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Can coral save our oceans? Soft coral tissue may help protect reefs against the hazardous effects of climate change

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 9:23pm
New research has uncovered the protective properties of soft coral tissue, which proved resilient when exposed to declining oceanic pH levels. The study provides insight into the changing face of coral reefs threatened by dropping oceanic pH levels as a result of climate change and may provide a new approach toward preserving the harder, calcified reef foundations.
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Collaboration of minds and metal leads to possible shortcut to new drugs

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 9:21pm
Researchers merged two powerful areas of research to enable an unprecedented chemical reaction that neither could broadly achieve on its own. The resulting bond formation could provide an excellent shortcut for chemists as they construct and test thousands of molecules to find new drugs.
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Hormones affect voting behavior, researchers find

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 9:21pm
Psychology and political science professors finds people with high levels of a stress hormone are less likely to vote. As witnessed by recent voter turnout in primary elections, participation in U.S. national elections is low, relative to other western democracies. In fact, voter turnout in biennial national elections ranges includes only 40 to 60 percent of eligible voters.
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How mutated X-linked mental retardation protein impairs neuron function

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 9:21pm
There are new clues about malfunctions in brain cells that contribute to intellectual disability and possibly other developmental brain disorders. A CSHL team has discovered how defects in an X-linked mental retardation protein, OPHN1, can lead to impairments in the maturation and adjustment of synaptic strength of excitatory neurons in the brain.
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Engineered muscle-mimic research: Technique uses living cells to build engineered muscle tissue

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 9:18pm
Biomedical engineers are designing and testing a biomaterial that regenerates damaged skeletal muscle. Living cells secrete fibrous proteins and polysaccharide gels called extracellular matrix, which support cell survival and tissue strength. Minor muscle injuries affect tissue cells but not the extracellular components. In severe injuries, however, the extracellular matrix does not function properly and cannot initiate the healing process. Engineered "muscle-mimics" provide the molecules necessary to cue regeneration.
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New study uses blizzard to measure wind turbine airflow

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 6:24pm
A first-of-its-kind study using snow during a Minnesota blizzard is giving researchers new insight into the airflow around large wind turbines. This research is essential to improving wind energy efficiency, especially in wind farms where airflows from many large wind turbines interact with each other.
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Metal particles in solids aren't as fixed as they seem, new memristor study shows

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 6:23pm
In work that unmasks some of the magic behind memristors and 'resistive random access memory,' or RRAM -- cutting-edge computer components that combine logic and memory functions -- researchers have shown that the metal particles in memristors don't stay put as previously thought.
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Not everyone wants cheering up, new study suggests

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 6:23pm
You may want to rethink cheering up your friends who have low self-esteem because chances are they don't want to hear it. People with low self-esteem have overly negative views of themselves, and often interpret critical feedback, romantic rejections, or unsuccessful job applications as evidence of their general unworthiness. A new study found that they likely don't want you to try to boost their spirits.
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Gender differences could mean more risk for cardiovascular death

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 6:22pm
One expert is advocating the use of gender-based treatment for mitigating the cardiovascular risk factors related to diabetes. Research has shown women with Type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol are less likely than their male peers to reach treatment goals to lower their bad cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
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Evidence that an Influenza A virus can jump from horses to camels

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 5:58pm
Evidence that an influenza A virus can jump from horses to camels has been found by scientists – and humans could be next. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve been amazed at all the cross-species jumps of influenza. Now we’re finding yet another,” said one researcher. Although there is no immediate risk, the inter-mammalian transmission of the virus is a major concern for public health researchers interested in controlling the threat of pandemic influenza.
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Prior drug use is greatest predictor of ecstasy use among U.S. high school seniors

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 5:58pm
A national sample of high school seniors was examined to determine who is currently at high risk for ecstasy use. Although ecstasy use in the U.S. is not as prevalent as in the late 1990s and early 2000s, its use remains popular among adolescents and young adults. The authors feel the popularity of ecstasy use may be related to increasing popularity of electronic dance festivals.
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BMI measurement may be missing 25 percent of children who could be considered obese

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 5:57pm
Physicians using body mass index (BMI) to diagnose children as obese may be missing 25 percent of kids who have excess body fat despite a normal BMI, which can be a serious concern for long-term health, according to a study. The researchers found that BMI has high specificity in identifying pediatric obesity, meaning BMI accurately identifies children who are obese, but has a moderate sensitivity, meaning the BMI tool misses children who actually should be considered obese, according to the percent of fat in their bodies.
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Sleep, mood improves after substantial weight loss

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 5:57pm
Obese adults who lose at least 5 percent of their body weight report that they sleep better and longer after six months of weight loss, according to a new study.
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Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery may reduce heart disease risk for obese patients with type 2 diabetes

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 5:57pm
Obese patients with Type 2 diabetes who don't have excessive surgical risk may find that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery can help them reduce their risk of heart disease, a new clinical trial shows.
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Role of cohesin in cancer revised by researcher

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 3:07pm
The role of cohesin, its regulation, as well as its recently identified function as a potential driver or facilitator for tumors has been explained and revised by an international expert in cohesin. The challenge now is to understand the link between cohesin and the development and evolution of cancer, an area where there is currently little data.
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Morphable surfaces cut air resistance: Golf ball-like dimples on cars may improve fuel efficiency

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 3:07pm
Testing over the years has proved that a golf ball’s irregular surface dramatically increases the distance it travels, because it can cut the drag caused by air resistance in half. Now researchers are aiming to harness that same effect to reduce drag on a variety of surfaces -- including domes that sometimes crumple in high winds, or perhaps even vehicles.
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Virus kills triple negative breast cancer cells, tumor cells in mice

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 3:07pm
A virus not known to cause disease kills triple-negative breast cancer cells and killed tumors grown from these cells in mice, according to researchers. Understanding how the virus kills cancer may lead to new treatments for breast cancer. "These results are significant, since tumor necrosis -- or death -- in response to therapy is also used as the measure of an effective chemotherapeutic," one researcher said.
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Cell division discovery could optimize timing of chemotherapy, explain some cancers

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 3:07pm
A new study has been able to demonstrate how the cycle of cell division in mammalian cells synchronizes with the body's own daily rhythm, its circadian clock. The study not only helps to explain why people with sustained disrupted circadian rhythms can be more susceptible to cancer, it may also help establish the optimal time of day to administer chemotherapy.
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UK's National Health Service: Committed to failure?

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 3:06pm
A project has failed. So why continue to invest in it? This is a pertinent question for large organizations, like the UK National Health Service, which has a history of investing vast amounts of taxpayer's money into unrealistic and ultimately unsuccessful projects. According to business experts, organizations develop blind spots due to a perfect storm of unworkable policies and defensive behavior.
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Restricting competitors could help threatened species cope with climate change

Tue, 24/06/2014 - 3:06pm
Threatened animal species could cope better with the effects of climate change if competition from other animals for the same habitats is restricted, according to new research. Observing the goats in the Italian Alps during the summer, the researchers found that Chamois tended to move to higher altitudes where it is cooler on hotter days and in the middle of the day, but moved much higher when sheep were present. To their surprise, they discovered that competition with sheep had a far greater effect on Chamois than the predicted effects of future climate change.
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