Research Suggests How Alien Life Could Spread Across the Galaxy

Slashdot - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 2:04am
astroengine writes: As astronomical techniques become more advanced, a team of astrophysicists think they will be able to not only detect the signatures of alien life in exoplanetary atmospheres, but also track its relentless spread throughout the galaxy. The research, headed by Henry Lin of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), assumes that this feat may be possible in a generation or so and that the hypothesis of panspermia may act as the delivery system for alien biology to hop from one star system to another.

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Women with hypertension in pregnancy and their siblings face increased risk of heart disease

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:59am
High blood pressure during pregnancy is a risk factor for future hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but it’s not clear if this increased risk is because these women are more likely to have a family history of heart disease or if elevated blood pressure during pregnancy causes long-term metabolic and vascular abnormalities. A new study is now providing some insights.
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Meningitis: Research advances on 'scourge' of transplant wards

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:59am
The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year. It's difficult to treat because fungi are genetically quite similar to humans, so compounds that affect fungi tend to have toxic side effects for patients. Now, researchers have identified 18 proteins that play a role in spore formation and germination. The findings raises the possibility of preventing the disease by blocking the spores' germination.
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Chemists solve major piece of cellular mystery

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:56am
Biochemists have solved the architecture of the nuclear pore complex's complicated inner ring, a subcomplex that is central to the cellular machine's ability to serve as a barrier and transport facilitator. In the process, they disproved many previously held ideas about how the inner ring works.
Categories: Science

Cheaper, better LED technology

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:56am
An engineering professor has developed a new highly efficient and low cost light emitting diode that could help spur more widespread adoption of the technology.
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Air pollution linked to children's low academic achievement

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:56am
A new study on children's health has found that fourth and fifth graders who are exposed to toxic air pollutants at home are more likely to have lower GPAs.
Categories: Science

Fishermen discards could increase prevalence of turtle disease in Turks and Caicos

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:56am
The team surveyed cases of green turtle fibropapillomatosis disease, which creates unsightly pink tumors on the turtles' flesh. Although benign, they can impede turtles' vision and movement, as well as feeding, swimming and organ function. The virus is not thought to be dangerous to humans. Over two years, around 13 percent of green turtles found in waters had the disease. In contrast, fishermen did not land any diseased turtles during this period, even though they were fishing in areas where diseased animals were prevalent.
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15 percent of cigarettes sold in NYC have illegal tax stamps, study finds

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:56am
Licensed tobacco retailers throughout New York City are selling a substantial number of cigarette packs carrying either counterfeit or out-of-state tax stamps.
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Goth teens could be more vulnerable to depression and self-harm

Science Daily - Fri, 28/08/2015 - 1:56am
Young people who identify with the goth subculture might be at increased risk of depression and self-harm, according to new research.
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Most Healthcare Managers Admit Their IT Systems Have Been Compromised

Slashdot - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 11:55pm
Lucas123 writes: Eighty-one percent of healthcare IT managers say their organizations have been compromised by at least one malware, botnet or other kind of cyber attack during the past two years, and only half of those managers feel that they are adequately prepared to prevent future attacks, according to a new survey by KPMG. The KPMG survey polled 223 CIOs, CTOs, chief security officers and chief compliance officers at healthcare providers and health plans, and found 65% indicated malware was most frequently reported line of attack during the past 12 to 24 months. Additionally, those surveyed indicated the areas with the greatest vulnerabilities within their organization include external attackers (65%), sharing data with third parties (48%), employee breaches (35%), wireless computing (35%) and inadequate firewalls (27%). Top among reasons healthcare facilities are facing increased risk, was the adoption of digital patient records and the automation of clinical systems.

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Learn FPGAs With a $25 Board and Open Source Tools

Slashdot - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 11:11pm
An anonymous reader writes: Hackaday has a 3 part tutorial with videos of using open source tools with a cheap ($25) FPGA board. The board isn't very powerful, but this could be the 'gateway drug' to FPGAs for people who don't want to spend hundreds of dollars and install 100s of megabytes of software and license keys just to get their feet wet. The videos are particularly good--like watching them over their shoulder. As far as I know, this is the only totally open source FPGA toolchain out there.

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'The Martian': 'Future' Neil Tyson Gets 'Cosmic' For Film Promo | Video

Space.com - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 10:53pm
A fictional Neil deGrasse Tyson of the future, played by Neil Tyson, unveils an excerpt of an episode of 'Star Talk' (that looks very similar to his 'Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey' role) to talk about the Hermes spaceship, the Ares mission and Mars.
Categories: Science

Canadian Nuclear Accident Study Puts Risks Into Perspective

Slashdot - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 10:28pm
An anonymous reader writes: A Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) study has concluded that there would be no detectable increase in cancer risk for most of the population from radiation released in a hypothetical severe nuclear accident. The CNSC's study is the result of a collaborative effort of research and analysis undertaken to address concerns raised during public hearings on the environmental assessment for the refurbishment of Ontario Power Generation's (OPG's) Darlington nuclear power plant in 2012. The draft study was released for public consultation in June 2014. Feedback from the Commission itself and comments from over 500 submissions from the public, government and other organizations have been incorporated in the final version. The study involved identifying and modelling a large atmospheric release of radionuclides from a hypothetical severe nuclear accident at the four-unit Darlington plant

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Boots on Mars by 2050, 'The Martian' Author Says (Video)

Space.com - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 10:22pm
The author of "The Martian" suspects a lack of cooperation from Congress will push NASA's first manned mission to the Red Planet back to the middle of the century.
Categories: Science

Never Attempt This Herculean Feat of Strength and Balance, Bro

Wired News - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 10:10pm

Bro, do you even lift? Bradley Martyn does, obviously, because he just squatted 315 pounds on a scooter.

The post Never Attempt This Herculean Feat of Strength and Balance, Bro appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Google May Try To Recruit You For a Job Based On Your Search Queries

Slashdot - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 9:46pm
HughPickens.com writes: If Google sees that you're searching for specific programming terms, they may ask you to apply for a job as Max Rossett writes that three months ago while working on a project, he Googled "python lambda function list comprehension." The familiar blue links appeared on the search page, and he started to look for the most relevant one. But then something unusual happened. The search results split and folded back to reveal a box that said "You're speaking our language. Up for a challenge?" Clicking on the link took Rossett to a page called "foo.bar" that outlined a programming challenge and gave instructions on how to submit his solution. "I had 48 hours to solve it, and the timer was ticking," writes Rossett. "I had the option to code in Python or Java. I set to work and solved the first problem in a couple hours. Each time I submitted a solution, foo.bar tested my code against five hidden test cases." After solving another five problems the page gave Rossett the option to submit his contact information and much to his surprise, a recruiter emailed him a couple days later asking for a copy of his resume. Three months after the mysterious invitation appeared, Rossett started at Google. Apparently Google has been using this recruiting tactic for some time.

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NASA's Next Nuclear-Powered Mars Rover: Building the Beast

Space.com - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 9:15pm
NASA's next nuclear-powered Mars rover, slated to launch in 2020, is slowly coming together. And while the Mars 2020 mission is largely based on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity now exploring the Red Planet, there are a variety of distinctions that set it apar
Categories: Science

1 Billion People Used Facebook on Monday

Wired News - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 9:08pm

Facebook is taking over the world. No, really. The company saw one billion people use the service on Monday.

The post 1 Billion People Used Facebook on Monday appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

NASA Scientists Paint Stark Picture of Accelerating Sea Level Rise

Slashdot - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 9:05pm
A NASA panel yesterday announced widely reported finding that global sea levels have risen about three inches since 1992, and that these levels are expected to keep rising as much as several more feet over the next century -- on the upper end of model-based predictions that have been made so far. From the Sydney Morning Herald piece linked above: NASA says Greenland has lost an average of 303 gigatons [of ice] yearly for the past decade. Since it takes 360 gigatons to raise sea level by a millimetre, that would suggest Greenland has done this about eight times over just in the last 10 years or so. "People need to be prepared for sea level rise," said Joshua Willis, an oceanographer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. "It's not going to stop."

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Former Apple CEO Creates an iPhone Competitor

Slashdot - Thu, 27/08/2015 - 8:22pm
An anonymous reader links to Fast Company's profile of Obi Worldphone, one-time Apple CEO John Sculley's venture into smartphones. The company's first two products (both reasonably spec'd, moderately priced Android phones) are expected to launch in October. And though the phones are obviously running a different operating system than Apple's, Sculley says that Obi is a similarly design-obsessed company: "The hardest part of the design was not coming up with cool-looking designs," Sculley says. "It was sweating the details over in the Chinese factories, who just were not accustomed to having this quality of finish, all of these little details that make a beautiful design. We had teams over in China, working for months on the floor every day. We intend to continue that process and have budgeted accordingly." Obi is also trying to set itself apart from the low-price pack by cutting deals for premium parts. "Instead of going directly to the Chinese factories, we went to the key component vendors, because we know that ecosystem and have the relationships," Sculley says. "We went to Sony. It’s struggling and losing money on its smartphone business, but they make the best camera modules in the world."

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Categories: Science