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Sudden shift in 'forcing' led to demise of Laurentide ice sheet

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 2:36pm
The massive Laurentide ice sheet that covered Canada during the last ice age initially began shrinking through calving of icebergs, and then abruptly shifted into a new regime where melting on the continent took precedence, ultimately leading to the sheet's demise. This is important, because it may provide a clue to how ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica may respond to a warming climate.
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Robot controlled remotely with thoughts

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 2:36pm
For someone suffering from paralysis or limited mobility, visiting with other people is extremely difficult. Scientists have been working on a revolutionary brain-machine approach in order to restore a sense of independence to the disabled. The idea is to remotely control a robot from home with one's thoughts. The research, involving numerous subjects located in different countries, produced excellent results in both human and technical terms.
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Parkinson's disease may begin in the gut

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 2:36pm
A major epidemiological registry-based study indicates that Parkinson's disease begins in the gastrointestinal tract. The study is the largest in the field so far.
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Nonphotosynthetic pigments could be biosignatures of life on other worlds

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
To find life in the universe, it helps to know what it might look like. If there are organisms on other planets that do not rely wholly on photosynthesis -- as some on Earth do not -- how might those worlds appear from light-years away?
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Astronomers explain why a star is so hot right now

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
Astronomers have solved a mystery over small, unusually hot blue stars, 10 times hotter than our Sun, that are found in the middle of dense star clusters.
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Tiny Dracula ants hunting underground in Madagascar and the Seychelles

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
Six new species of cryptic, subterranean ants from the genus Prionopelta have been described from the Malagasy region. The tiny underground dwellers are part of the larger group of the Dracula ants and are fierce, social predators that hunt down prey with dagger-like teeth.
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New light shed on how neurons control muscle movement

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
Researchers studying how the brain controls movement in people with paralysis, related to their diagnosis of Lou Gehrig's disease, have found that groups of neurons work together, firing in complex rhythms to signal muscles about when and where to move.
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Mirror-like display creates rich color pixels by harnessing ambient light

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
A new approach to realizing color displays breaks away from the RGB construct and provides a rich palette of colors at each mirror-pixel location.
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Adolescents uncertain about risks of marijuana, e-cigarettes, study finds

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
Teenagers are very familiar with the risks of smoking cigarettes, but are much less sure whether marijuana or e-cigarettes are harmful, according to a new study. The researchers compared teens' knowledge of cigarettes, e-cigarettes and marijuana because they heard from teachers, parents and youth that anti-smoking efforts needed to address more than just conventional cigarettes.
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Discovery in the US of the New Guinea flatworm, one of the worst known invasive species

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 1:55pm
The land planarian Platydemus manokwari, or New Guinea flatworm, is a highly invasive species, already reported in many territories in the Pacific area, as well as in France. This is the only land planarian in the '100 worst invasive alien species' list and it has now been found in additional localities including islands in the Pacific area, Puerto Rico, the first record in the Caribbean, and the first report in mainland US, in Florida.
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'Smarter' ordering of breast biomarker tests could save millions in health care dollars

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:32am
A review of medical records for almost 200 patients with breast cancer suggests that more selective use of biomarker testing for such patients has the potential to save millions of dollars in health care spending without compromising care.
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Climate change threatens to undermine the last half century of health gains

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:29am
The threat to human health from climate change is so great that it could undermine the last fifty years of gains in development and global health, according to a major new Commission.
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Researchers identify gene mutation that can cause key-hole shape defect in eye

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:29am
A scientific collaboration has pinpointed the genetic cause of a rare form of blindness, which can present itself as a key-hole shaped defect in the eye in newborn babies. 
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Dinosaur tracks reconstructed

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:29am
Twelve years ago, footprints of carnivorous dinosaurs were discovered and excavated in a quarry near Goslar. Paleontologists have now created a three-dimensional digital model based on photographs of the excavation. The reconstruction of the discovery site suggests that carnivorous dinosaurs hunted herbivorous island-dwelling dinosaurs about 154 million years ago. They believe the predators could have immigrated via a land bridge as sea levels dropped.
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Whooping cough: New findings on pertussis pathogen

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:29am
The worldwide spreading of the whooping cough, also known as pertussis, has substantially increased since 2010. Researchers have investigated structure and function of an important membrane protein of the bacterium causing pertussis. They discovered that the protein structure differs from a previously postulated model. Their findings may provide a basis for new treatment approaches for the infection.
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Researchers develop new breath test to diagnose oesophageal, gastric cancer

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:29am
A breath test that can help doctors diagnose the early signs of esophageal and gastric cancer in minutes has been developed by researchers. Researchers analysed breath samples of 210 patients using the test. They found that the test can discriminate between malignant and benign esophageal cancer in patients for the first time.
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Sahti, an old, home-brewed Finnish beer, characterized for the first time

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:29am
Scientists considered that it’s high time to finally scientifically characterize sahti beer. The sweet and strong sahti with its exceptionally rich combination of fruity flavors has been brewed in Finland for hundreds of years. To successfully recreate sahti-style beer a craft brewer outside Finland should have an idea of what it should taste like. This is complicated by the fact that sahti doesn’t travel well: it’s prone to spoilage. The study clearly shows that sahti beer differs from modern commercial beers in almost every respect. The twelve beers sampled were all very strong, very sweet and had flavors at concentrations as much as 10-fold greater than in the modern beers used as references.
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In Beijing, does desire for status means global car brands over local ones

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:24am
Everyone in China knows global automobile brands such as Ford and Chevrolet. But do those brands really sell better than local ones such as Senova or Eado? The answer is yes, and the reason lies in a complicated mix of brand recognition and local culture, according to a new study.
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National identity: Does buying local mean shunning global?

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:24am
U.S. consumers are often urged to “buy American,” and some special interest groups even claim that buying foreign products is inappropriate, or even immoral. But when it comes to buying domestic products, positive feelings for one’s own country may play a more important role than negative feelings toward another, according to a new study.
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The unwanted consumer: Harbingers of failure

Tue, 23/06/2015 - 11:24am
Positive customer feedback, to say nothing of positive sales, is always a good sign of a new product's potential success, right? Not necessarily, says a new study. According to the study, there is a small set of consumers who, time and again, purchase and rave about new products that consistently flop. Positive feedback from those customers, whom the study authors name "harbingers of failure," actually means that a product is likely to bomb.
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