Sensors Slip Into the Brain, Then Dissolve When Their Job Is Done

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 9:12pm
An anonymous reader writes: Silicon-based electronic circuits that operate flawlessly in the body for some number of days--soon weeks--and then harmlessly dissolve: they're what University of Illinois professor John Rogers says is the next frontier of electronics. Today he released news of successful animal tests on such transient electronics designed for use in brain implants, but says they could be used just about anywhere in the body. As these devices move into larger animal and eventually human tests, Rogers says he'll be working on the next generation--devices that intervene to accelerate healing or manage medical conditions, not just monitor them.

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Categories: Science

AMD Rips 'Biased and Unreliable' Intel-Optimized SYSmark Benchmark

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 8:27pm
MojoKid writes: AMD is making a stink about SYSMark, a popular benchmarking program that's been around for many years, and one the chip designer says is not reliable. Rather than provide meaningful results and information, AMD claims SYSMark unfairly favors Intel products and puts too much emphasis on strict CPU performance above all else. John Hampton, director of AMD's client computing products, explained in a video why SYSMark itself is an unreliable metric of performance. He even brought up the "recent debacle" involving Volkswagon as proof that "information provided by even the most established organizations can be misleading." Salinas says SYSMark's focus on the CPU is so "excessive" that it's really only evaluating the processor, not the system as a whole. In comparison, PCMark 8 probes not only the CPU, but graphics and subsystems as well. In an attempt to drive the point home, AMD ran a set of custom scripts it developed based on Microsoft Office and timed how long it took each system to complete them. The Intel system took 61 seconds to finish the benchmark versus 64 seconds for the AMD platform, a difference of about 6-7 percent and in line with what PCMark 8 indicated, though Sysmark shows a stark delta of 50 percent in favor of Intel with comparable CPUs.

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Categories: Science

Airbus Joins Uber For On-Demand Chopper Rides

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 7:45pm
An anonymous reader writes: Airbus is teaming up with Uber to provide on-demand helicopter rides, due to debut at the Sundance Film Festival which opens in Utah this month. The flight service will employ H125 and H130 aircraft to transport passengers, while Uber vehicles will ferry them to and from the helipad sites. A Utah-based firm, called Air Resources, will be coordinating the service. This is not the first time Uber has experimented with helicopter partnerships, transporting people via chopper ride at the U.S. Formula 1 Grand Prix, the Cannes Film Festival, Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, and from New York into the Hamptons in 2013.

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Categories: Science

Interviews: Ask David Peterson About Inventing Languages

Slashdot - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 7:00pm
samzenpus writes: David J. Peterson is a language creator and author. He created the Dothraki and Valyrian languages for HBO's Game of Thrones, and more recently has created languages for the CW's The 100 and MTV's The Shannara Chronicles. His new book, The Art of Language Invention, details how to create a new language from scratch, and goes over some of the specific choices he made in creating the languages for Game of Thrones and Syfy's Defiance. David has agreed to give us some of his time to answer any questions you may have. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one question per post.

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Categories: Science

Scientists demonstrate basics of nucleic acid computing inside cells

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:53pm
Using strands of nucleic acid, scientists have demonstrated basic computing operations inside a living mammalian cell. The research could lead to an artificial sensing system that could control a cell's behavior in response to such stimuli as the presence of toxins or the development of cancer.
Categories: Science

Blackouts in the brain: New complex systems perspective on Alzheimer's Disease

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:51pm
Alzheimer’s disease relentlessly targets large-scale brain networks that support the formation of new memories. However, it remains a mystery as to why the disease selectively targets memory-related brain networks and how this relates to misfolded proteins seen by pathologists at autopsy.
Categories: Science

Heightened ability to imagine odors linked to higher body weight

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:51pm
The ability to vividly imagine the smell of popcorn, freshly baked cookies and even non-food odors is greater in obese adults, new research suggests. Vivid mental imagery is a key factor in stimulating and maintaining food cravings, which can be induced by the thought, smell and sight of food, say authors of a new report on the work.
Categories: Science

No sex required

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:49pm
When a sperm and an egg cell merge a new life begins. This is the case in humans and in animals, but in principle also in plants. A team of biologists has discovered a gene trigger in the moss Physcomitrella patens that leads to offspring without fertilization. The researchers assume that this mechanism is conserved in evolution and holds the key to answer fundamental questions in biology.
Categories: Science

Seeing blood cells in action

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:49pm
Biophysicists measure, for the first time, what happens when red blood cells “wriggle.” The function of red blood cells (erythrocytes) is to transport oxygen in the blood of vertebrates. Up to now, scientists had only seen the reason for their constant wriggling in thermal (i.e. external) forces.
Categories: Science

Human sounds convey emotions clearer and faster than words

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:49pm
It takes just one-tenth of a second for our brains to begin to recognize emotions conveyed by vocalizations. It doesn't matter whether the non-verbal sounds are growls of anger, the laughter of happiness or cries of sadness. More importantly, the researchers have also discovered that we pay more attention when an emotion (such as happiness, sadness or anger) is expressed through vocalizations than we do when the same emotion is expressed in speech.
Categories: Science

Chemical study of influence of marine environment on historical buildings

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:49pm
By means of various analytical tools, researchers have analyzed the influence that may be exerted by various marine and urban-industrial atmospheres on the state of conservation of three buildings located in different places . To do this, they studied the chemical reactions that take place in different construction materials. All this could help to design possible strategies for new restoration processes of buildings close to the sea. 
Categories: Science

Quantum knots are real

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:49pm
The very first experimental observations of knots in quantum matter have just been reported. The scientists created knotted solitary waves, or knot solitons, in the quantum-mechanical field describing a gas of superfluid atoms, also known as a Bose--Einstein condensate.
Categories: Science

New findings may enhance PARP inhibitors therapy in breast cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:45pm
PARP inhibitors, an emerging class of drugs being studied in cancer clinical trials, may be enhanced by combining them with inhibitors targeting an oncogene known as c-MET which is overexpressed in many cancers, new research shows.
Categories: Science

Cheaper solar cells with 20.2 percent efficiency

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:45pm
A solar-panel material that can cut down on photovoltaic costs while achieving competitive power-conversion efficiency of 20.2 percent has been created by researchers.
Categories: Science

Explosive underwater volcanoes were a major feature of 'Snowball Earth'

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:44pm
Around 720-640 million years ago, much of the Earth's surface was covered in ice during a glaciation that lasted millions of years. Explosive underwater volcanoes were a major feature of this 'Snowball Earth,' according to new research.
Categories: Science

Mapping out cell conversion

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:44pm
An algorithm that can predict the factors required to convert one human cell type to another has been developed by researchers. These game-changing findings have significant implications for regenerative medicine and lay the groundwork for further research into cell reprogramming.
Categories: Science

Light-activated nanoparticles prove effective against antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs'

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:44pm
In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy recently developed by researchers.
Categories: Science

Scientists solve 3D structure of protein that guides the immune system

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:44pm
The three-dimensional structure of a crucial ion channel has been revealed by researchers, whose findings shed light on the channel's possible role in immune functions such as detecting infection and inflammation.
Categories: Science

Tiny electronic implants monitor brain injury, then melt away

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:44pm
A new class of small, thin electronic sensors can monitor temperature and pressure within the skull - crucial health parameters after a brain injury or surgery - then melt away when they are no longer needed, eliminating the need for additional surgery to remove the monitors and reducing the risk of infection and hemorrhage.
Categories: Science

Cardiac arrests in high-rise buildings: Low survival rates above 3rd floor

Science Daily - Mon, 18/01/2016 - 6:44pm
Residents of high-rise buildings had better survival rates from cardiac arrests if they lived on the first few floors, and survival was negligible for people living above the 16th floor, according to a study.
Categories: Science