Chip enables navigation aids for the visually impaired

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:49pm
A low-power chip for processing 3-D camera data has been developed that could help visually impaired people navigate their environments. The chip consumes only one-thousandth as much power as a conventional computer processor executing the same algorithms.
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The seawater temperature distribution in tropics affects the rainfall in East Asia

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:49pm
A wide swatch of Asia, from the tropics to the mid-latitudes, which has wet and dry seasons, is significantly affected by 'Asian monsoons.' The amount of rainfall in particular has a close relationship to agriculture and damage from flooding.
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To prevent infection after C-section, chlorhexidine better than iodine

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:49pm
Chlorhexidine-alcohol skin prep is superior to iodine-alcohol for preventing infection after C-section, according to a new study. Rather than prepping patients with iodine-alcohol -- a common antiseptic combination in C-sections -- the research indicates that chlorhexidine-alcohol is significantly more effective. The researchers argue that the evidence is strong enough to change standard skin-prep practices for C-sections.
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Meditation eases pain, anxiety and fatigue during breast cancer biopsy

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:49pm
Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent.
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Our Sun Is A Roiling Ball Of Magnetism, Computer Reveals | Video

Space.com - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:48pm
Looping, swirling, whipping magnetic fields – not visible to the naked eye – power and direct titanic explosions off the Sun’s surface.
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Congressional Testimony Says NASA Has No Plan For the Journey To Mars

Slashdot - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:24pm
MarkWhittington writes: Testimony at a hearing before the House Science Committee's Subcommittee on Space suggested that NASA's Journey to Mars lacks a plan to achieve the first human landing on the Red Planet, almost six years after President Obama announced the goal on April 15, 2010. Moreover, two of the three witnesses argued that a more realistic near term goal for the space agency would be a return to the moon. The moon is not only a scientifically interesting and potentially commercially profitable place to go but access to lunar water, which can be refined into rocket fuel, would make the Journey to Mars easier and cheaper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Snowden’s Chronicler Reveals Her Own Life Under Surveillance

Wired News - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:03pm

In a journal and FBI files shared as part of her Whitney Museum exhibit, Laura Poitras finally turns her lens of observation onto herself.

The post Snowden’s Chronicler Reveals Her Own Life Under Surveillance appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Here Come Cartooniverses! Cartoon Network Is Moving Beyond TV

Wired News - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 2:01pm

Cartoon Network is launching its first original mobile game in an effort to move beyond the small screen—and onto all the screens.

The post Here Come Cartooniverses! Cartoon Network Is Moving Beyond TV appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Connective tissue disease increases risk for cardiovascular problems

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:52pm
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis are twice as likely as white patients to suffer from atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death.
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Light signals from living cells

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:51pm
A process has been uncovered by researchers that uses pressure to deliver chemical probes in a fine-tuned manner into living cells.
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From genes to latrines: Vikings and their worms provide clues to emphysema

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:51pm
The key to an inherited deficiency, predisposing people to emphysema and other lung conditions, could lie in their Viking roots. Archaeological excavations of Viking latrine pits in Denmark have revealed that these populations suffered massive worm infestations. The way that their genes developed to protect their vital organs from disease caused by worms has become the inherited trait which can now lead to lung disease in smokers.
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Syrian aid: Lack of evidence for 'interventions that work,' say researchers

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:51pm
The lack of an evidence base in the donor-funded response to Syrian migrant crisis means funds may be allocated to ineffective interventions, say researchers, who call on funders and policymakers in London for this week's Syrian Donor Conference to insist on evaluation as a condition of aid.
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Diatoms sense the 'odor' of stones

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:51pm
Diatoms are unicellular algae that are native in many waters. They are a major component of marine phytoplankton and the food base for a large variety of marine organisms. In addition, they produce about one fifth of the oxygen in the atmosphere and are therefore a key factor for our global climate. However, these algae, which measure only a few micrometers, have yet another amazing ability: they can "smell" stones.
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Modelling how the brain makes complex decisions

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:51pm
Researchers have constructed the first comprehensive model of how neurons in the brain behave when faced with a complex decision-making process, and how they adapt and learn from mistakes.
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Researchers patent new methods that allow them to identify the cells causing metastasis in cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:51pm
Researchers have patented a new method that allows to identify the cells causing metastasis in cancer, with a simple blood analysis.
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The return of the flatworm

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:50pm
Where does the acoel flatworm belong in the tree of life? Biologists have discussed this question for the last 20 years. Now new research suggests that researchers have found the answer.
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European soil threats: What, where and why?

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:50pm
Over sixty soil experts have gone together and provided an up to date overview of European soil threats. The extensive report, which among other things provides information on the geographical spread of eleven soil threats, also addresses what kind of effect these threats may have on soil functions and ecosystem services, and why they occur.
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Mitochondria shown to trigger cell aging

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:49pm
Scientists have carried out an experiment which conclusively proves for the first time that mitochondria are major triggers of cell aging. This brings scientists a step closer to developing therapies to counteract the aging of cells, by targeting mitochondria.
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Scientists overcome hurdles for champion racehorses

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:49pm
Scientists are a step closer to preventing the kind of injuries that affect aging race horses like champion hurdler Rock on Ruby, the winner of Coral Hurdle at Ascot in 2015.
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Using steroids before late preterm delivery reduces neonatal respiratory problems

Science Daily - Thu, 04/02/2016 - 1:49pm
Using corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies, new research indicates. The new study enrolled more than 2,800 pregnant women deemed at high risk of delivery during the late preterm period (34-36 weeks of gestation). The women were randomized to receive two injections of the steroid betamethasone or a placebo, given 24 hours apart.
Categories: Science