Cancer Diagnosed More Often in Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:25pm
Researchers evaluated the overall and site-specific incidence of cancer among patients registered in USIDNET, and found increased cancer incidence rates, especially in lymphomas, among patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases.
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Increase in obesity among pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma patients may be linked to disease relapse

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:25pm
A new study used advanced imaging methods to evaluate obesity, and suggests a relationship between obesity and disease relapse.
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Weak evidence for prescribed alcohol drug, say scientists

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:23pm
A drug being used to treat alcohol problems in the UK was licensed for use despite insufficient evidence to prove its effectiveness, new research has found.
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Genome engineering of quantifiable protein tags: Western blot on the way down?

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:23pm
Cell biologists’ most notorious approach to detect and semi-quantify proteins, western blotting, could well be on its way down. Researchers have developed a set of universal protein tags that warrant protein quantification via targeted proteomics techniques.
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New synthetic models with electromagnetic properties of human tissues

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:23pm
New synthetic models of human tissues have been developed that simulate the electromagnetic properties of different tissues and organs. Known as phantoms, these models may be of interest for the development of new technologies for use in medical screening, as well as for the evaluation of 5G mobile communication devices. The researchers have also devised a methodology for creating these phantoms.
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How the brain merges the senses

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:23pm
Utilizing information from all the senses is critical for building a robust and rich representation of our surroundings. Given the wealth of multisensory information constantly bombarding us, however, how does our brain know which signals go together and thus need to be combined? And how does it integrate such related signals? Scientists have proposed a computational model that explains multisensory integration in humans utilizing a surprisingly simple processing unit.
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More is better: Diversity, number of soil animals determine leaf decomposition in the forest

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
Small animals that decompose fallen leaves in the forest form complex food webs and are essential to a functioning ecosystem. A study comprising over 80 forests in Germany and on Sumatra (Indonesia) has now shown that two factors particularly influence this function when examined over larger landscapes: the number of animals and their species diversity. In previous studies, the connection between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning had been investigated mostly in small test areas.
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My Smartphone and I: Scientists show that rubber-hand illusion can be produced by smartphones

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
It seems to be the stuff of pure fantasy: a hand made of rubber feels as if it belongs to the owner’s body. Although it is hardly conceivable, it is an illusion which is in fact well-known in the field of psychology – and one that can be produced in skillful experimental setups. Psychologists have now shown for the first time how test persons can also integrate their own smartphones into their bodily selves. This means that whether an object is felt to belong to the owner’s own body does not only depend on whether it has a form similar to that of a human hand. The extent to which the object is used also appears to play an important role.
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Cleaning up decades of phosphorus pollution in lakes

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
Phosphorus is the biggest cause of water quality degradation worldwide, causing 'dead zones', toxic algal blooms, a loss of biodiversity and increased health risks for the plants, animals and humans that come in contact with polluted waters. This threatens the loss of economic and social benefits from freshwaters upon which society relies. Scientists are now assessing how geo-engineering in lakes can control phosphorus pollution.
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Maintaining family rituals when working away from home

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
The way we work is fundamentally changing, with a rise in mobile working -- people who travel away from home for long or short periods of time. Some people, such as truck drivers, may be away from home as part of their normal working life, while other workers may have occupations that require them to travel and represent their organization regionally, nationally or even internationally. For mobile workers and their families, this kind of travel can have consequences for daily family life. A team of researchers has investigated the consequences of mobile working and what it means for family life.
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As temperatures rise, flowers emit less scent

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
The diverse and delicious fragrances of flowers brighten our days and inspire poetry. The more practical reason that flowers produce scent is to attract pollinating insects to the flowers' reproductive organs, thereby ensuring the continued existence of plant species. New research has now indicated that increases in ambient temperature also lead to a decrease in the production of floral scents.
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More precise diagnosis, treatment of brain tumors

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
Thanks to new methods of precision diagnostics, such as DNA sequencing and epigenetic analyses, it is becoming increasingly possible to identify specific central nervous system (CNS) tumors accurately and to provide targeted treatment. Researchers have now been actively involved as authors in the latest edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of CNS tumors.
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Enzyme-aided recovery methods' help in extracting protein from rapeseed press cake

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:21pm
One third of cold-pressed rapeseed press cake consists of nutritionally valuable protein that could have many other uses besides animal feed. A researcher has developed enzyme-aided methods for rapeseed protein enrichment. Her study also provides estimates of the costs of different protein extraction schemes.
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Women and people under the age of 35 at greatest risk of anxiety

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:17pm
Women are almost twice as likely to experience anxiety as men, according to a review of existing scientific literature. The study also found that people from Western Europe and North America are more likely to suffer from anxiety than people from other cultures.
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'Wasteful' galaxies launch heavy elements into surrounding halos and deep space

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:17pm
Galaxies 'waste' large amounts of heavy elements generated by star formation by ejecting them up to a million light years away into their surrounding halos and deep space, according to a new study.
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Evidence of hearing damage in teens prompts researchers' warning

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:17pm
New research into the ringing-ear condition known as tinnitus indicates an alarming level of early, permanent hearing damage in young people who are exposed to loud music, prompting a warning from a leading researcher in the field.
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Ships flagged for illegal fishing still able to get insurance

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:17pm
Rogue fishing vessels are able to secure insurance including those that have been flagged by international watchdogs for unlawful activity, new research indicates.
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Almost all food, beverage products marketed by music stars are unhealthy

Science Daily - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 12:16pm
The first study to quantify nutritional quality of food and drinks endorsed by music celebrities popular among teens has concluded that almost all such products are unhealthy. None of the music stars identified in the study endorsed fruits, vegetables, or whole grains. Only one endorsed a natural food deemed healthy--pistachios.
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