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Stem cell transplantation shows potential for reducing disability in patients with MS

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 5:06pm
Results from a preliminary study indicate that among patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), treatment with nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was associated with improvement in measures of disability and quality of life, according to a study.
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Patients actively warmed during surgery still experience hypothermia, study finds

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 5:04pm
Body temperature decreases during the first hour of surgery, even when patients are actively warmed with forced air, reports a new study. Furthermore, patients who experience the most hypothermia are more likely to require blood transfusions.
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Study challenges best way to position women during childbirth

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 5:04pm
New research is challenging what many obstetricians and physician anesthesiologists believe is the best way to position women during labor. According to a study, the traditional practice of positioning women on their side, with hips tilted at 15 degrees, during labor does not effectively reduce compression of the inferior vena cava, a large vein located near the abdominal area that returns blood to the heart, as previously thought. In fact, not until the degree of tilt reached 30 degrees did blood flow only partially increase in patients, the study found.
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Giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica's ice sheet

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:22pm
Extreme weather phenomena called atmospheric rivers were behind intense snowstorms recorded in 2009 and 2011 in East Antarctica. The resulting snow accumulation partly offset recent ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet, report researchers.
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Graphene enables all-electrical control of energy flow from light emitters

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:18pm
Scientists have now demonstrated active, in situ electrical control of the energy flow from erbium ions into photons and plasmons. The experiment was implemented by placing the erbium emitters a few tens of nanometers away from the graphene sheet, whose carrier density is electrically controlled.
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Burying beetles hatch survival plan to source food, study shows

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:17pm
Young beetles pick up sensory signals from adult insects to increase their chances of being fed -- and shorten the odds of being killed instead. Beetle larvae have an in-built ability to identify different adults based on distinct chemicals found on the outside of their shells and adjust their begging behavior accordingly, researchers say.
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Current nutrition labeling is hard to digest

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:17pm
Current government-mandated nutrition labeling is ineffective in improving nutrition, but there is a better system available, according to a study. The researchers compared four different labeling systems and found that the Nutrition Facts label currently required on most food products in the US and Canada was least useable.
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Researchers prevent type I diabetes in mouse model

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:12pm
A new approach developed by scientists stops the destruction of beta cells and preserves insulin production. Type I diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease that occurs when the body's immune system destroys insulin producing pancreatic beta cells, resulting in insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia. Researchers focused on blocking the autoimmune process that destroys beta cells and leads to diabetes, with the aim of developing therapies that can prevent the illness from developing rather than treating its symptoms.
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Laser-generated surface structures create extremely water-repellent, self-cleaning metals

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:12pm
Scientists have used lasers to transform metals into extremely water repellent, or super-hydrophobic, materials without the need for temporary coatings.
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Bioethicists call for return to asylums for long-term psychiatric care

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:12pm
As the United States population has doubled since 1955, the number of inpatient psychiatric beds in the United States has been cut by nearly 95 percent to just 45,000, a wholly inadequate equation when considering that there are currently 10 million U.S. residents with serious mental illness. A new article looks at the evolution away from inpatient psychiatric beds, evaluates the current system for housing and treating the mentally ill, and then suggests a modern approach to institutionalized mental health care as a solution.
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New signal amplification process set to transform communications, imaging, computing

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 4:12pm
A new signal amplification process is now poised to fuel new generations of electrical and photonic devices -- transforming the fields of communications, imaging and computing.
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Silk-weaving ant study sees new behavior

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:25pm
A professor's study of silk-weaving ants is promising to change our understanding of how all creatures work together. The study on the behaviour of the ants found the insects could evolve and abandon and then re-evolve the practice of building nests from silk, with different species adapting it in different ways once it was re-adopted.
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Twist1: Complex regulator of cell shape, function

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:25pm
Transcription factor Twist1 is involved in many processes where cells change shape or function. Thereby, Twist1 is crucial for embryonic development, but has also been implicated in cancer progression, researchers say. However, the precise contribution of Twist1 to these processes is under much debate. Scientists describe a new mode of action: a short-term, transient activation of Twist1 primes cells for stem cell-like properties. By contrast, prolonged, chronic Twist1 activity suppresses stem cell-like traits.
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Ocean floor dust gives new insight into supernovae

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:25pm
Extraterrestrial dust from the depths of the ocean could change the way we understand supernovae. Scientists have found the amount of plutonium in the dust is much lower than expected.
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Wearable sensor clears path to long-term EKG, EMG monitoring

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:25pm
A new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiographyor electromyography, has been developed by researchers. The new sensor is as accurate as the 'wet electrode' sensors used in hospitals, but can be used for long-term monitoring and is more accurate than existing sensors when a patient is moving.
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Genetic changes in Ebola virus in West African outbreak could hinder potential treatments

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:24pm
Researchers have tracked the genetic mutations that have occurred in the Ebola virus during the last four decades. Their findings identified changes in the current West African outbreak strain that could potentially interfere with experimental, sequence-based therapeutics.
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Updated assessment of medications to treat acute migraine

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:23pm
An updated assessment of the best treatments to use when a migraine attack occurs has been published by experts. The assessment forms the basis of new American Headache Society treatment guidelines.
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Use of methadone to treat pain increases risk of death, study shows

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 3:23pm
Outside the hospital, use of methadone to treat pain carries a 46 percent increased risk of death when compared to the equally effective but more costly alternative, morphine SR (sustained release), according to a recent study.
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First successful organ donation from newborn carried out in UK

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 2:02pm
The very first successful organ donation from a newborn carried out in the UK is has been reported. The donation involved the kidneys, which were transplanted into a patient with renal failure, and liver cells (hepatocytes), which were transfused into a further recipient.
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Group walking cuts risk of life-threatening conditions

Tue, 20/01/2015 - 2:02pm
Risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, depression and other life-threatening conditions can be reduced through regular outdoor walking in groups, according to research. Findings reveal that people who regularly walk in groups have lower blood pressure, resting heart rate and total cholesterol.
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