluded in their study that changes in the skin’s function as a barrier to the elements made a greater contribution than alterations in skin pigment in the ability of northern Europeans to make vitamin D.
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