Intel Launches Xeon E5 V3 Series Server CPUs With Up To 18 Cores

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 8:00pm
MojoKid writes Intel took the wraps off its Xeon E5 v3 server line-up today and the chip, based on Intel's Haswell-EP architecture, is looking impressive. Intel's previous generation Xeon E5 V2 chips, which were based on Ivy Bridge, topped out at 12 cores per socket. The new Xeon E5 v3 processors, in contrast, are going to push as high as 18 cores per socket — a 50% improvement. The TDP range is pushing slightly outwards in both directions; the E5 V2 family ranged from 50W to 150W, whereas the E5 V3 family will span 55W — 160W in a single workstation configuration. The core technologies Intel is introducing to the E5 V3 family pull from the Haswell architecture, including increased cache bandwidth, improved overall IPC, and new features like AVX2, which offers a theoretical near-doubling of floating point performance over the original AVX instructions. Full support for DDR4 DRAM memory is now included as well.

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Categories: Science

Intel Launches Xeon E5 V3 Series Server CPUs With Up To 18 Cores

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 8:00pm
MojoKid writes Intel took the wraps off its Xeon E5 v3 server line-up today and the chip, based on Intel's Haswell-EP architecture, is looking impressive. Intel's previous generation Xeon E5 V2 chips, which were based on Ivy Bridge, topped out at 12 cores per socket. The new Xeon E5 v3 processors, in contrast, are going to push as high as 18 cores per socket — a 50% improvement. The TDP range is pushing slightly outwards in both directions; the E5 V2 family ranged from 50W to 150W, whereas the E5 V3 family will span 55W — 160W in a single workstation configuration. The core technologies Intel is introducing to the E5 V3 family pull from the Haswell architecture, including increased cache bandwidth, improved overall IPC, and new features like AVX2, which offers a theoretical near-doubling of floating point performance over the original AVX instructions. Full support for DDR4 DRAM memory is now included as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Launches Xeon E5 V3 Series Server CPUs With Up To 18 Cores

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 8:00pm
MojoKid writes Intel took the wraps off its Xeon E5 v3 server line-up today and the chip, based on Intel's Haswell-EP architecture, is looking impressive. Intel's previous generation Xeon E5 V2 chips, which were based on Ivy Bridge, topped out at 12 cores per socket. The new Xeon E5 v3 processors, in contrast, are going to push as high as 18 cores per socket — a 50% improvement. The TDP range is pushing slightly outwards in both directions; the E5 V2 family ranged from 50W to 150W, whereas the E5 V3 family will span 55W — 160W in a single workstation configuration. The core technologies Intel is introducing to the E5 V3 family pull from the Haswell architecture, including increased cache bandwidth, improved overall IPC, and new features like AVX2, which offers a theoretical near-doubling of floating point performance over the original AVX instructions. Full support for DDR4 DRAM memory is now included as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Launches Xeon E5 V3 Series Server CPUs With Up To 18 Cores

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 8:00pm
MojoKid writes Intel took the wraps off its Xeon E5 v3 server line-up today and the chip, based on Intel's Haswell-EP architecture, is looking impressive. Intel's previous generation Xeon E5 V2 chips, which were based on Ivy Bridge, topped out at 12 cores per socket. The new Xeon E5 v3 processors, in contrast, are going to push as high as 18 cores per socket — a 50% improvement. The TDP range is pushing slightly outwards in both directions; the E5 V2 family ranged from 50W to 150W, whereas the E5 V3 family will span 55W — 160W in a single workstation configuration. The core technologies Intel is introducing to the E5 V3 family pull from the Haswell architecture, including increased cache bandwidth, improved overall IPC, and new features like AVX2, which offers a theoretical near-doubling of floating point performance over the original AVX instructions. Full support for DDR4 DRAM memory is now included as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Intel Launches Xeon E5 V3 Series Server CPUs With Up To 18 Cores

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 8:00pm
MojoKid writes Intel took the wraps off its Xeon E5 v3 server line-up today and the chip, based on Intel's Haswell-EP architecture, is looking impressive. Intel's previous generation Xeon E5 V2 chips, which were based on Ivy Bridge, topped out at 12 cores per socket. The new Xeon E5 v3 processors, in contrast, are going to push as high as 18 cores per socket — a 50% improvement. The TDP range is pushing slightly outwards in both directions; the E5 V2 family ranged from 50W to 150W, whereas the E5 V3 family will span 55W — 160W in a single workstation configuration. The core technologies Intel is introducing to the E5 V3 family pull from the Haswell architecture, including increased cache bandwidth, improved overall IPC, and new features like AVX2, which offers a theoretical near-doubling of floating point performance over the original AVX instructions. Full support for DDR4 DRAM memory is now included as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

FBI’s Story of Finding Silk Road’s Server Sounds a Lot Like Hacking

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:40pm
To hear the FBI tell it, tracking down the secret server behind the billion-dollar drug market known as the Silk Road was as easy as knocking on a door. The bureau’s latest court filing in the case describes how the hidden site accidentally revealed its location to anyone who visited its login page, thanks to […]






Categories: Science

Teens living with two college-educated parents less likely to use alcohol, marijuana

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
A high school senior who lives with 2 college-educated parents is significantly less likely to drink alcohol or smoke marijuana than a teenager who lives with one parent, a new study has found. In terms of race, the presence of both parents is an especially strong protective factor for African-American adolescents.
Categories: Science

Rapid and durable protection against Ebola virus with new vaccine regimens

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
One shot of an experimental vaccine made from two Ebola virus gene segments incorporated into a chimpanzee cold virus vector, called chimp adenovirus type 3 or ChAd3, protected all four macaque monkeys exposed to high levels of Ebola virus 5 weeks after inoculation, report scientists.
Categories: Science

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
Biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems. The life scientists, working with fruit flies, activated a gene called AMPK that is a key energy sensor in cells. Increasing AMPK in the intestine increased the fly's life by about 30 percent, and the fly stayed healthier longer as well. The research could have important implications for delaying aging and disease in humans.
Categories: Science

In one of nature's innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
A pond-dwelling, single-celled organism has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate. This elaborate process could provide a template for understanding how chromosomes in more complex animals such as humans break apart and reassemble, as can happen during the onset of cancer.
Categories: Science

Textbook theory behind volcanoes may be wrong

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
In the typical textbook picture, volcanoes, such as those that are forming the Hawaiian islands, erupt when magma gushes out as narrow jets from deep inside Earth. But that picture is wrong, according to a new study from researchers who conclude that seismology data are now confirming that such narrow jets don't actually exist.
Categories: Science

Co-flowing liquids can stabilize chaotic 'whipping' in microfluidic jets

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
Industrial wet spinning processes produce fibers from polymers and other materials by using tiny needles to eject continuous jets of liquid precursors. The electrically charged liquids ejected from the needles normally exhibit a chaotic 'whipping' structure as they enter a secondary liquid that surrounds the microscopic jets. Researchers have now learned how to control that chaotic structure.
Categories: Science

Study traces ecological collapse over 6,000 years of Egyptian history

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:29pm
Depictions of animals in ancient Egyptian artifacts have helped scientists assemble a detailed record of the large mammals that lived in the Nile Valley over the past 6,000 years. A new analysis of this record shows that species extinctions, probably caused by a drying climate and growing human population in the region, have made the ecosystem progressively less stable.
Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Robotics or Electronic Kits For Wounded Veterans?

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 7:15pm
An anonymous reader writes I am currently a combat veteran in the care of the VA Hospital. A lot of veterans here suffer from PTSD and other injuries related to combat and trauma. As part of the healing process, the VA finds it good that we take up hobbies such as art or music, and they supply us kits and stuff to put together and paint. This is great, but many of us younger veterans have an interest in robotics and electronics. Do you know of some good and basic robotic and electronic kits that can be ordered or donated to Veterans out there? Any information would be appreciated.

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Categories: Science

E Pluribus Unum Gone Digital: Connected Software Is the Next Step in Productivity

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:54pm
Google. Evernote. Wunderlist. Mailbox. Dropbox. GoToMeeting. The newest wave of apps is all about leveraging the right tools to help you get things done across multi-screen. This proliferation of mobile technology has promised liberation for today’s workforce. So why do we feel more chained to our work than ever? Nearly 1.3 billion (yes, billion) people […]






Categories: Science

Scientists Regenerate Rat Muscle Tissue

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:51pm
Zothecula writes Muscle lost through traumatic injury, congenital defect, or tumor ablation may soon be regenerated from within. A team of researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has shown how stem cells in the body of mice and rats can be mobilized to form new muscle in damaged regions. "Working to leverage the body’s own regenerative properties, we designed a muscle-specific scaffolding system that can actively participate in functional tissue regeneration," explains Sang Jin Lee, senior author on the study. This scaffold was implanted in the rats' tibialis anterior muscle (which is found below the knee), serving as a kind of home for the muscle progenitor cells to grow and develop.

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Categories: Science

Paleontologists discover new species of titanosaurian dinosaur in Tanzania

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:35pm
Paleontologists have identified a new species of titanosaurian, a member of the large-bodied sauropods that thrived during the final period of the dinosaur age, in Tanzania. Although many fossils of titanosaurians have been discovered around the globe, especially in South America, few have been recovered from the continent of Africa.
Categories: Science

Book Review: Architecting the Cloud

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:31pm
benrothke writes Most books about cloud computing are either extremely high-level quasi-marketing tomes about the myriad benefits of the cloud without any understanding of how to practically implement the technology under discussion. The other type of cloud books are highly technical references guides, that provide technical details, but for a limited audience. In Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models, author Michael Kavis has written perhaps the most honest book about the cloud. Make no doubt about it; Kavis is a huge fan of the cloud. But more importantly, he knows what the limits of the cloud are, and how cloud computing is not a panacea. That type of candor makes this book an invaluable guide to anyone looking to understand how to effective deploy cloud technologies. Keep reading below for the rest of Ben's review.

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Categories: Science

Ex-Googler Shares His Big-Data Secrets With the Masses

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:23pm
Google’s search engine makes it wonderfully easy to locate stuff on the web, whether it’s in a news article, a corporate website, or a video on YouTube. But that only begins to describe Google’s ability to find information. Inside the company, engineers use several uniquely powerful tools for searching and analyzing its own massive trove […]






Categories: Science

Beastly 24TB TiVo Mega Has 8 Times the Capacity of Any Other TiVo

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:23pm
Want to hoard 4,000 hours of Hoarders episodes? The new TiVo Mega is for you.






Categories: Science