Hemodialysis recommended for acute salicylate poisoning

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:22pm
The best remedy for severe salicylate poisoning is hemodialysis, according to a comprehensive systematic review of the medical literature. Salicylate is an active ingredient in aspirin as well as hundreds of over-the-counter medications, and contributes to approximately 20,000 accidental or intentional poisonings and nearly 30 deaths reported to US Poison Control Centers every year.
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The life and death of beta cells

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:21pm
Researchers studying microRNA -- tiny strands of ribonucleic acid -- in beta cells have found a type that plays a key role in cell death under stress. MicroRNAs have been regulating cell processes for aeons, as evidenced by phylogeny. Humans have around 21,000 genes, of which 700 to 1,000 code for microRNAs -- and 300 of these genes are present in all higher life forms, from worms to humans.
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Fresh milk, off the grid

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:21pm
Milk preservation depends upon refrigeration and boiling, but in developing countries these methods are costly and often impractical due to the sporadic availability of continuous electricity. New research now finds that short pulsed electric fields can be used to kill milk-contaminating bacteria. This process can prevent bacteria proliferation in stored milk, potentially increasing its shelf life.
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Chameleon proteins make individual cells visible

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:21pm
Researchers discovered a new mechanism of how fluorescent proteins can change color. It enables the microscopic visualization of individual cells in their three-dimensional environment in living organisms.
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Why an Apple HDTV Never Made Any Sense

Wired News - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:21pm

The myth of the Apple TV set is dead, and nothing can bring it back.

The post Why an Apple HDTV Never Made Any Sense appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Atmospheric release of BPA may reach nearby waterways

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:21pm
Existing research has determined that harmful concentrations of Bisphenol-A (BPA) have been deposited directly into rivers and streams by municipal or industrial wastewater. Now, researchers have assessed Missouri water quality near industrial sites permitted to release BPA into the air. Scientists now believe that atmospheric releases may create a concern for contamination of local surface water leading to human and wildlife exposure.
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Most European men descend from a handful of Bronze Age forefathers

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:19pm
Researchers determined DNA sequences from the Y chromosomes of 334 men belonging to 17 populations from Europe and the Middle East. The study shows that almost two out of three (64%) modern European men belong to just three young paternal lineage. Geneticists have discovered that most European men descend from just a handful of Bronze Age forefathers, due to a 'population explosion' several thousand years ago.
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Cancer drugs may hold key to treating Down syndrome and other brain disorders

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:18pm
A class of FDA-approved cancer drugs may be able to prevent problems with brain cell development associated with disorders including Down syndrome and Fragile X syndrome, researchers have found.
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'Redesigned' antibodies may control HIV

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:18pm
With the help of a computer program called “Rosetta,” researchers have “redesigned” an antibody that has increased potency and can neutralize more strains of the AIDS-causing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than can any known natural antibody.
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Tunable liquid metal antennas

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:18pm
Researchers have held tremendous interest in liquid metal electronics for many years, but a significant and unfortunate drawback slowing the advance of such devices is that they tend to require external pumps that can't be easily integrated into electronic systems. So researchers set out to create a reconfigurable liquid metal antenna controlled by voltage only.
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Researchers determine best anesthesia option for infants

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:15pm
Experts have long examined the effects of anesthesia on infants and toddlers, and many believe infants who undergo general anesthesia in their first year of life may be at higher risk of developmental and learning issues. New work suggests that infants undergoing some types of surgery could have better recovery if they receive regional anesthesia rather than general anesthesia.
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Smoking a significant predictor of lung cancer recurrence in survivors

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:15pm
A new study has shown that many lung cancer survivors are at high risk for developing another lung cancer or having their cancer return after completing treatment. The study specifically looked at lung cancer survivors from three different institutions who had shown no further evidence of having the disease after completing the required treatment for lung cancer.
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COPD is more prevalent in poor and rural areas of the U. S.

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:15pm
Living in a rural area and being poor are risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research.
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Heat and Geeks: Can This Unlikely Duo Restore Community Trust?

Wired News - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 4:11pm

An unusual collaboration between the Seattle Police Department and local hackers could go a long way in dampening the tinderbox of distrust that is harming the relationship between cops and communities and prompting nationwide protests over police treatment of suspects. The spark for this innovative partnership came from a seemingly adversarial act. Last fall, the […]

The post Heat and Geeks: Can This Unlikely Duo Restore Community Trust? appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

AMD Details High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) DRAM, Pushes Over 100GB/s Per Stack

Slashdot - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 3:52pm
MojoKid writes: Recently, a few details of AMD's next-generation Radeon 300-series graphics cards have trickled out. Today, AMD has publicly disclosed new info regarding their High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) technology that will be used on some Radeon 300-series and APU products. Currently, a relatively large number of GDDR5 chips are necessary to offer sufficient capacity and bandwidth for modern GPUs, which means significant PCB real estate is consumed. On-chip integration is not ideal for DRAM because it is not size or cost effective with a logic-optimized GPU or CPU manufacturing process. HBM, however, brings the DRAM as close to possible to the logic die (GPU) as possible. AMD partnered with Hynix and a number of companies to help define the HBM specification and design a new type of memory chip with low power consumption and an ultra-wide bus width, which was eventually adopted by JEDEC 2013. They also develop a DRAM interconnect called an "interposer," along with ASE, Amkor, and UMC. The interposer allows DRAM to be brought into close proximity with the GPU and simplifies communication and clocking. HBM DRAM chips are stacked vertically, and "through-silicon vias" (TSVs) and "bumps" are used to connect one DRAM chip to the next, and then to a logic interface die, and ultimately the interposer. The end result is a single package on which the GPU/SoC and High Bandwidth Memory both reside. 1GB of GDDR5 memory (four 256MB chips), requires roughly 672mm2. Because HBM is vertically stacked, that same 1GB requires only about 35mm2. The bus width on an HBM chip is 1024-bits wide, versus 32-bits on a GDDR5 chip. As a result, the High Bandwidth Memory interface can be clocked much lower but still offer more than 100GB/s for HBM versus 25GB/s with GDDR5. HBM also requires significantly less voltage, which equates to lower power consumption.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Pentagon Says 2013 Chinese Launch May Have Tested Antisatellite Technology

Space.com - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 3:27pm
The U.S. Defense Department is suggesting that the May 2013 launch of a Chinese rocket that it branded at the time as suspicious was a test of a technology designed to counter or destroy satellites in geosynchronous orbit.
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Anti-smoking commercials burn out over time

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 3:09pm
The massive, federally funded anti-smoking campaign in the United States 'Tips From Former Smokers' -- 'Tips' for short -- fizzled more than it popped. That's the conclusion behind new research on this public health issue.
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Australian researcher helps with Ebola vaccine trials

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 3:09pm
An Australian researcher has helped identify the kind of human trial that is most effective for testing Ebola vaccines. Safe and effective vaccines could help end the ongoing Ebola virus disease epidemic in parts of West Africa and stop future outbreaks of the virus, researchers say.
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Microwave Comms Betwen Population Centers Could Be Key To Easing Internet Bottlenecks

Slashdot - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 3:03pm
itwbennett writes: Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Duke University recently looked at the main causes of Internet latency and what it would take to achieve speed-of-light performance. The first part of the paper, titled Towards a Speed of Light Internet, is devoted to finding out where the slowdowns are coming from. They found that the bulk of the delay comes from the latency of the underlying infrastructure, which works in a multiplicative way by affecting each step in the request. The second part of the paper proposes what turns out to be a relatively cheap and potentially doable solution to bring Internet speeds close to the speed of light for the vast majority of us. The authors propose creating a network that would connect major population centers using microwave networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Stuttering linked to rhythm perception deficiency

Science Daily - Tue, 19/05/2015 - 2:59pm
Stuttering may be more than a speech problem. For the first time, researchers have found that children who stutter have difficulty perceiving a beat in music-like rhythms, which could account for their halting speech patterns.
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