Luscious Space Photos Made by Hacking an Old Scanner

Wired News - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 3:00pm

Those spackled galaxies are actually kitchen ingredients like olive oil and cinnamon, sprinkled across a scanner.

The post Luscious Space Photos Made by Hacking an Old Scanner appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Citizen scientists discover new plant species in the Cape Floral Kingdom

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:54pm
Amateur botanists in the Western Cape Province of South Africa have discovered two new species of beautiful blue-flowered legumes.
Categories: Science

'Nanofiber gusher' created

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:54pm
Researchers report a method that can produce unprecedented amounts of polymer nanofibers in liquid, which have potential applications in filtration, batteries and cell scaffolding.
Categories: Science

Citizen science project helps scientists develop a quantum computer

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:53pm
Since Quantum Games came online as a citizen science project to help scientists develop a quantum computer, the game has been played 400,000 times, making it possible for researchers to discover a kind of 'atlas of human thoughts.'
Categories: Science

World-first cancer drugs could work in larger group of patients

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:53pm
A pioneering class of drugs that target cancers with mutations in the BRCA breast cancer genes could also work against tumors with another type of genetic fault, a new study suggests. Scientists found that errors in a gene called CLBC leave cancer cells vulnerable to PARP inhibitor drugs. Around 2 percent of all tumors have defects in CLBC.
Categories: Science

Click! That's how modern chemistry bonds nanoparticles to a substrate

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:53pm
Nanoparticles of various types can be quickly and permanently bonded to a solid substrate, if one of the most effective methods of synthesis, click chemistry, is used for this purpose.
Categories: Science

Hidden benefits of electric vehicles revealed

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:53pm
Electric vehicles are cool, research shows. Literally. A new study adds more fuel to the already hot debate about whether electric vehicles are more environmentally friendly than conventional vehicles by uncovering two hidden benefits.
Categories: Science

To Avoid NSA Interception, Cisco Will Ship To Decoy Addresses

Slashdot - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:53pm
An anonymous reader writes with this news snipped from The Register: Cisco will ship boxes to vacant addresses in a bid to foil the NSA, security chief John Stewart says. The dead drop shipments help to foil a Snowden-revealed operation whereby the NSA would intercept networking kit and install backdoors before boxen reached customers. The interception campaign was revealed last May. Speaking at a Cisco Live press panel in Melbourne today, Stewart says the Borg will ship to fake identities for its most sensitive customers, in the hope that the NSA's interceptions are targeted. 'We ship [boxes] to an address that's has nothing to do with the customer, and then you have no idea who ultimately it is going to,' Stewart says.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

10 Ways the World’s First Open Server Architecture Is Disruptive

Wired News - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:46pm

Moore’s Law, which holds that processor advancement is derived from transistor scaling, is commonly believed to be dying as semiconductor design bumps up against the limits of physics. It’s debatable whether this is indeed true, but one thing is certain: Major computing shifts such as big data and cloud are placing heavy new demands on computing systems, […]

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Categories: Science

Medical expansion has led people worldwide to feel less healthy

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:42pm
Across much of the Western world, 25 years of expansion of the medical system has actually led to people feeling less healthy over time, a new study has found.
Categories: Science

Over 70 Years of Silence from Italy’s Vesuvius

Wired News - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:38pm

It has been 70 years since the last eruption of Vesuvius in Italy, but even in silence it is still one of the most dangerous volcanoes on Earth.

The post Over 70 Years of Silence from Italy’s Vesuvius appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Gabe Newell Understands Half-Life Fans, Not Promising Any Sequels

Slashdot - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:07pm
jones_supa writes Half-Life 3 is undoubtedly one of the most anticipated games in history. While Valve transitioned from the revolutionary series that brought the company most of its original success, to online games like Team Fortress, Dota and Left 4 Dead, people still desperately want to believe that there is more coming for Half-Life. In a recent podcast interview he had with Geoff Keighley, Valve CEO Gabe Newell opens up the current situation a bit more: "I'm a fan of TV shows, I'm a fan of writers, I'm a fan of movies, I'm a fan of games and I certainly understand why people are like, you know, hey I remember this awesome experience and I'm starting to get worried that I'm never going to have it again. I am a fan of Terry Pratchett and he has Alzheimer's, it's like, Oh my god, I may never get another great Discworld novel. [...] We aren't going to go all retro because there are too many interesting things that have been learned. The only reason we would go back and do a 'super classic' kind of product is if a whole bunch of people internally at Valve said they wanted to do it, and had a reasonable explanation for why it was."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Ninja Clone Armies Do Battle in This Week’s Best Videos

Wired News - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 2:00pm

Some weeks our music video roundup can be pretty heavy, but this time around we're out to get you movin’ like Michelle Obama.

The post Ninja Clone Armies Do Battle in This Week’s Best Videos appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

"Open Well-Tempered Clavier" Project Complete; Score and Recording Online

Slashdot - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:41pm
rDouglass writes Open source music notation software MuseScore, and pianist Kimiko Ishizaka, have completed the Open Well-Tempered Clavier project and released a new studio recording and digital score online, under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0, public domain) license. Their previous project, the Open Goldberg Variations (2012), has shown its cultural significance by greatly enhancing the Wikipedia.org article on J.S. Bach's work, and by making great progress in supplying musical scores that are accessible to the visually impaired and the blind. The recording has also received very positive early reviews by music critics. Over 900 fans of J.S. Bach financed this project on Kickstarter.com, where a total of $44,083 was raised.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Persistent BIOS Rootkit Implant To Debut At CanSecWest

Slashdot - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:27pm
msm1267 writes Research on new BIOS vulnerabilities and a working rootkit implant will be presented on Friday at the annual CanSecWest security conference. An attacker with existing remote access on a compromised computer can use the implant to turn down existing protections in place to prevent re-flashing of the firmware, enabling the implant to be inserted and executed. The devious part of the exploit is that the researchers have found a way to insert their agent into System Management Mode, which is used by firmware and runs separately from the operating system, managing various hardware controls. System Management Mode also has access to memory, which puts supposedly secure and privacy focused operating systems such as Tails in the line of fire of the implant. Their implant, the researchers said, is able to scrape the secret PGP key Tails uses for encrypted communication, for example. It can also steal passwords and encrypted communication. The implant survives OS re-installation and even Tails' built-in protections, including its capability of wiping RAM.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

How does weight stigma smell? Sense of smell may reveal weight bias

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:22pm
Could our reaction to an image of an overweight or obese person affect how we perceive odor? A trio of researchers says yes. The researchers discovered that visual cues associated with overweight or obese people can influence one's sense of smell, and that the perceiver's body mass index matters, too. Participants with higher BMI tended to be more critical of heavier people, with higher-BMI participants giving scents a lower rating when scent samples were matched with an obese or overweight individual.
Categories: Science

Insuring undocumented residents could help solve multiple US health care challenges

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:22pm
An extensive review of published scientific research on Latino health care identifies four problem areas related to health care delivery to Latinos under the Affordable Care Act.
Categories: Science

Quantum computing: One step closer with defect-free logic gate

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:22pm
What does hair styling have in common with quantum computing? The braiding pattern has inspired scientists as a potential new approach to quantum calculation. But due to their tight assembly, such braids are much more difficult to destabilize and less error-prone. Yet, local defects can still arise along nanowires. A new study identifies potential sources of computer errors arising from these defects.
Categories: Science

Regulatory network in the kidney uncovered

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:22pm
The kidney continuously filters the blood and excretes waste products into the urine. This is achieved by a complex system of tubules which transports the urine and regulates its composition. Researchers have now discovered a novel molecular signaling pathway and show how parts of these kidney tubules establish an inner space and form a tight barrier against adjacent structures.
Categories: Science

Researchers tweak the immune system to target cells bearing tumor antigens

Science Daily - Thu, 19/03/2015 - 1:22pm
Researchers have succeeded in generating cells of the immune system to specifically target and destroy cancer cells. The immune system of the body is trained to distinguish between "foreign" and "self" and to recognize and destroy exogenous structures. In cancer, however, the immune system appears to be quite docile in its response. While it is capable of detecting cancer cells because they often bear characteristics (antigens) on their surfaces that identify them as pathologically altered cells, usually the immune system does not mount an attack but rather tolerates them.
Categories: Science