Soft Robot Exosuits Will Give You Springier Steps

Wired News - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 7:00pm
Rigid exoskeletons to help the movement-impaired heavy, and they have a hard time aligning with human joints. A soft robotic wearable could be the fix. The post Soft Robot Exosuits Will Give You Springier Steps appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Prehistoric mega-lake sediment offers key insight into how inland regions responded to ‘super-greenhouse’ event

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:49pm
Sediment found at the site of one of the largest lakes in Earth's history could provide a fascinating new insight into how inland regions responded to global climate change millions of years ago.
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The Problem With Google AMP

Slashdot - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:40pm
Kyle Schreiber has raised some issues about Google's AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages), an open source project unveiled by the company in 2015 with which it aims to accelerate content on mobile devices. He writes on his blog: The largest complaint by far is that the URLs for AMP links differ from the canonical URLs for the same content, making sharing difficult. The current URLs are a mess. They all begin with some form of https://wwww.google.com/amp/ before showing a URL to the AMP version of the site. There is currently no way to find the canonical link to the page without guessing what the original URL is. This usually involves removing either a .amp or ?amp=1 from the URL to get to the actual page. Make no mistake. AMP is about lock-in for Google. AMP is meant to keep publishers tied to Google. Clicking on an AMP link feels like you never even leave the search page, and links to AMP content are displayed prominently in Google's news carousel. This is their response to similar formats from both Facebook and Apple, both of which are designed to keep users within their respective ecosystems. However, Google's implementation of AMP is more broad and far reaching than the Apple and Facebook equivalents. Google's implementation of AMP is on the open web and isn't limited to just an app like Facebook or Apple.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Novel mechanism identified that protects pancreas from digestive enzymes

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:25pm
Researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which the stress hormone FGF21 keeps digestive enzymes from damaging the pancreas.
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Magnetic recording with light and no heat

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:24pm
A strong short light pulse can record data on a magnetic layer of yttrium iron garnet doped with Co-ions. The novel mechanism outperforms existing alternatives allowing ever fastest write-read magnetic recording accompanied by unprecedentedly low heat load, researchers report.
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A toolkit for transformable materials

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:23pm
Researchers have developed a general framework to design reconfigurable metamaterials. The design strategy is scale independent, meaning it can be applied to everything from meter-scale architectures to reconfigurable nano-scale systems such as photonic crystals, waveguides and metamaterials to guide heat.
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'Collateral' lethality may offer new therapeutic approach for cancers of the pancreas, stomach and colon

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:22pm
Cancer cells often delete genes that normally suppress tumor formation. These deletions also may extend to neighboring genes, an event known as 'collateral lethality,' which may create new options for development of therapies for several cancers.
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International effort announced to try to save the world's most endangered marine mammal

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:22pm
An ambitious, emergency plan to help save the vaquita porpoise from extinction in the northern Gulf of California has been recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA). The plan involves relocating some of the remaining vaquitas to a temporary sanctuary, while crucial efforts aimed at eliminating illegal fishing and removing gillnets from their environment continue.
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Toxic brain cells may drive many neurodegenerative disorders, study finds

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:22pm
While most of us haven't heard of astrocytes, these cells are four times as plentiful in the human brain as nerve cells. Now, a team led by researchers has found that astrocytes, which perform many indispensable functions in the brain, can take on a villainous character, destroying nerve cells and likely driving many neurodegenerative diseases.
Categories: Science

Traffic jam in empty space

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:22pm
An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made by researchers in Germany. The team of scientists has now shown how to manipulate the electric vacuum field and thus generate deviations from the ground state of empty space which can only be understood in the context of the quantum theory of light.
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Slack’s New Threaded Messages Tame Your Meandering Chats

Wired News - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:00pm
Finally. Slack has just released threaded messaging, a way to connect related messages within a chatroom. The post Slack's New Threaded Messages Tame Your Meandering Chats appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Japan To End Tourists' Toilet Trouble With Standardised Buttons

Slashdot - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 6:00pm
The Japan Sanitary Equipment Industry Association, a consortium of companies producing plumbing products has agreed to unify the iconography used on the often baffling control panels for Japanese toilets. From a report on The Guardian: Navigating the array of buttons on Japan's high-tech toilets can be a disconcerting experience for the uninitiated, who, expecting to hear a familiar flushing sound, are instead subjected to a sudden, and unwanted, cleansing of the nether regions. As Japan prepares for an influx of overseas visitors during the 2019 rugby World Cup and the Tokyo Olympics the following year, the country's sanitation industry has agreed to standardize pictograms on toilets so users know for certain if they are about to receive a blast of warm air or a jet of water. Nine manufacturers belonging to the Japan sanitary equipment industry association will soon start using the same eight symbols to explain the buttons found on their state-of-the-art WCs. At a launch event this week, the firms said they had agreed to simplify the pictography in response to complaints from tourists that they are confused by symbols that differ depending on the make of toilet. In a survey of 600 foreign visitors, a quarter said they could not understand some of the symbols that appear on the toilet buttons.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

What You Need to Know From Ryan Zinke’s Interior Secretary Hearing

Wired News - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:59pm
With a history of voting to expand fossil fuel exploration on public lands and weakening regulations, Zinke curries no favor with environmentalists. The post What You Need to Know From Ryan Zinke's Interior Secretary Hearing appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Super-resolution imaging offers fast way to discern fate of stem cells

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:58pm
A new way to identify the state and fate of individual stem cells earlier than previously possible has now been developed by a team of scientists.
Categories: Science

Which facebook 'friends' help most when looking for a job? Depends where you live in the world

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:57pm
Research used anonymous Facebook data from almost 17 million social connections in 55 countries to determine that the role of weak and strong ties in job searches is important around the world, but the value of a single strong tie is even more important for job seekers in countries with pronounced income inequality.
Categories: Science

Heat from earth’s core could be underlying force in plate tectonics

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:57pm
For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth's tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows plate dynamics are driven significantly by the additional force of heat drawn from the Earth's core. The new findings also challenge the theory that underwater mountain ranges known as mid-ocean ridges are passive boundaries between moving plates. The findings show the East Pacific Rise, the Earth's dominant mid-ocean ridge, is dynamic as heat is transferred.
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Massive sea lion, fur seal hunting in the Patagonian coasts is altering Southern Atlantic Ocean ecosystems

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:56pm
Sea lion hunting by the Europeans at the Atlantic coasts of South America – it started in the 19th Century and continued up to the second half of the 20th century in Argentina and Uruguay – changed its nutrition guidelines of these pinnipeds as well as the structure of the coastal trophic network, according to new research.
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Severe side effects of approved multiple sclerosis medication

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:52pm
The multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy alemtuzumab can trigger severe, unpredictable side effects. Scientists report on two patients for whom the infusion of alemtuzumab significantly worsened symptoms. The team also describes a treatment that successfully curbed the harmful side effects.
Categories: Science

Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:52pm
Researchers have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat.
Categories: Science

Gestational diabetes increases risk for postpartum depression

Science Daily - Wed, 18/01/2017 - 5:52pm
Gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression in first-time mothers, researcher have concluded.
Categories: Science