Why Are We Spending Billions and Tons of Fossil Fuel On Search of Lost Planes?

Slashdot - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:50pm
Reader Max_W asks: After days of massive search finally, "Report: Signals detected from EgyptAir Flight 804 in Mediterranean" Why not record GPS/GLONASS track constantly into a text file on say twenty flash USB drives enclosed into orange styrofoam with the serial aircraft number on it? In case of an accident, these waterproof USB flash drives are released outside overboard. Certainly the text file is encrypted. Such a floating USB flash drive would cost maximum a hundred USD even if equipped with a tiny LED lamp; while an aircraft costs millions, and a search may costs billions let alone thousands of tons of burned fossil fuel.

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Categories: Science

Canadian Space Agency: Facts & Information

Space.com - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:42pm
The Canadian Space Agency is famous for its astronaut program and robotics technology.
Categories: Science

Rethinking hospital alarms

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:30pm
On average, there are about 480,000 patients in hospitals in the United States -- each generating about 135 clinical alarms per day. But studies show that more than 90 percent of these alarms result in no action, and alarm errors occur roughly 8 million times per day.
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Telling irregularities: New procedure uses heart rate to estimate the life expectancy of infarct patients

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:29pm
The heart rate may be an indicator of a person's life expectancy. A research team has to this end analyzed an effect which at first seems paradoxical: Minor irregularities in the heartbeat are indicative of a healthy body. A clinical study confirmed a strong correlation between this phenomenon and the survival prospects of heart attack patients. The new methods of measurement may soon be applied in medical practice.
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Blood test supports use of potential new treatment for patients with stomach cancer

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:29pm
Testing cancers for 'addiction' to a gene that boosts cell growth can pick out patients who may respond to a targeted drug under development, a major new study reports. By measuring the number of copies of just one gene from cancer DNA circulating in the bloodstream, scientists were able to identify the patients with stomach cancer who were most likely to respond to treatment.
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Guarding the gatekeepers

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:29pm
Calcium is a key signalling agent in the information networks of life. As calcium ions cannot cross cell membranes directly, the rise and fall of calcium levels within a cell are controlled through a set of proteins known as the Orai. Researchers have discovered a new player in calcium signalling pathways - a protein named Septin 7 that functions as a 'molecular brake' to Orai activation.
Categories: Science

Appalachian coal ash richest in rare earth elements

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:29pm
The first comprehensive study of the content of rare earth elements in coal ashes from the United States shows that coal originating from the Appalachian Mountains has the highest concentrations of scarce elements like neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium, yttrium and erbium that are needed for alternative energy and other technologies. The study also reveals how important developing inexpensive, efficient extraction technologies will be to any future recovery program.
Categories: Science

Microsoft's Get Windows 10 App, KB 3035583, Reappears

Slashdot - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:10pm
An anonymous reader shares an InfoWorld article: Once again, Microsoft has unleashed the GWX Kraken, with no explanation and no description. The latest KB 3035583 appears as a "Recommended" optional patch for Windows 7 and 8.1. Those with Automatic Update turned on and "Give me recommended updates the same way I receive important updates" checked -- the default settings -- will see the patch as a checked, optional update, and it will be installed the next time Automatic Update runs. If you previously hid KB 3035583, it's now unhidden. I'm sure there are a dozen people on earth who still have Auto Updates turned on, "Recommended updates" checked, and who haven't yet accepted Microsoft's kind invitation for a free copy of Windows 10. This one's for them. In late March 2015, Microsoft released the first version of KB 3035583. Described as "Update enables additional capabilities for Windows Update notifications in Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 SP1," the patch immediately raised eyebrows. In April of last year, a German researcher named Gerard Himmelein, writing at heise.de, figured out that Microsoft was sneaking a Windows 10 upgrader onto Win7 and 8.1 machines. Life for Win7 and 8.1 customers since then has degenerated into Win10 whack-a-mole.In some other news, Chinese news outlet Xinhua reports that plenty of users in China are unhappy about Microsoft's push to get them to mandatorily upgrade their Windows OS. "The company has abused its dominant market position and broken the market order for fair play," Xinhua quoted Zhao Zhanling, a legal adviser with the Internet Society of China, as saying.

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Here Comes Mars! Red Planet Makes Closest Earth Approach Since 2005 Monday

Space.com - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 4:00pm
Mars will make its closest approach to Earth on Memorial Day (May 30), presenting a prime viewing opportunity for skywatchers.
Categories: Science

Tasty fat: X-rays finding the blueprint of why fat is yummy

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:30pm
Over three years, a research team has collected increasingly complex samples of edible fat for research. They are using new data to characterize the nanoscale structure of different kinds of edible fats and applying the data to a model that predicts the effect of processes like heating and mixing on fat structure. If food manufacturers understand the unique structures of different fat compositions, they can better mimic the desirable tastes and textures of unhealthy fats with healthier alternatives, potentially impacting diseases closely tied to diet, according to a new article.
Categories: Science

First-of-its-kind procedure combines scalp, skull, kidney and pancreas transplant

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:30pm
Simultaneous transplantation of a "composite" skull and scalp flap plus a kidney and pancreas -- all from the same donor -- provided excellent outcomes for a patient with a non-healing scalp defect and declining organ kidney and pancreas function, according to a report.
Categories: Science

Slashdot Asks: Would You Pay For Android Updates?

Slashdot - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:30pm
It's no secret that most Android OEMs could do better when it comes to seeding out updates for their existing devices. A report on Bloomberg earlier this week claimed that Google plans to publicly name and shame the OEMs who are too slow at updating their devices. An HTC executive who didn't want to be identified told Slashdot on Thursday that it is not the right way to approach the problem. But that's only one part of the problem. The other issue is that almost every Android OEM partner -- including Google itself -- only provides support to their devices for 18-24 months. Vlad Savov of The Verge in a column today urges Android OEMs to perhaps charge its users if that is what it takes for them to offer support to their devices for a longer period of time and in a timely manner. He writes: I've been one of the many people dissatisfied with the state of Android software updates, however I can't in good conscience direct my wrath at the people manufacturing the devices. Price and spec competition is so intense right now that there's literally no option to disengage: everyone's been sucked into the whirlpool of razor-thin profit margins, and nobody can afford the luxury of dedicating too many resources to after-sales care. The question that's been bugging me lately is, if we value Android updates as highly as we say we do, why don't we pay for them? The situation can't be fixed by manufacturers -- most of them are barely breaking even -- or by Google, which is doing its best to improve things but ultimately relies on carriers and device makers to get the job done. Carriers will most certainly not be the solution, given how they presently constitute most of the problem (just ask AT&T Galaxy S6 owners) -- so like it or not, the best chance for substantial change comes from us, the users. What I'm proposing is a simple crowdfunding operation. I'm skeptical about this, because I don't think it is in an OEM's best interest to serve its existing users for long -- how else they will convince customers to purchase their new devices? A newer software version is after all one of the ultimate selling points of a new phone. So I don't think an OEM will take up on such an offer. What do you folks think?

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Categories: Science

A planet 1,200 light-years away is a good prospect for a habitable world

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:28pm
A distant 'super-Earth' size planet known as Kepler-62f could be habitable, a team of astronomers reports. The planet, which is about 1,200 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lyra, is approximately 40 percent larger than Earth. At that size, Kepler-62f is within the range of planets that are likely to be rocky and possibly could have oceans.
Categories: Science

Underwater grass beds have ability to protect, maintain their own health

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:28pm
An expansive bed of underwater grass at the mouth of the Susquehanna River has proven it is able to 'take a licking and keep on ticking.' A recent study has found that the submersed aquatic vegetation bed at Susquehanna Flats, which only recently made a comeback in the Chesapeake Bay, was not only able to survive a barrage of rough storms and flooding, but it has proven a natural ability to protect and maintain itself.
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Expert urges voluntary family planning to mitigate climate change

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:26pm
A professor calls for action to tackle the effect of a rapidly growing world population on greenhouse gas production.
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Arctic Ocean methane does not reach the atmosphere

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:26pm
250 methane flares release the climate gas methane from the seabed and into the Arctic Ocean. During the summer months this leads to an increased methane concentration in the ocean. But surprisingly, very little of the climate gas rising up through the sea reaches the atmosphere, report investigators.
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Hawk moths have second nose for evaluating flowers

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:26pm
Manduca sexta hawk moth use their proboscis to smell the floral volatiles when they visit flowers, report scientists. They discovered the olfactory neurons involved in the perception of these volatiles on the Manduca proboscis. Only when flowers produced volatiles did the moths stay long enough to drink nectar, and only then did they deliver enough pollen on their proboscis to successfully pollinate other scenting flowers.
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Baby talk words with repeated sounds help infants learn language

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:26pm
Babies find it easier to learn words with repetitive syllables rather than mixed sounds, a study suggests. Assessments of language learning in 18-month-olds suggest that children are better at grasping the names of objects with repeated syllables, over words with non-identical syllables. Researchers say the study may help explain why some words or phrases, such as 'train' and 'good night', have given rise to versions with repeated syllables, such as choo-choo and night-night.
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Fungi: Promising source of chemical diversity

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:26pm
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces a group of previously unknown natural products. With reference to plant isoquinoline alkaloids, these substances have been named fumisoquins. Researchers have now discovered the novel substances while studying the fungal genome. This study shows that fungi and plants developed biosynthetic pathways for these complex molecules independently of each other. These findings make Aspergillus an interesting target for the discovery of novel drugs and their biotechnological production.
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Faster, more efficient CRISPR editing in mice

Science Daily - Fri, 27/05/2016 - 3:26pm
Creating transgenic mice, while critical to biomedical research, is laborious and expensive, despite improvements since the advent of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing. Now, biologists have invented a technique that simplifies, improves and lowers the cost of generating knockout mice. They discovered that electroporation can move CRISPR-Cas9 molecules into mouse embryos with nearly 100 percent efficiency, much better than the success from microinjecting Cas9 mRNA and guide RNA. The gene-editing success is also higher.
Categories: Science