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Flowers critical link to bacteria transmission in wild bees

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 6:56pm
Flowers are a hot spot of transmission of bacteria that end up in the microbiome of wild bees, new research has found. The work shows for the first time that multiple flower and wild bee species share several of the same types of bacteria. Bees therefore obtain both food and bacteria from flowers. These bacteria may play important roles in bee health.
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NFL players' careers most affected by surgery to patellar tendon, Achilles tendon and ACL

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 6:56pm
The first comprehensive injury database that compares return-to-play rate and performance-based outcomes in NFL players who had orthopaedic surgery has now been released. Nearly 80 percent of the 559 players included in the database returned to play after surgery. Surgery for tendon injuries results in worse career trajectory than with other surgeries, say the authors, emphasizing that understanding performance outcomes may lead to alterations in training regimens and help guide postoperative expectations for an athlete's career
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What are the challenges of implementing new TB screening guidelines?

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 6:56pm
An editorial accompanies the publication of new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) screening recommendations for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in primary care settings. The editorial points out the urgent need for TB-related research to identify new tools and diagnostics that will identify patients who are at high risk from progressing from latent TB infection to active TB disease.
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Project investigates malnutrition in children, liver impairments

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 6:55pm
A gene, PEX2, has been identified as an essential requirement for the loss of peroxisomes in cells cultured without enough nutrients. The study's findings contribute to a project on novel treatment strategies for severely malnourished children.
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New article-level metric measures the influence of scientific research

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 6:55pm
Scientists have developed a new metric, known as the Relative Citation Ratio, which will allow researchers and funders to quantify and compare the influence of a scientific article. RCR measures a scientific publication's influence in a way that is article-level and field-independent.
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Extending primary care hours is linked to fewer emergency department visits

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 6:55pm
Keeping primary care practices open for more hours on nights and weekends was linked to a reduction in patient-initiated emergency department visits for minor problems, according to a new study.
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Structure of mammalian protein complex of respiratory chain solved at atomic level

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:16pm
The mitochondrial Complex I plays a central role in cellular respiration and energy metabolism. The ~1 Megadalton L-shaped protein complex is the largest protein assembly of the respiratory chain and now the largest asymmetric membrane protein assembly solved to date.
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Rumor patterns on social media during emergencies

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:16pm
Chat and social media apps like WhatsApp and Facebook have drastically sped up the pace of rumor proliferation during emergencies. This research was conducted in real-time to identify the rumors that had spread on WhatsApp in Israel, but mainly to trace their source and the people disseminating them.
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Early study shows malaria vaccine efficacy may improve by changing dosing schedule

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:16pm
Researchers recently published results of a phase II study which demonstrated that by changing the dosing regimen, the efficacy of malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01, was improved to approximately 87 percent, compared with 63 percent using the current standard regimen.
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TB can persist in lungs despite treatment, researchers find

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
It has been known that the microbe that causes TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can persist in the lungs even after patient tissue samples test negative for the bacteria. In new research, scientists have found through the use of positron emission tomography/computerized tomography scanning that TB lesions can remain in the lungs long after treatment with antibiotics has been completed.
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Flycatcher genome sheds light on causes of mutations

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
A research team has determined the complete genetic code of 11 members of a flycatcher pedigree. Doing this, they have for the first time been able to estimate the rate of new mutations in birds. When they combined the new results with mutation rate estimates from other organisms, a clear pattern emerged: The more common a species is, the lower its mutation rate.
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Similarities found between how ancient and modern fish survived youth

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
The discovery of a group of young, prehistoric fish fossils provides some insights into the way the extinct creatures survived their youth -- and how fish today might be similar to them.
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Trauma and shopping: Post disaster consumers value off brand, low cost goods

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
Traumatic events have lasting influence on what products people desire and purchase. When rebuilding and restocking an area that has been affected by conflict or natural disaster, what traumatized individuals value most is what is most practical and quick -- even 50 years after the traumatic incident. A new study found strong consumer trends among those who experienced traumatic events that offer insights into what store owners and aid providers can stock to meet the needs of trauma-altered shoppers.
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Over-the-counter head lice treatments are likely to fail

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
A recent review on head lice treatments available in the United States described a marked decline in the effectiveness of permethrin/synergized pyrethrins (collectively pyrethroids), likely due to resistance arising from widespread and indiscriminate use over 30 years.
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Electric fans may exacerbate heat issues for seniors, study finds

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
Using electric fans to relieve high levels of heat and humidity may, surprisingly, have the opposite effect for seniors, a study by heart specialists suggests.
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Human spatial memory is made up of numerous individual maps

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
Spatial memory is something we use and need in our everyday lives. Time for morning coffee? We head straight to the kitchen and know where to find the coffee machine and cups. To do this, we require a mental image of our home and its contents. If we didn't have this information stored in our memory, we would have to search through the entire house every time we needed something. Exactly how this mental processing works is not clear. Do we use one big mental map of all of the objects we have in our home? Or do we have a bunch of small maps instead -- perhaps one for each room?
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Study demonstrates seasonality of bird migration in response to environmental cues

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:14pm
For the first time, a study shows that remote sensing data from weather surveillance radar and on-the-ground data from the eBird citizen science database both yield robust indices of migration timing, also known as migration phenology. These indices can now be used to address the critical gap in our knowledge regarding the cues that migrants use for fine tuning their migration timing in response to climate.
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Detailed age map shows how Milky Way came together

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:13pm
Using colors to identify the approximate ages of more than 130,000 stars in the Milky Way's halo, astronomers have produced the clearest picture yet of how the galaxy formed more than 13.5 billion years ago.
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Researchers design solids that control heat with spinning superatoms

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:13pm
Superatom crystals are periodic arrangements of C60 fullerenes and similarly sized inorganic molecular clusters. There are two nearly identical formations, one with rotating (i.e. orientationally disordered) C60s and low conductivity, and one with fixed C60s and high thermal conductivity. Superatom crystals represent a new class of materials with potential for applications in sustainable energy generation, energy storage, and nanoelectronics. Additional research could lead to controlling rotational disorder in new kinds of thermal switches and transistors.
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Post-mortem assessment guidelines for vascular cognitive impairment

Tue, 06/09/2016 - 5:13pm
The first validated set of pathological criteria for assessing the likelihood that cognitive impairment was caused by vascular disease has been outlined by new research.
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