Leaked Document Reveals UK Plans For Wider Internet Surveillance

Slashdot - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:40pm
The UK government is planning to push greater surveillance powers that would force internet providers to monitor communications in near-realtime and install backdoor equipment to break encryption, according to a leaked document. From a report on ZDNet: A draft of the proposed new surveillance powers, leaked on Thursday, is part of a "targeted consultation" into the Investigatory Powers Act, brought into law last year, which critics called the "most extreme surveillance law ever passed in a democracy." Provisions in proposals show that the government is asking for powers to compel internet providers to turn over the realtime communications of a person "in an intelligible form," including encrypted content, within one working day. To that end, internet providers will be forced to introduce a backdoor point on their networks to allow intelligence agencies to read anyone's communications.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Greasy Smudges on Your Phone Aren’t Grime. They’re Art

Wired News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:30pm
Despite the clean, sleek aesthetic of an iPad or smartphone, the virtual world is just as messy as the real one. The post The Greasy Smudges on Your Phone Aren't Grime. They're Art appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

The Higgs Boson: A Not-So-Godlike Particle

Space.com - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:25pm
Let's be perfectly honest: The Higgs boson and its role in the universe are not the easiest things to explain.
Categories: Science

How One Drug Could Affect Pain, Memory and Nicotine Addiction

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:16pm
Researchers are working to develop drugs to enhance the function of these receptors in the brain, which could have three very different applications: easing pain, slowing the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s and making it easier for people to stop smoking.
Categories: Science

Group rituals can make us biased against outsiders

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:10pm
From our greetings to our celebrations to how we take our coffee, everyday life is full of shared rituals. The effort and commitment involved in these rituals can help us bond with others -- but new research suggests that they may also push us away from those who don't share the same practices. Findings from a series of experiments suggest that people trust others who did not engage in the same ritual less than those who did.
Categories: Science

New theory on how Earth's crust was created

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:10pm
Conventional theory holds that all of the early Earth's crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity. Now, however, earth scientists have published a theory with a novel twist: some of the chemical components of this material settled onto Earth's early surface from the steamy atmosphere that prevailed at the time.
Categories: Science

The Loony ‘Circular Runway’ Will Never Happen, But Maybe It Should

Wired News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:00pm
Maybe it is time to rethink modern aviation. The post The Loony ‘Circular Runway’ Will Never Happen, But Maybe It Should appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

'We Don’t Planet' Episode 2: What’s Up with Dark Energy?

Space.com - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:00pm
Dark energy is the mysterious force causing the universe's accelerating expansion. Learn all about it in the second episode of the astrophysics video-explainer series "We Don't Planet."
Categories: Science

EU Leader Says English Is Losing Importance

Slashdot - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 4:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission president, opted to deliver a speech in French on Friday morning because he said "English is losing importance" in Europe. He gave the comments, which are unlikely to mend fences after a war of words between Brussels and London over Brexit negotiations, at the "State of the Union" conference in Florence's Palazzo Vecchio -- an annual event for European dignitaries. Juncker said he was opting for French because "slowly but surely English is losing importance in Europe and France has elections this Sunday and I want the French people to understand what I am saying about the importance of the EU." He spoke in English.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interaction

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:39pm
Control of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. Researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways.
Categories: Science

Gene controls birth defect common in diabetes

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:39pm
Researchers have identified a gene that plays a key role in the formation of neural tube defects, a problem commonly found in infants of pregnant women with diabetes. This is the first time the gene has been shown to play this role; it opens up a new way to understand these defects, and may one day lead to new treatments that could prevent the problem or decrease its incidence.
Categories: Science

New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 years

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:38pm
Little does a scientist expect to discover a new species of easy-to-see and well-studied animal, especially if it inhabits thoroughly explored areas. However, a biologist has now made a startling discovery: a new, beautiful butterfly named Acentria's fritillary, which was spotted as it flew over the slopes of the popular Mount Hermon ski resort in northern Israel.
Categories: Science

This Hilarious Video’s Fake. I Can Tell From the Physics

Wired News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:30pm
A video making the rounds online shows a strong dog giving an old lady a hard pull. Let's use video analysis to see if it's real. The post This Hilarious Video’s Fake. I Can Tell From the Physics appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Vitamin A deficiency is detrimental to blood stem cells

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:26pm
Lack of vitamin A in the body has a detrimental effect on the hematopoietic system in the bone marrow. The deficiency causes a loss of important blood stem cells, scientists now report. These findings will open up new prospects in cancer therapy.
Categories: Science

A New Instance of Android Malware is Discovered Every 10 Seconds, Say Researchers

Slashdot - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:20pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Security firm G Data says that a new piece of Android malware is discovered every 10 seconds. At this rate, the company is predicting that there will be 3,500,000 new malicious Android files by the end of the year. "The threat level for users with smartphones and tablets with an Android operating system remains high. In all, the G DATA security experts expect around 3.5 million new Android malware apps for 2017," they said. The firm said that the risk was heightened by the fact that only a small minority of users are on the latest version of Android.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Crazy Eruptions That Spit Up Diamonds

Wired News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:00pm
What would happen if we had a new kimberlite eruption? The post The Crazy Eruptions That Spit Up Diamonds appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

The Giant Purple History of Guardians 2’s Best New Character

Wired News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:00pm
Kurt Russell aside, Ego is one of Marvel's more obscure characters—but there may just be a reason he shows up. The post The Giant Purple History of Guardians 2's Best New Character appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

'Star Trek' Icon William Shatner to Take Zero-G Flight in August

Space.com - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 2:44pm
This August, William Shatner will get closer to the final frontier than he ever did in his "Star Trek" days.
Categories: Science

April Jobs Report: 211,000 Jobs Added, Unemployment At 4.4 Percent

Slashdot - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 2:40pm
An anonymous reader shares an NPR report: The U.S. economy added 211,000 jobs to nonfarm payrolls in April, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says. Both the unemployment rate, at 4.4 percent, and the number of unemployed persons, at 7.1 million, saw only incremental changes in April. The new data follow disappointing results from March, when the Labor Department initially said less than 100,000 jobs were created. In April, some of the biggest job gains came in leisure and hospitality, health care and social assistance, financial activities, and mining, the agency says.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Scientists find genetic mutation responsible for rare skin disease in Afrikaners

Science Daily - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 2:36pm
Researchers at the Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Division of Human Genetics at Wits, in collaboration with peers in Europe, the US and Canada published this research in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.
Categories: Science