Nanomaterial outsmarts ions: Novel types of electronic components made of graphene

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 2:00pm
Ions are an essential tool in chip manufacturing, but they can also be used to produce nano-sieves. A large number of electrons must be removed from the atoms for this purpose. Such ions either lose a large amount of energy or almost no energy at all as they pass through a membrane that measures one nanometer in thickness. Researchers report that this discovery is an important step towards developing novel types of electronic components made of graphene.
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Like a hall of mirrors, nanostructures trap photons inside ultrathin solar cells

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 2:00pm
In the quest to make sun power more competitive, researchers are designing ultrathin solar cells that cut material costs. At the same time they're keeping these thin cells efficient by sculpting their surfaces with photovoltaic nanostructures that behave like a molecular hall of mirrors.
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Drug-related morbidity in more than 10 percent of adults, Swedish study finds

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 1:59pm
Twelve percent of adults in Sweden have diseases related to their use of medicines. But in four cases of ten it would have been possible to avoid the undesired effects, research shows. Two effects were most commonly reported: side effects, and insufficient effect of the drug. "The studies show that both those treating outpatients and those treating inpatients must become better at recognizing drug-related morbidity. Further, new studies should be carried out by scientists, experts in safety and healthcare personnel together to develop preventative strategies," says the researcher.
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Bariatric surgery health benefits: Is it bile acids at work?

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 1:59pm
Bariatric surgery has positive effects not only on weight loss but also on diabetes and heart disease. Researchers have shown that the health benefits are not caused by a reduction in the stomach size but by increased levels of bile acids in the blood. These findings indicate that bile acids could be a new target for treating obesity and diabetes.
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Increasing diversity of America's youth: Hispanics leading the way

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 1:59pm
Diversity is increasing among America’s youth because of unprecedented population increases of minority children, particularly Hispanic, as well as a significant decline in the number of non-Hispanic white children, according to research. Most of the growth in the minority child population between 2000 and 2012 was attributable to Hispanic births; more than 95% of Hispanic children under the age of 5 were U.S. born. Indeed, three-fourths of the entire Hispanic population gain between July 2011 and July 2012 came from natural increase -- the difference between births and deaths -- rather than immigration. And this trend will likely continue.
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Lytro’s Magical DSLR-Like Camera Lets You Refocus Photos After You Take Them

Wired News - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 1:47pm
With a new camera called the Illum, a DSLR-style shooter with an 8X optical zoom and high-speed, sports-worthy shutter, Lytro is hoping to tap into the creative professional market.






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Asteroid Impacts on Earth More Powerful than Nuclear Bomb | Video

Space.com - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 1:32pm
Between 2000 and 2013, 26 explosions ranging from 1-600 kilotons have been detected by the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization's network of sensors. -- FULL STORY: http://goo.gl/pKFcCq
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Netflix Plans To Raise Prices By "$1 or $2 a Month"

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 1:28pm
New submitter Burphytez (3625571) writes with this excerpt of a Reuters story, as carried by the Chicago Tribune: "Video streaming service Netflix Inc said it intends to raise the monthly subscription price for new customers by $1 or $2 a month to help the company buy more movies and TV shows and improve service for its 48 million global subscribers. Investors welcomed the announcement by Netflix, which had suffered from a consumer exodus and stock plunge after it announced an unpopular price increase in July 2011. The company's shares jumped 6.7 percent in after-hours trading to $371.97, after the company released plans for a price hike and posted a rise in first-quarter profit that beat Wall Street expectations."

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New way to enhance nerve growth following injury discovered

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:49pm
A mechanism to promote growth in damaged nerve cells as a means to restore connections after injury has been uncovered by scientists who have discovered a key molecule that directly regulates nerve cell growth in the damaged nervous system. "We made the surprising discovery that a protein called Retinoblastoma (Rb) is present in adult neurons," explains the lead researcher. "This protein appears to normally act as a brake -- preventing nerve growth."
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First brain images of African infants enable research into cognitive effects of nutrition

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:49pm
Brain activity of babies in developing countries could be monitored from birth to reveal the first signs of cognitive dysfunction, researchers say. The cognitive function of infants can be visualized and tracked more quickly, more accurately and more cheaply using the method, called functional near infra-red spectroscopy (fNIRS), compared to the behavioral assessments Western regions have relied upon for decades.
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Not Just a Cleanup Any More: LibreSSL Project Announced

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:48pm
An anonymous reader writes "As some of you may know, the OpenBSD team has started cleaning up the OpenSSL code base. LibreSSL is primarily developed by the OpenBSD Project, and its first inclusion into an operating system will be in OpenBSD 5.6. In the wake of Heartbleed, the OpenBSD group is creating a simpler, cleaner version of the dominant OpenSSL. Theo de Raadt, founder and leader of OpenBSD and OpenSSH, tells ZDNet that the project has already removed 90,000 lines of C code and 150,000 lines of content. The project further promises multi-OS support once they have proper funding and the right portability team in place. Please consider donating to support LibreSSL via the OpenBSD foundation."

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How are we different and what gave us the advantage over extinct types of humans like the Neanderthals?

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:47pm
In parallel with modern man (Homo sapiens), there were other, extinct types of humans with whom we lived side by side, such as Neanderthals and the recently discovered  Denisovans of Siberia. Yet only Homo sapiens survived. What was it in our genetic makeup that gave us the advantage?
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'Blood lab' inside a mobile phone could detect cancer

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:47pm
Scientists are in the early stages of an 'e-health technology' project aimed at developing a mobile phone app that can examine blood sample images and diagnose cancer. It would work by taking a magnified image of a blood slide via a microscopic lens attached to the smart phone, which the app would then be able to screen for evidence of leukemia -- a blood cancer.
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Tarantulas' personality determines whether they copulate with males or cannibalize them

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:47pm
Sexual cannibalism in spiders – the attack and consumption of males by females before or after copulation – is very widespread. A new investigation analyses the reason behind such extreme behavior, at times even before the females have ensured the sperm’s fertilization of their eggs.
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Jacket works like a mobile phone

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:47pm
A fire is raging in a large building and the fire leader is sending a message to all firefighters at the scene. But they don't need a mobile phone -- they simply check their jacket sleeves and read the message there.
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Red stars and big bulges: How black holes shape galaxies

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:46pm
The universe we can see is made up of thousands of millions of galaxies, each containing anywhere from hundreds of thousands to hundreds of billions of stars. Large numbers of galaxies are elliptical in shape, red and mostly made up of old stars. Another (more familiar) type is the spiral, where arms wind out in a blue thin disk from a central red bulge. On average stars in spiral galaxies tend to be much younger than those in ellipticals. Now a group of astronomers has found a (relatively) simple relationship between the color of a galaxy and the size of its bulge: the more massive the bulge, the redder the galaxy.
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Solved: Mysteries of a nearby planetary system

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:46pm
Mysteries of one of the most fascinating nearby planetary systems now have been solved. A new study presents the first viable model for the planetary system orbiting one the first stars discovered to have planets - the star named 55 Cancri. Numerous studies since 2002 had failed to determine a plausible model for the masses and orbits of two giant planets located closer to 55 Cancri than Mercury is to our Sun. Astronomers had struggled to understand how these massive planets orbiting so close to their star could avoid a catastrophe such as one planet being flung into the star, or the two planets colliding with each other.
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Higher solar-cell efficiency achieved with zinc-oxide coating

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:45pm
Researchers have achieved 14-percent efficiency in a 9-millimeter-square solar cell made of gallium arsenide. It is the highest efficiency rating for a solar cell that size and made with that material.
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New tool helps doctors better predict, prevent deadly respiratory failure after surgery, multicenter study says

Science Daily - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:45pm
A new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study. The prediction tool could help doctors assign risk levels to patients by determining if they have one or more of nine predictors identified as most associated with the development of ARDS: blood infection (sepsis), liver disease, high-risk surgery on the heart or aorta, emergency surgery, admission from a location other than home, an increased respiratory rate, and two measures that show the patient has lower-than-normal oxygen levels in the blood.
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GitHub Founder Resigns Following Harassment Investigation

Slashdot - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 12:04pm
An anonymous reader writes "Late Yesterday, GitHub concluded its investigation regarding sexual harassment within its work force, and although it found no evidence of 'legal wrongdoing,' Tom Preston-Werner, one of its founding members implicated in the investigation resigned. In its statement, GitHub vows to implement 'a number of new HR and employee-led initiatives as well as training opportunities to make sure employee concerns and conflicts are taken seriously and dealt with appropriately.' Julie Ann Horvath, the former GitHub employee whose public resignation last month inspired the sexual harassment investigation, found the company's findings to be gratuitous and just plain wrong."

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Categories: Science