Gene defect may point to solution for Alzheimer's

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 3:12pm
New research has discovered that one protein, called PITRM1, which is found in mitochondria, otherwise known as the powerhouses of the cell, may be involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease.
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Simulating carbon dioxide saturation in rocks gives potential breakthrough in carbon capture, storage

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:57pm
A successful new simulation method for characterizing carbon dioxide transfer and storage in natural rock reservoirs has been developed by researchers. The team scanned rocks with X-ray microcomputed tomography and combined the results with detailed mathematical simulation to visualize real displacement of water by carbon dioxide below ground, potentially leading to means of actual carbon dioxide storage in rocks.
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Pain drug in pipeline as researchers unwind marine snail puzzle

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:57pm
A big step toward the holy grail of biomedical science has been made -- a new form of effective pain relief. Marine snail venom has been a well-known and promising source of new pain drugs, but substantial hurdles had restrained progress to date.
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Riddle of missing efficiency in zinc oxide-based dye-sensitised solar cells solved

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:57pm
To convert solar energy into electricity or solar fuels, you need specialized systems of materials such as those consisting of organic and inorganic thin films. Processes at the junction of these films play a decisive role in converting the solar energy. Now a team of researchers has used ultra-short laser pulses and observed for the first time directly how boundary states form between the organic dye molecules and a zinc-oxide semiconductor layer, temporarily trapping the charge carriers.
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After 18 million years, a new species of extinct rodent discovered in Israel

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:57pm
A handful of tiny teeth found in Israel's Negev desert led researchers to describe a new species of rodent which has been extinct for nearly 18 million years.
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Sun 'Hearts' Us With Huge Active Region | Video

Space.com - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:57pm
We heart you too, Sun! Active Region 2529 has taken on a heart-shape over the past few days (seen here from April 11-13, 2016).
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Asiagomphus reinhardti: A newly discovered insect

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:43pm
A newly discovered dragonfly species was named after the zoologist Klaus Reinhardt.
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Innovative research pioneers nanotechnology for gas sensing

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:43pm
A new type of device that could be used to develop cost-effective gas sensors has been developed by a team of researchers. The team has created a new type of device that emits light in the infrared part of the spectrum. Many important gases strongly absorb infrared light and this characteristic absorption can be used as a way of sensing them.
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Spotting DNA repair genes gone awry

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:43pm
Researchers have developed a new technique for sussing out the genes responsible for helping repair DNA damage that, if left unchecked, can lead to certain cancers.
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Untwist scoliosis by clipping wings of an overactive 'ladybird'

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:43pm
People with scoliosis, a twisting of the spine that can occur as a birth defect or more commonly starts during the teen years, are now closer to a genetic explanation for their condition. An overactive gene, called ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1), is the start of a genetic chain reaction that causes the spine to grow abnormally. The report is the first to demonstrate the functional association of scoliosis with LBX1.
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In-vitro reproduction of long-lasting effects of stress on memory

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:42pm
A group of researchers succeeded in reproduction of the same phenomenon as memory consolidation by using organotypic slice cultures of the cerebral cortex and revealed that stress interfered with memory consolidation. As cultures can be maintained for a long period, it is possible to examine long-term effects. This group's achievement will be useful for developing therapeutic methods for and preventive measures against stress-induced memory defects.
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Slow-binding inhibition of cholinesterases: Pharmacological, toxicological relevance

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:42pm
Researchers describe slow-binding inhibition of cholinesterases and present their pharmacological advantages over classical reversible inhibitors (e.g. long target-residence times, resulting in prolonged efficacy with minimal unwanted side effects), slow-binding inhibitors of ChEs are promising new drugs for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, myasthenia, and neuroprotection.
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New method to preserve microfluidic devices for HIV monitoring in developing countries

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:42pm
Inspired by pregnancy tests, researchers have developed a novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing in extreme weather conditions for up to six months without refrigeration. These devices have broad applications in chemotherapy monitoring, transplant patient monitoring, and especially in monitoring the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy. If produced at a large scale, the device would cost less than $1 compared with the current cost of a CD4 assay which is about $30-$50.
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FBI Paid Professional Hackers One-Time Fee To Crack San Bernardino iPhone

Slashdot - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:41pm
There's another new wrinkle in the never-ending FBI vs Apple saga. The Washington Post is claiming that FBI did not require Cellebrite's assistance in hacking San Bernardino iPhone. Instead, the report claims, the government intelligence organization bought a previously unknown security bug from a group of professional hackers. According to the report, the hacker group provided FBI with at least one zero-day flaw in the iPhone 5c's security, which enabled FBI to circumvent the lockscreen and other security features. The bug hasn't been disclosed. FBI has previously noted that the technique it utilized in breaking into the iPhone 5c does not work with any new iPhone models (iPhone 5s or newer).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Insanely Detailed 3-D Globe of the Moon Shows Every Dimple

Wired News - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:00pm
Lunar globes already exist, but 3-D, topographically accurate ones do not. These designers say they've made the first. The post Insanely Detailed 3-D Globe of the Moon Shows Every Dimple appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Amazon Kindle Oasis With 'Months' of Battery Life, Redesigned Body Launched

Slashdot - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 2:00pm
Amazon, on Wednesday, announced the Kindle Oasis, the company's latest addition to its ebook reader offering. The Kindle Oasis offers a range of improvements and changes over the Kindle Paperwhite. Mashable's Lance Ulanoff writes, "[The company has] essentially discarded the previous design in favor of a paper-thin display attached to a somewhat thicker side grip." Elaborating: First of all, the 6-inch screen is close to square. Second of all, it no longer sits in the center of the device. And thirdly, the screen is now an insane 3.4-mm thick. Yes, that is as thin as you think it is. Amazon's Oasis e-reader even marks the return of buttons to the design.As for the specifications, the Kindle Oasis sports a 6-inch display of 300ppi screen resolution, and 10 LEDs for "enhanced page consistency." Instead of "weeks"-long battery life, Amazon is promising "months" of usage on a single charge with Oasis thanks to the cover that ships with it and doubles as a rechargeable battery. It starts at $289.99 (Wi-Fi-only edition and with "advertisements that appear when you wake up the reader"), and goes all the way up to $379 (Wi-Fi + 3G, and no ads).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Heliopause In Under A Decade! NASA's 'E-Sail' Concept Begins Tests | Video

Space.com - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 1:53pm
The Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transport System (HERTS) concept aims to use an electric sail (E-Sail) to harness the solar wind's protons and electrons, which travel at breakneck speeds of 400 to 750 kilometers per second.
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Obama: The Word 'Classified' Means Whatever We Need It To Mean

Slashdot - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 1:01pm
An anonymous reader writes: During an interview with Fox News, President Obama said "There's classified, and then there's classified" when trying to answer questions about an ongoing investigation about Hillary Clinton and her emails. Techdirt writes, "Clinton sent, received and stored classified info on a private email server. But some classified info is more equal than others. It all depends on who has it and how the current administration feels about that person. Clinton playing fast and loose with classified info is subject to an entirely different standard than the large number of whistleblowers the Obama administration has prosecuted over the years." President Obama said in an interview broadcast on Sunday that while Hillary Clinton had been careless in managing her emails as secretary of state, she would never intentionally do anything to endanger the country. Obama says, "There's stuff that is really top-secret, and there's stuff that is being presented to the president or the secretary of state that you might not want on the transom, or going out over the wire, but is basically stuff that you could get in open-source." Basically, classification means all things to all people, as long as it allows officials and agencies to control narratives and disrupt public accountability.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Amazon’s New Kindle Oasis Is the Fanciest-Pantsiest E-Reader Ever

Wired News - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 1:00pm
For $289, you get the best thing this side of paperback. The post Amazon's New Kindle Oasis Is the Fanciest-Pantsiest E-Reader Ever appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Diet affects the evolution of birds

Science Daily - Wed, 13/04/2016 - 12:47pm
How diet has affected the evolution of the 10,000 bird species in the world is still a mystery to evolutionary biology. A new study shows how diet preferences have influenced bird diversification over millions of years.
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