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Updated: 4 hours 28 min ago

Treatment with lymph node cells controls dangerous sepsis in animal models

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:44pm
An immune-regulating cell present in lymph nodes may be able to halt severe cases of sepsis, an out-of-control inflammatory response that can lead to organ failure and death. "Our findings are important because, to our knowledge, no experimental therapeutic has shown such a significant survival benefit after the disease has progressed so far -- in our study up to 16 hours after a sepsis-inducing injury," says the senior author of the paper.
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Young blue sharks use central North Atlantic nursery

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:42pm
Blue sharks may use the central North Atlantic as a nursery prior to males and females moving through the ocean basin in distinctly different patterns.
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Little penguins forage together: 40% of studied penguins synchronized underwater movements while foraging

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:42pm
Most little penguins may search for food in groups, and even synchronize their movements during foraging trips.
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New species of flying pterosaur: Bones from nearly 50 ancient flying reptiles discovered

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:42pm
Scientists discovered the bones of nearly 50 winged reptiles from a new species, Caiuajara dobruskii, that lived during the Cretaceous in southern Brazil.
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Embalming study 'rewrites' key chapter in Egyptian history

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:41pm
Researchers have discovered new evidence to suggest that the origins of mummification started in ancient Egypt 1,500 years earlier than previously thought.
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Injected bacteria shrink tumors in rats, dogs and humans

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:39pm
A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report. In its natural form, C. novyi is found in the soil and, in certain cases, can cause tissue-damaging infection in cattle, sheep and humans. The microbe thrives only in oxygen-poor environments, which makes it a targeted means of destroying oxygen-starved cells in tumors that are difficult to treat with chemotherapy and radiation.
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Common household chemicals responsible for reproductive declines in mice

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:36pm
Researchers who were using a disinfectant when handling mice have discovered that two active ingredients in it cause declines in mouse reproduction. The ingredients are found in commercial and householder cleaners, disinfectants, hand sanitizers, preservatives in makeup and other cosmetics, fabric softeners, and dryer sheets. "If these chemicals are toxic to humans, they could also be contributing to the decline in human fertility seen in recent decades, as well as the increased need for assistive reproductive technologies such as in-vitro fertilization," one researcher said.
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Estimated 1.65 million global cardiovascular deaths each year linked to high sodium consumption

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 9:36pm
More than 1.6 million cardiovascular-related deaths per year can be attributed to sodium consumption above the World Health Organization's recommendation of 2.0 grams per day, researchers have found in a new analysis of populations across 187 countries.
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Tick-tock: How to quite literally speed up a woman's biological clock

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:21pm
The metaphor of a ticking clock is often used to refer to a woman's growing urge -- from puberty onwards to menopause -- to conceive before her childbearing years are over. New research shows that there's more truth to this phrase than you might think. "The very subtle sound prime of a ticking clock changed the timing with which women sought to have children and the traits they sought in potential partners -- both central aspects of women's mating-related psychology," says one researcher.
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Cell discovery brings blood disorder cure closer

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:21pm
A cure for a range of blood disorders and immune diseases is in sight, according to scientists who have unraveled the mystery of stem cell generation. Found in the bone marrow and in umbilical cord blood, HSCs are critically important because they can replenish the body's supply of blood cells. Leukemia patients have been successfully treated using HSC transplants, but medical experts believe blood stem cells have the potential to be used more widely.
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Foreshock series controls earthquake rupture

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:21pm
A long lasting foreshock series controlled the rupture process of this year's great earthquake near Iquique in northern Chile. The earthquake was heralded by a three quarter year long foreshock series of ever increasing magnitudes culminating in a magnitude 6.7 event two weeks before the mainshock. The mainshock, which had a magnitude of 8.1. finally broke on April 1st a central piece out of the most important seismic gap along the South American subduction zone.
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Scientists boost potential of passive immunization against HIV

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:21pm
Scientists are pursuing injections or intravenous infusions of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bNAbs) as a strategy for preventing HIV infection. This technique, called passive immunization, has been shown to protect monkeys from a monkey form of HIV called simian human immunodeficiency virus, or SHIV. To make passive immunization a widely feasible HIV prevention option for people, scientists want to modify bNAbs such that a modest amount of them is needed only once every few months.
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Single gene controls jet lag, study finds

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:20pm
A master gene responsible for sleep and wake cycles has been identified by scientists, offering hope for a drug that could help reset sleep. The discovery of the role of this gene, called Lhx1, provides scientists with a potential therapeutic target to help night-shift workers or jet lagged travelers adjust to time differences more quickly. The results can point to treatment strategies for sleep problems caused by a variety of disorders.
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Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:20pm
The latest research on sports concussions in teens has been the focus of recent study. "We discovered a bidirectional relationship between both emotional symptoms developing in conjunction with physical symptoms, and also emotional symptoms developing because of the physical symptoms," said one researcher. In other words, "this research gives us a better understanding of the interaction between physical and emotional symptoms in concussion and will allow us to explore ways to help adolescents recover in a more timely fashion."
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Forces that hold rapidly spinning near-Earth asteroid together discovered

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:20pm
Astronomers studied near-Earth asteroid 1950 DA and discovered that the body, which rotates extremely quickly, is held together by cohesive forces called van der Waals, never detected before on an asteroid.
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Why aren't campus emergency alerts taken more seriously?

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:11pm
Well-publicized tragedies on college campuses across the United States have prompted university officials to implement alert systems that broadcast real-time warnings to students, faculty, and staff. Such systems can be highly effective tools, but only if users take them seriously. New research illustrates some factors that can determine whether campus alert systems are attended to or disregarded.
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From eons to seconds, proteins exploit the same forces

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:11pm
Nature's artistic and engineering skills are evident in proteins, life's robust molecular machines. Scientists have now employed their unique theories to show how the interplay between evolution and physics developed these skills. Energy landscapes for protein folding, they found, operate on evolutionary processes that take eons as well as folding that takes microseconds.
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New insights into survival, transmission strategy of malaria parasites

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:11pm
Malaria parasites exploit the function of the epigenetic regulator HP1 to promote survival and transmission between human hosts, a new study shows. Using HP1 the parasite controls expression of surface antigens to escape immune responses in the infected victim. This prolongs survival of the parasite in the human blood stream and secures its transmission via mosquitoes. The study paves important avenues for new intervention strategies to prevent severe disease and malaria transmission.
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Prostate cancer prevention trial identifies men mostly likely to undergo challenging study procedure

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:11pm
Healthy men participating in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial who actively participate in all steps of the clinical trial are most likely to undergo a biopsy, according to a study. "We also found that participants were more likely to adhere to biopsies if the study site that recruited the participant enrolled more than 200 participants and/or had resources for conducting activities to encourage continued participation in the trial," said one investigator.
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Involuntary eye movement a foolproof indication for ADHD diagnosis

Wed, 13/08/2014 - 5:10pm
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed -- and misdiagnosed -- behavioral disorder in American children. Now a new study can provide the objective tool medical professionals need to accurately diagnose ADHD. The study indicates that involuntary eye movements accurately reflect the presence of ADHD.
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