Former MLB Pitcher Doxes Internet Trolls, Delivers Real-World Consequences

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:54pm
An anonymous reader writes: When Twitter trolls began posting obscene, sexually explicit comments about his teenage daughter, former MLB pitcher Curt Schilling responded by recording their comments and gathering personal information readily available to the public. He then doxxed two of them on his blog, resulting in one being suspended from his community college and the other being fired from his part-time job as a ticket seller for the New York Yankees. There were seven others in Curt's crosshairs, all college athletes, but although he hasn't publicly doxxed those individuals, he hints, "I found it rather funny at how quickly tone changed when I heard via email from a few athletes who'd been suspended by their coaches. Gone was the tough guy tweeter, replaced by the 'I'm so sorry' apology used by those only sorry because they got caught."

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Categories: Science

Back to the Future’s Clock Tower Scene, Remade With Lego

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:44pm

Would you like to watch the climax of Back to the Future remade with Lego bricks? Of course you would!

The post Back to the Future’s Clock Tower Scene, Remade With Lego appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Physicists Gear Up To Catch a Gravitational Wave

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:11pm
sciencehabit writes: A patch of woodland just north of Livingston, Louisiana, population 1893, isn't the first place you'd go looking for a breakthrough in physics. Yet it is here that physicists may fulfill perhaps the most spectacular prediction of Albert Einstein's theory of gravity, or general relativity. Structures here house the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), an ultrasensitive instrument that may soon detect ripples in space and time set off when neutron stars or black holes merge. Einstein himself predicted the existence of such gravitational waves nearly a century ago. But only now is the quest to detect them coming to a culmination. Physicists are finishing a $205 million rebuild of the detectors, known as Advanced LIGO, which should make them 10 times more sensitive and, they say, virtually ensure a detection.

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Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Wireless Microphone For Stand-up Meetings?

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 10:00pm
rolandw writes We have daily stand-ups and normally there is at least one person missing from the room. We relay via on-line chat but the sound quality is rubbish. The remote person sounds great via our speaker when they use a headset but they can't hear what is happening in the room. We need a wireless mic that copes with a large echoing room and will stop feedback. Can you recommend one? We're not an over-funded start-up so don't have an unlimited budget...

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Categories: Science

Google Gives Lick Observatory $1 Million to Relieve Funding Woes

Space.com - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 9:43pm
Tech giant Google will give $1 million to Lick Observatory, a University of California, Berkeley facility that has been battling for funds since 2013, the observatory announced today (Feb. 10).
Categories: Science

FREAK Attack Threatens SSL Clients

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 9:29pm
msm1267 writes: For the nth time in the last couple of years, security experts are warning about a new Internet-scale vulnerability, this time in some popular SSL clients. The flaw allows an attacker to force clients to downgrade to weakened ciphers and break their supposedly encrypted communications through a man-in-the-middle attack. Researchers recently discovered that some SSL clients, including OpenSSL, will accept weak RSA keys–known as export-grade keys–without asking for those keys. Export-grade refers to 512-bit RSA keys, the key strength that was approved by the United States government for export overseas. This was an artifact from decades ago and it was thought that most servers and clients had long ago abandoned such weak ciphers. The vulnerability affects a variety of clients, most notably Apple's Safari browser.

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Categories: Science

A Versatile and Rugged MIDI Mini-Keyboard (Video)

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:46pm
The K-Board won a "Best in Show" award at CES 2015. Plus, as Timothy said, "I always like pour and stomp demos." And it's totally cross-platform. If your computer, tablet or smartphone has a USB port and (almost) any kind of music software, it works. In theory, you could hook a K-Board to your Android or iOS device and use it to accompany yourself while you sing for spare change on a downtown corner. Or noodle around to get a handle on a theme you'll use in your next major symphony. Or...?

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Categories: Science

Forget PCs. The Real Bloatware Problem Is on Android

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:44pm

Google has a bloatware problem on its Android phones. But now that it's going to be a mobile carrier, it could make everything that sucks go away.

The post Forget PCs. The Real Bloatware Problem Is on Android appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Norm Carlson, Who Gave 'Go' for NASA's Saturn V, Shuttle and Beans, Dies at 81

Space.com - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:32pm
When U.S. astronauts next launch to space from Florida, the control team that oversees their liftoff may celebrate with the traditional crock of beans. If so, they'll be honoring the legacy of test director Norm Carlson, too.
Categories: Science

Creative genius driven by distraction

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:32pm
The literary great Marcel Proust wore ear-stoppers because he was unable to filter out irrelevant noise -- and lined his bedroom with cork to attenuate sound. Now new research suggests why the inability to shut out competing sensory information while focusing on the creative project at hand might have been so acute for geniuses such as Proust, Franz Kafka, Charles Darwin, Anton Chekhov and many others.
Categories: Science

Far from home: Wayward star cluster is both tiny and distant

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:32pm
Like the lost little puppy that wanders too far from home, astronomers have found an unusually small and distant group of stars that seems oddly out of place. The cluster, made of only a handful of stars, is located far away, in the Milky Way's 'suburbs.' It is located where astronomers have never spotted such a small cluster of stars before.
Categories: Science

Air pollution linked to slower cognitive development in children

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:32pm
Attendance at schools exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution is linked to slower cognitive development among 7- to 10-year-old children in Barcelona, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Highly sensitive detection of malaria parasites

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:32pm
New assays can detect malaria parasites in human blood at very low levels and might be helpful in the campaign to eradicate malaria, reports a new study. An international team led by Ingrid Felger, took advantage of genes that have multiple copies in the parasite genome to reveal parasites present at concentrations that are 10 times lower than the detection limit of current standard assays.
Categories: Science

Vanishing Binary Star Calibrates Space-Time Warp | Animation

Space.com - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:10pm
Two stars, each more massive than our Sun but orbiting 100 times closer, affect each others gravity wells allowing astronomers to gauge space-time itself.
Categories: Science

Linux and Multiple Internet Uplinks: a New Tool

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:02pm
New submitter Alessandro Zarrilli writes: Linux has been able do multipath routing for a long time: it means being able to have routes with multiple gateways and to use them in a (weighted) round-robin fashion. But Linux is missing a tool to actively monitor the state of internet uplinks and change the routing accordingly. Without it, from a LAN perspective, it's like having a RAID-0: just one uplink goes down and all of your LAN-to-WAN traffic goes down too. Documentation and examples on the subject are lacking; existing solutions are few and deeply integrated in firewall/routing specific distributions. To address these issues, a new standalone tool was just released: Fault Tolerant Router. It also includes a complete (iptables + ip policy routing) configuration generator.

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Categories: Science

New Connected Credit Card Aims to Succeed Where Coin Failed

Wired News - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 7:26pm

Stratos could be a great connected card, but it might not last long.

The post New Connected Credit Card Aims to Succeed Where Coin Failed appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Snowden Reportedly In Talks To Return To US To Face Trial

Slashdot - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 7:20pm
HughPickens.com writes: The Globe and Mail reports that Edward Snowden's Russian lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, says the fugitive former U.S. spy agency contractor is working with American and German lawyers to return home. "I won't keep it secret that he wants to return back home. And we are doing everything possible now to solve this issue. There is a group of U.S. lawyers, there is also a group of German lawyers and I'm dealing with it on the Russian side." Kucherena added that Snowden is ready to return to the States, but on the condition that he is given a guarantee of a legal and impartial trial. The lawyer said Snowden had so far only received a guarantee from the U.S. Attorney General that he will not face the death penalty. Kucherena says Snowden is able to travel outside Russia since he has a three-year Russian residency permit, but "I suspect that as soon as he leaves Russia, he will be taken to the U.S. embassy."

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Categories: Science

Real estate bidding wars aren't going away, experts say

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 7:17pm
Frenzy, frustration and disappointment are what home buyers have come to dread about real estate bidding wars. They'd better get used to it, suggests a new study. Once a rarity -- representing between 3 and 4 per cent -- homes sold through bidding wars tripled their market share during the real estate boom between 1995 and 2005, says the paper.
Categories: Science

ADHD plus childhood trauma heightens risk for self-harm, suicide

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 7:17pm
Young women with ADHD who have been exposed to abuse, neglect or other traumas in childhood and adolescence are at greater risk for self-injury, eating disorders and suicide than those with ADHD who were not mistreated in early youth, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Lasting severe weather impact found in feathers of young birds

Science Daily - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 7:17pm
While studying a ground-nesting bird population near El Reno, Okla., a research team found that stress during a severe weather outbreak of May 31, 2013, had manifested itself into malformations in the growing feathers of the young birds. The team witnessed a phenomenon termed 'pallid bands' in a large proportion of fledgling Grasshopper Sparrows and found spikes in the chemical signatures of 'pallid bands,' which led to abnormalities in the new feathers.
Categories: Science