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Updated: 2 hours 37 min ago

New map tool identifies patterns of racial diversity across the U.S.

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 8:23pm
Geography researchers have developed a large-scale mapping technique to track a variety of demographic data across the United States, including researching populations based on gender, race and economic diversity. Details on the technique behind the new, high resolution, grid-based map of U.S. demographics are now available online.
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Proactive office ergonomics can increase job satisfaction, employee retention

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 8:23pm
Although office ergonomics training programs have been shown to improve employee well-being and productivity, in many cases training occurs only after complaints are logged. New research demonstrates that a comprehensive and proactive workplace ergonomics program can help to prevent discomfort and injury.
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Multiple sclerosis researchers find role for working memory in cognitive reserve

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 8:23pm
Working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis, research shows. This finding informs the relationships between working memory, intellectual enrichment and long-term memory in this population.
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Experts create multiuser, multiantenna scheme to make most of UHF band

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 8:23pm
Researchers have found a way to make the most of the unused UHF TV spectrum by serving up fat streams of data over wireless hotspots that could stretch for miles.
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Two-dimensional electron liquids: Looking for novel forms of superconductivity

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 8:23pm
Truly two-dimensional objects are rare. Even a thin piece of paper is trillions of atoms thick. When physicists do succeed in producing 2D systems, quantum interactions can lead to new phenomena and Nobel prizes. Two examples: graphene -- single-atom-thick sheets of carbon atoms -- has unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties; and two-dimensional electron gases (2DEG) -- planar collections of electrons supported at the interface between certain semiconductors such as gallium arsenide -- allow the observation of such emergent behaviors as the quantum Hall effect and the spin Hall effect. Using an overlying bath of ionic liquid, a piece of superconductor -- divided by an insulating strip -- supports narrow tunnels which permit currents to flow between.
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Sickle cell patients who experience discrimination miss out on treatment

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:27pm
Experiencing discrimination because of their race or health condition can influence just how much trust people put into the health profession. In fact, having these experiences was associated with a 53 percent increase in the chances that someone suffering from sickle cell disease will not follow their doctors' orders, says one researcher.
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Indian Ocean expedition pioneers citizen oceanography

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:27pm
Recreational sailors are being called upon to become 'citizen oceanographers' and help provide vital scientific knowledge about the world's oceans by sampling and testing remote waters from their yachts. In 2013, a microbiologist and sailing champion, led an international scientific expedition across the Indian Ocean to pioneer this cost-effective method of data collection. With the right equipment, citizen scientists could gather large quantities of information too, his team says.
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Prioritizing pregnant women in malaria endemic regions for bed nets from clinics

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:27pm
Donors, Ministries of Health, implementing agencies, and other partners should prioritize providing pregnant women in malaria endemic regions with long-lasting insecticide treated nets through antenatal care clinics to help prevent malaria and its adverse effects on mother and infant, according to experts.
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After two years on antiretroviral therapy, survival in South African patients meets rates from North America

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 7:27pm
Provided that therapy is started promptly, South Africans with HIV have chances of remaining alive beyond two years on antiretroviral therapy that are comparable to those of North American patients, according to new research.
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Cetane data used for development of energy efficient fuels and engines updated

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:45pm
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released a long-anticipated update to the source-of-record for cetane number data. This information is vital to the development of new, energy-efficient, low-carbon fuels and compatible engines. Researchers, as well as members of the engine, vehicle, and fuel industries, rely on these numbers to target compounds for development of new fuels capable of greater energy efficiency, cleaner emissions, and maximum performance in diesel engines.
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Whooping cough vaccine recommended for pregnant women amid spike in cases

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
Expectant moms should be vaccinated for pertussis, or whooping cough, during their third trimester, according to obstetricians. Those in close contact with the infant also should be up to date with their whooping cough vaccine.
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Developing first comprehensive guidelines for management of sickle cell disease

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has released the first comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines for management of sickle cell disease from birth to end of life. Sickle cell anemia is the most common form of sickle cell disease, a serious disorder in which the body makes sickle-shaped red blood cells.
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A decade of research identifies threats to Adirondack loons, provides guidance on protection

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
Biologists have published three new articles summarizing research on Adirondack loons. The Common Loon (Gavia immer), one of five loon species worldwide, is a charismatic icon of New York's Adirondack Park. These large, stunning black and white birds breed on Adirondack lakes, and serve as sentinels of the quality of the waterways where they summer.
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'Must-have' sexual health services for men outlined in report

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:44pm
Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing of exams, tests and treatments that should be offered to all men of reproductive age. Now a report aims to fill that need.
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An evolutionary approach to epidemics

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:08pm
An evolutionary analysis of public health data during a major disease outbreak, such as bird flu, E. coli contamination of food or the current Ebola outbreak could help the emergency services plan their response and contain the disease more effectively.
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'Solid' light could compute previously unsolvable problems

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:08pm
Researchers have begun crystallizing light as part of an effort to answer fundamental questions about the physics of matter. As part of an effort to develop exotic materials such as room-temperature superconductors, the researchers have locked together photons, the basic element of light, so that they become fixed in place.
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Companion star hidden for 21 years in a supernova's glare

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 5:07pm
Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered a companion star to a rare class of supernova, known as a Type IIb. The discovery confirms a long-held theory that the supernova, dubbed SN 1993J, occurred inside what is called a binary system, where two interacting stars caused a cosmic explosion.
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Search for Ebola immune response targets

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 4:36pm
The effort to develop therapeutics and a vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus disease (EVD) requires a complex understanding of the microorganism and its relationship within the host, especially the immune response. Adding to the challenge, EVD can be caused by any one of five known species within the genus Ebolavirus (EBOV), in the Filovirus family.
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Gambling is just plain fun for those players who are in control

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 4:35pm
Most gamblers who play responsibly enjoy the experience and exhibit no problems, research suggests. These people set limits on how much money and time they can spend, and they are likely to gamble on the internet. But gambling is just one of several leisure activities these players undertake.
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Why humans don't suffer from chimpanzee malaria: DNA region controlling red blood cell invasion holds genetic key to infection

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 4:35pm
By comparing the genomes of malaria parasites that affect chimpanzees and those that affect humans, researchers discovered that it is the difference in the parasites’ surface proteins that determine which host it will infect.
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