Evolution of a species also involves the bacteria it carries

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 6:23pm
Animals live in close association with microorganisms, carrying beneficial bacteria while coping with pathogenic infections. Now, a study shows that symbiotic bacteria play a direct role in the evolution of their host, shaping the way it adapts to pathogens.
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Cable TV Companies Could Lose Nearly $1 Billion in the Next Year From People Ditching Their Subscriptions

Slashdot - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 6:10pm
Nathan McAlone, writing for BusinessInsider: Cable TV companies could lose nearly $1 billion to people cutting the cord over the next year, according to a new study by management consulting firm cg42. The firm estimates that 800,000 cable customers will ditch their subscriptions in the next 12 months. Cg42 expects each customer to be an average loss of $1,248 annually, and losses to approach $1 billion over the year. Cg42 also found that the average cord-cutter saves $104 per month by canceling. Some in the industry have argued that cutting the cord doesn't actually save you money if you subscribe to a bunch of streaming services like Netflix, HBO, and so on. But that point of view neglects the reality that many cable subscribers pay for those streaming services already.

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Scientists track unexpected mechanisms of memory

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 6:05pm
Our brains hold on to memories via physical changes in synapses, the tiny connections between neurons. Unexpected molecular mechanisms by which these changes take place have now been revealed by new research.
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Ancient reptile fossils claw for more attention

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:55pm
Newly recovered fossils confirm that Drepanosaurus, a prehistoric cross between a chameleon and an anteater, was a small reptile with a fearsome finger. The second digit of its forelimb sported a massive claw.
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New devices emulate human biological synapses

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:54pm
A new type of nanodevice for computer microprocessors is being developed that can mimic the functioning of a biological synapse -- the place where a signal passes from one nerve cell to another in the body, report scientists.
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New evidence shifts the timeline back for human arrival in the Americas

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:37pm
Humans occupied South America earlier than previously thought, according to the recent discovery of ancient artifacts found at an archeological site in Argentina.
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Scientists discover how cells put the brakes on protein production

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:37pm
A new scientific study conducted by a team of geneticists has characterized how cells know when to stop translating DNA into proteins, a critical step in maintaining healthy protein levels and cell function.
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Contrary to popular belief, coca not the driving force of deforestation, report reveals

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:36pm
Most of the world’s coca—the plant source of cocaine—grows in the Amazon forests of the Andean countries of Colombia, Peru and Bolivia, where many think this illicit crop causes deforestation. However, a team of researchers shows that most deforestation isn’t caused by coca cultivation. In fact, the study found that deforestation and coca both share a common origin in the implementation of an infrastructure plan from the 1960s to open the Amazon frontier through road construction and development projects.
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Network and gene tools help quickly identify new, rare genetic disease

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:36pm
A new genetic disorder, which still has no name, has been identified using a national network and gene mapping tools. It shares similarities to two other rare genetic disorders arising from related genes, say researchers.
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Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:36pm
Consuming an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus and potentially other autoimmune disorders, researchers have discovered.
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WhatsApp Won't Comply With India's Order To Delete User Data

Slashdot - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:30pm
An anonymous reader shares an Engadget report: WhatsApp's decision to share user data with Facebook has provoked the ire of yet another foreign government. Last week, India's Delhi High Court ordered WhatsApp to delete any data collected from users who opted out of the company's new privacy policy before September 25th. According to Mashable, however, WhatsApp has no plan to comply with the court order and it will have "no impact on the planned policy and terms of service updates." In August, privacy groups in the US spoke out against the change, which allows WhatsApp to pass account information like mobile phone number, contacts, profile pictures and status messages to its parent company. Facebook claims that sharing information between the two will help it to improve the experience and fight abuse across both platforms, while WhatsApp defended the change by saying that all messages on the service will remain encrypted.

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An Eruption at Rinjani in Indonesia Traps Hundreds of Tourists

Wired News - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:25pm
An unexpectedly powerful explosion from Barujari at Rinjani prompted evacuations of over 1,000 tourists, with some still possibly in danger. The post An Eruption at Rinjani in Indonesia Traps Hundreds of Tourists appeared first on WIRED.
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Research into fly development provides insights into blood vessel formation

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:25pm
Researchers working with flies describe that the concentration of some small intracellular organelles determines the branching capacity of tracheal cells. Tracheal cells are analogous to the cells that form blood vessels in the human body. The inhibition or stimulation of new blood vessels has implications in cancer and in tissue regeneration.
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Structure of the BinAB toxin revealed

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:25pm
Could we get rid of mosquitoes without polluting the environment? Yes, we can, say researchers. The BinAB toxin, produced in crystal form by a bacterium, specifically kills the larvae of Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes, but it is inactive on tiger mosquitoes (or Aedes), the vectors for dengue fever and chikungunya. Knowledge of the molecular structure of BinAB is necessary if we are to broaden its spectrum of action.
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Use of body-worn cameras sees complaints against police 'virtually vanish,' study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:24pm
The introduction of wearable cameras led to a 93% drop in complaints made against police by the public – suggesting the cameras result in behavioral changes that ‘cool down’ potentially volatile encounters, a year-long study of almost 2,000 officers across UK and US forces shows.
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Where you live shapes your immune system more than your genes

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:24pm
Like fingerprints, immune systems vary from person to person. And although we all inherit a unique set of genes that help us respond to infections, recent studies have found that our history and environment--like where and with whom we live--are responsible for 60% to 80% of the differences between individual immune systems, while genetics account for the rest.
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Scientists reveal how signals from pathogenic bacteria reach danger sensors of cells

Science Daily - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 5:24pm
An essential protein induced by the signaling protein interferon is needed to activate danger-sensing proteins in the cytoplasm of cells, scientists describe in a new report.
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Microsoft Widens Edge Browser Bug Hunt For Bounty Hunters

Slashdot - Thu, 29/09/2016 - 4:50pm
Microsoft said today it is expanding its program for rewarding those who find and report bugs in Edge, its latest web browser, enabling bounty hunters to claim their prize for a broader range of vulnerabilities. The Register adds: The snappily titled "Microsoft Edge Web Platform on Windows Insider Preview Bug Bounty Programme" was launched in August, and enabled anyone to report vulnerabilities they discover in Microsoft Edge in exchange for flippin' great wodges of cash. Now, the firm has expanded the programme, with a focus on vulnerabilities that lead to "violation of W3C standards that compromise privacy and integrity of important user data," or which enable remote code execution by a particular threat vector. Specifically, the bounty programme now covers the following: Same Origin Policy bypass vulnerabilities (such as universal cross-site scripting), Referrer Spoofing vulnerabilities, Remote Code Execution vulnerabilities in Microsoft Edge on Windows Insider Preview, and Vulnerabilities in open source sections of Chakra.

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