Calcium pump caught in the act

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:55pm
One of the cell's key enzymes, the calcium pump, has now been been described in its decisive moment -- a so-called transition state. These findings provide a very detailed picture of how one of the most energy-consuming processes in the body takes place. Calcium pumps are intimately involved in the activity of muscle, such as the heart, and therefore they are considered important targets for development of new drugs for cardiovascular diseases.
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Where you are is who you are: How enclosed and open spaces affect cognition

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:55pm
A recent study suggests that who we are might be more integrated with where we are than previously thought. The fact that experience can shape individual differences, which in turn can affect the quality of spatial and social cognition a person, suggests that growing up in certain built environments can have detrimental or beneficial effects on their cognitive ability. This brings up questions such as whether raising children in enclosed spaces versus open spaces will result in differences in spatial and social cognition.
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New techniques make RFID tags 25 percent smaller

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:55pm
Engineering researchers have developed a suite of techniques that allow them to create passive radio-frequency identification tags that are 25 percent smaller -- and therefore less expensive.
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Parents Could Be Sued By Their Kids For Posting Pictures of Them On Facebook

Slashdot - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:40pm
Next time you share pictures of your children on Facebook, you will want to take their permission before doing that. French authorities have warned parents in France of fines of up to $50,000 and a year in prison for publishing intimate photos of their children on social media without permission. From a Guardian report: It's a development that could give pause for thought for many parents used to sharing details of their children's lives across social media. A 2015 study by internet company Nominet found parents in the UK post nearly 200 photos of their under fives online every year, meaning a child will feature in around 1,000 online photos before their fifth birthday. [...] "In a few years, children could easily take their parents to court for publishing photos of them when they were younger," Eric Delcroix, an expert on internet law and ethics, told Le Figaro. "Children at certain stages do not wish to be photographed or still less for those photos to be made public," he added.It may seem like an absurd law to many, but think about the potential consequences of putting a kid's picture on social media. Among others, we've seen plenty of pictures becoming meme on the web.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Artificial intelligence course creates AI teaching assistant

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:19pm
Jill Watson is a virtual teaching assistant. She was one of nine teaching assistants in an artificial intelligence online course. And none of the students guessed she wasn't a human.
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Novel role for spleen B cells in inflammatory response to bacterial toxins

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:17pm
A new role for marginal zone B lymphocytes has been discovered: enhancing inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharides. These findings broaden understanding of marginal zone B cell function and interleukin-6 signaling in the immune system, which could be exploited to treat sepsis.
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Opinions on fracking linked to political persuasion, says new study

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:17pm
A person's opinion on fracking can be predicted by their political ideology, according to a new study. The researchers found that politically conservative people are more likely to be in favour of the practice and to believe fracking offers greater economic benefits and fewer health risks.
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Method to improve photoluminescence efficiency of 2-D semiconductors

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:17pm
Scientists have developed a method to enhance the photoluminescence efficiency of tungsten diselenide, a two-dimensional semiconductor, paving the way for the application of such semiconductors in advanced optoelectronic and photonic devices.
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Further evidence found against ancient 'killer walrus' theory

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:17pm
A team of scientists using techniques from the field of dentistry is shedding new light on the evolution of walruses, fur seals and sea lions. The researchers have cast further doubt on previous claims that an ancient 'killer walrus' was a marine mammal eater. The multidisciplinary research team analyzed the internal structure of tooth enamel in a fossil walrus from California, Pelagiarctos thomasi, and in teeth of New Zealand fur seals and sea lions.
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In US, celiac disease diagnosis is most common among patients with Punjabi ancestry

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:17pm
About 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease, an immune-based condition brought on by the consumption of gluten in genetically susceptible patients. Among patients diagnosed with celiac disease by small intestinal biopsy in the US, those from the Punjab region of India have the highest rates of disease, according to new research.
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The Transit of Mercury Across the Sun's Face Has Begun: First Videos

Space.com - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:15pm
The planet Mercury is making its way across the face of the sun (as seen from Earth) in a rare transit event today (May 9). See our first video of the sight from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory.
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How Captain America Became Marvel’s Big-Screen Secret Weapon

Wired News - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:00pm
He'll never be the most powerful superhero, nor the coolest. But Cap's become the most valuable soldier in the Marvel universe. The post How Captain America Became Marvel's Big-Screen Secret Weapon appeared first on WIRED.
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Microsoft: Windows 10 Will Remain Free For People With Accessibility Needs

Slashdot - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 2:00pm
Reader Mark Wilson writes: The free ride is coming to an end. Windows 10 was always going to be free for the first year after release, and this year is up on 29 July. There are, of course, still ways to get your hands on Windows 10 for free beyond this date. One way is to buy a new PC with Windows 10 installed, although not many people would regard this as a free upgrade. But Microsoft has also confirmed that people with accessibility needs will still be able to upgrade to Windows 10 for free after the deadline. Writing on its Accessibility Blog, Microsoft points out that the 29 July cut-off point does not apply to people with accessibility needs.From Microsoft's blog post: As you may have heard, the free Windows 10 upgrade offer for customers running Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 is set to end on July 29, but we want to clarify that that deadline will not apply to customers who use assistive technologies. We are continuing to deliver on our previously-shared vision for accessibility for Windows 10 and we are committed to ensuring that users of assistive technologies have the opportunity to upgrade to Windows 10 for free as we do so.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Mercury Transit 2016 - Spacecraft View In Different Wavelength | Video

Space.com - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 1:27pm
NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory is capturing imagery of the transit in multiple wavelengths and transmitting it back to Earth in near real-time.
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Game of Thrones Death Pool: Dany’s Back and Arya’s Back in Action

Wired News - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 1:00pm
SPOILERS: Arya is back on her way to being just "a girl" and Daenerys Targaryen is back with the Dothraki. Oh, and Tyrion wants to play a drinking game. The post Game of Thrones Death Pool: Dany's Back and Arya's Back in Action appeared first on WIRED.
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Large-scale data study of super storm sandy utility damage shows 'small' failures, big impact

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 1:00pm
A new study shows the extent of the challenge faced by the upstate New York distribution grid during Super Storm Sandy in October 2012, and suggests what might be done to make the system more resilient against future storms.
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Transit of Mercury 2016: Full Coverage of the May 9 Event

Space.com - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 1:00pm
Mercury will cross the sun's face next Monday (May 9) in a rare "transit" that will be visible from most places on Earth, weather permitting. Read all about the skywatching event here.
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Visualizing the lithiation of a nanosized iron-oxide material in real time

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 12:59pm
An electron microscopy technique for visualizing how lithium ions migrate at the nanoscale could help improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries.
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No evidence found linking anti-nausea drug to birth defects

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 12:59pm
No evidence has been found to link the anti-nausea drug Zofran to an increased risk of birth defects. In fact, women with the condition who took Zofran reported fewer miscarriages and pregnancy terminations and higher live birth rates than women with extreme morning sickness who did not take the drug.
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Medicare Part D boosts medication adherence, reduces blood pressure risk

Science Daily - Mon, 09/05/2016 - 12:59pm
Implementation of Medicare Part D has increased the number of people taking their prescribed medications as directed – so-called “medication adherence” – and reduced the likelihood that newly covered beneficiaries develop high blood pressure, new research shows.
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