Competition for graphene: Researchers demonstrate ultrafast charge transfer in new family of 2-D semiconductors

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:25pm
The first experimental observation of ultrafast charge transfer in photo-excited MX2 materials, the graphene-like two-dimensional semiconductors, has been conducted. Charge transfer time clocked in at under 50 femtoseconds, comparable to the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics.
Categories: Science

100 recent fetal surgeries for spina bifida performed at one American hospital

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:25pm
Reporting on 100 recent cases of fetal surgery for spina bifida, specialists at a premier fetal surgery program achieved results similar to those published three years previously in a landmark clinical trial that established a new standard of care for prenatal repair of this birth defect.
Categories: Science

Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:25pm
Each year, more than 300,000 Americans, primarily adults over age 65, sustain a hip fracture, a debilitating injury that can diminish life quality and expectancy. A new study found that average lifetime societal benefits in the U.S. reduced the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 per patient (in 2009 dollars), and that total, lifetime societal savings exceeded $16 billion for older patients.
Categories: Science

New statin guidelines an improvement, study shows

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:24pm
New national guidelines can improve the way statin drugs are prescribed to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease, a study has found. The research also showed the new guidelines produce only a modest increase in the number of patients being given the drugs.
Categories: Science

Existing power plants will spew 300 billion more tons of carbon dioxide during use

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:24pm
Existing power plants around the world will pump out more than 300 billion tons of carbon dioxide over their expected lifetimes, significantly adding to atmospheric levels of the climate-warming gas, according to scientists.
Categories: Science

Ninety-four years ago, women won the right to vote; Newly discovered letters will help show how

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:12pm
On Aug. 26, 1920, with the formal adoption of the 19th Amendment, women won the right to vote. Now, a newly discovered collection of Susan B. Anthony letters will help show how.
Categories: Science

Young driver's gender linked to crash type, injury severity

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:12pm
Gender differences do exist in young drivers when it comes to safety, a study finds. Gender is often related to what type of severe or fatal crash a young male or young female driver will be involved in. Researchers hope that the findings contribute to an improved understanding of crashes as well as help develop educational materials targeted more toward young drivers and each gender.
Categories: Science

Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke pot

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:11pm
New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. "These findings suggest that marijuana use is predictive of lower levels of aggression towards one's partner in the following year," authors say.
Categories: Science

How parents can help their children succeed, stay in school

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:11pm
Students are back in school and now is the time for parents to develop routines to help their children succeed academically. A university professor says parental involvement, more than income or social status, is a predictor of student achievement.
Categories: Science

Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:11pm
Astronomers have obtained the best view yet of a collision between two galaxies when the Universe was only half its current age. To make this observation, the team also enlisted the help of a gravitational lens, a galaxy-size magnifying glass, to reveal otherwise invisible detail.
Categories: Science

Brain benefits from weight loss following bariatric surgery

Science Daily - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:11pm
Weight loss surgery can curb alterations in brain activity associated with obesity and improve cognitive function involved in planning, strategizing and organizing, according to a new study. Bariatric surgery is used to help people who are dangerously obese lose weight. Bariatric surgery procedures are designed to restrict the amount of food you can eat before you feel full by reducing the stomach's size or limit the absorption of nutrients by removing part of the small intestine from the path food takes through the digestive tract.
Categories: Science

Former NASA Chief Says Russia Holding US Spaceflight Hostage: Report

Space.com - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 6:03pm
Former NASA administrator Mike Griffin thinks the United States' dependence on Russian technology to fly astronauts to the International Space Station is tantamount to a "hostage situation," according to an interview conducted in May.
Categories: Science

MOOCs Are Dead — Long Live the MOOC

Wired News - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:59pm
Do you remember all the way back in 2013? You know, the year North West was born, the Harlem Shake made its debut, and selfies changed phone texting rates. More notably, there was the bombing at the Boston Marathon, our climate proved that abnormal would be the new normal, and our planet lost Nelson Mandela. […]






Categories: Science

Science’s Big Data Problem

Wired News - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:59pm
Modern science seems to have data coming out of its ears. From genome sequencing machines capable of reading a human’s chromosomal DNA (about 1.5 gigabytes of data) in half an hour to particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (which generates close to 100 terabytes of data a day), researchers are awash with […]






Categories: Science

Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:56pm
First time accepted submitter merbs writes At the first major climate engineering conference, Stanford climatologist Ken Caldeira explains how and why we might come to live on a geoengineered planet, how the field is rapidly growing (and why that's dangerous), and what the odds are that humans will try to hijack the Earth's thermostat. From the article: "For years, Dr. Ken Caldeira's interest in planet hacking made him a curious outlier in his field. A highly respected atmospheric scientist, he also describes himself as a 'reluctant advocate' of researching solar geoengineering—that is, large-scale efforts to artificially manage the amount of sunlight entering the atmosphere, in order to cool off the globe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:56pm
First time accepted submitter merbs writes At the first major climate engineering conference, Stanford climatologist Ken Caldeira explains how and why we might come to live on a geoengineered planet, how the field is rapidly growing (and why that's dangerous), and what the odds are that humans will try to hijack the Earth's thermostat. From the article: "For years, Dr. Ken Caldeira's interest in planet hacking made him a curious outlier in his field. A highly respected atmospheric scientist, he also describes himself as a 'reluctant advocate' of researching solar geoengineering—that is, large-scale efforts to artificially manage the amount of sunlight entering the atmosphere, in order to cool off the globe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:56pm
First time accepted submitter merbs writes At the first major climate engineering conference, Stanford climatologist Ken Caldeira explains how and why we might come to live on a geoengineered planet, how the field is rapidly growing (and why that's dangerous), and what the odds are that humans will try to hijack the Earth's thermostat. From the article: "For years, Dr. Ken Caldeira's interest in planet hacking made him a curious outlier in his field. A highly respected atmospheric scientist, he also describes himself as a 'reluctant advocate' of researching solar geoengineering—that is, large-scale efforts to artificially manage the amount of sunlight entering the atmosphere, in order to cool off the globe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:56pm
First time accepted submitter merbs writes At the first major climate engineering conference, Stanford climatologist Ken Caldeira explains how and why we might come to live on a geoengineered planet, how the field is rapidly growing (and why that's dangerous), and what the odds are that humans will try to hijack the Earth's thermostat. From the article: "For years, Dr. Ken Caldeira's interest in planet hacking made him a curious outlier in his field. A highly respected atmospheric scientist, he also describes himself as a 'reluctant advocate' of researching solar geoengineering—that is, large-scale efforts to artificially manage the amount of sunlight entering the atmosphere, in order to cool off the globe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:56pm
First time accepted submitter merbs writes At the first major climate engineering conference, Stanford climatologist Ken Caldeira explains how and why we might come to live on a geoengineered planet, how the field is rapidly growing (and why that's dangerous), and what the odds are that humans will try to hijack the Earth's thermostat. From the article: "For years, Dr. Ken Caldeira's interest in planet hacking made him a curious outlier in his field. A highly respected atmospheric scientist, he also describes himself as a 'reluctant advocate' of researching solar geoengineering—that is, large-scale efforts to artificially manage the amount of sunlight entering the atmosphere, in order to cool off the globe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Climate Scientist Pioneer Talks About the Furture of Geoengineering

Slashdot - Tue, 26/08/2014 - 5:56pm
First time accepted submitter merbs writes At the first major climate engineering conference, Stanford climatologist Ken Caldeira explains how and why we might come to live on a geoengineered planet, how the field is rapidly growing (and why that's dangerous), and what the odds are that humans will try to hijack the Earth's thermostat. From the article: "For years, Dr. Ken Caldeira's interest in planet hacking made him a curious outlier in his field. A highly respected atmospheric scientist, he also describes himself as a 'reluctant advocate' of researching solar geoengineering—that is, large-scale efforts to artificially manage the amount of sunlight entering the atmosphere, in order to cool off the globe."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science