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Updated: 1 hour 35 min ago

Parkinson's disease reverted at experimental stage

Fri, 19/12/2014 - 1:58am
Scientists demonstrated experimentally, with adult rats, that mobility can be restored in patients with Parkinson's disease, the major degenerative disease of the motor system worldwide. The experiments have not yet been transferred to humans, but are a scientific, measurable and repeatable basis to fight against this disease.
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Most commonly prescribed glaucoma drug reduces risk of vision loss by more than 50% over 2 years

Fri, 19/12/2014 - 1:58am
“Medication to lower raised eye pressure has been used for decades as the main treatment for OAG to delay progressive vision loss. But, until now, the extent to which the most frequently prescribed class of pressure-lowering drugs (prostaglandin analogues) have a protective effect on vision was not known," explains the lead author of a new study. “Our findings offer solid proof to patients and practitioners that the visual deterioration caused by glaucoma can be reduced using this treatment.”
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Doctor who survived Ebola received experimental drug treatment

Fri, 19/12/2014 - 1:58am
On 28 September, 2014, the 38-year old doctor, who was in charge of an Ebola virus treatment unit in Lakka, Sierra Leone, developed a fever and diarrhea. He tested positive for the virus on the same day. The doctor was airlifted to Frankfurt University Hospital on the 5th day of his illness and admitted to a specialized isolation unit. Within 72 hours of admission he developed signs of vascular leakage and severe multi-organ failure, including the lungs, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. He was placed on a ventilator and on kidney dialysis, and was given antibiotics together with a 3-day course of an experimental drug called FX06—a fibrin-derived peptide that has been shown to reduce vascular leakage and its complications in mice with Dengue hemorrhagic shock.
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Older kidney donors with hypertension may have good kidney health following donation

Fri, 19/12/2014 - 1:57am
Kidney donors with hypertension had slightly fewer nephrons (the kidney’s filtering units) at the time of donation than similarly aged donors with normal blood pressure; however, 6 months following their surgery, hypertensive and non-hypertensive donors both maintained excellent blood pressure control and had similarly robust compensatory kidney responses.
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Signs of Europa plumes remain elusive in search of Cassini data

Fri, 19/12/2014 - 12:47am
A fresh look at data collected by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its 2001 flyby of Jupiter shows that Europa's tenuous atmosphere is even thinner than previously thought and also suggests that the thin, hot gas around the moon does not show evidence of plume activity occurring at the time of the flyby. The new research provides a snapshot of Europa's state of activity at that time, and suggests that if there is plume activity, it is likely intermittent.
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NASA's Kepler reborn, makes first exoplanet find of new mission

Fri, 19/12/2014 - 12:44am
NASA's planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft makes a comeback with the discovery of the first exoplanet found using its new mission -- K2. The discovery was made when astronomers and engineers devised an ingenious way to repurpose Kepler for the K2 mission and continue its search of the cosmos for other worlds.
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Improving rechargeable batteries by focusing on graphene oxide paper

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
An engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries.
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'Tipping points' for sea level rise-related flooding determined

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
By 2050, a majority of US coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new study.
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Study on world's biggest animal finds more than one population in the southeastern Pacific

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
Scientists are examining molecular clues to answer a big question: how many types of blue whales exist in the waters of the southeastern Pacific?
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Glimpsing pathway of sunlight to electricity

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
Four pulses of laser light on nanoparticle photocells in a spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity. The work, which potentially could inspire devices with improved efficiency in solar energy conversion, was performed on photocells that used lead-sulfide quantum dots as photoactive semiconductor material.
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Cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission: The neglected pathway

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
Scientists are challenging dogma about the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Most research has focused on infection by free viral particles, while this group of researchers proposes that HIV is also transmitted by infected cells.
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New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinction

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago played a role in the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, and challenges the dominant theory that a meteorite impact was the sole cause of the extinction.
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Physicists characterize electronic, magnetic structure in transition metal oxides

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
Scientists have characterized the electronic and magnetic structure in artificially synthesized materials called transition metal oxides.
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Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:45pm
If data could be encoded without current, it would require much less energy and make things like low-power, instant-on computing a ubiquitous reality. Scientists have made a breakthrough in that direction with a room-temperature magnetoelectric memory device. Equivalent to one computer bit, it exhibits the holy grail of next-generation nonvolatile memory: magnetic switchability, in two steps, with nothing but an electric field.
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Dust devil and the details: Spinning up a storm on Mars

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:44pm
Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, researchers show. “To start a dust devil on Mars you need convection, a strong updraft,” said Bryce Williams, an atmospheric science graduate student at UAH. “We looked at the ratio between convection and surface turbulence to find the sweet spot where there is enough updraft to overcome the low level wind and turbulence. And on Mars, where we think the process that creates a vortex is more easily disrupted by frictional dissipation – turbulence and wind at the surface – you need twice as much convective updraft as you do on Earth.”
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RNA measurements may yield less insight about gene expression than assumed

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 8:44pm
The majority of RNA expression differences between individuals have no connection to the abundance of a corresponding protein, report scientists. The results point to a yet-unidentified gene regulatory mechanism.
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Computational clues into the structure of a promising energy conversion catalyst

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 7:11pm
Researchers at Princeton University have reported new insights into the structure of an active component of the nickel oxide catalyst, a promising catalyst for water splitting to produce hydrogen fuel.
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Resistance to anti-viral drug may be more likely in cystic fibrosis patients

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 7:10pm
Following lung transplantation, resistance to the anti-viral drug ganciclovir may be more likely in cystic fibrosis patients, scientists report. Ganciclovir is given to lung transplant patients to protect against a life-threatening virus that is common after transplantation, and reduces mortality due to the virus from 34 percent to between 3 and 6 percent. But between 5 percent and 10 percent of patients infected with the virus have strains that are resistant to the drug.
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Scientists identify new, beneficial function of endogenous retroviruses in immune response

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 7:10pm
Endogenous retroviruses play a critical role in the body's immune defense against common bacterial and viral pathogens, researchers have found. Retroviruses are best known for causing contagious scourges such as AIDS, or more sporadically, cancer.
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Bacterial infections differ based on geography, healthcare spending

Thu, 18/12/2014 - 7:10pm
Bacterial infections differ based on distance from the equator and spending on health care, researchers have discovered. In their study, 23 health centers on six continents participated in study of bloodstream infections.
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