Gang life is short-lived, study finds

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:35pm
Although membership in a gang often is depicted as a lifelong commitment, the typical gang member joins at age 13 and only stays active for about two years, according to a study.
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'Fracking' wastewater that is treated for drinking downstream produces potentially harmful compounds

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:35pm
Concerns that fluids from hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking,' are contaminating drinking water abound. Now, scientists are bringing to light another angle that adds to the controversy. A new study has found that discharge of fracking wastewaters to rivers, even after passage through wastewater treatment plants, could be putting the drinking water supplies of downstream cities at risk.
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'Greener,' low-cost transistor heralds advance in flexible electronics

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:35pm
As tech company LG demonstrated this summer with the unveiling of its 18-inch flexible screen, the next generation of roll-up displays is tantalizingly close. Researchers are now reporting a new, inexpensive and simple way to make transparent, flexible transistors -- the building blocks of electronics -- that could help bring roll-up smartphones with see-through displays and other bendable gadgets to consumers in just a few years.
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Southern European healthcare systems in the economic crisis

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
Very few matters draw as much public attention as the ongoing debate surrounding national healthcare services. When we speak of even the most basic access to medicines and cures - particularly sensitive topics during times of economic crises - political interference and private interests have dominated much of the discourse.
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False memories could be a side-effect of human ability to learn rules

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
Our tendency to create false memories could be related to our ability to learn rules according to new research. New research suggests that individuals who are particularly good at learning rules and classifying objects by common properties are also particularly prone to false memory illusions.
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Final proof for optimal encoding strategies in optical communication

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
Theorist have demonstrated that Gaussian encoding guarantees minimum output entropy and hence ultimate capacity of optical communication channels.
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Surgeon employs novel technique using cadaver meniscus to reconstruct finger joints

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
Artist Joost van Oss was chopping wood a few years ago when he injured the middle knuckle on his right hand. The intense pain and swelling that followed nearly ended his career as a painter and a sculptor. But thanks to a novel surgery using knee meniscus from a cadaver to reconstruct his finger joint, he’s back to cooking, sailing, painting and sculpting – all pain free.
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Flying doctor bees to prevent cherry disease

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
A method to use bees to deliver disease control to cherry blossom, preventing brown rot in cherries, is being introduced by researchers. "Brown rot is caused by a fungus that significantly impacts the cherry industry through costs of applying fungicide, yield loss and fruit spoilage," says the project's leader and bee researcher.
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States need to assume greater role in regulating dietary supplements for weight loss, muscle building, experts say

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
Because of lax federal oversight of dietary supplements, which are marketed to adults and adolescents for weight loss and muscle building, but usually do not deliver promised results and can actually cause severe health issues, state governments need to increase their regulation of these products to protect consumers.
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Many elite college athletes return to play after ACL surgery

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:30pm
The majority of athletes included in a new study were able to return to play after having knee surgery to repair an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. "It's very clear from our data that the younger the elite athlete, the higher risk for reinjury," said the lead author of the study.
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Wavefront optics emerging as new tool for measuring and correcting vision

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:29pm
A technique developed by astronomers seeking a clear view of distant objects in space is being intensively studied as a new approach to measuring and correcting visual abnormalities.
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New mobile solar unit is designed to save lives when the power goes out

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:29pm
Brooke Ellison draws her own power from will, but the ventilator that keeps her alive requires uninterrupted electricity. Dr. Ellison is allowing scientists to field-test, at her home, the Nextek Power Systems STAR, a mobile solar generator.
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Most breast cancer patients who had healthy breast removed at peace with decision

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:28pm
More women with cancer in one breast are opting to have both breasts removed to reduce their risk of future cancer. New research shows that in the long term, most have no regrets. Researchers surveyed hundreds of women with breast cancer who had double mastectomies between 1960 and 1993 and found that nearly all would make the same choice again.
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Tonsil stem cells could someday help repair liver damage without surgery

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:28pm
The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report a way to potentially inject stem cells from tonsils, a body part we don't need, to repair damaged livers — all without surgery.
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Gender barriers: History of discrimination against women in engineering

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:28pm
To better understand the gender divide that still exists today in engineering, it's necessary to look at the history of the field, says one expert who explored those gender issues in a new book.
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Are weak values quantum? Don't bet on it: Key technique used to probe quantum systems may not be so quantum after all

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:28pm
Over the past 20 years, a strange idea called a "weak value" has taken root in quantum information science. Many of the things you can do with quantum technologies entail being able to gain information from quantum systems. But there is a quantum conundrum: we can't say what a particle is doing when we're not looking at it, but when we do look at it, we change its behavior. But what if we could look "a little"?
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Imaging studies open a window on how effective antibodies are formed

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:28pm
Sometimes, in order to understand what’s happening in the immune system, you just have to watch it. By imaging the immune response, researchers have observed how two types of immune cells, T and B cells, interact with one another during a critical period following infection in order to prepare the best antibodies and establish long-lasting protection.
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Good news for young patients with a leukemia subtype associated with a poor prognosis

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:28pm
Adjusting treatment based on early response to chemotherapy made a life-saving difference to young patients with an acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtype associated with a poor outcome, researchers have found. The results are good news for children and adolescents with Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL (Ph-like ALL), a subtype that until now was associated with a poor prognosis. Ph-like ALL accounts for as much as 15 percent of the most common pediatric cancer.
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Most stars are born in clusters, some leave 'home'

Science Daily - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:26pm
New modeling studies demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up. These protostars are born out of rotating clouds of dust and gas, which act as nurseries for star formation. Rare clusters of multiple protostars remain stable and mature into multi-star systems. The unstable ones will eject stars until they achieve stability and end up as single or binary stars.
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Emma Watson Leaked Photo Threat Was a Plot To Attack 4chan

Slashdot - Wed, 24/09/2014 - 3:05pm
ideonexus writes: After Emma Watson gave a speech on the need for feminism (video) to the United Nations, 4chan users threatened to release nude photos of the Harry Potter star in retaliation, setting up the emmayouarenext.com website with a countdown clock. Now it has been revealed that the site was an elaborate hoax intended publicize a movement to shut down 4chan.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science