In 1984, Jobs and Wozniak Talk About Apple's Earliest Days

Slashdot - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 3:11pm
harrymcc writes: In 1984, Apple launched the Apple IIc computer. As part of its promotion, it produced a video with Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and other employees talking about company's founding and the creation of the Apple I and Apple II computers. Over at Fast Company, I've shared this remarkable, little-seen bit of history. It's full of goodies, from images of Jobs and Wozniak wearing remarkably Apple Watch-like timepieces to evocative photos of early computer stores.

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Categories: Science

Pre-Orders Start For Neo900 Open Source Phone

Slashdot - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:54pm
New submitter JoSch1337 writes: After a year and a half of development, the Neo900 project now opened its web shop for the down payments of binding pre-orders for either a full Neo900 phone or the bare circuit board to upgrade an existing Nokia N900. The up-front down payment is necessary to now secure expensive "risk parts" like the modem, 1GB RAM and N900 cases. Thus, without pre-ordering now, there might not be enough parts left after the first batch. The Neo900 is the spritual successor of the Nokia N900. The new circuit board can be placed into an existing N900 for better specs (faster CPU, more RAM, LTE modem) than the original device while still maintaining fremantle (maemo 5) backwards compatibility. Alternatively, a fully assembled phone can be purchased as well. The Neo900 will be fully operational without any binary blob running on the main CPU. While the modem still requires a non-free firmware, it is completely decoupled from the rest of the device (think of a LTE usb stick you put in your laptop) and can reliably be monitored or switched off by the operating system. You can follow the development of the project in the maemo forum, read about the specs of the device or consult the FAQ

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Categories: Science

Symbiosis turns messy in 13-year cicadas

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:49pm
Bacteria that live in the guts of cicadas have split into many separate but interdependent species in a strange evolutionary phenomenon that leaves them reliant on a bloated genome, a new paper has found.
Categories: Science

Eastern diamondback rattlesnakes' quest for fire

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:49pm
The eastern diamondback rattlesnake has lost 97 percent of its habitat since becoming an American icon on the Revolutionary-era 'Don't Tread on Me' flag. New research demonstrates the critical nature of one element of the diamondback's home range, pine savanna. For conservationists seeking surrogate habitats for the now-rare species' dwindling population, the results underscore the need for prescribed fire management to maintain the open-canopy forest and its ecosystem.
Categories: Science

Hiding your true colors may make you feel morally tainted

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:49pm
The advice, whether from Shakespeare or a modern self-help guru, is common: Be true to yourself. New research suggests that this drive for authenticity -- living in accordance with our sense of self, emotions, and values -- may be so fundamental that we actually feel immoral and impure when we violate our true sense of self. This sense of impurity, in turn, may lead us to engage in cleansing or charitable behaviors as a way of clearing our conscience.
Categories: Science

Brain tumors: Millimeter by millimeter towards a better prognosis

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:49pm
A method known as navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) has been gaining importance in neurosurgery for some time now. Among other applications, it is used to map brain tumors before an operation and to test whether important regions of the brain, for example motor and language areas, are affected. Doctors have now shown that preoperative nTMS analysis of motor areas improves the prognosis of patients with malignant brain tumors.
Categories: Science

Field study shows how a GM crop can have diminishing success at fighting off insect pest

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:49pm
A new study finds the toxin in a widely used genetically modified (GM) crop is having little impact on the crop pest corn earworm -- which is consistent with predictions made almost 20 years ago that were largely ignored. The study may be a signal to pay closer attention to warning signs about the development of resistance in agricultural pests to GM crops.
Categories: Science

Odds are that chronic gamblers are often also depressed

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:48pm
If a young man is a chronic gambler, the chances are extremely high that he also suffers from depression, finds a study that is is the first to investigate the extent to which gambling and depression develop hand-in-hand from the teenage years to early adulthood.
Categories: Science

Shape-shifting plastic developed

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:47pm
Researchers have developed a process to make a thermoset that can be reshaped and reused. The new plastic is a shape-memory polymer, so named because the material can “remember” its original shape and return to it after being deformed with heat or other forces.
Categories: Science

Twin boundaries in lithium-ion batteries: Turn that defect upside down

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:47pm
Most people see defects as flaws. A few researchers, however, see them as opportunities. Twin boundary defects may present an opportunity to improve lithium-ion batteries.
Categories: Science

Safe long-term storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers?

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:46pm
Emplacement of carbon dioxide at the Bravo Dome gas field in New Mexico began more than 900,000 years earlier than previously estimated, according to scientists. The study documents the first field evidence for the safe long-term storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers.
Categories: Science

US Proposes Tighter Export Rules For Computer Security Tools

Slashdot - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:10pm
itwbennett writes: The U.S. Commerce Department has proposed tighter export rules for computer security tools and could prohibit the export of penetration testing tools without a license. The proposal would modify rules added to the Wassenaar Arrangement in 2013 that limit the export of technologies related to intrusion and traffic inspection. The definition of intrusion software would also encompass 'proprietary research on the vulnerabilities and exploitation of computers and network-capable devices,' the proposal said.

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Categories: Science

Cape Watch: Let’s Talk About Lex Luthor’s Fashion Choices

Wired News - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 2:00pm

With 'Avengers: Age of Ultron' still fresh in everyone's minds, attentions have turned to other super teams. Here is all the superhero movie news you need.

The post Cape Watch: Let’s Talk About Lex Luthor’s Fashion Choices appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Development of face perception earlier in Japanese children than Western children

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:59pm
Face perception plays an important role in social communication. There have been many studies of face perception in human using non-invasive neuroimaging and electrophysiological methods, but studies of face perception in children were quite limited. Scientists have now investigated the development of face perception in Japanese children, by using an electroencephalogram (EEG). The team also compared their results for Japanese children with the previous findings for Western children.
Categories: Science

Continuous glucose monitoring with real-time measurement devices has added benefit

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:50pm
Real-time continuous glucose monitoring has advantages for HbA1c control, reviewers have concluded in a new report.
Categories: Science

The flight of the oryx: Qatar's success may be stymied

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:50pm
Qatar's capital city, Doha, is set to emerge as a major knowledge hub, with its educated, high-tech workforce and its international connectivity. However, the lack of a cohesive plan for development and the mobility of that workforce in and out of Qatar could stymie its success on the global stage, experts say.
Categories: Science

How our gut changes through our lifetimes, and how this determines our overall health

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:50pm
Scientists and clinicians have carried out the first detailed study of how our intestinal tract changes as we age, and how this determines our overall health.
Categories: Science

Infections can affect your IQ

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:50pm
New research shows that infections can impair your cognitive ability measured on an IQ scale. The study is the largest of its kind to date, and it shows a clear correlation between infection levels and impaired cognition.
Categories: Science

Social structure 'helps birds avoid a collision course'

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:49pm
The sight of skilful aerial maneuvering by flocks of Greylag geese to avoid collisions with York's Millennium Bridge intrigued a mathematical biologist. It raised the question of how birds collectively negotiate human-made obstacles such as wind turbines that lie in their flight paths.
Categories: Science

Boosting college and career readiness among Black and Latino male students

Science Daily - Thu, 21/05/2015 - 1:49pm
A new report on New York City's Expanded Success Initiative (ESI), which is designed to boost college and career readiness among Black and Latino male students, finds that the schools involved are changing the way they operate and offering students opportunities they would not otherwise have.
Categories: Science