One single biopsy not sufficient to guide treatment decisions in prostate cancer, say researchers

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 6:24pm
While the majority of prostate cancers are slow growing and not fatal, some are aggressive and lethal. Genomic fingerprinting can help predict a tumor's aggressiveness and tailor treatment plans, report researchers.
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Different tree species use the same genes to adapt to climate change, researchers find

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 6:24pm
Both pine and spruce use the same suite of 47 genes to adapt to geographic variation in temperature, and to appropriately time acquisition of cold hardiness -- a trait that allows plants to tolerate the adverse conditions of winter -- large-scale analysis has revealed.
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Our Favorite Hacker Moments From Mr. Robot Season 2

Wired News - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 6:18pm
USA's Mr. Robot is known for its authentic portrayal of hacking. We've culled this season's best tidbits, from big hacks to spot-on references. The post Our Favorite Hacker Moments From Mr. Robot Season 2 appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

ALMA Explores the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Deepest ever millimeter observations of early Universe

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 6:16pm
International teams of astronomers have used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to explore the distant corner of the Universe first revealed in the iconic images of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). These new ALMA observations are significantly deeper and sharper than previous surveys at millimetre wavelengths. They clearly show how the rate of star formation in young galaxies is closely related to their total mass in stars. They also trace the previously unknown abundance of star-forming gas at different points in time, providing new insights into the “Golden Age” of galaxy formation approximately 10 billion years ago.
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Song Exploder: Peter Bjorn and John’s ‘Young Folks’ Almost Didn’t Happen

Wired News - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 6:00pm
To mark the 10th anniversary of the Swedish trio's biggest hit, the three songwriters recount how the band's third album almost never happened. The post Song Exploder: Peter Bjorn and John's 'Young Folks' Almost Didn't Happen appeared first on WIRED.
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Hackers Seed Torrent Trackers With Malware Disguised as Popular Downloads

Slashdot - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 6:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: Cybercriminals are spreading malware via torrent distribution networks, using an automated tool to disguise the downloads as trending audio, video and other digital content in an attempt to infect more unsuspecting victims. Researchers at InfoArmor say they have uncovered a malicious torrent distribution network that relies on a tool called RAUM to infect computers with malware. The network begins with a torrent parser, which collects information about some of the most popular torrent files circulating around the web. Computer criminals then apply their RAUM tool to create a series of malicious files. Some are fake copies of those popular torrent files that in reality hide notorious malware such as CryptXXX, Cerber, or Dridex. Others are weaponized torrent files, while others still are parsed torrent files that rely on a high download rating, a reputation which the attackers artificially inflate by abusing compromised users' accounts to set up new seeds.

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Charter Fights FCC's Attempt To Uncover 'Hidden' Cable Modem Fees

Slashdot - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 5:20pm
Charter is trying to convince the Federal Communications Commission to backtrack on a plan that would force cable providers to charge a separate fee for cable modems, an anonymous writes, citing an ArsTechnica report. From the article: Charter is unusual compared to other cable companies in that it doesn't tack on a cable modem rental fee when offering Internet service. But FCC officials don't think that's good for consumers, because the price of Charter Internet service is the same whether a customer uses a Charter modem or buys their own. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler's latest proposal for new cable box rules would require companies to list fees for equipment used to access video. The FCC is clearly hoping that Charter will create a separate fee for cable modems and lower the base price of Internet service by a corresponding amount, thus letting customers save money in the long run by purchasing their own modems. (Separately from modems, Charter already charges monthly fees for the use of its TV set-top boxes.) "As part of the proposal, all pay-TV providers are required to be fully transparent about the cost consumers pay for leased equipment used to access video programming," an FCC spokesperson told Ars. "The goal is to uncover hidden fees and give consumers the ability to make informed choices. If a consumer chooses to purchase their own equipment at retail, our rules would require they no long have to pay for the built-in cost on their bill. We look forward to input from the Commissioners on this aspect of the proposal."

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X-ray laser glimpses how electrons dance with atomic nuclei in materials

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:54pm
The coupling between electrons and phonons determines how efficiently solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. It also plays key roles in superconductors that transfer electricity without losses, topological insulators that conduct electricity only on their surfaces, materials that drastically change their electrical resistance when exposed to a magnetic field, and more.
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Melanoma tumors use interferon-gamma mutations to fight immunotherapy

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:54pm
Melanoma tumors use genetic mutations in a prominent immune response pathway to resist the immunotherapy ipilimumab, researchers report. These findings open the door to testing an array of IFN-y genes prospectively as a predictor for response to ipilimumab and for exploring new combinations to defeat IFN-y-related resistance.
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Ancient remedy becomes novel approach to treating clostridium difficile infection

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:44pm
The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection, clinical presentation of infection, diagnosis and various therapies including fecal microbiota transplant have been the focus of recent research, all laid out in a new report.
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Trophy hunting of lions can conserve the species, report suggests

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:44pm
Trophy hunters can play an important role in lion conservation, researchers have shown. These findings may surprise the public, but most lion conservationists think trophy hunting could play a key role in conserving this species because lions need large areas to thrive, and managing this land is expensive. The new work shows land under long-term management for trophy hunting can help fill this shortfall.
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Researchers identify protein critical in causing chronic UTIs

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:43pm
Researchers have identified a way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Vaccinating mice against a key protein that bacteria use to latch onto the bladder and cause UTIs reduces severe disease, according to researchers.
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Bizarre new species of extinct reptile shows dinosaurs copied body, skull shapes of distant relatives

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:43pm
Iconic dinosaur shapes were present for at least a hundred million years on our planet in animals before those dinosaurs themselves actually appeared.
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New ALS discovery: Scientists reverse protein clumping involved in neurodegenerative conditions

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:43pm
Stabilizing a protein called SOD1 can help reverse protein clumping in the types of neurons affected by the fatal neurodegenerative condition Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, report researchers.
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New views of intracellular channel that controls skeletal muscle

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:43pm
New details of the structure and function of an intracellular channel that controls the contraction of skeletal muscle have been uncovered by new research. The findings could lead to new treatments for a variety of muscle disorders.
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With great power comes great laser science

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:43pm
Scientists have found a way to compress ultrashort laser pulses, increasing its peak power to half a terawatt – which is equivalent to the output of hundreds of nuclear reactors.
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Farming with forests

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:40pm
In the race to feed a growing population, it is important to consider sustainability. Researchers are promoting the practice of agroforestry—the intentional planting of trees and shrubs with crops or livestock—to achieve sustainability goals. A number of practical and policy challenges have prevented adoption of agroforestry practices on a large scale in the U.S. If adopted more widely, agroforestry could benefit wildlife, soil and water quality, and the global climate.
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Cesarean section carries increased risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism (VTE)

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:40pm
Women are four times more likely to suffer a VTE after a cesarean-section compared to a vaginal birth, according to a new study. Roughly one-third of all births in Europe and North America now occur via cesarean section.
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Germany Unveils a Hydrogen-Powered Passenger Train

Slashdot - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: The world's first CO2-emission-free train powered through hydrogen was unveiled this week in Germany. The Coradia iLint, created by French company Alstom, was presented at the Berlin InnoTrans trade show on Tuesday. The train's energy comes from combining hydrogen stored in tanks on the train with oxygen in the air. The energy is then stored in lithium-ion batteries. The train's only emissions are steam and condensed water. The train also has lower noise levels than diesel trains, emitting only the sound of its wheels on the track and any sounds from air resistance at even its highest speed of 140 kilometers per hour (about 87 miles per hour). The train has the ability to travel up to 800 kilometers (497 miles) and carry up to 300 passengers; it's the worldâ(TM)s first hydrogen passenger train that can regularly operate long journeys.

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Researchers take a new step towards non-antibiotic bladder infection therapies

Science Daily - Thu, 22/09/2016 - 4:39pm
Cystitis is a common infection, particularly in women. Although usually treatable with antibiotics, patients can be plagued with recurrent and chronic infections. When ascending to the kidneys, bladder infections can turn into a life threatening complications, a particular concern in case of multidrug-resistant strains of the causative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium. A new step towards non-antibiotic bladder infection therapies has now been taken by researchers.
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