Top 5 Weird Facts About Mysterious Uranus: Photos

Space.com - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 7:07am
Explore a few of our favorite facts about this oddball planet in the outer solar system.
Categories: Science

Autonomous Cars? How About Autonomous Bikes?

Slashdot - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 5:16am
R3d M3rcury writes: So we've all heard about the brave new world of autonomous cars which will be at our beck-and-call. But how about an autonomous bike? The i-Bike (not to be confused with the iBike computer) is the winner of KPIT Sparkle 2016, the All India Science and Engineering Student Contest. It started off as a bicycle suitable for use by people with disabilities. If you could use a smartphone, you could ride a bike. But the developers realized that this could be part of a bike-sharing system. You could rent a bike at the train station, ride to work, and then have the bike automatically return to the train station for the next person. Of course, the obvious question is: Will the bike stop at stop signs?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Braava Is iRobot’s New Roomba. And This One Mops

Wired News - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 4:01am
This time, iRobot is ditching circles for a square. The post The Braava Is iRobot's New Roomba. And This One Mops appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

16 US Ships That Aided In Operation Tomodachi Still Contaminated With Radiation

Slashdot - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 2:50am
mdsolar writes: Sixteen U.S. ships that participated in relief efforts after Japan's nuclear disaster five years ago remain contaminated with low levels of radiation from the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, top Navy officials told Stars and Stripes. In all, 25 ships took part in Operation Tomadachi, the name given for the U.S. humanitarian aid operations after the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011. The tsunami, whose waves reached runup heights of 130 feet, crippled the Fukushima plant, causing a nuclear meltdown. In the years since the crisis, the ships have undergone cleanup efforts, the Navy said, and 13 Navy and three Military Sealift Command vessels still have some signs of contamination, mostly to ventilation systems, main engines and generators. "The low levels of radioactivity that remain are in normally inaccessible areas that are controlled in accordance with stringent procedures," the Navy said in an email to Stars and Stripes. "Work in these areas occurs mainly during major maintenance availabilities and requires workers to follow strict safety procedures."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Typosquatters Running<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.om Domain Scam To Push Mac Malware

Slashdot - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 1:25am
msm1267 writes from an article on Threatpost: Typosquatters are targeting Apple computer users with malware in a recent campaign that snares clumsy web surfers who mistakenly type .om instead of .com when surfing the web. According to Endgame security researchers, the top level domain for Middle Eastern country Oman (.om) is being exploited by typosquatters who have registered more than 300 domain names with the .om suffix for U.S. companies and services such as Citibank, Dell, Macys and Gmail. Endgame made the discovery last week and reports that several groups are behind the typosquatter campaigns. Mac OS X users are being singled out in this typosquatting campaign with malware. According to Endgame, when a Mac user stumbles on one of the typosquatters' webpages, a fake Adobe Flash update pops up and attempts to trick users to install the advertising component called Genieo. Endgame suspects that typosquatters are exploiting a hole in Oman's domain name registration process. When Endgame tried to register a domain it was asked to verify that it had the authority to registrar a specific commercial domain. "It's unclear how typosquatters were able to register so many domains in such a short period of time," Endgame said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

New SARS-like virus is poised to infect humans

Science Daily - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 1:15am
A SARS-like virus found in Chinese horseshoe bats may be poised to infect humans without the need for adaptation, overcoming an initial barrier that could potentially set the stage for an outbreak according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Bacteria-powered microrobots navigate with help from new algorithm

Science Daily - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 1:14am
Engineers have recently published research on a method for using electric fields to help tiny bio-robots propelled by flagellated bacteria navigate around obstacles in a fluid environment. These microrobots could one day be used for building microscopic devices or even delivering medication at the cellular level.
Categories: Science

Huge problems faced by parents of children with autism

Science Daily - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 1:14am
Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder face severe challenges in accessing adequate services, according to a survey of hundreds of parents in the United Kingdom.
Categories: Science

Fertilizer applied to fields today will pollute water for decades

Science Daily - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 1:14am
Dangerous nitrate levels in drinking water could persist for decades, increasing the risk for blue baby syndrome and other serious health concerns, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Sweet 'quantum dots' light the way for new HIV and Ebola treatment

Science Daily - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 1:14am
A research team has observed for the first time how HIV and Ebola viruses attach to cells to spread infection. The findings offer a new way of treating such viruses: instead of destroying the pathogens, introduce a block on how they interact with cells.
Categories: Science

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Will Be Weirder in Season 2

Wired News - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 12:44am
"Let's go to Red Hook with these 'morpets' and get pregnant!" The post Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Will Be Weirder in Season 2 appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Xbox Live Now Supports Cross-Platform Multiplayer With PS4

Slashdot - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 12:42am
An anonymous reader writes from an article on TechCrunch: Microsoft just announced that game developers can now create cross-platform multiplayer modes that work with other consoles and operating systems. So it means that the next Call of Duty or FIFA could feature a multiplayer mode that works with both Xbox and Playstation gamers. It just depends on developers now. Microsoft has historically restricted cross-platform play as the Xbox Live was the first successful multiplayer network for consoles. And yet, Microsoft is now lagging behind the Playstation 4 with its Xbox One. By opening up cross-platform multiplayer, Microsoft could convince late adopters to buy an Xbox One even though their friends have a PlayStation 4. It's also a way to make sure that there are enough plays for less popular games. It's unclear how developers are supposed to deal with duplicated PlayStation Network and Xbox Live screen names.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

New synthesized molecule could reduce brain damage in stroke victims

Kurzweil AI - Tue, 15/03/2016 - 12:02am

This graphic depicts a new inhibitor, 6S, locking up an enzyme (red) to block the production of hydrogen sulfide (yellow and white). Hydrogen sulfide concentrations have been shown to climb after the onset of a stroke, leading to brain damage. (credit: Matthew Beio, University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

A new molecule known as 6S has reduced the death of brain tissue from ischemic stroke by up to 66 percent in rats while reducing the accompaning inflammation, researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the National University of Singapore reported March 9 in an open-access paper published by the journal ACS Central Science.

The inhibitor molecule works by binding to cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), an enzyme that normally helps regulate cellular function, but can also trigger production of toxic levels of hydrogen sulfide in the brain. (That buildup initiates brain damage after strokes by disrupting blood flow, which prevents oxygen and glucose from reaching brain tissue, ultimately killing neurons and other cells.)

The researchers modeled the inhibitor on a naturally occurring molecule produced by the CBS enzyme, tailoring the molecule’s structure to improve its performance.* That increased the inhibitor’s binding time from less than a second to hours.

Because the 6S inhibitor has only demonstrated its effects in cell cultures and the brain tissue of rats, the researchers cautioned that it represents just an initial step toward developing a stroke-treating drug for humans.

Research and facilities that contributed to the study were partly funded by the American Heart Association, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health.

The World Health Organization has estimated that stroke kills more than 6 million people annually.

* The researchers replaced functional groups of atoms known as amines with hydrazines.

Abstract of “Zipped Synthesis” by Cross-Metathesis Provides a Cystathionine β-Synthase Inhibitor that Attenuates Cellular H2S Levels and Reduces Neuronal Infarction in a Rat Ischemic Stroke Model

The gaseous neuromodulator H2S is associated with neuronal cell death pursuant to cerebral ischemia. As cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is the primary mediator of H2S biogenesis in the brain, it has emerged as a potential target for the treatment of stroke. Herein, a “zipped” approach by alkene cross-metathesis into CBS inhibitor candidate synthesis is demonstrated. The inhibitors are modeled after the pseudo-C2-symmetric CBS product (l,l)-cystathionine. The “zipped” concept means only half of the inhibitor needs be constructed; the two halves are then fused by olefin cross-metathesis. Inhibitor design is also mechanism-based, exploiting the favorable kinetics associated with hydrazine-imine interchange as opposed to the usual imine–imine interchange. It is demonstrated that the most potent “zipped” inhibitor 6S reduces H2S production in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing CBS, thereby reducing cell death. Most importantly, CBS inhibitor 6S dramatically reduces infarct volume (1 h post-stroke treatment; ∼70% reduction) in a rat transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model for ischemia.

Categories: Science

AT&amp;T Defeats Class Action In Unlimited Data Throttling Case

Slashdot - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 11:54pm
An anonymous reader writes from an Ars Technica article: Customers who sued ATT over its practice of throttling unlimited data plans will not be able to pursue a class-action lawsuit against the company. ATT argued that the customers could not only have their complaints heard individually in arbitration, and Judge Edward Chen of US District Court in Northern California has sided with the cellular company. Chen accepted ATT's argument, noting that the Supreme Court previously upheld ATT's arbitration provision in a 2011 decision. In the 2011 case, ATT Mobility v. Concepcion, the Supreme Court found that the Federal Arbitration Act preempted a California state law that limited the power of companies to force customers into arbitration. [Chen's ruling granting ATT's motion to compel arbitration was issued on February 29 and highlighted in a MediaPost article Friday.] "Plaintiffs argue that the Concepcion Court never addressed the specific issues now raised -- i.e., that enforcement of the arbitration agreements would violate their rights as protected by the Petition Clause of the First Amendment," Chen wrote. "Because there is no state action in the instant case, Plaintiffs lack a viable First Amendment challenge to the arbitration agreements. As Plaintiffs have not challenged the arbitration agreements on any other bases, the Court grants ATT's motion to compel arbitration." ATT is still being punished by the FCC and FTC. Ars Technica writes, "The FCC last year proposed a $100 million fine to punish ATT for throttling the wireless Internet connections of customers with unlimited data plans without adequately notifying the customers about the reduced speeds. Separately, the FTC sued ATT in an attempt to gain millions of dollars worth of refunds for customers who paid for unlimited data and had their speeds throttled."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Docs With Malicious Macros Deliver Fileless Malware

Slashdot - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 11:12pm
itwbennett writes: Researchers from Palo Alto Networks warn that attackers are using Word documents with malicious macros and PowerShell to infect computers with fileless malware. The rogue PowerShell script performs a variety of checks on the computer aimed at finding systems that are used to conduct financial transactions and to avoid systems that belong to security researchers as well as medical and educational institutions. "Due to the target-specific details contained within the spam emails and the use of memory-resident malware, this particular campaign should be treated as a high threat," the Palo Alto researchers said in a blog post. A similar combination of PowerShell and fileless malware was observed last week by researchers from the SANS Institute's Internet Storm Center.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

ExoMars on its way to solve the Red Planet’s mysteries

Science Daily - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 10:24pm
The first of two joint ESA-Roscosmos missions to Mars has begun a seven-month journey to the Red Planet, where it will address unsolved mysteries of the planet's atmosphere that could indicate present-day geological -- or even biological -- activity.
Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Alternatives To "Atomic" Clocks?

Slashdot - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 10:24pm
Tony Isaac writes: "Atomic" clocks that you can buy in stores synchronize time using the WWVB shortwave band from NIST in Boulder. The problem is, this signal is notoriously weak, making these clocks very sensitive to interference by other RF or electronic devices, or less-than-ideal reception conditions. In many locations, these clocks are never able to receive a time signal, making them no better at timekeeping than a cheap quartz clock. There are other ways to synchronize clock time: NTP over WiFi, GPS, or cellular. The cheapest clocks that use NTP over Wi-Fi cost around $400. Really? And while there are plenty of GPS-enabled smartwatches in the $100 price range, there don't seem to be any similar wall clocks. Are there any reasonably-priced wall clock alternatives, that use something other than shortwave to set the time?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

No Hamilton Tickets? That’s OK—The White House Is Streaming It

Wired News - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 10:17pm
Watch the Broadway hit show no one can get tickets for right here. The post No Hamilton Tickets? That's OK—The White House Is Streaming It appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Hyperloop to Feature 'Augmented' and 'Interactive' Windows

Slashdot - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 9:31pm
An anonymous reader writes about the much-anticipated Hyperloop transportation system: Dirk Ahlborn, CEO of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, took to the stage at SXSW to announce that the Hyperloop will have "interactive panels" as windows. Through these "augmented windows," users will be able to "look out" at "motion capture technology." He added, "Based on your position, we're actually manipulating the image. [...] It's psychologically really important and great to have the possibility to look out the window."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Feds Are Prepping Strict Rules to Protect Your Online Privacy

Wired News - Mon, 14/03/2016 - 8:59pm
Chairman Wheeler announced a new set of privacy rules that will regulate how Internet providers are allowed to handle user data. The post The Feds Are Prepping Strict Rules to Protect Your Online Privacy appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science