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Weekly non-invasive brain stimulation provides long-term relief of post-stroke pain

Mon, 08/06/2015 - 12:16pm
Weekly sessions of non-invasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation provided sufficient long-term pain relief in 61 percent of patients with central post-stroke pain, and delivered long-term relief for patients who continued for one year, scientists say.
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New study describes cancer's cheating ways

Mon, 08/06/2015 - 1:42am
The ways in which cancers bypass the protective mechanisms used by multicellular forms to ensure their survival and well-being has been the focus of recent study.
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Men are 50 per cent more likely to get esophageal cancer than 30 years ago

Sun, 07/06/2015 - 12:41am
Esophageal cancer rates in men have increased by 50 per cent since the early 1980s. In women, the increase is much smaller with around 10 per cent more now developing the disease compared to the 80s, research shows.
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Current mobile contracts damaging the environment

Sun, 07/06/2015 - 12:40am
Researchers analyzed studies on the lifespan of mobile devices, from manufacture, use and disposal to see what impact each stage had on the environment. Through their investigation, they concluded that the current mobile business model, driven by frequent upgrades, is costing both the manufacturer and the environment. The study argues that where frequent upgrades are encouraged and recycling schemes not actively pursued, valuable materials integral to phone manufacture are lost, causing damage to the environment by additional waste to landfill as well as from the impact of extracting additional finite resources.
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Rabbit virus improves bone marrow transplants, kills some cancer cells

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:29pm
For patients with blood cancers such as leukemia and multiple myeloma, a bone marrow transplant can be both curative and perilous. It replenishes marrow lost to disease or chemotherapy but raises the risk that newly transplanted white blood cells will attack the recipient's body. Now researcher have found that a rabbit virus can deliver a one-two punch, killing some kinds of cancer cells while eliminating a common and dangerous complication of bone marrow transplants.
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Research reveals key interaction that opens the channel into the cell's nucleus

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:29pm
Scientists have uncovered crucial steps in the dynamic dance that dilates and constricts the nuclear pore complex -- the latest advance in their ongoing efforts to tease apart the mechanism by which its central channel admits specific molecules. Their work has shown that the nuclear pore complex is much more than the inert structure it was once thought to be.
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Autologous stem cell therapy helpful in traumatic brain injury

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:29pm
The use of cell therapy after traumatic brain injury in children can reduce the amount of therapeutic interventions needed to treat the patient, as well as the amount of time the child spends in neurointensive care, according to research.
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Moving sector walls on the nano scale

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:29pm
Scientists are able to visualize and selectively modify the internal order of an intensively researched class of materials known as multiferroics. This opens the door to promising applications in electronics. The researchers are particularly interested in the walls of the ordered sections.
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New strategies for stopping the spread of Staph and MRSA

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:29pm
Staphylococcus aureus -- better known as Staph -- is a common inhabitant of the human nose, and people who carry it are at increased risk for dangerous Staph infections. However, it may be possible to exclude these unwelcome guests using other more benign bacteria, according to a new study.
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Why good people do bad things

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:28pm
When facing an ethical dilemma, being aware of the temptation before it happens and thinking about the long-term consequences of misbehaving could help more people do the right thing, according to a new study.
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Top salads with eggs to better absorb vegetables' carotenoids

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:28pm
Adding eggs to a salad with a variety of raw vegetables is an effective method to improve the absorption of carotenoids, which are fat-soluble nutrients that help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, according to research.
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Babies who can resettle are more likely to 'sleep through the night'

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:28pm
Young infants who can 'resettle' themselves after waking up are more likely to sleep for prolonged periods at night, according to a video study. The researchers also looked for times when the infants woke up but were able to "resettle autonomously"--to go back to sleep without parental involvement.
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Nw role for zebrafish: Larger scale gene function studies

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:28pm
Scientists are using a fairly new gene-editing technology known as CRISPR/Cas9 to target specific DNA sequences in zebrafish. This technique could dramatically accelerate the discovery of gene function and the identification of disease genes in humans.
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Diverse coral communities persist, but bioerosion escalates in Palau's low-pH waters

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:28pm
The coral reefs in Palau seem to be defying the odds, showing none of the predicted responses to low pH except for an increase in bioerosion -- the physical breakdown of coral skeletons by boring organisms such as mollusks and worms.
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Arabidopsis uses molecular decoy to trick pathogens

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:24pm
In the animal kingdom, predators use a full range of strategies, such as camouflage, speed and optical illusions, to catch their prey. Meanwhile, prey species resort to the same tactics to escape from their predators. Such tricks are also used at the molecular level, as discovered by researchers in one of the most devastating bacterial plant pathogens in the world, which bypasses plant cell defenses by preventing an immune signaling from being triggered. Even more surprising is the fact that plant cells have developed a receptor incorporating a decoy intended to catch the invader in its own trap.
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As baby boomers age, do their decisions get better or worse?

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:23pm
As an economic and political force, researchers say that older adults hold a tremendous amount of social power in the United States. A new study is examining what factors contribute to older adults’ decisions.
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New data on botulinum toxin as treatment for nerve pain

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:23pm
Botulinum toxin could offer an effective new treatment for two forms of neuropathy—pain caused by different types of nerve injury, according to an experimental study.
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Daily sugar-sweetened beverage habit linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:23pm
A daily sugar-sweetened beverage habit may increase the risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), researchers report. NAFLD is characterized by an accumulation of fat in the liver cells that is unrelated to alcohol consumption. NAFLD is diagnosed by ultrasounds, CT, MRI, or biopsy, and many of the approximately 25% of Americans with the disease don’t experience any symptoms.
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Paleo-engineering: Complexity of triceratops' teeth revealed

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:19pm
When it comes to the three-horned dinosaur called the Triceratops, science is showing the ancient creatures might have been a little more complex than we thought. In fact, their teeth were far more intricate than any reptile or mammal living today.
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Strokes steal eight years' worth of brain function, new study suggests

Fri, 05/06/2015 - 10:19pm
Having a stroke ages a person's brain function by almost eight years, new research finds -- robbing them of memory and thinking speed as measured on cognitive tests. In both black and white patients, having had a stroke meant that their score on a 27-item test of memory and thinking speed had dropped as much as it would have if they had aged 7.9 years overnight.
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