State Television Says Iran Launches New Satellite Into Space

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:49pm
An anonymous reader writes State television in Iran is reporting the Islamic Republic has launched a new satellite into space, its fourth in recent years to orbit the Earth. The report Monday quoted Defense Minister Gen. Hossein Dehghan saying the satellite, designed and built in Iran, is named "Fajr," or dawn in Farsi. The report did not elaborate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

State Television Says Iran Launches New Satellite Into Space

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:49pm
An anonymous reader writes State television in Iran is reporting the Islamic Republic has launched a new satellite into space, its fourth in recent years to orbit the Earth. The report Monday quoted Defense Minister Gen. Hossein Dehghan saying the satellite, designed and built in Iran, is named "Fajr," or dawn in Farsi. The report did not elaborate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

State Television Says Iran Launches New Satellite Into Space

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:49pm
An anonymous reader writes State television in Iran is reporting the Islamic Republic has launched a new satellite into space, its fourth in recent years to orbit the Earth. The report Monday quoted Defense Minister Gen. Hossein Dehghan saying the satellite, designed and built in Iran, is named "Fajr," or dawn in Farsi. The report did not elaborate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

State Television Says Iran Launches New Satellite Into Space

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:49pm
An anonymous reader writes State television in Iran is reporting the Islamic Republic has launched a new satellite into space, its fourth in recent years to orbit the Earth. The report Monday quoted Defense Minister Gen. Hossein Dehghan saying the satellite, designed and built in Iran, is named "Fajr," or dawn in Farsi. The report did not elaborate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

State Television Says Iran Launches New Satellite Into Space

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:49pm
An anonymous reader writes State television in Iran is reporting the Islamic Republic has launched a new satellite into space, its fourth in recent years to orbit the Earth. The report Monday quoted Defense Minister Gen. Hossein Dehghan saying the satellite, designed and built in Iran, is named "Fajr," or dawn in Farsi. The report did not elaborate.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Fewer viral relics may be due to a less bloody evolutionary history

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:19pm
Humans have fewer remnants of viral DNA in their genes compared to other mammals, a new study has found. This decrease could be because of reduced exposure to blood-borne viruses as humans evolved to use tools rather than biting during violent conflict and the hunting of animals.
Categories: Science

Babies can follow complex social situations

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:19pm
Infants can make sense of complex social situations, taking into account who knows what about whom, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Metformin may lower lung cancer risk in diabetic nonsmokers

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:19pm
Among nonsmokers who had diabetes, those who took the diabetes drug metformin had a decrease in lung cancer risk, scientists report. Metformin use for five or more years was associated with a 31 percent decrease in the risk for adenocarcinoma, the most common type of lung cancer diagnosed in nonsmokers, and an 82 percent increase in the risk for small-cell carcinoma, a type of lung cancer often diagnosed in smokers, they say.
Categories: Science

New technique captures real-time diagnostic 3-D images

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:07pm
A new technique uses Optical Projection Tomography, which is “similar to X-rays, but uses light,” explains a researcher.  With this technique, it is possible to use optical markers which are often used with transgenic animals.  One such marker is green fluorescent protein.  Thanks to this substance, one can observe the anatomy and functions of living organisms like flies or very small fish.
Categories: Science

Fitness game for the physically impaired

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:07pm
Modern IT has the potential to make fitness training more varied for people with physical limitations. But what exactly is required? Researchers put this question to thalidomide victims, and developed new IT-based fitness training technology in close collaboration with them. The method motivates users with elements found in computer games.
Categories: Science

Interconnected IT for business models in rural areas

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:07pm
More and more people are moving from rural areas to cities, leaving behind crumbling infrastructures that make daily life difficult for those who stay. Some people are bucking this trend. Researchers are now planning to create new business models in rural areas with the help of interconnected IT.
Categories: Science

Supercomputing reveals genetic code of cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:07pm
Cancer researchers must use one of the world's fastest computers to detect which versions of genes are only found in cancer cells. Every form of cancer, even every tumor, has its own distinct variants, they report.
Categories: Science

Urban taste for bushmeat poses threat to Amazonian wildlife

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:07pm
Alarming evidence of an under-reported wild-meat crisis in the heart of Amazonia has been uncovered by researchers who interviewed households in two Brazilian 'prefrontier' cities -- cities which are surrounded by more than 90 per cent of their original forest cover. They found virtually all urban households in these cities consumed wildlife for food, including fish (99%), bushmeat (mammals and birds; 79%), turtles and tortoises (48%) and caimans (28%).
Categories: Science

Mini synthetic organism instead of test animals

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:06pm
In medical research, animal-based experiments have thus far been a necessary evil. Now researchers have developed a highly promising alternative, however: They are developing a mini-organism inside a chip. This way, complex metabolic processes within the human body can be analyzed realistically.
Categories: Science

Possible cause of IVF failure in some women identified

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:06pm
A previously unexplored biological process, which can lead to the failure of embryos to attach to the uterine wall during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), has been identified by researchers. IVF only has around a 25% success rate, researchers report.
Categories: Science

Novel technology could combat flight pollution

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:06pm
A breakthrough propulsion technology to provide greener air transport could be developed after the underlying engineering was declared a success.
Categories: Science

Protein, skin care and biopesticide products developed from fish filleting residue, rapeseed press cakes

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:06pm
Food industry co-streams could be upgraded to more valuable products than the original ones ending up as animal feed, scientists say after developing gentle methods to make good use of fish filleting residues and rapeseed press cakes.
Categories: Science

Amazon.com benefits from collaboration between competing firms

Science Daily - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:06pm
Online-selling pioneer Amazon.com has utilized three individual business models, by means of which it engages in productive cooperation with its competitors. By harnessing its competitors within its own business operations and by looking strategically at customer value, Amazon.com has managed to raise the size of its current markets and to create entirely new markets both for itself and for its competitors. Through its competitor cooperation-driven business model, Amazon.com utilizes the existent resources most effectively, because it involves competitors in distributing the expenses incurred by business operations.
Categories: Science

MIT Randomizes Tasks To Speed Massive Multicore Processors

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:05pm
itwbennett writes Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a data structure that they claim can help large multicore processors churn through their workloads more effectively. Their trick? Do away with the traditional first-come, first-served work queue and assign tasks more randomly. The SprayList algorithm allows processors with many cores to spread out their work so they don't stumble over one another, creating bottlenecks that hamper performance.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

MIT Randomizes Tasks To Speed Massive Multicore Processors

Slashdot - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 1:05pm
itwbennett writes Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a data structure that they claim can help large multicore processors churn through their workloads more effectively. Their trick? Do away with the traditional first-come, first-served work queue and assign tasks more randomly. The SprayList algorithm allows processors with many cores to spread out their work so they don't stumble over one another, creating bottlenecks that hamper performance.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science