Interviews: Ask the Hampton Creek Team About the Science and Future of Food

Slashdot - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 6:02pm
samzenpus writes Hampton Creek is a food technology company that makes food healthier by utilizing a specially made egg substitute in food products. The company was selected by Bill Gates to be featured on his website in a story called, The Future of Food, and has raised $30 million in funding. Hampton Creek's latest product is called, Just Cookies, which is an eggless chocolate chip cookie dough, but it is their eggless mayo that has been in the news lately. Unilever, which manufactures Hellmann's and Best Foods mayonnaise, is suing Hampton Creek claiming that the name Just Mayo is misleading to consumers. Named one of Entrepreneur Magazine's 100 Brilliant Companies and one of CNBC's Top 50 Disruptors, Hampton Creek has picked up some impressive talent including the former lead data scientist at Google Maps, Dan Zigmond. With Thanksgiving just around the corner, Dan and the Hampton Creek team have agreed to answer any questions you may have. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one per post.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Interviews: Ask the Hampton Creek Team About the Science and Future of Food

Slashdot - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 6:02pm
samzenpus writes Hampton Creek is a food technology company that makes food healthier by utilizing a specially made egg substitute in food products. The company was selected by Bill Gates to be featured on his website in a story called, The Future of Food, and has raised $30 million in funding. Hampton Creek's latest product is called, Just Cookies, which is an eggless chocolate chip cookie dough, but it is their eggless mayo that has been in the news lately. Unilever, which manufactures Hellmann's and Best Foods mayonnaise, is suing Hampton Creek claiming that the name Just Mayo is misleading to consumers. Named one of Entrepreneur Magazine's 100 Brilliant Companies and one of CNBC's Top 50 Disruptors, Hampton Creek has picked up some impressive talent including the former lead data scientist at Google Maps, Dan Zigmond. With Thanksgiving just around the corner, Dan and the Hampton Creek team have agreed to answer any questions you may have. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one per post.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Pitch Perfect 2 and Better Call Saul Top This Week’s Trailers

Wired News - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 6:00pm

Do you love singing and laughing and smiles and rainbows? Then this is the week in trailers for you! We've got Pitch Perfect 2, live-action Cinderella, and a trailer for the next season of Portlandia. Check it.

The post Pitch Perfect 2 and Better Call Saul Top This Week’s Trailers appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Why You Need to Think About APIs Before Websites

Wired News - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:58pm

I came out of college right at the exciting explosion of the web. Most people paid little attention to it, WIRED looked like this, and my family would get excited when they saw a URL in a TV ad because that was that web thing that Brant worked on. As business models began to solidify […]

The post Why You Need to Think About APIs Before Websites appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How permanent stress may lead to mental disorders

Kurzweil AI - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:57pm

Microglia cells from rat cortex before (left) and after (right) traumatic brain injury (credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Activated through permanent stress, immune cells in the brain can cause changes to the brain, resulting in mental disorders, a research team headed by professor Georg Juckel, Medical Director of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) LWL university clinic, has found. The research was based on psychoneuroimmunology, the study of the interaction between psychological processes and the nervous and immune systems of the human body.

The team focused mainly on microglia, a type of glial cell that acts as the main immune defense in the central nervous system and comprise 10–15% of all cells found within the brain. Under normal circumstances, microglia repair synapses between nerves cells in the brain and stimulate their growth. Repeatedly activated, however, microglia may damage nerve cells and trigger inflammation processes — a risk factor for mental diseases such as schizophrenia, the researchers found.

Interactions between the brain and immune system

“Originally, the brain and the immune system were considered two separate systems,” explains Juckel in RUB’s RUBIN publication. “It was assumed that the brain operates independently from the immune system and has hardly anything to do with it. This, however, is not true.

“Direct neural connections from the brain to organs of the immune system, such as the spleen, do exist. And vice versa, immune cells migrate to the brain, and local immune cells carry out various tasks there, including disposing of damaged synapses. Notably, treatment with an immune system mediator such as Interferon alpha, used in hepatitis C treatment, for example, leads to depressions in 20 to 30 per cent of the patients.

The RUB studies of microglia focused on patients suffering from multiple sclerosis or Alzheimer’s. “The brain areas affected by inflammation or neurodegeneration are surrounded by a circle of microglial cells,” says Juckel. “In schizophrenia patients, the number of microglial cells is considerably higher than in healthy individuals. Here, the cells cause synaptic links between neurons to degenerate,” especially in schizophrenia patients.

Microglial cells can also be activated via the peripheral immune system (outside the brain). “Acute stress stimulates the immune system. In stress situations, the body readies itself for fight or flight [and] prepares itself for potential injuries,” explains researcher Astrid Friebe, whose team at the LWL clinic lab studies the mechanisms involved in these processes. But under permanent stress, “microglial cells adapt to the new conditions, in a way. The more frequently they get triggered due to stress, the more they are inclined to remain in that mode. This is when microglial cells start to pose a danger to the brain.”

But not every individual who is under permanent stress will develop a mental disorder, the researchers note. They suspect the cause starts in the embryonic stage. U.S. researchers demonstrated in the 1950s that children born of mothers who contracted true viral influenza during pregnancy were seven times as likely to suffer schizophrenia later in life. The RUB researchers confirmed this hypothesis in animal models.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Science

Asteroid impacts on Earth make structurally bizarre diamonds

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:56pm
Scientists have settled a longstanding controversy over a purported rare form of diamond called lonsdaleite -- a type of diamond formed by impact shock, but which lacks the three-dimensional regularity of ordinary diamond.
Categories: Science

Preconception care for diabetic women could potentially save $5.5 billion

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:56pm
Pregnant women with diabetes are at an increased risk for many adverse birth outcomes. Preconception care (PCC) can significantly lower these risks by helping pregnant mothers with diabetes control their glucose levels, resulting in healthier babies and less money spent on complicated deliveries and lifelong medical complications, researchers say, adding that this care could avert an estimated $5.5 billion in health expenditures and lost employment productivity over affected children's lifetimes.
Categories: Science

Provider-focused intervention improves HPV vaccination rates

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:56pm
Changing the way doctors practice medicine is difficult, however a new study has shown that combining traditional education with quality improvement and incentives improves Human Papilloma virus vaccination rates in boys and girls. The study has the potential to produce sustained improvements in these vaccination rates.
Categories: Science

Avoiding ecosystem collapse: Experts Weigh in

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:56pm
From coral reefs to prairie grasslands, some of the world's most iconic habitats are susceptible to sudden collapse due to seemingly minor events. A classic example: the decimation of kelp forests when a decline of otter predation unleashes urchin population explosions. Three studies hold the promise of helping resource managers predict, avoid, and reverse the tipping points that lead to degraded habitats, economic losses, and social upheaval.
Categories: Science

Cell's skeleton is never still

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:55pm
Computer models show how microtubules age. The models reported by researchers help explain the dynamic instability seen in microtubules, essential elements in cells' cytoskeletons.
Categories: Science

Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:55pm
Are Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse? A new study points out that these institutions are facing a critical situation and proposes an innovative solution in the face of a virtual structure acting as a 'metamuseum.'
Categories: Science

Global warming skeptics unmoved by extreme weather

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:54pm
What will it take to convince skeptics of global warming that the phenomenon is real? Surely, many scientists believe, enough droughts, floods and heat waves will begin to change minds. But a new study throws cold water on that theory.
Categories: Science

Selenium compounds boost immune system to fight against cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:54pm
Cancer types such as melanoma, prostate cancer and certain types of leukemia weaken the body by over-activating the natural immune system. Researchers have now demonstrated that selenium -- naturally found in, e.g., garlic and broccoli -- slows down the immune over-response. In the long term, this may improve cancer treatment.
Categories: Science

Important element in fight against sleeping sickness found

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:54pm
Researchers have now uncovered how parasites that cause the deadly sleeping sickness in Africa absorb an important nutrient from the human blood stream. The result may help the development of more effective drugs to fight the disease.
Categories: Science

Many animals steal defenses from bacteria: Microbe toxin genes have jumped to ticks, mites and other animals

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:54pm
Bacteria compete for resources in the environment by injecting deadly toxins into their rivals. Researcher have now discovered that many animals steal toxins from bacteria to fight unwanted microbes growing on them. Genes for these toxins have jumped from bacterial to animals. These genes are now permanently incorporated into the genomes of these animals. Deer ticks, which can carry Lyme disease, are one of the many diverse organisms in which toxin gene transfers from bacteria to animal has occurred.
Categories: Science

Masking HIV target cells prevents viral transmission in animal model

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:54pm
Cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission in a non-human primate model of HIV infection, scientists report.
Categories: Science

Pain and itch in a dish: Skin cells converted into pain sensing neurons

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:53pm
After more than six years of intensive effort, and repeated failures that made the quest at times seem futile, researchers have successfully converted mouse and human skin cells into pain sensing neurons that respond to a number of stimuli that cause acute and inflammatory pain.
Categories: Science

Enabling biocircuits: New device could make large biological circuits practical

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:53pm
Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits -- systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But while individual components of such biological circuits can have precise and predictable responses, those outcomes become less predictable as more such elements are combined. Scientists have now come up with a way of greatly reducing that unpredictability, introducing a device that could ultimately allow such circuits to behave nearly as predictably as their electronic counterparts.
Categories: Science

Excessive contact between cellular organelles disrupts metabolism in obesity

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:53pm
Researchers have found a novel mechanism causing type 2 diabetes that could be targeted to prevent or treat the disease. The research highlights a previously unrecognized molecular pathway that contributes to the malfunction of liver cells in obesity, leading to insulin resistance and diabetes.
Categories: Science

Magnetic fields and lasers elicit graphene secret

Science Daily - Mon, 24/11/2014 - 5:53pm
Scientists have studied the dynamics of electrons from the 'wonder material' graphene in a magnetic field for the first time. This led to the discovery of a seemingly paradoxical phenomenon in the material. Its understanding could make a new type of laser possible in the future.
Categories: Science