Obese dogs helped by 'effective' weight loss trials

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:17pm
On average overweight dogs lose an average of 11 percent of their body weight when enrolled on a weight loss trial according to researchers who have conducted the largest international multi-center weight study.
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Astonishing time limit for ultrafast perovskite solar cells set

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:17pm
Researchers have quantified the astonishingly high speeds at which future solar cells would have to operate in order to stretch what are presently seen as natural limits on their energy conversion efficiency.
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Lightning-fast trappers: Biomechanics of suction traps in carnivorous bladderworts

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:17pm
New findings have been gained on the biomechanics and evolution of suction traps in carnivorous bladderworts.
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Researchers discover new cattle disease and prevent it from spreading

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:17pm
Following genetic studies of deformed calves, research is able to uncover a previously unknown disease found among Holstein cattle. The breeding bull from which the mutation and thus the deformation originate has now been put down to prevent the disease from spreading further.
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Whole food diet may help prevent colon cancer, other chronic conditions

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:17pm
A diet that includes plenty of colorful vegetables and fruits may contain compounds that can stop colon cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases in pigs, according to an international team of researchers. Understanding how these compounds work on a molecular level could be an initial step toward finding treatments for people with cancer, they added.
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Plate Tectonics May Have Begun a Billion Years After Earth's Birth

Space.com - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:03pm
The differentiation of oceanic and continental crust could date back 3.5 billion years.
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The CCleaner Malware Fiasco Targeted at Least 20 Specific Tech Firms

Slashdot - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 2:00pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Hundreds of thousands of computers getting penetrated by a corrupted version of an ultra-common piece of security software was never going to end well. But now it's becoming clear exactly how bad the results of the recent CCleaner malware outbreak may be. Researchers now believe that the hackers behind it were bent not only on mass infections, but on targeted espionage that tried to gain access to the networks of at least 20 tech firms. Earlier this week, security firms Morphisec and Cisco revealed that CCleaner, a piece of security software distributed by Czech company Avast, had been hijacked by hackers and loaded with a backdoor that evaded the company's security checks. It wound up installed on more than 700,000 computers. On Wednesday, researchers at Cisco's Talos security division revealed that they've now analyzed the hackers' "command-and-control" server to which those malicious versions of CCleaner connected. On that server, they found evidence that the hackers had attempted to filter their collection of backdoored victim machines to find computers inside the networks of 20 tech firms, including Intel, Google, Microsoft, Akamai, Samsung, Sony, VMware, HTC, Linksys, D-Link and Cisco itself. In about half of those cases, says Talos research manager Craig Williams, the hackers successfully found a machine they'd compromised within the company's network, and used their backdoor to infect it with another piece of malware intended to serve as a deeper foothold, one that Cisco now believes was likely intended for industrial espionage.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Increasing frequency of blood donation has no major side effects

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:55pm
Giving blood more frequently - up to every 8 weeks for men and every 12 weeks for women - has no major side effects and could help to increase blood stocks, according to the first ever randomized trial of blood donation involving more than 45000 people in England.
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Treating asthma or COPD with steroid inhaler increases the risk of hard-to-treat infections

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:55pm
Older people who use steroid inhalers for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more likely to suffer particular bacterial infections, according to a large study.
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Diamonds show Earth still capable of ‘superhot’ surprises

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:55pm
Diamonds may be ‘forever’ but some may have formed more recently than geologists thought. A study of 26 diamonds, formed under extreme melting conditions in the Earth’s mantle, found two populations, one of which has geologically ‘young’ ages. The results show that certain volcanic events on Earth may still be able to create super-heated conditions previously thought to have only existed early in the planet’s history before it cooled. The findings may have implications for diamond prospecting.
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Solar eruption ‘photobombed’ Mars encounter with Comet Siding Spring

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:50pm
When Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) passed just 140,000 kilometers from Mars on 19th October 2014, depositing a large amount of debris in the Martian atmosphere, space agencies coordinated multiple spacecraft to witness the largest meteor shower in recorded history. It was a rare opportunity, as this kind of planetary event occurs only once every 100,000 years.
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New genetic test for predicting cancer recurrence

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:50pm
Researchers have discovered a new genetic test which could help predict cancer recurrence - paving the way for more precise, personalised treatments.
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In times of climate change: What a lake’s color can tell about its condition

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:50pm
With the help of satellite observations from 188 lakes worldwide, scientists have shown that the warming of large lakes amplifies their color. Lakes which are green due to their high phytoplankton content tend to become greener in warm years as phytoplankton content increases. Clear, blue lakes with little phytoplankton, on the other hand, tend to become even bluer in warm years caused by declines in phytoplankton. Thus, contrary to previous assumptions, the warming of lakes tends to amplify their richness or poverty of phytoplankton.
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Cannabis, 'spice' – better think twice

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:49pm
Marijuana is the most commonly abused drug in the world, and the advent of synthetic cannabinoids creates additional challenges to the society because of their higher potency and ability to escape drug detection screenings.  Scientists have a warning about a new danger coming from cannabinoid abuse.
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Football helmet smartfoam signals potential concussions in real time, study suggests

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:03pm
While football-related concussions have been top of mind in recent years, people have struggled to create technology to accurately measure them in real time. Engineers have now developed and tested a nano composite smartfoam that can be placed inside a football helmet (and pads) to more accurately test the impact and power of hits.
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No magic pill to cure alcohol dependence yet

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:03pm
A new study has found no reliable evidence for using nalmefene, naltrexone, acamprosate, baclofen or topiramate to control drinking in patients with alcohol dependence or alcohol use disorder. At best, some treatments showed low to medium efficacy in reducing drinking, but those findings were from studies with a high risk of bias. None demonstrated any benefit on health outcomes.
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Many YouTube videos glorify alcohol

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:03pm
YouTube videos featuring alcohol are heavily viewed and nearly always promote the 'fun' side of drinking.
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Tiny Brazilian frogs are deaf to their own calls

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:03pm
Pumpkin toadlets, found on the leaf litter of Brazil's Atlantic forest, are among the smallest frogs in the world. Scientists have now discovered that two species of these tiny orange frogs cannot hear the sound of their own calls.
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Precisely defined polymer chains now a reality

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:03pm
The materiality exhibited by humanmade polymers currently relies on simple chemical bonds and the sequence order taken by molecules in the polymer chain. We now no longer need to rely on fate to determine such materiality with this new technique for precisely defining polymer-chain order. This system uses highly specific 'grabber' ends on each molecule that bond with only one type of 'pin' end on another molecule.
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An extraordinary cave animal found in Eastern Turkmenistan

Science Daily - Thu, 21/09/2017 - 1:02pm
A remote cave in Eastern Turkmenistan was found to shelter a marvelous cave-adapted inhabitant that turned out to represent a species and genus new to science. This new troglodyte is the first of its order from Central Asia and the first strictly subterranean terrestrial creature recorded in the country.
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