Syndicate content Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breaking science news and articles on global warming, extrasolar planets, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate and environment, computers, engineering, health and medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more -- from the world's leading universities and research organizations.
Updated: 4 hours 48 min ago

Wintertime ozone pollution in Utah oil and gas fields explained

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 5:30pm
Chemicals released into the air by oil and gas exploration, extraction and related activities can spark reactions that lead to high levels of ozone in wintertime, high enough to exceed federal health standards, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Genetic secrets of the monarch butterfly revealed

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 5:30pm
Sequencing the genomes of monarch butterflies from around the world, a team of scientists has made surprising new insights into the monarch's genetics. They identified a single gene that appears central to migration -- a behavior generally regarded as complex -- and another that controls pigmentation. The researchers also shed light on the evolutionary origins of the monarch.
Categories: Science

Giving botox a safer facelift: Structures of botulinum neurotoxins studied

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 5:30pm
New insights into botulinum neurotoxins and their interactions with cells are moving scientists ever closer to safer forms of Botox and a better understanding of the dangerous disease known as botulism. By comparing all known structures of botulinum neurotoxins, researchers suggest new ways to improve the safety and efficacy of Botox injections.
Categories: Science

Support for controversial Darwin theory of 'jump dispersal'

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:27pm
More than one hundred and fifty years ago, Charles Darwin hypothesized that species could cross oceans and other vast distances on vegetation rafts, icebergs, or in the case of plant seeds, in the plumage of birds. Though many were skeptical of Darwin's 'jump dispersal' idea, a new study suggests that Darwin might have been correct.
Categories: Science

FDG-PET/CT shows promise for breast cancer patients younger than 40

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:27pm
PET/CT imaging of patients younger than 40 who were initially diagnosed with stage I–III breast cancer resulted in change of diagnosis, a study shows. While guidelines recommend FDG-PET/CT imaging only for women with stage III breast cancer, it can also help physicians more accurately diagnose young breast cancer patients initially diagnosed with earlier stages of the disease.
Categories: Science

New drug-delivery capsule may replace injections

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:27pm
A pill coated with tiny needles can deliver drugs directly into the lining of the digestive tract, researchers have found, suggesting that the end of injections may be near.
Categories: Science

Nature collides with James Bond: Newly discovered ant species hides in plain sight

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:26pm
A new species of ant has been discovered that uses social parasitism to access host ant species' food sources and foraging trails: Cephalotes specularis, commonly known as the mirror turtle ant. Mirror turtle ants are the first-known ant species to use visual mimicry to parasitize another ant species. They have mastered the movements of C. ampla and are careful to dodge the host ants to avoid them detecting C. specularis' scent. By mimicking C. ampla, the mirror turtle ants can access their food and follow their foraging trails to food sources. In spy terms, this new form of social parasitism allows ants to steal food from an enemy.
Categories: Science

ZEB1: Oscar for leading role in fat storage

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:26pm
A research team has managed to decode the process of adipogenesis by identifying the precise proteins that play the leading roles in fat absorption. There are many actors involved in the process of adipogenesis, used by the body to store the fat that it absorbs from food. Up to now there had been some uncertainty as to how it was regulated. Yet, understanding this mechanism is of crucial importance to prevent the diseases related to fat accumulation in adipose tissue.
Categories: Science

Dog waste contaminates our waterways: A new test could reveal how big the problem is

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:26pm
Americans love their dogs, but they don't always love to pick up after them. And that's a problem. Dog feces left on the ground wash into waterways, sometimes carrying bacteria -- including antibiotic-resistant strains -- that can make people sick. Now scientists have developed a new genetic test to figure out how much dogs are contributing to this health concern.
Categories: Science

Nanoparticles accumulate quickly in wetlands: Aquatic food chains might be harmed by molecules 'piggybacking' on carbon nanoparticles

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:26pm
Using mesocosms that closely approximate wetland ecosystems, researchers show carbon nanotubes accumulate quickly in sediments -- a tendency that could indirectly damage aquatic food chains by piggybacking harmful molecules.
Categories: Science

Paint on 'smart' bandage emits phosphorescent glow for healing below

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:26pm
Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, a team of researchers has created a paint-on, see-through, 'smart' bandage that glows to indicate a wound's tissue oxygenation concentration. Because oxygen plays a critical role in healing, mapping these levels in severe wounds and burns can help significantly improve the success of surgeries to restore limbs and physical functions.
Categories: Science

Medical discovery first step on path to new painkillers

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:26pm
A major medical discovery could lead to the development of an entirely new type of painkiller, scientists suggest. The new drug would offer new hope to sufferers of chronic pain conditions such as traumatic nerve injury, for which few effective painkillers are currently available, they say.
Categories: Science

Snapshots of chemical reactions: Characterizing an important reactive intermediate

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:25pm
An international group of researchers has been able to isolate and characterize an important chemical intermediate whose existence has, so far, only been inferred from indirect experimental evidence.
Categories: Science

Robot researcher combines nature to nurture 'superhuman' navigation

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:25pm
Researchers are investigating realistic navigation for robots using computer modeling of the human eye and the brain of a rat.
Categories: Science

Acupuncture does not improve chronic knee pain, study finds

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:25pm
In patients older than 50 years with moderate or severe chronic knee pain, acupuncture did not provide any benefit, a study has concluded. Acupuncture is the most popular of alternative medical systems. Although traditionally administered with needles, laser acupuncture (low-intensity laser therapy to acupuncture points) is a non-invasive alternative with evidence of benefit in some pain conditions.
Categories: Science

Eighty percent of bowel cancers halted with existing medicines

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:25pm
More than 80 percent of bowel cancers could be treated with existing drugs, an international team of scientists say at the conclusion of their study. The study found that medicines called 'JAK inhibitors' halted tumor growth in bowel cancers with a genetic mutation that is present in more than 80 per cent of bowel cancers. Multiple JAK inhibitors are currently used, or are in clinical trials, for diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, blood cancers and myeloproliferative disorders.
Categories: Science

Changing Antarctic waters could trigger steep rise in sea levels, conditions 14,000 years ago suggest

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:25pm
Current changes in the ocean around Antarctica are disturbingly close to conditions 14,000 years ago that new research shows may have led to the rapid melting of Antarctic ice and an abrupt 3-4 meter rise in global sea level.
Categories: Science

Fat chats: The good, the bad and the ugly comments

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:24pm
Cyberbullying and hurtful "fat jokes" are disturbingly prevalent in the social media environment, especially on Twitter, says the lead author of a study that analyzed well over a million social media posts and comments about weight matters. However, the researchers were also happy to find that the news was not all bad: many instances of support and advice were also observed, especially on blogs and forums.
Categories: Science

What to anticipate after you've heard those dreaded words 'you have breast cancer'

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:20pm
A new article looks at breast cancer and provides insight on what a patient may anticipate. Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts in the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that can invade other parts of the body. For American women, breast cancer is the second most common cancer (second only to skin cancer). About 12 percent of women in the United States will battle invasive breast cancer at one point during their lifetime.
Categories: Science

Lift weights, improve your memory, study shows

Wed, 01/10/2014 - 2:20pm
Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults.
Categories: Science