Dead body feeding larvae useful in forensic investigations

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:39pm
Non-biting blow fly Chrysomya megacephala is commonly found in dead bodies and is used in forensic investigations to determine the time of death, referred to as the post mortem interval. A report of synanthropic derived form of C. megacephala from Tamil Nadu is provided for the first time based on morphological features and molecular characterization through generation of DNA barcoding.
Categories: Science

Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:39pm
Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for themselves but hurts them when they are negotiating in a situation that requires compromise. Additionally, men who are more attractive are better collaborators compared to less attractive men.
Categories: Science

Protein evolution follows modular principle

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:39pm
Similarities between proteins reveal that their great diversity has arisen from smaller building blocks. Proteins consist of long chains of 20 different amino acid building blocks that fold into a characteristic three-dimensional structure. It is noteworthy that some modules, known as protein domains, occur more frequently than others. Scientists suspect that many of these domains share a common evolutionary origin.
Categories: Science

Timing everything with NFL contracts

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:38pm
When renegotiating a contract in the NFL, timing is of the essence — the player can benefit financially the earlier in the offseason the contract is signed, while the team can benefit by waiting — and can mean a difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars, according to new research.
Categories: Science

SpaceX Releases Video of Falcon Rocket's Splashdown

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:25pm
First time accepted submitter cowdung (702933) writes In spite of Elon Musk's characterization of the landing as a KABOOM event. Judging by this video SpaceX has managed to land the first stage rocket booster nicely on the ocean after their Orbcomm launch on July 14th. It seems we're one step closer to a landing on dry land. Both this and the previous landing seem to have gone well. Hopefully the next landing test camera has something to deice the camera lens.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NASA's Chandra X-Ray Space Telescope Celebrates 15 Years of Discoveries

Space.com - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:08pm
The agency's Chandra X-ray Observatory — one of NASA's 'Great Observatories,' along with the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes and the now-retired Compton Gamma Ray Observatory — launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia on July 23, 1999.
Categories: Science

Landsat: 42 Years of Earth from Space Photos | Video

Space.com - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:06pm
NASA's first Landsat mission launched in July 1972. Seven more satellites have been launched since. Two of these, Landsat 7 & 8, are still active. The program acquired science imagery of natural disasters, urban change, water, ice, and farming.
Categories: Science

Microsoft FY2014 Q4 Earnings: Revenues Up, Profits Down Slightly

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:06pm
Microsoft has released their latest earnings report, and it's not as bleak as last week's news might have you suspect. Quoting Forbes: Microsoft reported $23.38 billion of revenue for the fourth quarter, up 17.5% from the same period last year. Net income, however, came in at $4.6 billion, down from last year and behind Wall Street analysts' consensus estimate, both about $5 billion. At 55 cents earnings per share were down 4 cents and a nickel short of the Street’s call. For the full year, revenue clocked in at $86.8 billion an 11.5% increase from a year earlier. Net income was $22.1 billion and earnings per share were $2.63. They took a hit from finalizing the acquisition of Nokia's handset division (not unexpected). The cloud services side of the business appears to be growing, while traditional software sales have stagnated. The layoffs will cost Microsoft between $1.1 and $1.6 billion over the first half of next year.

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Categories: Science

So Long, Craigslist Scammers. This Startup Will Change the Way You Find a Home

Wired News - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 4:04pm
Investors are pouring millions into Urban Compass, a New York City-based startup that offers an antidote to Craigslist chaos.






Categories: Science

Why Dropbox Is Tying Its Future to Microsoft Office

Wired News - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:48pm
The file-syncing service is rolling out several Office-related features for businesses, including full-text search of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents, among other file types, and the ability for multiple users to simultaneously edit Office documents via Dropbox.






Categories: Science

Calcification in changing oceans

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:42pm
What do mollusks, starfish, and corals have in common? Aside from their shared marine habitat, they are all calcifiers -- organisms that use calcium from their environment to create hard carbonate skeletons and shells for stability and protection.
Categories: Science

Voyager spacecraft might not have reached interstellar space

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:41pm
In 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that the Voyager 1 spacecraft had passed into interstellar space, traveling further from Earth than any other humanmade object. But, in the nearly two years since that historic announcement, and despite subsequent observations backing it up, uncertainty about whether Voyager 1 really crossed the threshold continues.
Categories: Science

Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients, physicians

Science Daily - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:41pm
For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised intracranial pressure. A systematic review of 10 recent studies of what many emergency physicians regard as a 'wonder drug' has been recently published for review.
Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Slashdot - Wed, 23/07/2014 - 3:35pm
meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Advancing a career in the U.S. government might soon require an interview with a computer-generated head who wants to know about that time you took ketamine. A recent study by psychologists at the National Center for Credibility Assessment, published in the journal Computers and Human Behavior, asserts that not only would a computer-generated interviewer be less "time consuming, labor intensive, and costly to the Federal Government," people are actually more likely to admit things to the bot. Eliza finds a new job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science