Protein may provide key to arresting development of diabetes

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
The STK25 protein contributes to cell growth. Now researchers have discovered that the protein also affects metabolism, demonstrating that elevated levels accelerate the progress of diabetes in mice.
Categories: Science

Many nurses unprepared to meet dying patients, study suggests

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
Most nurses in their work care for patients who are dying. A study of more than 200 students has shown that many nurses in training feel unprepared and anxious when faced with the prospect of meeting patients during end-of-life care.
Categories: Science

Scientists create renewable fossil fuel alternative using bacteria

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
Researchers have engineered the harmless gut bacteria E.coli to generate renewable propane. The development is a step towards commercial production of a source of fuel that could one day provide an alternative to fossil fuels. Propane is an appealing source of cleaner fuel because it has an existing global market.
Categories: Science

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:42pm
In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.
Categories: Science

Whose to blame for ocean trash? Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:40pm
Researchers have created a new model that could help determine what area of the world is to blame for each ocean garbage patch of floating debris – a difficult task for a system as complex and massive as the ocean.
Categories: Science

Code.org Discloses Top Donors

Slashdot - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:21pm
theodp (442580) writes "Under the leadership of Code.org, explained the ACM, it joined CSTA, NCWIT, NSF, Microsoft and Google in an effort "to reshape the U.S. education system," including passing a federal law making Computer Science a "core subject" in schools. If you're curious about whose money helped fuel the effort, Code.org's Donors page now lists those who gave $25,000+ to $3,000,000+ to the K-12 CS cause (the nonprofit plans to raise $20-30 million for 2015-16 operations). Microsoft is at the top of the list as a Platinum Supporter ($3,000,000+), while Bill Gates is Gold ($1,000,000+), and Steve Ballmer is Silver ($500,000+). Interestingly, six of Code.org's ten biggest donors are also Founders of Mark Zuckerberg's FWD.us tech immigration reform PAC."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Skywatching Planets and the Harvest Moon In September 2014 | Video

Space.com - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:02pm
In the evening, Mars and Saturn can be seen in the southwestern sky. Jupiter can be viewed in the eastern sky in the early morning hours. Also, the Moon adds additional light for farmers to harvest their crops.
Categories: Science

'Wet' Constellations Featured In September 2014 Skywatching Video

Space.com - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 2:47pm
The constellations of Aquarius (God of the Waters) and Capricornus (The Water Goat) hold a bevy of skywatching targets. The M2 star cluster in Aquarius harbors about 150,000 stars.
Categories: Science

In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Slashdot - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 2:42pm
An anonymous reader writes A 23-year-old teacher at a Cambridge, Md. middle school has been placed on leave and—in the words of a local news report — "taken in for an emergency medical evaluation" for publishing, under a pseudonym, a novel about a school shooting. The novelist, Patrick McLaw, an eighth-grade language-arts teacher at the Mace's Lane Middle School, was placed on leave by the Dorchester County Board of Education, and is being investigated by the Dorchester County Sheriff's Office, according to news reports from Maryland's Eastern Shore. The novel, by the way, is set 900 years in the future."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Unusual 'Pyramid Of Light' Brightens September 2014 Skywatching | Video

Space.com - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 2:18pm
The reflection of sunlight off of cosmic dust particle creates the effect known as "zodiacal light", sometimes called the "false dawn." (Best seen from mid-September to early October).
Categories: Science

Scientists sequence complete genome of E. coli strain responsible for food poisoning

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:43pm
The first complete genome sequencing of a strain of E. coli that is a common cause of outbreaks of food poisoning in the United States has been sequenced by scientists. Although the E. coli strain EDL933 was first isolated in the 1980s, it gained national attention in 1993 when it was linked to an outbreak of food poisoning from Jack-in-the-Box restaurants in the western United States.
Categories: Science

Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:42pm
Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers have now managed to make artificial cell membranes form across a large number of vertical nanowires, known as a 'nano-forest'.
Categories: Science

'Deadly force' lab finds racial disparities in shootings

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:41pm
Participants in an innovative study of deadly force were more likely to feel threatened in scenarios involving black people. But when it came time to shoot, participants were biased in favor of black suspects, taking longer to pull the trigger against them than against armed white or Hispanic suspects.
Categories: Science

Cannabis withdrawal symptoms common among adolescents treated for substance use disorder

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:41pm
Although cannabis -- commonly known as marijuana -- is broadly believed to be nonaddictive, a study has found that 40 percent of cannabis-using adolescents receiving outpatient treatment for substance use disorder reported experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, which are considered a hallmark of drug dependence.
Categories: Science

Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:34pm
When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
Categories: Science

Exceptionally well preserved insect fossils from the Rhône Valley found

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:34pm
In Bavaria, the Tithonian Konservat-Lagerstätte of lithographic limestone is well known as a result of numerous discoveries of emblematic fossils from that area (for example, Archaeopteryx). Now, for the first time, researchers have found fossil insects in the French equivalent of these outcrops -- discoveries which include a new species representing the oldest known water treader.
Categories: Science

Quantum control of molecules for ultra-fast computers: Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:34pm
In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential for new applications, such as quantum computing, can be harnessed: shine a single laser on a trapped molecule and it instantly cools to the temperature of outer space, stopping the rotation of the molecule.
Categories: Science

Asian camel crickets now common in U.S. homes

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:34pm
With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.
Categories: Science

Apple Reveals the Most Common Reasons That It Rejects Apps

Slashdot - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:34pm
mrspoonsi writes One of the great mysteries of the App Store is why certain apps get rejected and why others don't. Apple has let a surprising number of ripoffs and clones through the store's iron gates, yet some developers face rejection for seemingly innocent apps. "Before you develop your app, it's important to become familiar with the technical, content, and design criteria that we use to review all apps," explains Apple on a new webpage called "Common App Rejections." Rejections include: Apple and our customers place a high value on simple, refined, creative, well thought through interfaces. They take more work but are worth it. Apple sets a high bar. If your user interface is complex or less than very good, it may be rejected; Apps that contain false, fraudulent or misleading representations or use names or icons similar to other Apps will be rejected.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Migrating birds sprint in spring, but take things easy in autumn

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 1:32pm
Passerine birds, also known as perching birds, that migrate by night tend to fly faster in spring than they do in autumn to reach their destinations. This seasonal difference in flight speed is especially noticeable among birds that only make short migratory flights, research shows. As short-distance migratory birds, they have the luxury to wait until winds are just right.
Categories: Science