Genetically inherited high cholesterol increases long-term risks of coronary heart disease, stroke

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:59pm
People who inherit a genetic disorder from one of their parents that results in high cholesterol may be five times more likely to develop coronary heart disease. These patients also may be more likely to have hardening of the arteries, including an accelerated onset of coronary heart disease by up to 30 years.
Categories: Science

Facebook Wins Belgian Court Appeal Over Storing Non-User Data

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:40pm
Stephanie Bodoni, and Aoife White reporting for Bloomberg Technology (condensed):Facebook won an appeal against a Belgian privacy ruling that prompted the social network to prevent people without an account from accessing its site within the country. The Brussels Court of Appeal said the nation's data protection authority couldn't prevent Facebook from storing data from non-users in a fight over measures the technology giant says help it combat hacking attacks. "Belgian courts don't have international jurisdiction over Facebook Ireland, where the data concerning Europe is processed," the Brussels court of appeal said in a ruling Wednesday, referring to the company's European headquarters. The court also said there was no urgency to rule on the case since Belgian court proceedings only started in mid-2015 over behavior that started in 2012. Facebook is appealing a ruling that ordered it to stop storing data from people who don't have an account with the social network, or face a 250,000 euro ($277,800) daily fine. Willem Debeuckelaere, president of the Belgian data protection commission, said last year that Facebook's "disrespectful" treatment of users' personal data, without their knowledge, "needs tackling." Facebook said it can now start showing its pages to Belgians who aren't signed up to its service.

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Categories: Science

Lassen Peak Is Sinking, and Volcanologists Don’t Know Why

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:18pm
New data shows that the area around California's Lassen Peak is sinking, but exactly why is unclear. The post Lassen Peak Is Sinking, and Volcanologists Don't Know Why appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

El Niño could drive intense season for Amazon fires

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:05pm
The long-lasting effects of El Niño are projected to cause an intense fire season in the Amazon, according to the 2016 seasonal forecast from experts.
Categories: Science

Stem cell treatment for Lou Gehrig's disease may be safe

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:05pm
A phase II clinical trial in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, suggests that transplanting human stem cells into the spinal cord may be done safely. While the study was not designed to determine whether the treatment was effective, researchers noted that it did not slow down the progression of the disease.
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As sea level rises, Hudson River wetlands may expand

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:03pm
In the face of climate change impact and inevitable sea level rise, scientists studying New York's Hudson River estuary have forecast new tidal wetlands, comprising perhaps 33 percent more wetland area by the year 2100.
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Researchers create new method for identifying black holes

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:03pm
Scientists have developed a faster, more accurate way to assess gravitational wave signals and infer the astronomical sources that made them. Their method directly compares data from the LIGO detectors to cutting-edge numerical simulations of binary black holes.
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Collisions during DNA replication, transcription contribute to mutagenesis

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:02pm
Replication-transcription head-on collisions contribute to mutagenesis, report scientists.
Categories: Science

New technique sorts drivers from passengers in cancer genomics, implicates GON4L

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:02pm
A new study demonstrates a novel method for sorting passenger from driver alterations, and uses this method to pinpoint a new driver and potential therapeutic target in cancer progression, GON4L.
Categories: Science

Culture Podcast: Recovering From Game of Thrones by Ragging on Resurgence

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:00pm
We might need a little breather after consuming last week's media diet. Thank goodness this weekend is the Fourth of July. The post Culture Podcast: Recovering From Game of Thrones by Ragging on Resurgence appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Wi-Fi Gets Multi-Gigabit, Multi-User Boost With Upgrades To 802.11ac

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 8:00pm
The Wi-Fi Alliance has announced its certification program for IEEE 802.11ac Wave 2, a technology that has been around on the market for more than a year. Wave 2 can deliver up to 6.8Gbps and lets an access point interact with more than one device at a time. Wave 2 features MIMO (or MU-MIMO) which improves the MIMO technology that lets Wi-FI transmit over more than one stream through the air. Wave 2 standard utilizes channels up to 160MHz wide (up from 80MHz channels available with Wave 1). It also creates more spatial streams and uses spectrum more efficiently, the industry group said on Wednesday. Ars Technica adds:On top of MU-MIMO, wider channels, and more streams, the Wi-Fi Alliance says Wave 2 features now being certified bring "support for a greater number of available channels in 5GHz," a change that "makes more efficient use of available spectrum and reduces interference and congestion by minimizing the number of networks operating on overlapping channels." You may have already noticed routers supporting some of these features, since the specification details have been available for a few years. In fact, routers with MU-MIMO started appearing in July 2014, and you can find routers that use 160MHz channels. The certification program takes a while to catch up with real-world implementations, but it ensures compatibility between devices and may spur faster adoption by vendors. End-user devices such as phones, tablets, and laptops must also be updated to take advantage of new features such as MU-MIMO.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Happy 60th Birthday, Interstate Highway System! You Look Awful

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 7:25pm
A three-step intervention for a middle-aged infrastructure project. The post Happy 60th Birthday, Interstate Highway System! You Look Awful appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Facebook Tweaks Its Newsfeed To Better Showcase Posts From Friends Instead Of Publishers

Slashdot - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 7:20pm
Facebook announced on Wednesday that it is making some changes to its algorithm that powers the News Feed to better showcase posts from friends and family members over posts from publishers. Mark Wilson, writing for BetaNews:The problem we currently face, Facebook says, is that there is "far too much information for any one person to consume." This is where algorithms come into play, meddling with timelines and newsfeeds in ways that never please everyone. The latest change promises that content from "the friends you care about" will appear "higher up in your News Feed."The move comes as Facebook struggles to get people to interact and post more on its social network. This is yet another blow to publishers that rely heavily on social media exposure. In recent years, Facebook has not only downranked stories that have misleading and unclear headlines but also cut the traffic it was once sending publishers' way. It is worth pointing out that these events have happened in the lights of Facebook launching its own publishing network called Instant Articles on the social media and encouraging publishers to directly publish on its platform instead of their respective websites.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

WIRED Book Club: Alright Fine We’ll Read The Name of the Wind

Wired News - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 7:00pm
After two months of challenging ourselves, we're ready for what Rothfuss is selling: classic fantasy that's not so much read as consumed. The post WIRED Book Club: Alright Fine We'll Read The Name of the Wind appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Wearable technology gets good ratings from plastic surgeons

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 6:52pm
Plastic surgeons see some clear advantages of using Google Glass in the operating room, reports a new survey.
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Immune system link to kidney disease risk, research finds

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 6:52pm
A gene which forms part of our body's first line of defense against infection may be associated with an increased risk with a type of kidney disease, research indicates.
Categories: Science

Inserting stents through the wrist reduces bleeding, death rates in heart disease patients

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 6:52pm
Access through the wrist, or radial access, when inserting stents to restore blood flow in heart disease patients has fewer complications and should be the default approach over access through the groin, or femoral access, according to researchers.
Categories: Science

Current stimulation to the brain partially restores vision in patients with glaucoma and optic nerve damage

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 6:52pm
Vision loss due to glaucoma or optic nerve damage is generally considered irreversible. Now a new prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial demonstrates significant vision improvement in partially blind patients after 10 days of noninvasive, transorbital alternating current stimulation. In addition to activation of their residual vision, patients also experienced improvement in vision-related quality of life such as acuity, reading, mobility or orientation.
Categories: Science

Radiation-guided nanoparticles zero in on metastatic cancer

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 6:52pm
Zap a tumor with radiation to trigger expression of a molecule, then attack that molecule with a drug-loaded nanoparticle, say cancer researchers.
Categories: Science

Little to no association between butter consumption, chronic disease or total mortality

Science Daily - Wed, 29/06/2016 - 6:52pm
An epidemiological study analyzing the association of butter consumption with chronic disease and mortality finds that butter was only weakly associated with total mortality, not associated with heart disease, and slightly inversely associated (protective) with diabetes.
Categories: Science