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Updated: 3 hours 13 min ago

Lack of naturally occuring protein linked to dementia

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 3:29pm
The first evidence that the lack of a naturally occurring protein is linked to early signs of dementia has been provided by researchers. An absence of MK2/3, in spite of the brain cells (neurons) having significant structural abnormalities, did not prevent memories being formed, but did prevent these memories from being altered.
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No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 3:26pm
Loyal customers of a company feel that they are more likely and more deserving than others to win perks from the business – even those that are randomly given out. the results should remind corporate managers that devoted customers have high expectations of special treatment, even in contexts where they shouldn't, one author said.
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Fighting bureaucracy by improving it

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 3:26pm
Bureaucracy may be inevitable, but it can be tamed enough so that it serves rather than strangles those in its clutches. That's the aim of a professor, who has some suggestions for making bureaucracy work better.
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Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 3:26pm
Dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles can be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors. In addition, the particles are biocompatible and have shown no toxicity.
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Earth can sustain more terrestrial plant growth than previously thought, analysis shows

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:08pm
A new analysis suggests the planet can produce much more land-plant biomass -- the total material in leaves, stems, roots, fruits, grains and other terrestrial plant parts -- than previously thought. The study recalculates the theoretical limit of terrestrial plant productivity, and finds that it is much higher than many current estimates allow.
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Link between prenatal antidepressant exposure, autism risk called into question

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:08pm
Previous studies that have suggested an increased risk of autism among children of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may actually reflect the known increased risk associated with severe maternal depression. Now researchers have called that into question with further studies -- and complex answers.
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Fibre-based satiety ingredient shown to make you eat less

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:08pm
The effectiveness of a fibre-based dietary ingredient that makes people feel less hungry and consume less food has been demonstrated by a team of scientists. "What is notable is this product, given with breakfast, produced effects on appetite, which were apparent across the day. This is important when consumers are seeking help controlling they hunger across the day," one researcher remarked.
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Education, dog-friendly neighborhoods could tackle obesity

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:08pm
Investing in dog owner education and facilities as a strategy to target physical inactivity and problems such as obesity in both people and their pets. It is estimated that 40% of dog owners don't take their dogs for a walk. In the UK, almost a quarter of households own a dog, but less than half of adults meet the recommended level of 150 minutes a week of physical activity.
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Key to speed? Elite sprinters unlike other athletes, deliver forceful punch to ground

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:08pm
The world's fastest sprinters have a distinctive ability unlike other runners to attack the ground and attain faster speeds, according to new research. The new findings indicate that sprinters use a combined limb motion and foot-strike mechanism that enhances speed by elevating foot-ground impact forces. "The sprinters we tested all used the same mechanism for maximizing force application and sprinting performance," said the study's lead author.
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Laser pulse turns glass into a metal: New effect could be used for ultra-fast logical switches

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:08pm
For tiny fractions of a second, quartz glass can take on metallic properties, when it is illuminated be a laser pulse. This has been shown by new calculations. The effect could be used to build logical switches which are much faster than today's microelectronics.
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Disability, deafness often go hand-in-hand

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:07pm
At least forty per cent of UK people with learning disabilities are suffering from hearing loss, but new research shows they are unlikely to be diagnosed. To research hearing loss in people with learning disabilities, one expert focuses on the current issues people with learning disabilities (PWLD) are facing and why they are left undiagnosed in the long-term.
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Risk of young people driving drunk increases if their parents drink

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:07pm
If parents consume alcohol, it is more likely that their children will drive under its influence. This is one of the conclusions of a new study analyzing the data of more than 30,000 students and their relationship with drinking and driving.
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New implanted sensor could reduce heart failure admissions

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:06pm
Unexpected trips to the hospital are inconvenient and worrisome for anyone, but for congestive heart failure sufferers, they can be all too frequent. Cardiologists can now implant a new tiny, wireless monitoring sensor to help doctors and patients manage heart failure while eliminating the need for frequent surprise hospital visits.
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Recommendations for prostate cancer active surveillance

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:06pm
Active surveillance offers low-risk prostate cancer patients a means to avoid the potentially harmful side effects from treatment. Pathologists help determine patient eligibility for active surveillance and today a multi-specialty team published their recommendations for making such determinations in a special on-line posting from the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine.
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Health care workers in poor nations lack gear needed to protect from hiv and other bloodborne infections like ebola

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 2:06pm
Health care workers in some of the world’s poorest countries lack basic equipment to shield them from HIV and other bloodborne infections during surgical and other procedures, new research suggests. The findings underscore the lack of adequate protective supplies in nations at the center of the current Ebola outbreak.
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Eye implant could lead to better glaucoma treatments

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Lowering internal eye pressure is currently the only way to treat glaucoma. A tiny eye implant recently developed could pair with a smartphone to improve the way doctors measure and lower a patient's eye pressure. Daily or hourly measurements of eye pressure could help doctors tailor more effective treatment plans.
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Duality principle is 'safe and sound'

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Decades of experiments have verified the quirky laws of quantum theory again and again. So when scientists in Germany announced in 2012 an apparent violation of a fundamental law of quantum mechanics, physicists were determined to find an explanation.
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Cancer leaves common fingerprint on DNA

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes in a broad variety of cancers to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA, which help govern whether genes are turned 'on' or 'off.'
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RNA sequence could help doctors to tailor unique prostate cancer treatment programs

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Sequencing RNA, not just DNA, could help doctors predict how prostate cancer tumors will respond to treatment, according to research. Because a tumor's RNA shows the real time changes a treatment is causing, the authors think this could be a useful tool to aid diagnosis and predict which treatment will most benefit individual cancer patients.
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Flu outbreak provides rare study material

Tue, 26/08/2014 - 1:10pm
Five years ago this month, one of the first U.S. outbreaks of the H1N1 virus swept through the Washington State University campus, striking some 2,000 people. A university math and biology professor has used a trove of data gathered at the time to gain insight into how only a few infected people could launch the virus's rapid spread across the university community.
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