Viruses work together to attack their hosts

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:24pm
Viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively, report scientists. The results of this study also show that natural selection “facilitates the teamwork of viruses in relation to their position in the same cell."
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Timber skyscrapers could transform London's skyline

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:23pm
London’s first timber skyscraper could be a step closer to reality this week after researchers presented Mayor of London Boris Johnson with conceptual plans for an 80-storey, 300m high wooden building integrated within the Barbican.
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New perceptual illusion: How the index finger can be fooled

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:23pm
Cognitive scientists have discovered new perceptual illusion.
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Switching specific G-protein-coupled signalling pathways on and off

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:22pm
Blue on, yellow off: using different-colored light, researchers are able to switch signalling pathways in the brain on and off. Depending on what kind of melanopsin the researchers used, signalling pathways were switched on either transiently or sustained. In mammals, the protein typically regulates the circadian rhythm.
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The Strait of Gibraltar proves no obstacle for eels

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:22pm
For the first time, it has been shown that eels from the Mediterranean Sea are able find their way through the Strait of Gibraltar to the Atlantic and potentially reach the Sargasso Sea to spawn along with eels from the rest of Europe. This is the conclusion from a recent study involving the tagging of eels in French waters.
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Scientists creates antibacterial geopolymer for the construction industry

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:22pm
A new resin inhibits growth, reproduction and transfer of yeast and fungi, and used as cement it can adhere to metal surfaces, glass or ceramics.
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Physicists discover flaws in superconductor theory

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:22pm
Physicists report finding major theoretical flaws in the generally accepted understanding of how a superconductor traps and holds a magnetic field. More than 50 years ago, C.P. Bean, a scientist at General Electric, developed a theoretical explanation known as the “Bean Model” or “Critical State Model.”
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New models predicting where to find fossils

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:20pm
An international team of scientists have developed a way to help locate fossils of long-extinct animals. The models were developed for Australia but the researchers provide guidelines on how to apply their approach to assist fossil hunting in other continents.
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AMOR, a love potion for plant fertilization

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:20pm
Scientists have succeeded in discovering AMOR, a sugar chain that increases the fertilization efficiency in plants. AMOR was found to be responsible for activating pollen tubes to lead to fertilization. Moreover, through the collaboration between biologists and chemists, they have synthesized a disaccharide, which exhibits the same properties as AMOR. This discovery is expected to lead to advances in research to improve plant fertilization efficiency as well as carbohydrate chemistry for plants.
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What really happened on Easter Island?

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:20pm
Hundreds of iconic moai statues stand testament to the vibrant civilization that once inhabited Easter Island, but there are far fewer clues about why this civilization mysteriously vanished. Did they shortsightedly exhaust the island's resources? Were they decimated by European illnesses and slave trade? Such theories have spread widely, but recent evidence shows that the truth is not as simple as any one of these alone.
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Simultaneous cocaine, alcohol use linked to suicide risk

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
A new study of hundreds of emergency department visits finds that the links between substance misuse and suicide risk are complex, but that use of cocaine and alcohol together was particularly significant.
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Curiosity leads us to seek out unpleasant, painful outcomes

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
Curiosity is a powerful motivator, leading us to make important discoveries and explore the unknown. But new research shows that our curiosity is sometimes so powerful that it leads us to choose potentially painful and unpleasant outcomes that have no apparent benefits, even when we have the ability to avoid these outcomes altogether.
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Bronchial carcinoma: Added benefit of crizotinib for first-line treatment not proven

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
In the only study of direct comparison, carboplatin in the control arm was not used in compliance with the Pharmaceutical Directive, reviewers report.
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Restoring ecosystems: How to learn from our mistakes

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
Ecologists have issued a warning of underdocumented results of ecological restorations. The researchers show that continuous and systematic evaluations of cost-efficiency, planning, implementations and effects are necessary in order to make use of experiences in future projects.
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Intracellular recordings using nanotower electrodes

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
Researchers have developed an intracellular recording device, a long three-dimensional nanoscale-tipped microneedle-electrodes. Moreover, they demonstrated the needle penetrations into muscle cells and measured the signals. The nanoelectrode, whose size is longer than the conventional intracellular nanoelectrode, has the potential to be used in cells that are deep within a tissue, such as cells in brain slices or brain in vivo, thus accelerating the understanding of the brain.
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Protective effect of genetically modified cord blood on spinal cord injury in rats

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
Researchers genetically modified cord blood which managed to increase tissue sparing and numbers of regenerated axons, reduce glial scar formation and promote behavioral recovery when transplanted immediately after a rat contusion spinal cord injury.
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Skateboarding sent about 176 youth to US emergency departments every day

Science Daily - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:19pm
A study examined data for youth and adolescents 5-19 years of age who were treated in US emergency departments (EDs) for skateboarding-related injuries from 1990-2008. Nationally, over the 19-year period, there was an average of 64,572 children and adolescents treated each year for skateboarding-related injuries -- about 176 a day.
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Microsoft Edge Will Start Automatically Pausing Less Important Flash Content

Slashdot - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 2:01pm
An anonymous reader cites an article on VentureBeat: Microsoft Edge will "intelligently auto-pause" Flash content that is "not central to the webpage." If you want to try this out now, you can take the feature for a spin with Windows 10 build 14316, which was recently made available to Windows Insiders. Peripheral content like animations or advertisements built with Flash will be displayed in a paused state unless the user explicitly clicks to play that content. This significantly reduces power consumption and improves performance while preserving the full fidelity of the page. Flash content that is central to the page, like video and games, will not be paused. Microsoft wrote in a blog post, "We encourage the web community to continue the transition away from Flash and towards open web standards. We are planning for and look forward to a future where Flash is no longer necessary as a default experience in Microsoft Edge."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Uber To Pay Up To $25 Million For Misleading Advertising In California

Slashdot - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 1:01pm
Bruce66423 writes: Uber has agreed to a settlement of $10 million for misleading advertising about the quality of its background checks for drivers. One particular concern was its absence of fingerprint-based checking.Uber has agreed to no longer use such terms as "safest drive on the road" in its advertising. Prosecutors said Uber failed to prevent 25 people with criminal records from becoming drivers, including several sex offenders and a convicted murderer. Another language change included renaming its "safe ride fee" as a "booking fee." Uber has agreed to make the $10 million payment within 60 days to settle the agreement, otherwise they will be forced to pay an additional $15 million in two years.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Shades Are So 2015. These Airplane Windows Tint Themselves

Wired News - Fri, 08/04/2016 - 1:00pm
Plastic shades are for lameoids—the real way to block the sun is with a window that goes from transparent to opaque using microscopic particles. The post Shades Are So 2015. These Airplane Windows Tint Themselves appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science