Long-term memories are maintained by prion-like proteins

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:28pm
Researchers have uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.
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Viral protein in their sights

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:27pm
A team using electron cryomicroscopy has for the first time revealed at the atomic level the structure of a protein required for viral replication in vesicular stomatitis virus, a virus that is a model for a group of RNA viruses that includes Ebola and other threats to human health.
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Black Hole 'Wakes Up' After 26-Year Slumber

Space.com - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:26pm
After "sleeping" for 26 years, a black hole's activity lit up astronomical observatories on June 15,and it's still going on today.
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Telomeres linked to origins of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:23pm
Researchers have now discovered that telomeres, the structures that protect the chromosomes, are at the origin of pulmonary fibrosis. This is the first time that telomere damage has been identified as a cause of the disease. This finding opens up new avenues for the development of therapies to treat a disease for which there is currently no treatment.
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Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:23pm
Healthy people given the serotonin-enhancing antidepressant citalopram were willing to pay almost twice as much to prevent harm to themselves or others than those given placebo drugs in a moral decision-making experiment. In contrast, the dopamine-boosting Parkinson's drug levodopa made healthy people more selfish, eliminating an altruistic tendency to prefer harming themselves over others.
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What bee-killing mites can teach us about parasite evolution

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:22pm
An infestation of speck-sized Varroa destructor mites can wipe out an entire colony of honey bees in two to three years if left untreated. Pesticides help beekeepers rid their hives of these parasitic arthropods, which feed on the blood-like liquid inside of their hosts and lay their eggs on larvae, but mite populations become resistant to the chemicals over time.
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Can autism be measured in a sniff?

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:22pm
Imagine the way you might smell a rose. You'd take a nice big sniff to breathe in the sweet but subtle floral scent. Upon walking into a public restroom, you'd likely do just the opposite -- abruptly limiting the flow of air through your nose. Now, researchers have found that people with autism spectrum disorder don't make this natural adjustment like other people do.
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Encryption made easier: Just talk like a parent

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:18pm
A researcher has created an easier email encryption method – one that sounds familiar to parents who try to outsmart their 8-year-old child. The new technique gets rid of the complicated, mathematically generated messages that are typical of encryption software. Instead, the method transforms specific emails into ones that are vague by leaving out key words.
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New technique maps elusive chemical markers on proteins

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:18pm
Unveiling how the 20,000 or so proteins in the human body work -- and malfunction -- is the key to understanding much of health and disease. Now, researchers have developed a new technique that allows scientists to better understand an elusive step critical in protein formation.
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Water to understand the brain

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:17pm
To observe the brain in action, scientists and physicians use imaging techniques, among which functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the best known. These techniques are not based on direct observations of electric impulses from activated neurons, but on one of their consequences. Indeed, this stimulation triggers physiological modifications in the activated cerebral region, changes that become visible by imaging. Until now, it was believed that these differences were only due to modifications of the blood influx towards the cells. By using intrinsic optical signals (IOS) imaging, researchers have now demonstrated that, contrary to what was thought, another physiological variation is involved: the activated neurons swell due to the massive entry of water.
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First comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome completed

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:17pm
The first comprehensive analysis of the woolly mammoth genome reveals extensive genetic changes that allowed mammoths to adapt Arctic life, including skin and hair development, insulin signaling, fat biology, and even traits such as small ears and short tails. A mammoth gene for temperature sensation was resurrected in the lab as a functional test.
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Discovery points to a new path toward a universal flu vaccine

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:17pm
The conventional flu vaccine protects only against a few specific strains of flu. However, experiments show that by including modified antibodies within the vaccine it may be possible to elicit broad protection against many strains simultaneously.
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Audio Visuals: These Ice Cream Cones Sure Are Emotional

Wired News - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:15pm

This week's music video roundup has everything: love stories, ice cream cones, and Kendrick Lamar.

The post Audio Visuals: These Ice Cream Cones Sure Are Emotional appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

New technology using silver may hold key to electronics advances

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:15pm
Engineers have invented a way to fabricate silver, a highly conductive metal, for printed electronics that are produced at room temperature. There may be broad applications in microelectronics, sensors, energy devices, low emissivity coatings and even transparent displays.
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Cancer survivors who smoke perceive less risk from tobacco

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:15pm
Cancer survivors who smoke report fewer negative opinions about smoking, have more barriers to quitting, and are around other smokers more often than survivors who had quit before or after their diagnosis.
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Organization of North America's bird species: List updated

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:15pm
Biologists have made several major updates to the organization of the North America's bird species. The updated work groups birds into genera, families, and orders based on their evolutionary relationships, and some of the most significant changes in this year's work involve the tanagers, family Thraupidae.
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Freezing single atoms to absolute zero with microwaves brings quantum technology closer

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:15pm
Physicists have found a way of using everyday technology found in kitchen microwaves and mobile telephones to bring quantum technology closer.
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Working out in artificial gravity

Science Daily - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 5:15pm
Engineers have built a compact human centrifuge with an exercise component: a cycle ergometer that a person can pedal as the centrifuge spins. The centrifuge was sized to just fit inside a module of the ISS. After testing the setup on healthy participants, the team found the combination of exercise and artificial gravity could significantly lessen the effects of extended weightlessness in space -- more so than exercise alone.
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Solar Impulse 2 Breaks Three Records En Route To Hawaii

Slashdot - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 4:53pm
Zothecula writes: Solar Impulse 2 has started smashing records even before the longest leg of its round-the-world flight is complete. At around three quarters of the way to its next touch down in Hawaii, the single-pilot aircraft has broken the world records for longest distance and duration for solar aviation, with the record for longest ever solo flight of any kind thrown in for good measure.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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The ‘Aurorasaurus’ Maps This Year’s Spectacular Auroras

Wired News - Thu, 02/07/2015 - 4:51pm

Scientists are using a combination of outer space technology and crowdsourced observations to map the location of aurora.

The post The ‘Aurorasaurus’ Maps This Year’s Spectacular Auroras appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science