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Updated: 17 hours 36 min ago

Three doses of HPV vaccine recommended against genital warts

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 9:25pm
Two doses of vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) provide good protection against genital warts, but three doses is better according to an extensive register study.
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'Growth charts' for cognitive development may lead to earlier diagnosis, treatment for children with risk for psychosis

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 9:25pm
Researchers have developed a better way to assess and diagnose psychosis in young children. By “growth charting” cognitive development alongside the presentation of psychotic symptoms, they have demonstrated that the most significant lags in cognitive development correlate with the most severe cases of psychosis.
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Scents that are sent: oPhone delivers aromas

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 9:25pm
A technological breakthrough is on the horizon: a new kind of smart phone that sends scents. Scientists have created the oPhone, which will allow odors -- oNotes -- to be sent, via Bluetooth and smartphone attachments, to oPhones across the state, country or ocean, where the recipient can enjoy American Beauties or any other variety of rose.
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Kidney failure risk for organ donors 'extremely low'

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 9:25pm
The risk of a kidney donor developing kidney failure in the remaining organ is much lower than in the population at large, even when compared with people who have two kidneys, according to results of new research.
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How chronic stress predisposes brain to mental disorders

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 8:35pm
Biologists have shown in rats that chronic stress makes stem cells in the brain produce more myelin-producing cells and fewer neurons, possibly affecting the speed of connections between cells as well as memory and learning. This could explain why stress leads to mental illness, such as PTSD, anxiety and mood disorders, later in life.
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Promise for castor crop planting in Florida

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 8:35pm
Castor hasn't been grown in the U.S. since 1972. Now, a study shows that, using proper techniques, the crop that's used for many industrial applications, can be grown in Florida.
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Macro-portrait of future bird and wetland scenarios under climate change

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 8:35pm
Macrosystems ecology is a new and emerging science using large amounts of information that are analyzed by faster and smarter computers to not only create greater understanding of how habitats interact, but also make better predictions about how these systems may react in the face of global climate change.
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New standards for kids' medicine, aiming to reduce medication errors

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 8:35pm
A lack of standardization of compounded pediatric oral liquids has posed significant safety risks to patients. New guidelines have been released in Michigan to reduce medication errors in children's medications.
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New way to measure electron pair interactions

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 7:41pm
Measuring electron pair emission measurements has always been difficult because it was traditionally done using highly expensive synchrotron light sources, which are available in only a few laboratories worldwide. Now a team of researchers has developed a new way to measure the emission of electron pairs directly by combining two common laboratory instruments called time-of-flight spectrometers.
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Antibody treatment used by researchers to protect humanized mice from HIV

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 7:11pm
Scientists have shown that boosting the production of certain broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect humanized mice from both intravenous and vaginal infection with HIV. Humanized mice have immune systems genetically modified to resemble those of humans, making it possible for them to become HIV-infected.
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Tech products can turn 'uncool' when they become too popular

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 7:11pm
In the tech world, coolness takes more than just good looks. Technology users must consider a product attractive, original and edgy before they label those products as cool, according to researchers.
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First global evidence that foreign aid boosts public opinion

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 6:30pm
A new study provides the first empirical evidence using data from a variety of countries that foreign aid can greatly improve foreign public opinion of donor countries.
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No clowning around: Juggling sheds light on how we run

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 6:30pm
Juggling may seem like mere entertainment, but a study led by engineers used this circus skill to gather critical clues about how vision and the sense of touch help control the way humans and animals move their limbs in a repetitive way, such as in running. The findings eventually may aid in the treatment of people with neurological diseases and could lead to prosthetic limbs and robots that move more efficiently.
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I smoke, but I’m not a smoker: Why some 'non-identifying smokers' face risks while denying behavior

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 6:30pm
While smoking among California adults has dramatically declined in recent decades, researchers report there is a surprisingly large number of people who say they use cigarettes, but don’t consider themselves to be “smokers.”
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Child abuse rises with income inequality

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 6:29pm
As the Great Recession deepened and income inequality became more pronounced, county-by-county rates of child maltreatment -- from sexual, physical and emotional abuse to traumatic brain injuries and death -- worsened, according to a nationwide study.
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Nanoparticles treat muscular dystrophy in mice

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 6:29pm
Researchers have demonstrated a new approach to treating muscular dystrophy. Mice with a form of this muscle-weakening disease showed improved strength and heart function when treated with nanoparticles loaded with rapamycin, an immunosuppressive drug recently found to improve recycling of cellular waste.
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Apollo reflectors performance: Source of 'full moon curse' revealed by eclipse

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 5:18pm
Signals bounced off reflectors on the lunar surface return surprisingly faint echoes on full moon nights. Scientists think it's the result of uneven heating of the reflective lenses, which would alter their refractive index, dispersing the return beam, and they found compelling evidence for this explanation during an eclipse as Earth's shadow passed over each reflector in turn.
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Excess weight linked to brain changes that may relate to memory, emotions, and appetite

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 5:18pm
Being overweight appears related to reduced levels of a molecule that reflects brain cell health in the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in memory, learning, and emotions, and likely also involved in appetite control, according to a new study.
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Hacking the environment: Bringing biodiversity hardware into the open

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 5:18pm
New technologies are changing the way we collect biodiversity data, providing low-cost and customizable alternative to expensive proprietary data loggers and sensors. A new article describes the construction of a data-logger using the Arduino platform in the hope of encouraging the adoption of new data collection technologies by biodiversity scientists and fostering new collaborations with both electronics hobbyists and electronical engineers.
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Are wind farms changing Europe's climate?

Tue, 11/02/2014 - 5:18pm
The development of wind farms in Europe only has an extremely limited impact on the climate at the continental scale, and this will remain true until at least 2020. These are the main conclusions of a new study.
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