Leaked Documents Show EU Council Presidency Wants To Impair Net Neutrality

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:53pm
NotInHere writes: The advocacy group "European Digital Rights" (EDRi) reports on leaked documents proposed by the Presidency of the council of the EU (currently held by Italy), which plans to remove vital parts from the telecommunications package that introduced net neutrality. The changes include removing the definition of "net neutrality" and replacing it with a "reference to the objective of net neutrality," which EDRi says will impair any ability to enforce it. Also, the proposed changes would allow ISPs to "block, slow down, alter, degrade or discriminate" traffic in order to meet "obligations under a contract with an end-user to deliver a service requiring a specific level of quality to that end-user." EDRi writes that "[w]ith all of the talk of the need for a single digital market in Europe, we would have new barriers and new monopolies." The council of the EU is one of its two legislative chambers. The EU parliament can now object or propose further changes to prevent the modified telecommunications package from passing.

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Categories: Science

Leaked Documents Show EU Council Presidency Wants To Impair Net Neutrality

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:53pm
NotInHere writes: The advocacy group "European Digital Rights" (EDRi) reports on leaked documents proposed by the Presidency of the council of the EU (currently held by Italy), which plans to remove vital parts from the telecommunications package that introduced net neutrality. The changes include removing the definition of "net neutrality" and replacing it with a "reference to the objective of net neutrality," which EDRi says will impair any ability to enforce it. Also, the proposed changes would allow ISPs to "block, slow down, alter, degrade or discriminate" traffic in order to meet "obligations under a contract with an end-user to deliver a service requiring a specific level of quality to that end-user." EDRi writes that "[w]ith all of the talk of the need for a single digital market in Europe, we would have new barriers and new monopolies." The council of the EU is one of its two legislative chambers. The EU parliament can now object or propose further changes to prevent the modified telecommunications package from passing.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Brain injuries in mice treated using bone marrow stem cells, antioxidants

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:29pm
For the first time, researchers have transplanted bone marrow stem cells into damaged brain tissue while applying lipoic acid (a potent antioxidant), with the aim of improving neuroregeneration in the tissue. This new way of repairing brain damage, which combines cellular treatment with drug therapy, has shown positive results, especially in forming blood vessels (a process called angiogenesis) in damaged areas of the brains of adult laboratory mice.
Categories: Science

Erosion may trigger earthquakes

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:29pm
Researchers have shown that surface processes, i.e. erosion and sedimentation, may trigger shallow earthquakes (less than five kilometers deep) and favor the rupture of large deep earthquakes up to the surface. Although plate tectonics was generally thought to be the only persistent mechanism able to influence fault activity, it appears that surface processes also increase stresses on active faults, such as those in Taiwan, one of the world's most seismic regions.
Categories: Science

Novel robotic walker helps patients regain natural gait and increases productivity of physiotherapists

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:29pm
Survivors of stroke or other neurological conditions such as spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries and Parkinson’s disease often struggle with mobility. To regain their motor functions, these patients are required to undergo physical therapy sessions. A team of researchers has invented a novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait. The system also increases productivity of physiotherapists and improves the quality of rehabilitation sessions.
Categories: Science

Mental disorders due to permanent stress?

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:29pm
Activated through permanent stress, immune cells will have a damaging effect on and cause changes to the brain. This may result in mental disorders. Medical researchers are studying the effects of permanent stress on the immune system.
Categories: Science

A coating that protects against heat and oxidation

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:29pm
Researchers have developed a coating technique that they plan to use to protect turbine engine and waste incinerator components against heat and oxidation. A topcoat from micro-scaled hollow aluminium oxide spheres provides heat insulation, in the lab, already proved more economical than conventional techniques.
Categories: Science

Teasing out glitches in immune system's self-recognition

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:27pm
In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.
Categories: Science

Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found

Science Daily - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:27pm
A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment, researchers report. Understanding how cytokinesis goes awry is important since abnormal cell division impacts tumor cell growth and spread, they add.
Categories: Science

Swedish Court Refuses To Revoke Julian Assange's Arrest Warrant

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:05pm
An anonymous reader writes A Swedish court rejected an appeal by Julian Assange to revoke a detention order issued over allegations of sexual assault. "In the view of the Court of Appeal there is no reason to set aside the detention solely because Julian Assange is in an embassy and the detention order cannot be enforced at present for that reason," the appellate court added. "When it comes to the reasons for and against detention, i.e. the assessment of proportionality that is always made when use is made of a coercive measure such as detention, the Court of Appeal considers that Julian Assange's stay at the embassy shall not count in his favor since he can himself choose to bring his stay there to an end."

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Categories: Science

How Designers Recreated Alan Turing’s Code-Breaking Computer for Imitation Game

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 1:00pm

Benedict Cumberbatch may be the star of The Imitation Game, but the film's truly central figure is the code-breaking computer Christopher.

The post How Designers Recreated Alan Turing’s Code-Breaking Computer for Imitation Game appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Binary Earth-Size Planets Possible Around Distant Stars

Space.com - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 12:29pm
Binary Earth-size planets that orbit each other might exist around distant stars, researchers say. Simulations suggest such worlds can begin circling each other after slow, grazing collisions.
Categories: Science

This Tiny Engine Could Make Leaf Blowers Sound Less Like Jets

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:45am

Big engines like the 707-horsepower monster Dodge put in the Challenger Hellcat or Volvo’s little four-cylinder that makes 425 ponies get all the attention these days. But there are millions of tiny engines doing tiny things (think garden trimmers, leaf blowers, that sort of thing) that we never give much thought to. But just as there are engineers pondering how to make big engines more powerful, so too are there engineers pondering how to make tiny engines more powerful.

The post This Tiny Engine Could Make Leaf Blowers Sound Less Like Jets appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Cutest and Weirdest Wild Animal Incidents This Week

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:45am

This Week in Wild Animals for November 21, 2014 Starfish were deflating. Polar bears were going bald. Fur seals were raping penguins. A 400-pound tortoise named Benjamin Franklin made an appearance outside a Walmart. This Week in Wild Animals is a public service for human beings compiled by Jon Mooallem, author of the book Wild […]

The post The Cutest and Weirdest Wild Animal Incidents This Week appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Urban Planning Ideas for 2030, When Billions Will Live in Megacities

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:30am

How can urban planners make cities more livable for everyone?

The post Urban Planning Ideas for 2030, When Billions Will Live in Megacities appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Adorably Creepy Gliding Mammal That’s Basically Just a Big Flap of Skin

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:30am

The colugo is the most accomplished mammalian glider of all—on account of being essentially a giant flap of skin—capable of soaring an incredible 200 feet from tree to tree.

The post Absurd Creature of the Week: The Adorably Creepy Gliding Mammal That’s Basically Just a Big Flap of Skin appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Sony Xperia Z3

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:30am

With the Xperia Z3, Sony once again makes a fantastic piece of hardware that's marred by horrible software.

The post Sony Xperia Z3 appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Is Fantastic. We Ain’t Even Mad It Was Cut in Half

Wired News - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 11:30am

Yes, the new Hunger Games movie is an appetizer, but it also leaves you wanting more.

The post The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Is Fantastic. We Ain’t Even Mad It Was Cut in Half appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Coal Plants Get New Lease On Life With Natural Gas

Slashdot - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 10:34am
HughPickens.com writes Christina Nunez reports in National Geographic that in the past four years, at least 29 coal-fired plants in 10 states have switched to natural gas or biomass while another 54 units, mostly in the US Northeast and Midwest, are slated to be converted over the next nine years. By switching to natural gas, plant operators can take advantage of a relatively cheap and plentiful US supply. The change can also help them meet proposed federal rules to limit heat-trapping carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, given that electricity generation from natural gas emits about half as much carbon as electricity from coal does. But not everyone is happy with the conversions. The Dunkirk plant in western New York, slated for conversion to natural gas, is the focus of a lawsuit by environmental groups that say the $150 million repowering will force the state's energy consumers to pay for an unnecessary facility. "What we're concerned about is that the Dunkirk proceeding is setting a really, really bad precedent where we're going to keep these old, outdated, polluting plants on life support for political reasons," says Christopher Amato. Dunkirk's operator, NRG, wanted to mothball the plant in 2012, saying it was not economical to run. The utility, National Grid, said shutting it down could make local power supplies less reliable, a problem that could be fixed by boosting transmission capacity—at a lower cost than repowering Dunkirk. Meanwhile the citizens of Dunkirk are happy the plant is staying open. "We couldn't let it happen. We would lose our tax base, we would lose our jobs, we would lose our future," said State Sen. Catharine M. Young. "This agreement saves us. It gives us a foundation on which to build our economy. It gives us hope. This is our community's Christmas miracle!"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Philae Lander, Like Philae Obelisk, Is a Window to the Past

Space.com - Fri, 21/11/2014 - 8:51am
The Philae lander is named for the Philae obelisk, as both are uncovering answers to ancient secrets.
Categories: Science