Serious risks from common IV devices mean doctors should choose carefully, experts say

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:17pm
Every day, patients get IV devices placed in their arms, to make it easier to receive medicines or have blood drawn. New research shows how serious the risk of blood clots from these devices is for hospitalized patients, and a new tool can help doctors decide when to use them.
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UN urged to ensure open access to plant genomes

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:17pm
A plant scientist has called for the United Nations to guarantee free and open access to plant DNA sequences to enable scientists to continue work to sustainably intensify world food production.
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Glimpse into the regulation of water exchange in the brain

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:15pm
The mechanism that regulates the flow of water in brain cells has been discovered by researchers. The human brain is 80 percent water, which makes the constant regulation of the amount of fluid in the brain very important. Disruptions in the regulation of the direction or speed of the water flow are associated with medical conditions, including hydrocephalus ("water in the brain"), for example.
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Detailed genetic map of world wheat varieties developed

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:15pm
Researchers have produced the first haplotype map of wheat that provides detailed description of genetic differences in a worldwide sample of wheat lines. This is an important foundation for future improvements in wheat around the world.
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The oldest old are changing Canada

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:15pm
In 1971 there were 139,000 Canadians aged 85 and over. By 2013 their numbers had risen to 702,000. The Oldest Old as they have become known today represent 2% of the total Canadian population. “They are a demographic reality which has to be taken into account in formulating public policy”, according to a Canadian demographer.
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Troops who don't pass the smell test likely have traumatic brain injury

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:15pm
Decreased ability to identify specific odors can predict abnormal neuroimaging results in blast-injured troops, according to a new study. The olfactory system processes thousands of different odors, sending signals to the brain which interprets the smell by linking it to a past memory. If memory is impaired, as is the case with Alzheimer's disease, sleep deprivation, and acute traumatic brain injury, the task is not entirely possible.
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German Vice Chancellor: the US Threatened Us Over Snowden

Slashdot - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:15pm
siddesu sends this report from The Intercept: German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel said this week in Homburg that the U.S. government threatened to cease sharing intelligence with Germany if Berlin offered asylum to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden or otherwise arranged for him to travel to that country. 'They told us they would stop notifying us of plots and other intelligence matters,' Gabriel said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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German Vice Chancellor: the US Threatened Us Over Snowden

Slashdot - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:15pm
siddesu sends this report from The Intercept: German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel said this week in Homburg that the U.S. government threatened to cease sharing intelligence with Germany if Berlin offered asylum to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden or otherwise arranged for him to travel to that country. 'They told us they would stop notifying us of plots and other intelligence matters,' Gabriel said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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What I Learned Writing A Brain Blog For 17 Months

Wired News - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 2:13pm

Brain myths die hard, and other things I learned from writing WIRED's popular Brain Watch blog for 17 months.

The post What I Learned Writing A Brain Blog For 17 Months appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

At Least 700,000 Routers Given To Customers By ISPs Are Vulnerable To Hacking

Slashdot - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:33pm
itwbennett writes: More than 700,000 ADSL routers provided to customers by ISPs around the world contain serious flaws that allow remote hackers to take control of them. Most of the routers have a 'directory traversal' flaw in a firmware component called webproc.cgi that allows hackers to extract sensitive configuration data, including administrative credentials. The flaw isn't new and has been reported by multiple researchers since 2011 in various router models.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Thinking of drinking and driving? What if your car won't let you?

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:18pm
If every new car had a built-in blood alcohol level tester that prevented impaired drivers from driving the vehicle, the US could avoid 85 percent of crash deaths attributable to alcohol-involved motor vehicle crashes. In just 15 years, that would mean preventing more than 59,000 deaths.
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Healthy grain fiber helps barley resist pests

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:15pm
Research has shed light on the action of the serious agricultural pest, cereal cyst nematode, which will help progress improved resistant varieties. Cereal cyst nematode is a microscopic parasitic worm that lives in soils and infects the roots of cereal crops such as barley, wheat and oats. This affects root growth and leads to poor nutrient uptake, a reduction in crop yield and, in susceptible varieties, more worm eggs in the soil for ongoing infection.
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Bright new hope for beating deadly hereditary stomach, breast cancers

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:15pm
Deadly familial stomach and lobular breast cancers could be successfully treated at their earliest stages, or even prevented, by existing drugs that have been newly identified by cancer genetics researchers.
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'Attract and kill:' Trapping malaria mosquito moms before they lay eggs

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:15pm
In a world first, researchers have found that a naturally occurring chemical attracts pregnant malaria-transmitting mosquitoes -- a discovery which could boost malaria control efforts. The chemical, cedrol, found in mosquito breeding sites near Africa's Lake Victoria, could be used in traps that would 'attract and kill' the female mosquito, preventing reproduction before she lays hundreds of eggs.
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Review of global guidelines for sepsis needed

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:15pm
Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria.
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New transitory form of silica observed

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:15pm
Silicon dioxide, commonly called silica, is one of the most-abundant natural compounds and a major component of the Earth's crust and mantle. It is well-known even to non-scientists in its quartz crystalline form. Silica's various high-pressure forms make it an often-used study subject for scientists interested in the transition between different chemical phases under extreme conditions. A research team was able to discover five new forms of silica under extreme pressures at room temperature.
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Government anti-drinking messages irrelevant to young binge drinkers, study finds

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:14pm
Government advertising campaigns to tackle excessive drinking are dismissed as irrelevant by young binge drinkers, because consuming extreme quantities of alcohol is part of their sub-cultural social identity, according to new research.
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Adapting to climate change will bring new environmental problems

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:13pm
Adapting to climate change could have profound environmental repercussions, according to a new study. Research reveals that adaptation measures have the potential to generate further pressures and threats for both local and global ecosystems. “Climate change is a just a little bit more complicated than we previously thought. We need to take into account not only the direct impact of climate change, but also how people will respond to such change - the impact of adaptation," notes the lead researcher.
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First blood test for osteoarthritis could soon be available

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:13pm
The first blood test for osteoarthritis could soon be developed, thanks to new research. The research findings could potentially lead to patients being tested for osteoarthritis and diagnosed several years before the onset of physical symptoms.
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Neuropsychology: Power naps produce a significant improvement in memory performance

Science Daily - Fri, 20/03/2015 - 1:13pm
Psychologists have shown that a short nap lasting about an hour can significantly improve memory performance. The study involved examination of memory recall in 41 participants. The volunteers had to learn single words and word pairs. Once the learning phase was over, the participants were tested to determine how much information they could remember. About half of the participants were then allowed to sleep, while the others watched a DVD. After that, the participants were re-tested and those who had taken a nap were shown to have retained substantially more word pairs in memory than the participants in the control group who had watched a DVD.
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