Pastejacking Attack Appends Malicious Terminal Commands To Your Clipboard

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 11:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: "It has been possible for a long time for developers to use CSS to append malicious content to the clipboard without a user noticing and thus fool them into executing unwanted terminal commands," writes Softpedia. "This type of attack is known as clipboard hijacking, and in most scenarios, is useless, except when the user copies something inside their terminal." Security researcher Dylan Ayrey published a new version of this attack last week, which uses only JavaScript as the attack medium, giving the attack more versatility and making it now easier to carry out. The attack is called Pastejacking and it uses Javascript to theoretically allow attackers to add their malicious code to the entire page to run commands behind a user's back when they paste anything inside the console. "The attack can be deadly if combined with tech support or phishing emails," writes Softpedia. "Users might think they're copying innocent text into their console, but in fact, they're running the crook's exploit for them."

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Categories: Science

Calling an Uber Is Cooler Than Owning a Car—And Automakers Want In

Wired News - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 11:09pm
Today both Toyota and VW said they were pouring money into ride-hailing startups as Silicon Valley redefines the future of getting around. The post Calling an Uber Is Cooler Than Owning a Car—And Automakers Want In appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Elderly Use More Secure Passwords Than Millennials, Says Report

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 10:57pm
An anonymous reader writes from a report via Quartz: A report released May 24 by Gigya surveyed 4,000 adults in the U.S. and U.K. and found that 18- to 34-year-olds are more likely to use bad passwords and report their online accounts being compromised. The majority of respondents ages 51 to 69 say they completely steer away from easily cracked passwords like "password," "1234," or birthdays, while two-thirds of those in the 18-to-34 age bracket were caught using those kind of terms. Quartz writes, "The diligence of the older group could help explain why 82% of respondents in this age range did not report having had any of their online accounts compromised in the past year. In contrast, 35% of respondents between 18 and 34 said at least one of their accounts was hacked within the last 12 months, twice the rate of those aged 51 to 69."

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Categories: Science

Microsoft Awards Grants To Deliver Affordable Internet Access

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 10:13pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNET: Microsoft said Tuesday it had awarded grants to 12 businesses as part of the company's Affordable Access Initiative, part of the software giant's effort to encourage low-cost Internet around the world. Grant recipients include businesses from Argentina, Botswana, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Nigeria, Philippines, Rwanda, Uganda, the UK and the US. In addition to financial support, each company will have access to Microsoft resources, software and services to help them develop their technology. "With more than half of the world's population lacking access to the Internet, connectivity is a global challenge that demands creative problem solving," Peggy Johnson, executive vice president of business development, said in a press release. "By using technology that's available now and partnering with local entrepreneurs who understand the needs of their communities, our hope is to create sustainable solutions that will not only have impact today but also in the years to come." Google and Facebook are also working on bringing affordable Internet access around the world. Google has plans to broadcast Internet from hot air balloons via Project Loon, while Facebook plans to beam Internet down to earth from drones.

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Categories: Science

Google France Being Raided For Unpaid Taxes

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 9:30pm
jones_supa writes: Investigators in France have raided Google's Paris headquarters amid a probe over the company's tax payments, Reuters reports. The French Finance Ministry is investigating $1.8 billion in back taxes. According to a report in French daily Le Parisien, at least 100 investigators are part of the raid at Google's offices. A source close to the finance ministry said that the raid at Google's offices has been ongoing on Tuesday since 03:00 GMT. In February, a source at the French Finance Ministry told Reuters that the government was seeking the $1.8 billion from Google. At the time, official spokespeople for Google France and the Finance Ministry refused to comment on the situation. Google could face up to a $11.14 million fine if it is found guilty, or a fine of half of the value of the laundered amount involved. In April, the EU revealed plans to force multinationals such as Google, Amazon and Facebook to disclose exactly where and how much tax they pay across the continent. A new clause was added since the Panama Papers leak requiring the companies to report how much money they make in so-called "tax havens."

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Categories: Science

Diamonds closer to becoming ideal power semiconductors

Kurzweil AI - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 9:25pm

A diode array bonded to a natural single crystalline diamond plate. Inset: deposited anode metal on top of doped silicon nanomembrane. (credit: Jung-Hun Seo)

Researchers have developed a new method for doping (integrating elements to change a semiconductor’s properties) single crystals of diamond with boron at relatively low temperatures, without degradation.

Diamonds have properties that could make them ideal semiconductors for power electronics. They can handle high voltages and power, and electrical currents also flow through diamonds quickly, meaning the material would make for energy-efficient devices. And they are thermally conductive, which means diamond-based devices would dissipate heat quickly and easily (no need for bulky, expensive cooling methods). However. diamond’s rigid crystalline structure makes doping difficult.*

Doping a diamond with boron

Zhengqiang (Jack) Ma, a University of Wisconsin-Madison electrical and computer engineering professor, and his colleagues describe a solution in the Journal of Applied Physics, from AIP Publishing.

They discovered that if you bond a single-crystal diamond with a piece of silicon doped with boron, and heat it to 800 degrees Celsius (low compared to conventional techniques), the boron atoms will migrate from the silicon to the diamond. It turns out that the boron-doped silicon has defects such as vacancies, where an atom is missing in the lattice structure. Carbon atoms from the diamond will fill those vacancies, leaving empty spots for boron atoms.

This technique also allows for selective doping, which means more control when making devices. You can choose where to dope a single-crystal diamond simply by bonding the silicon to that spot.

The new method currently only works for P-type doping, where the semiconductor is doped with an element that provides positive charge carriers (in this case, the absence of electrons, called holes). The researchers are already working on a simple device using P-type single-crystal diamond semiconductors.

But to make electronic devices like transistors, you need N-type doping, which gives the semiconductor negative charge carriers (electrons). And other barriers remain: diamond is expensive and single crystals are very small.

Still, Ma says, achieving P-type doping is an important step, and might inspire others to find solutions for the remaining challenges. Eventually, he said, single-crystal diamond could be useful everywhere — perfect, for instance, for controlling power in the electrical grid.

* Currently, you can dope diamond by coating the crystal with boron and heating it to 1450 degrees Celsius. But it’s difficult to remove the boron coating at the end. This method only works on diamonds consisting of multiple crystals stuck together. Because such polydiamonds have irregularities between the crystals, single crystals would be superior semiconductors. You can dope single crystals by injecting boron atoms while growing the crystals artificially. The problem is the process requires powerful microwaves that can degrade the quality of the crystal.

Abstract of Thermal diffusion boron doping of single-crystal natural diamond

With the best overall electronic and thermal properties, single crystal diamond (SCD) is the extreme wide bandgap material that is expected to revolutionize power electronics and radio-frequency electronics in the future. However, turning SCD into useful semiconductors requires overcoming doping challenges, as conventional substitutional doping techniques, such as thermal diffusion and ion implantation, are not easily applicable to SCD. Here we report a simple and easily accessible doping strategy demonstrating that electrically activated, substitutional doping in SCD without inducing graphitization transition or lattice damage can be readily realized with thermal diffusion at relatively low temperatures by using heavily dopedSi nanomembranes as a unique dopant carrying medium. Atomistic simulations elucidate a vacancyexchange boron doping mechanism that occurs at the bonded interface between Si and diamond. We further demonstrate selectively doped high voltage diodes and half-wave rectifier circuits using such dopedSCD. Our new doping strategy has established a reachable path toward using SCDs for future high voltage power conversion systems and for other novel diamond based electronic devices. The novel dopingmechanism may find its critical use in other wide bandgap semiconductors.

Categories: Science

With Trending Topics, Facebook Is Creating Its Own News Cycle

Wired News - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 9:20pm
Facebook may be a rookie when it comes to news judgment, but it is a veteran at data mining. Now, it's using those skills to its advantage. The post With Trending Topics, Facebook Is Creating Its Own News Cycle appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google Now Handles At Least 2 Trillion Searches Per Year

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:45pm
Danny Sullivan, reporting for Search Engine Land: How many searches per year happen on Google? After nearly four years, the company has finally released an updated figure today of "trillions" per year. How many trillions, exactly, Google wouldn't say. Consider two trillion the starting point. Google did confirm to Search Engine Land that because it said it handles "trillions" of searches per year worldwide, the figure could be safely assumed to be two trillion or above. Is it more than two trillion? Google could be doing five trillion searches per year. Or 10 trillion. Or 100 trillion. Or presumably up to 999 trillion, because if it were 1,000 trillion, you'd expect Google would announce that it does a quadrillion searches per year.

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Categories: Science

High performance golf club comes with annoying sound

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:39pm
In 2007, a new golf club hit the market. The distribution of mass in the club head made it less likely to twist, making an off-center hit less likely, but it had a drawback: a loud noise when it struck the ball, piercing through the tranquility of a golf course. The club never grew popular among players, with many saying they disliked the noise. Researchers set out to find the cause of the offensive clang.
Categories: Science

Chemo, radiation, surgery combo boosts survival for pancreatic cancer patients

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:38pm
In roughly one-third of pancreatic cancer patients, tumors have grown around the pancreas to encompass critical blood vessels. Conventional wisdom has long held that surgery to remove the tumors is rarely an option, and life expectancies are usually measured in months. New research is finding that many of these patients actually are candidates for surgery.
Categories: Science

Harnessing nature’s vast array of venoms for drug discovery

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:37pm
Scientists have invented a method for rapidly identifying venoms that strike a specific target in the body -- and optimizing such venoms for therapeutic use.
Categories: Science

Experts develop method for including migration uncertainty in population projections

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:37pm
Statisticians have developed what is believed to be the first model for factoring in the uncertainties of migration in population projections.
Categories: Science

Can't resist temptation? That may not be a bad thing

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:37pm
Children raised in poverty may have been mistakenly labeled as 'maladapted' for what appears to be a lack of self-control, new research suggests. The new study finds that what looks like selfishness may actually be beneficial behavior that's based on a child's environmental context -- that is to say, from being raised in a resource-poor environment.
Categories: Science

Mucus may play vital role in dolphin echolocation

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:37pm
A dolphin chasing a tasty fish will produce a stream of rapid-fire echolocation clicks that help it track the speed, direction and distance to its prey. Now researchers have developed a model that could yield new insights into how the charismatic marine mammals make these clicks - and it turns out mucus may play an important role.
Categories: Science

American Scientists Working On Creating Chimeras: Half-Human, Half-Animal Embryos

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 8:15pm
Researchers at the University of California, Davis are working on creating half-human, half-animal hybrid embryos dubbed chimeras to better understand diseases and its progression. But not everybody is thrilled about it. IBTimes reports: One of the aims of the experiment using chimeras is to create farm animals with human organs. The body parts could then be harvested and transplanted into very sick people. However, a number of bioethicists and scientists frown on the creation of interspecies embryos which they believe crosses the line. New York Medical College Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy Stuart Newman calls the use of chimeras as entering unsettling ground which damages "our sense of humanity." They are not alone in voicing their opinion against the idea. Huffington Post adds: The project is so controversial that the National Institutes of Health has refused to fund it. The researchers are relying on private donors. Critics of these experiments say they are too risky because there is no way of knowing where the human stem cells will go. Will they just become a pancreas? Or could they become a brain? And if they become a brain, will the pigs who house them have human consciousness?

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Categories: Science

No, Apple Won't Become a Wireless Carrier

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 7:45pm
Don Reisinger, reporting for Fortune: Apple won't be competing with its carrier partners anytime soon. Speaking at Startup Fest Europe in Amsterdam during an interview on Tuesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook squashed rumors that his company is planning to eventually get into the cellular market to compete with the likes of AT&T and Verizon. "Our expertise doesn't extend to the network," Cook said. "We've worked with AT&T in the U.S., O2 in the U.K., as well as T-Mobile and Orange, and we expanded as we learned more. But generally, the things Apple likes to do, are things we can do globally. We don't have the network skill. We'll do some things along the way with e-SIMs along the way, but in general, I like the things carriers do."

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Categories: Science

Beware Of Keystroke Loggers Disguised As USB Phone Chargers, FBI Warns

Slashdot - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 7:15pm
An anonymous reader cites an article on Ars Technica: FBI officials are warning private industry partners to be on the lookout for highly stealthy keystroke loggers that surreptitiously sniff passwords and other input typed into wireless keyboards. The FBI's Private Industry Notification (PDF) comes more than 15 months after whitehat hacker Samy Kamkar released a KeySweeper, a proof-of-concept attack platform that covertly logged and decrypted keystrokes from many Microsoft-branded wireless keyboards and transmitted the data over cellular networks. To lower the chances that the sniffing device might be discovered by a target, Kamkar designed it to look almost identical to USB phone chargers that are nearly ubiquitous in homes and offices."If placed strategically in an office or other location where individuals might use wireless devices, a malicious cyber actor could potentially harvest personally identifiable information, intellectual property, trade secrets, passwords, or other sensitive information," FBI officials wrote in last month's advisory. "Since the data is intercepted prior to reaching the CPU, security managers may not have insight into how sensitive information is being stolen."

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Categories: Science

Acupuncture used in clinical settings reduced symptoms of menopause

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 6:49pm
Acupuncture treatments can reduce the number of hot flashes and night sweats associated with menopause by as much as 36 percent, according to researchers.
Categories: Science

Single-step hydrogen peroxide production could be cleaner, more efficient

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 6:49pm
Chemical and biological engineers have uncovered new insight into how the compound hydrogen peroxide decomposes. This advance could inform efficient and cost-effective single-step strategies for producing hydrogen peroxide.
Categories: Science

Great apes communicate cooperatively

Science Daily - Tue, 24/05/2016 - 6:49pm
Gestural communication in bonobos and chimpanzees shows turn-taking and clearly distinguishable communication styles.
Categories: Science