German Court: "Sharing" Your Amazon Purchases Is Spamming

Slashdot - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 7:30pm
An anonymous reader writes: A court in Germany has ruled that the 'Share' links which Amazon provides to customers directly after making a purchase at the site are unlawful. The "Share" functionality provides buttons which allow the consumer to signal a new purchase via Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or email. The court, ratifying an earlier decision made at a lower court, declared that emails initiated via the Share function constitute "unsolicited advertising and unreasonable harassment."

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Categories: Science

Throwing This Out Here: Plastic Bags Are Amazing and You Should Appreciate Them More

Wired News - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 7:20pm

Plastic shopping bags are remarkable feats of engineering, and consumers have taken them for granted this whole time.

The post Throwing This Out Here: Plastic Bags Are Amazing and You Should Appreciate Them More appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Heavily Redacted Tweet Teases a Her Story Sequel

Wired News - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 7:13pm

Sam Barlow, creator of the lauded live-action mystery game, shows a heavily redacted proposal for 'Her Story 2' on Twitter.

The post Heavily Redacted Tweet Teases a Her Story Sequel appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Apple Court Testimony Reveals Why It Refuses To Unlock iPhones For Police

Slashdot - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 6:46pm
blottsie writes: Newly unsealed court transcripts from the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York show that Apple now refuses to unlock iPhones for law enforcement, saying "In most cases now and in the future, the government’s requested order would be substantially burdensome, as it would be impossible to perform." “Right now Apple is aware that customer data is under siege from a variety of different directions. Never has the privacy and security of customer data been as important as it is now,” Apple lawyer Marc Zwillinger said at the hearing. “A hypothetical consumer could think if Apple is not in the business of accessing my data and if Apple has built a system to prevent itself from accessing my data, why is it continuing to comply with orders that don’t have a clear lawful basis in doing so?”

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Categories: Science

'Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes' Recounts Shuttle Tragedy 30 Years Later

Space.com - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 6:43pm
The new National Geographic Channel special "Challenger Disaster: Lost Tapes" marks the 30th anniversary of the space shuttle's loss, using long-forgotten news footage, radio reports and rarely seen NASA video to retell the story of the 1986 tragedy.
Categories: Science

Microsoft Releases Its Deep Learning Toolkit On GitHub

Slashdot - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 6:03pm
An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft is moving its machine learning Computational Network Toolkit (CNTK) from its own hosting site, CodePlex, to GitHub. They're also putting it under the MIT open source license. The move marks an effort to make it easier for developers to collaborate on building their own deep learning applications using the CNTK. Under the CodePlex license, access was restricted to academics only, and it was wholly targeted to that audience. Now that it's opening the project to everyone, Microsoft hopes to attract a greater number of developers, and a wider variety as well. This follows similar releases from Google and Baidu.

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Categories: Science

Most commonly used TB test fails to accurately diagnose pregnant HIV+ women

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 6:00pm
The most commonly used test for tuberculosis fails to accurately diagnose TB in up to 50 percent of pregnant women who are HIV+, new research has found. The research is believed to be the first study to compare the accuracy of two TB tests – the Quantiferon Gold In Tube® blood test and the more commonly used TST or tuberculin skin test—in this population.
Categories: Science

Gene often lost in childhood cancer crucial in cells' life or death decision

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 6:00pm
A gene that is often lost in childhood cancer plays an important role in the decision between life and death of certain cells, according to a new study. Researchers have discovered the process by which that gene, KIF1B-?, kills cells and thereby suppresses tumor development.
Categories: Science

Reviewing Donald Rumsfeld’s Solitaire App as Rumsfeld Might

Wired News - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:59pm

There are known knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns.

The post Reviewing Donald Rumsfeld’s Solitaire App as Rumsfeld Might appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Snake-hunting Secretary Birds use force of five times their body weight to stamp on, kill their prey

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:58pm
Snake-hunting Secretary Birds use the force of five times their body weight to stamp on and kill their prey. Researchers have discovered that Secretary Birds can kick with 195 Newtons, which is equivalent to five times their own body weight, when they attack and kill their prey. And the contact time between the bird's feet and the snake is delivered extremely quickly -- on average just 15 milliseconds.
Categories: Science

Smartphones may decrease sedentary time, increase activity, study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:56pm
Using smartphone reminders to prompt people to get moving may help reduce sedentary behavior, report investigators. Evidence has linked sedentary time to increased risk of breast, colorectal, ovarian, endometrial, and prostate cancers as well as weight gain, higher BMI, and obesity. Nevertheless, adults in the U.S. spend an average of about 8 waking hours per day being sedentary.
Categories: Science

Global report reveals dire state of fisheries, worsening air pollution

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:56pm
According to the 2016 Environmental Performance Index, which provides a diagnostic tool for policymakers to evaluate and improve environmental performance, the world's nations have expanded access to water and sanitation while creating more protected areas than ever before. However, countries have failed to reverse degradation of air quality and decline in fisheries.
Categories: Science

Novel 4-D printing method blossoms from botanical inspiration

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:55pm
A team of scientists has evolved their microscale 3-D printing technology to the fourth dimension, time. Inspired by natural structures like plants, which respond and change their form over time according to environmental stimuli, the team has unveiled 4-D-printed hydrogel composite structures that change shape upon immersion in water.
Categories: Science

Graphene composite may keep wings ice-free

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:55pm
A composite of graphene nanoribbons and epoxy proves effective at de-icing a helicopter blade, report researchers. The new material may be suitable for keeping aircraft, wind turbines and transmission lines free of ice.
Categories: Science

Mom's in control, even before you're born

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:55pm
Researchers have uncovered previously unappreciated means by which epigenetic information contained in the egg influences the development of the placenta during pregnancy. The research, which was performed in mice, indicates that a mother's health, even before conception, may influence the health of her fetus, and opens questions on how a mother's age may influence placental development.
Categories: Science

Shallow earthquakes, deeper tremors along southern San Andreas fault compared by researchers

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:55pm
Seismologists working along California's San Andreas Fault near Cholame and Parkfield now have a better idea of how and where friction changes along the fault to produce both shallow earthquakes and the deeper earth tremors called low-frequency earthquakes.
Categories: Science

Did ear sensory cell stereocilia evolve from gut microvilli?

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:54pm
Evolution likes to borrow. It can take an already-successful biological structure and alter it until it serves a new function. Two independent groups studying the proteins that organize gut microvilli now suspect that this may have been the case in the development of inner ear hair cell stereocilia. While functionally very different, the protein complexes that organize microvilli and stereocilia have striking parallels.
Categories: Science

Hollywood Turning Against Digital Effects

Slashdot - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:20pm
An anonymous reader writes: One of the easiest complaints to lob at a modern film is that the special effects look bad. It's been over two decades since Jurassic Park; the novelty is finally wearing off. The New Yorker puts it this way: "It's as if directors—especially the reboot generation—have finally become self-conscious about CGI; 2015 was the year they got embarrassed by the digital miracles of the movies." Both the new Star Wars film and Mad Max: Fury Road were lauded for their use of "practical effects" — not abandoning CGI entirely, but using it to embellish scenes, rather than creating them from whole cloth. "Movies are a faddish, self-quoting business. At one time, the stark lighting effects of the German Expressionists were the visual rage. Later, it was the helicopter shot or the zoom. Any new tool, once used promiscuously, becomes a cliché. As time goes by, a director rediscovers the tool, and what was once cliché becomes an homage to a distant and more cultured time. This is what has happened to the last, pre-digital wave of effects. They are now happily vintage." It also counts as marketing, when you consider that audiences are turned off by too much CGI: "Touting your movie's wood, concrete, and steel is an implicit promise of restraint. I didn't go totally wild, the filmmaker is telling the audience, not like Peter Jackson did in the Hobbit trilogy."

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Categories: Science

San Francisco’s Biggest Cab Company Files for Bankruptcy

Wired News - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 5:17pm

In San Francisco, the birthplace of Uber, the largest traditional taxi company has filed for bankruptcy.

The post San Francisco’s Biggest Cab Company Files for Bankruptcy appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Potential therapeutic targets identified for multiple sclerosis

Science Daily - Mon, 25/01/2016 - 4:52pm
Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other inflammatory diseases may benefit by new findings from a study that identified potential therapeutic targets for a devastating disease striking some 2.3 million people worldwide.
Categories: Science