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First frequency comb of time-bin entangled qubits created

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:06pm
An international team of researchers has built a chip that generates multiple frequencies from a robust quantum system that produces time-bin entangled photons. In contrast to other quantum state realizations, entangled photons don't need bulky equipment to keep them in their quantum state, and they can transmit quantum information across long distances. The new device creates entangled photons that span the traditional telecommunications spectrum, making it appealing for multi-channel quantum communication and more powerful quantum computers.
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Polarization may cause climate communication to backfire

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:06pm
Political polarization may cause communication about climate change to backfire, a new study finds. Even efforts that frame climate change around seemingly win-win issues such as economic growth or natural security are likely to fail if the communication conflicts with the partisan identity of its audience, exacerbating and hardening their opposition on the issue. The backfire effect doubles or triples in size among people with strong political interests.
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Probiotics stop menopause-like bone loss in mice

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:06pm
Probiotic supplements protected female mice from the loss of bone density that occurs after having their ovaries removed, researchers have shown. The findings suggest that probiotic bacteria may have potential as an inexpensive treatment for post-menopausal osteoporosis.
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Decoding Zika to fight future outbreaks

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:06pm
Zika virus has been associated to several cases of neurological disorders and has raised worldwide public health alerts. Now due to the urgency, researchers are detailing the characteristics of the virus to find solutions.
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Contamination in North Dakota linked to fracking spills

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:06pm
Accidental wastewater spills from unconventional oil production in North Dakota have caused widespread water and soil contamination, a new study finds. Researchers found high levels of contaminants and salt in surface waters polluted by the brine-laden wastewater, which primarily comes from fracked wells. Soil at spill sites was contaminated with radium. At one site, high levels of contaminants were detected in residual waters four years after the spill occurred.
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Surprising central role of darks in brain visual maps

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:05pm
Scientists have been studying how visual space is mapped in the cerebral cortex for many decades under the assumption that the map is equal for lights and darks. Surprisingly, recent work demonstrates that visual brain maps are dark-centric and that, just as stars rotate around black holes in the Universe, lights rotate around darks in the brain representation of visual space.
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Beach buoys deployed to detect beach contamination

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:05pm
Beachgoers may soon be able to know in a timely manner if the water is clean enough for swimming, thanks to some new technology. Sensors in new buoys gather information, everything from temperature to how clear the water is. Using a cellular modem on board the buoy, the data are uploaded to a land-based server.
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Brain's 'thesaurus' mapped to help decode inner thoughts

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:03pm
What if a map of the brain could help us decode people's inner thoughts? Scientists have taken a step in that direction by building a 'semantic atlas' that shows in vivid colors and multiple dimensions how the human brain organizes language.
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Scientists uncover new way to grow rare life-saving blood stem cells

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:03pm
A protein called Musashi-2 regulates the function and development of important blood stem cells. This knowledge provides new strategies that can be used to control the growth of these cells -- cells that can be used as therapeutics for a range of life-threatening diseases but are, in general, in very short supply.
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Researchers create a better way to find out 'when'

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:03pm
A machine-learning algorithm created by a research team has created an algorithm that improves the accuracy of dating past events by a factor of up to 300.
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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy linked to reduced depressive relapse risk

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:03pm
The largest meta-analysis so far of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for recurrent depression has found that MBCT is an effective treatment option that can help prevent the recurrence of major depression. The study used anonymised individual patient data from nine randomized trials of MBCT.
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Study finds high death rate among people who are or have been incarcerated

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:03pm
People recently released from correctional facilities in Ontario had a risk of dying from a drug overdose 56 times greater than the general population, a new study has found.
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Bacterial virulence is stimulated by burns

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:03pm
Sepsis constitutes the main cause of disease in people suffering from burns. Researchers studied the effect of exudates on the survival and the virulence of these bacteria. The results demonstrate that Pseudomonas aeruginosa has the capacity to multiply within these human fluids and that some of its virulence factors are overexpressed. The scientists also made a analysis of the composition of exudates. These data will enable them to develop an artificial culture medium.
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Coral 'toolkit' allows floating larvae to transform into reef skeletons

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 2:37pm
Key components of the molecular 'toolkit' that allow corals to build their skeletons (called biomineralization) has been desicribed in that new article that also outlines when -- in the transformation from floating larvae to coral skeleton -- these components are used.
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Slow worms react quickly to climate change

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 2:36pm
Evolution can react surprisingly quickly to climate change -- at least for an important species of earthworms. For seven years, scientists have exposed the natural habitat of Enchytraeidae to a warmer (+0.5 degrees C) and drier climate by ingenious use of curtains. Twelve percent of the genetic changes found in the worms could be directly attributed to the small changes in the soil temperature and moisture.
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Breast cancer progression: the devil is in the details

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 2:36pm
Researchers describe how breast cancer cells challenged with a small-molecule inhibitor targeting specific invasive properties switch to an alternative mode-of-action, rendering them even more aggressive. The results may impair future therapeutic approaches in the TGF-beta pathway.
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Consumers reveal barriers to brain-training app-iness

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 2:36pm
The preconceptions and concerns of young US consumers about brain-training smartphone apps are examined in a new scientific study. The work investigated why consumers decide to download these apps, how they use them and what they think their benefits may be.
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Emotion detector: Facial expression recognition to improve learning, gaming

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 2:36pm
A computer algorithm that can tell whether you are happy or sad, angry or expressing almost any other emotion would be a boon to the games industry. New research describes such a system that is almost 99 percent accurate.
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Got good fat?

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 2:36pm
Brown fat cells can burn fat to generate heat. Researchers have discovered a new method to measure the activity of brown fat cells in humans and mice. The researchers showed that microRNA-92a can be used as an indirect measure for the activity of energy consuming brown fat cells. They showed that a small blood sample was sufficient.
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Even a little air pollution may have long-term health effects on developing fetus

Wed, 27/04/2016 - 1:52pm
Even small amounts of air pollution appear to raise the risk of a condition in pregnant women linked to premature births and lifelong neurological and respiratory disorders in their children, new research suggests.
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