Small changes to US kidney allocation policy may help reduce geographic disparities in transplantation

Science Daily - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 9:27pm
Small changes to kidney allocation policies in the United States could help alleviate geographic disparities related to transplantation, according to a new study. The findings suggest that local changes may be more effective than the sweeping changes that are currently being proposed to address geographic disparities.
Categories: Science

Risk factors for chronic kidney disease are present decades before diagnosis

Science Daily - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 9:27pm
Risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are present and identifiable 30 years before diagnosis, according to a new study. The findings suggest avenues for future research to determine whether certain early interventions can prevent future kidney disease.
Categories: Science

40 Years on, the Barcode Has Turned Everything Into Information

Wired News - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 9:26pm
When Alan Haberman came to San Francisco to upend the global economy---which in the end he did---he wasn't seeking venture capitalists or software engineers. This was the early 1970s, when a computer in every home was still just Steve Jobs' teenage dream. Anyway, Haberman wasn't a geek. He was a grocer.






Categories: Science

How Facebook Moved 20 Billion Instagram Photos Without You Noticing

Wired News - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 9:11pm
Your Instagram photos aren't where they used to be, and they moved without you even noticing.






Categories: Science

Diverse Faces Keep Guenon Monkeys From Interbreeding

Wired News - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 9:11pm
A group of Old World monkeys called guenons have undergone an incredible diversification in facial appearance to avoid interbreeding with closely related species.






Categories: Science

Automated Remote Charging for Your Flying Drones (Video)

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 8:49pm
The Skysense website says, 'Save time and manage your drone operations remotely: whenever the batteries run out, land on a Skysense Charging Pad and take off as soon as the batteries are recharged. Without ever leaving the office.' That certainly sounds convenient. Since it looks like everybody and her dog is jumping on the flying drone bandwagon, the next step is obviously charging the things without human intervention. We're talking about battery-powered ones, of course, like the multicopter drones that are starting to be used for things like pipeline inspection, mapmaking, and security alarm response. Sadly, using drones for beer delivery is currently against the law in the USA, as are the Burrito Bomber and the much-ballyhooed Amazon Prime Air drone delivery system. All this may change in the next few years as the FAA figures out how to regulate the many commercial drones that will inevitably be zipping through our skies, landing on pads to recharge themselves, and continuing their missions without human intervention. The next step in drone automation will probably be using driverless ground vehicles as drone launching and control stations. Shockingly, there aren't a dozen Kickstarter projects raising money to build automated ground support systems for automated flying drones already, but surely they'll show up before long. (Alternate Video Link)

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Categories: Science

Funding for iFind Kickstarter Suspended

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 8:38pm
An anonymous reader writes As of approximately 9AM PDT, funding for the iFind project at Kickstarter, the one with the bluetooth tags that have no battery and that harvest energy from WiFi and other radio sources, has been suspended. No word yet on how this came about. Not an unexpected outcome since their claims of harvesting enough energy for a Bluetooth beacon from ambient wireless signals looked pretty far-fetched.

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Categories: Science

10 Years at Saturn: Video Relives NASA Probe's Arrival

Space.com - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 8:30pm
The NASA video shows the tense scene at mission control on the night of June 30, 2004, as the Cassini spacecraft prepared to execute a crucial engine burn that would allow it to enter orbit around Saturn.
Categories: Science

Gigantic Ocean Vortices Seen From Space Could Change Climate Models

Wired News - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 8:09pm
Enormous vortices of water, measuring 60 miles across, spin their way across the sea at a deliberate pace---3 miles per day.






Categories: Science

Former NSA Chief Warned Against Selling NSA Secrets

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 8:05pm
An anonymous reader writes Former NSA Chief General Keith Alexander has apparently started his own cybersecurity consulting firm, IronNet Cybersecurity, and approached the banking industry pitching his company's suite of services. Word from Wired indicates that his services cost $1 million per month with a special discount asking price of $600,000 per month. Congressman Alan Grayson (D-FL) expressed concern about General Alexander's activities to the banking industry, stating, "I question how Mr. Alexander can provide any of the services he is offering unless he discloses or misuses classified information, including extremely sensitive sources and methods....Without the classified information he acquired in his former position, he literally would have nothing to offer to you." (PDF) The congressman from the House of Representatives reminds the bankers (and General Alexander, should he be listening) that selling top secret information is a federal offense.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

New Ion-Propulsion System Could Deliver Time Capsule to Mars

Space.com - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 8:01pm
A student-led mission aims to send a time capsule to the Red Planet, using a new, more compact kind of propulsion system.
Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is Time Moving Forward Or Backward? Computers Learn To Spot the Difference

Slashdot - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 7:22pm
sciencehabit (1205606) writes For the first time, scientists have taught computers to figure out the direction of time in videos, a result that could help researchers better understand our own perception of time. Regardless of any possible applications, "we just thought it was a great problem," says one of the study's authors. Teaching computers to see the arrow of time combines computer science, physics, and human perception to get at the heart of the question, "How do we understand the visual world?" The researchers "broke down 180 YouTube videos into square patches of a few hundred pixels, which they further divided into four-by-four grids. Combining standard techniques for discovering objects in still photographs with motion detection algorithms, the researchers identified 4000 typical patterns of motion, or 'flow words,' across a grid’s 16 cells. ... When they tested their program on the remaining 60 videos, the trained computers could correctly determine whether a video ran forward or backward 80% of the time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science