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How gardens could help dementia care

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:52pm
Gardens in care homes could provide promising therapeutic benefits for patients suffering from dementia, a study has shown. The research critically reviewed the findings from 17 different pieces of research, has found that outdoor spaces can offer environments that promote relaxation, encourage activity and reduce residents' agitation.
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Researchers assess emergency radiology response after Boston Marathon bombings

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:52pm
An after-action review of one hospital's emergency radiology response to the Boston Marathon bombings highlights the crucial role medical imaging plays in emergency situations and ways in which radiology departments can improve their preparedness for mass casualty events.
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Little too late: Pathogenic bacterium in 700-year-old skeleton identified

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:51pm
Researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village. Researchers used a technique called shotgun metagenomics to sequence DNA from a calcified nodule from the pelvic region of a middle-aged male skeleton excavated from the settlement of Geridu in Sardinia, an island off the coast of Italy. Geridu is thought to have been abandoned in the late 14th century.
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Fuel cells for powering homes

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:51pm
Fuel cells are similar to batteries, but they differ from them mainly in that they are continually resupplied by the reagents consumed, typically oxygen and hydrogen. One of the applications that fuel cells may have is the supplying of homes with electrical power. When considering applications of this type that call for greater power, a research group has studied the use of one type of material, perovskites, for the design of these cells.
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Cancer patients: How strongly does tissue decelerate the therapeutic heavy ion beam?

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:51pm
A method for the more exact dosing of heavy ion irradiation in the case of cancer has been developed by researchers. Research in this relatively new therapy method is focused again and again on the exact dosing: how must the radiation parameters be set in order to destroy the cancerous cells "on the spot" with as low a damage as possible to the surrounding tissue?
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Ötzi's non-human DNA: Opportunistic pathogen discovered in Iceman tissue biopsy

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:50pm
Ötzi’s human genome was decoded from a hip bone sample taken from the 5,300 year old mummy. However the tiny sample weighing no more than 0.1 g provides so much more information. A team of scientists analyzed the non-human DNA in the sample. They found evidence for the presence of Treponema denticola, an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of periodontal disease.
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Eating disorders and depression in athletes: Does one lead to the other?

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:50pm
Sport is a proven contributor to high self-esteem, confidence, positive outlook and good health. It would be reasonable to assume then that athletes have higher than average protection from depression and dysfunctional eating? On the contrary, athletes are considered three times more likely to develop an eating disorder and there is strong empirical evidence linking eating disorders and depression. Previous research to determine causality between the two conditions has been conflicting.
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Progress in allergic asthma research after ingestion of fruits

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:50pm
The interaction between two proteins can be the responsible for the allergic asthma episodes after eating an infected fruit, new research suggests. Alternaria alternata is a fungus that proliferates in fruit and vegetables crops and also when are collected and are on sale for the final consumer. A protein known as Alt a 1 and related to the virulence is found in the spores, this protein is described as the major allergen of this fungus. According to this research, this protein can be a major cause of childhood asthma in U.S.
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Smallest Swiss cross: Made of 20 single atoms

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:50pm
The manipulation of atoms has reached a new level: Physicists were able to place 20 single atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest “Swiss cross”, thus taking a big step towards next generation atomic-scale storage devices.
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No anti-clotting treatment needed for most kids undergoing spine surgeries

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:49pm
Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new study. Because clotting risk in children is poorly understood, treatment guidelines are largely absent, leaving doctors caring for pediatric patients at a loss on whom to treat and when.
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Hidden variations in neuronal networks may explain differences in traumatic brain injury outcomes

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:49pm
Hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury, new research shows. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma. People vary in their responses to stroke and trauma, which impedes the ability of physicians to predict patient outcomes. Damage to the brain and nervous system can lead to severe disabilities, including epilepsy and cognitive impairment.
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Zinc deficiency magnifies, prolongs lethal immune response to sepsis

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 12:49pm
A key immune response pathway regulated by zinc has been discovered by scientists that may hold clues to stopping sepsis, one of the leading causes of death in America’s intensive care units. As many as 20% of people who develop sepsis will die, not from the infection itself -- but from the overload of inflammatory chemical signals created by the immune system which ultimately leads to organ failure.
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SIDS risks vary by infant age: Bed sharing remains greatest risk factor for sleep related infant deaths

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 1:39am
Sudden infant death syndrome and other sleep-related causes of infant mortality have several known risk factors, but little is known if these factors change for different age groups.
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Business should embrace 'boomerang employees'

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 1:37am
The phenomenon of 'boomerang employees' is not unique to professional athletes, says two recent studies. Organizations of all types are beginning to recognize and embrace the value of recruiting and welcoming back former employees. From infantry soldiers to chief executives, accountants and professional basketball players, many organizations proactively recruit and rehire former employees as a way to offset high turnover costs and hedge against the uncertain process of socializing replacement employees.
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New combination drug controls tumor growth, metastasis in mice

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 1:36am
A combination drug has been developed that controls both tumor growth and metastasis, a mouse study has shown. By combining a COX-2 inhibitor, similar to Celebrex, and an epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, the drug controls angiogenesis, limiting a tumor's ability to grow and spread.
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The power of making amends

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 1:36am
A new study reveals how conciliatory gestures promote human forgiveness. These findings show that peacemaking efforts such as apologies, offers of compensation and owning up to one's responsibility increase forgiveness -- and reduce anger -- by making the aggressor seem more valuable as a relationship partner and by causing the victim to feel less at risk of getting hurt again by the transgressor.
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Bonuses for doctors do little to improve cancer screening in Ontario

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 1:36am
Ontario spent nearly $110 million dollars between 2006 and 2010 on bonuses to motivate family doctors to screen more of their patients for cancer but these bonuses were associated with little or no improvement in actual cancer screening rates, according to researchers. "Governments around the world are experimenting with paying doctors extra to improve the quality of care but there's actually very little evidence that this strategy works," said the lead author.
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Fungicides for crops: Worrying link to fungal drug resistance in UK, warns scientists

Tue, 15/07/2014 - 1:34am
Aspergillus -- a common fungus that attacks the lungs and is found in soil and other organic matter -- has become resistant to life-saving drugs in parts of rural Yorkshire, researchers report. Although the link has been made before in the Netherlands, it’s the first time its been made in the UK between drug resistance in Aspergillus and fungicides used on crops. Experts warn their findings, now published, are significant and raise serious implications for transplant patients, those with leukemia and people who suffer from severe asthma.
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Study: Young women with sexy social media photos seen as less competent

Mon, 14/07/2014 - 10:24pm
Girls and young women who post sexy or revealing photos on social media sites are viewed by their female peers as less attractive and less competent to perform tasks, a new study indicates. One researcher's advice for girls and young women is to select social media photos that showcase their identity rather than her appearance, such as one from a trip or one that highlights participation in a sport or hobby.
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Capturing cancer: A powerful new technique for early diagnosis

Mon, 14/07/2014 - 10:24pm
An innovative technique for early disease detection, which researchers call immunosignaturing, has been described in a new article. Rather than using a reductionist biomarker paradigm, immunosignaturing relies on a multiplexed system in which the entire population of antibodies circulating in blood at a given time is profiled.
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