Growing inequalities make science more of a 'winner takes all' field

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 6:13pm
As new research documents growing inequalities in health and wealth, the gap between "haves" and "have-nots" is growing in the field of scientific research itself, says a sociologist.
Categories: Science

NSA Reform Bill Passes the House—With a Gaping Loophole

Wired News - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 6:01pm
The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would end the NSA's mass collection of Americans' phone records. Unfortunately, it may not end the NSA's mass collection of Americans' phone records.






Categories: Science

Japanese Court Rules Against Restarting Ohi Reactors

Slashdot - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:38pm
AmiMoJo writes: "A Japanese court has ordered the operator of the Ohi nuclear plant in Fukui Prefecture, central Japan, not to restart two of its reactors, citing inadequate safety measures. The plant's No. 3 and 4 reactors were halted for regular inspections last September. Local residents filed a lawsuit asking that the reactors be kept offline. They said an estimate of possible tremors is too small, and that the reactors lack backup cooling systems. The operator, Kansai Electric Power Company, has insisted that no safety problems exist."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Cell migration and the mysterious role of cadherin

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:34pm
Fruit-fly ovaries were used in a new study to uncover how E-cadherin guides collective cell migration. According to traditional scientific dogma, E-cadherin acts like the mortar between bricks, holding cells together and preventing motility. This research team found the opposite: Cadherin is actually promoting the ability of cells to move and migrate. "It's doing it in three different ways in three different parts of the cell," the lead investigator said. "In each spot in the cell, cadherin is doing something different and all of those function together to orchestrate the movement of cells."
Categories: Science

New details on microtubules and how the anti-cancer drug Taxol works

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:34pm
Images of microtubule assembly and disassembly have been produced by researchers at the unprecedented resolution of 5 angstroms, providing new insight into the success of the anti-cancer drug Taxol and pointing the way to possible improvements. "This is the first experimental demonstration of the link between nucleotide state and tubulin conformation within the microtubules and, by extension, the relationship between tubulin conformation and the transition from assembled to disassembled microtubule structure," says a biophysicist on the study.
Categories: Science

Neurostimulation: What is being said in the media, academic literature? Better acceptance, it seems

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:34pm
Neurostimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have gradually gained favor in the public eye over the past decade. In a new report, ethics experts raise important questions about the rising tide of tDCS coverage in the media, while regulatory action is lacking and ethical issues need to be addressed.
Categories: Science

Antibiotic crisis needs united global response, experts say

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:34pm
Growing resistance to antibiotics and other drugs demands a coordinated global response on the same scale as efforts to address climate change, say experts. Without an international commitment to tackle the issue, the world faces a future in which simple infections that have been treatable for decades become deadly diseases, they warn.
Categories: Science

Why Facebook Spent a Year Learning to Listen in on Your TV Shows

Wired News - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:30pm
If you’re watching TV or listening to music and you feel like discussing it online, Facebook believes, nothing should stand in the way. Not even a few keystrokes. The social networking giant spent more than a year developing its new audio sampling system, which can listen to a TV show or a song and then […]






Categories: Science

Near-normal or below-normal 2014 Atlantic hurricane season predicted

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:28pm
In its 2014 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued today NOAA's Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a near-normal or below-normal season. The main driver of this year's outlook is the anticipated development of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms.
Categories: Science

Near-normal or above-normal Eastern Pacific hurricane season predicted

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:25pm
NOAA's Climate Prediction Center has announced that a near-normal or above-normal hurricane season is likely for the Eastern Pacific this year. The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and a 10 percent chance of a below normal season.
Categories: Science

Near-normal or above-normal Central Pacific hurricane season predicted

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:21pm
NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center announced that climate conditions point to a near-normal or above-normal season in the Central Pacific Basin this year. For 2014, the outlook calls for a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, a 40 percent chance of an above-normal season, and a 20 percent chance of a below-normal season.
Categories: Science

US Navy Missile Launch Photos: Aegis SM-3 Test Flight from Land (May 24, 2014)

Space.com - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 5:03pm
See photos of the Aegis Ashore Weapon System launch test, the first to launch an SM-3 missile from land, on May 20, 2014. The U.S. Navy performed the test from Kawaii, Hawaii in a flight overseeen by the U.S. Missile Defense Agency.
Categories: Science

How the Internet of Garbage Cans Will Remake Our Future Cities

Wired News - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:58pm
New Yorkers grumble about the daily wake-up call they get when the city’s garbage trucks arrive outside their windows. But it wasn’t just the noise that bothered Sam Saha. Sometimes, Saha says, the trucks would make all that racket even when there wasn’t much to pick up. The thought of all that inefficiency–the wasted fuel, […]






Categories: Science

Google Fiber: No Charge For Peering, No Fast Lanes

Slashdot - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:55pm
An anonymous reader writes "Addressing the recent controversy over Netflix paying ISPs directly for better data transfer speeds, Google's Director of Network Engineering explains how their Fiber server handles peering. He says, 'Bringing fiber all the way to your home is only one piece of the puzzle. We also partner with content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and Akamai) to make the rest of your video's journey shorter and faster. (This doesn't involve any deals to prioritize their video 'packets' over others or otherwise discriminate among Internet traffic — we don't do that.) Like other Internet providers, Google Fiber provides the 'last-mile' Internet connection to your home. ... So that your video doesn't get caught up in this possible congestion, we invite content providers to hook up their networks directly to ours. This is called 'peering,' and it gives you a more direct connection to the content that you want. ... We don't make money from peering or colocation; since people usually only stream one video at a time, video traffic doesn't bog down or change the way we manage our network in any meaningful way — so why not help enable it?'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

'I can' mentality goes long way after childbirth

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:35pm
The way a woman feels about tackling everyday physical activities, including exercise, may be a predictor of how much weight she'll retain years after childbirth says a professor. A study followed 56 women during pregnancy and measured their physical activity levels, along with barriers to exercise and the ability to overcome them. Six years later, the research team followed up with more than half of the participants and found that the women who considered themselves less able to take on these barriers had retained more of their pregnancy weight. Top barriers identified in the study included time, motivation and childcare issues.
Categories: Science

Stem cell development: Experts offer insight into basic mechanisms of stem cell differentiation

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:35pm
The world has great expectations that stem cell research one day will revolutionize medicine. But in order to exploit the potential of stem cells, we need to understand how their development is regulated. Now researchers report a new discovery that provides valuable insight into basic mechanisms of stem cell differentiation. The discovery could lead to new ways of making stem cells develop into exactly the type of cells that a physician may need for treating a disease.
Categories: Science

One molecule blocks both pain and itch, discovered in mouse study

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:35pm
An antibody that simultaneously blocks the sensations of pain and itching has been found in studies with mice. The new antibody works by targeting the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the cell membrane of neurons. "We hope our discovery will garner interest from pharmaceutical companies that can help us expand our studies into clinical trials," said one researcher.
Categories: Science

Blocking pain receptors extends lifespan, boosts metabolism in mice

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:35pm
Chronic pain is known to shorten lifespan, and pain tends to increase with age. But is there a relationship between pain and longevity? Researchers have found that mice lacking the capsaicin pain receptor live around 14 percent longer than other mice, and they retain a more youthful metabolism as well. Receptor blockers could not only relieve pain, but increase lifespan, improve metabolic health and help diabetics and the obese.
Categories: Science

Computer models helping unravel the science of life? How cells of the fruit fly react to changes in the environment

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:35pm
Scientists have developed a sophisticated computer modelling simulation to explore how cells of the fruit fly react to changes in the environment. The model shows how cells of the fruit fly communicate with each other during its development.
Categories: Science

Gene behind unhealthy adipose tissue identified

Science Daily - Thu, 22/05/2014 - 4:35pm
A gene driving the development of pernicious adipose tissue in humans has been identified by researchers for the first time. The findings imply that the gene may constitute a risk factor promoting the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. "Our findings represent an important step forward in the understanding of how adipose tissue links to the development of metabolic disease," comments one of the principal investigators.
Categories: Science