Depression is driven by networks of genes that span brain circuits, study suggests

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 5:05pm
Depression is a disorder that involves changes in coordinated networks of hundreds of genes across key brain circuits, according to a study. Researchers show through their work how tweaking gene networks can affect susceptibility to depression.
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Male birds may sing, but females are faster at discriminating sounds

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 5:03pm
It may well be that only male zebra finches can sing, but the females are faster at learning to discriminate sounds, researchers have found. The aim of the research was to find out why some birds could recognize sounds faster than others.
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The NYPD Was Ticketing Legally Parked Cars; Open Data Put an End to It

Slashdot - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 5:00pm
Data analyst Ben Wellington claims that that the NYPD has been systematically ticketing legally parked cars for years. Doing so, he says, helps NYPD collect millions of dollars every year. In a blog post, Wellington notes about a change of law in 2008 (PDF) which allowed one in New York City to park their car in front of a sidewalk pedestrian ramp -- provided it's not connected to a crosswalk. Despite this, the NYPD continues to ticket people. To check how many more people are falling for this, Wellington looked into NYC's Open Data portal, and his findings are startling. In front of 575 Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn, which is in the middle of the block, with no crosswalk, over $48,000 in parking fines were issued in the last 2.5 years. He writes: 1705 Canton Avenue in Brooklyn, 273 Tickets, $45,045: Legal. 270-05 76 Avenue in Queens, 256 Tickets ($42,440) Legal. 143-49 Cherry Ave, Queens, 246 Tickets, ($40,590). Legal. A spot in Battery Park, ranked #16 on my list and the top spot in Manhattan, had 116 tickets ($19,140) and turned out to be legal.Wellington wrote to the NYPD about this, and he got the following response: Mr. Wellington's analysis identified errors the department made in issuing parking summonses. It appears to be a misunderstanding by officers on patrol of a recent, abstruse change in the parking rules. We appreciate Mr. Wellington bringing this anomaly to our attention. The department's internal analysis found that patrol officers who are unfamiliar with the change have observed vehicles parked in front of pedestrian ramps and issued a summons in error. When the rule changed in 2009 to allow for certain pedestrian ramps to be blocked by parked vehicles, the department focused training on traffic agents, who write the majority of summonses.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Use of complementary, alternative medicine affects initiation of chemotherapy

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:54pm
Women with early-stage breast cancer for whom chemotherapy was indicated and who used dietary supplements and multiple types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) were less likely to start chemotherapy than nonusers of alternative therapies, according to new research. This is one of the first studies to evaluate how complementary and alternative medicine use affects decisions regarding chemotherapy.
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Gene expression depends on aonstant dialogue between nucleus, cytoplasm

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:54pm
Gene expression is the process by which genetic information is used to produce proteins, essential for cells to function properly. It takes place in two steps (first the transcription, then the translation), considered to be two independent processes until now. Today, microbiologists provide additional evidence that they are intrinsically related and that a protein complex called Ccr4-Not plays a key role in gene expression by acting as a messenger between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.
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New SLENDR technique: Protein labeling in developing brain by genome editing

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:54pm
A research team has developed a method, called SLENDR, that allows precise modification of neuronal DNA in living samples. Using their new technique, the research team was able to reliably label two different proteins with distinct colors at the same time in the same cell. The researchers used a variety of imaging methods as well as DNA sequencing to confirm that the SLENDR method had truly and precisely knocked in the genes.
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When dung beetles dance, they photograph the firmament

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:54pm
The discovery that dung beetles use the light of the Milky Way to navigate in the world has received much praise. Researchers have now taken a new step in understanding the existence of these unique beetles: when the beetles dance on top of a ball of dung, they simultaneously take a photograph -- a snapshot -- of how celestial bodies are positioned.
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Cape Watch: One of the New Mutants Isn’t Exactly New

Wired News - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:50pm
This week's superhero movie news: We now know at least one character potentially in the next X-Men movie. Also, Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool is still awesome. The post Cape Watch: One of the New Mutants Isn't Exactly New appeared first on WIRED.
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Study finds low levels of ultraviolet A light protection in automobile side windows

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
An analysis of the ultraviolet A (UV-A) light protection in the front windshields and side windows of automobiles finds that protection was consistently high in the front windshields while lower and highly variable in side windows, findings that may in part explain the reported increased rates of cataract in left eyes and left-sided facial skin cancer, according to a new study.
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Repetitive, subconcussive head impacts from football associated with short-term changes in eye function

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
In a study that included 29 NCAA football players, repetitive subconcussive impacts were associated with changes in near point of convergence (NPC) ocular-motor function among players in the higher-impact group, although NPC was normalized after a 3-week rest period, according to a new study. The NPC measures the closest point to which one can maintain convergence (simultaneous inward movement of eyes toward each other) while focusing on an object before diplopia (double vision) occurs.
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Online therapy effective at treating depression and anxiety

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
Providing an online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) program both alone and in combination with Internet support groups (ISG) is a more effective treatment for anxiety and depression than doctors' usual primary care, a new study has demonstrated.
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Stopping cancer in its tracks

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
Inhibiting autophagy, the process cells use to degrade large intra-cellular cargo, effectively blocks tumor cell migration and breast cancer metastasis in tumor models. Metastasis is responsible for 90 percent of cancer deaths. There are approved drugs that can disrupt autophagy.
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Scientists identify key factor in mitochondrial calcium uptake and bioenergetics

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
Mitochondria are the energy-generating batteries of cells, but they also perform other critical functions, including protecting cells against calcium overload, a significant cause of cell death in certain cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Underlying this safety mechanism is a protein complex known as the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). New work shows how MCU proteins come together to effect calcium uptake, shedding new light on the physiological role of the MCU complex and its importance to cellular bioenergetics.
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Melatonin signaling is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
A sleeping pancreas releases less insulin, but how much insulin drops each night may differ from person to person, suggests a new study. Up to 30 percent of the population may be predisposed to have a pancreas that's more sensitive to the insulin-inhibiting effects of melatonin. People with this increased sensitivity carry a slightly altered melatonin receptor gene that is a known risk factor for type 2 diabetes.
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Study identifies potential treatment target for pancreatic cancer

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
Investigators have identified the first potential molecular treatment target for the most common form of pancreatic cancer, which kills more than 90 percent of patients.
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Change the Textbooks: This eukaryote completely lacks mitochondria

Science Daily - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:49pm
Mitochondria are membrane-bound components within cells that are often described as the cells' powerhouses. They've long been considered as essential components for life in eukaryotes, the group including plants, fungi, animals, and unicellular protists, if for no other reason than that every known eukaryote had them. But researchers now challenges this notion. They've discovered a eukaryote that contains absolutely no trace of mitochondria at all.
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The Tale of a Wild Coast-to-Coast Road Trip … in 1903

Wired News - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:31pm
In 1903, two men spent 71 days driving a Packard Model F across the US—before most of the West even had paved roads. The post The Tale of a Wild Coast-to-Coast Road Trip ... in 1903 appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

US Congress Bans Members From Using Yahoo Mail

Slashdot - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:20pm
A week after we learned that the House of Represantives had banned its members from using Google's appshot.com, more details about the blockage have surfaced. Reader Big Hairy Ian writes: A series of ransomware attacks on the House of Representatives has led U.S. Congress to ban members from using Yahoo Mail, according to a leaked email. Both Yahoo Mail and Gmail are named in the 30 April email, published on Thursday by Gizmodo, saying the attacks had increased "in the past 48 hours". Yahoo Mail will be blocked "until further notice" it adds. Ransomware encrypts victims' files and demands a ransom be paid for unlocking. In this particular instance, I think it isn't all of Yahoo Mail's fault. People need to be wary of the links they click on.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Three Million Photos and Counting: Space Station Crew Takes Milestone Snapshots

Space.com - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:02pm
To suggest that the astronauts on the space station have been "snap happy" would be an understatement of astronomical proportions — the crew recently took the three millionth photo since the first residents began capturing images 15 years ago.
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Peek Inside London’s Epic New Train System Before It Opens

Wired News - Thu, 12/05/2016 - 4:00pm
A $21 billion infrastructure project is starting to look real. The post Peek Inside London's Epic New Train System Before It Opens appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science