Even with copayments for nonurgent care, Medicaid patients still rely on ERs

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:47pm
To control costs and encourage Medicaid recipients to get primary care doctors, some states charge copayments to Medicaid patients who got nonurgent care in hospital emergency departments. A new study based on 2001-2010 data finds copayments did not affect the rate of Medicaid patients' emergency room visits or lead to more primary care doctor's office visits.
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Scientists discover a new blood platelet formation mechanism

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:47pm
A new cellular mechanism, called the endocycle, encourages the formation of platelets, the cells needed to coagulate blood. In mouse models, endocycles can help to control thrombocytopenia, a disease caused by a deficit in platelet production that causes heavy haemorrhaging. The new process could act as an alternative source of platelets when the normal mechanisms fail.
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Global warming doubles risk of extreme La Niña event, research shows

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:47pm
The risk of extreme La Niña events in the Pacific Ocean could double due to global warming, new research has shown. El Niño and La Niña events are opposite phases of the natural climate phenomenon, the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Extreme La Niña events occur when cold sea surface temperatures in the central Pacific Ocean contrast with the warming land areas of Maritime Southeast Asia in the west and create a strong temperature gradient.
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Higher dementia risk linked to more use of common drugs

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:47pm
A large study links a significantly increased risk for developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, to taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects at higher doses or for a longer time. Many older people take these medications, which include nonprescription diphenhydramine (Benadryl).
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Possible therapeutic target for common, but mysterious brain blood vessel disorder

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:46pm
Tens of millions of people worldwide have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations. These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, and hemorrhages, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. Now, cardiovascular scientists have studied this pathway in heart development to discover an important set of molecular signals, triggered by CCM-linked gene defects, that potentially could be targeted to treat the disorder.
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Brain white matter changes seen in children who experience neglect

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:46pm
Experiencing neglect in childhood was associated with alterations in brain white matter in a study of abandoned children in Romania who experienced social, emotional, linguistic and cognitive impoverishment while living in institutions compared with children who were placed in high-quality foster care or those who had never been in institutional care, according to the results of a clinical trial.
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Initial diagnostic test in ED for chest pain did not affect low rate of heart attack

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:46pm
Patients seen in the emergency department for chest pain who did not have a heart attack appeared to be at low risk of experiencing a heart attack during short- and longer-term follow-up and that risk was not affected by the initial diagnostic testing strategy, according to a study.
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Largest-ever autism genome study finds most siblings have different autism-risk genes

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:46pm
The largest-ever autism genome study reveals that the disorder's genetic underpinnings are more complex than previously thought: Most siblings who have autism have different autism-linked genes. The study's data is part of the historic first upload of approximately 1,000 autism genomes to the Autism Speaks MSSNG portal in Google Cloud Platform. The data will be openly available for global research in order to speed understanding of autism and the development of individualized treatments.
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New strategy to combat 'undruggable' cancer molecule

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:46pm
Three of the four most fatal cancers are caused by a protein known as Ras; either because it mutates or simply because it ends up in the wrong place at the wrong time. Ras has proven an elusive target for scientist trying to cure the deadly diseases. Now a group of researchers has discovered an unknown way for RAS to find its proper place in the cell. Their discovery may lead to completely novel approaches to curing cancer.
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New Canadian guideline to help prevent, manage adult obesity

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:45pm
A new Canadian guideline to help prevent and manage obesity in adult patients recommends body mass index measurement for both prevention and management and structured behavioral changes to help those who are overweight or obese to lose weight. The guideline is aimed at physicians and health care providers.
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Nocturnal leg cramps more common in summer

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:45pm
Painful nocturnal leg cramps are about twice as common during summer than in winter, found a new study. Because quinine is commonly prescribed to treat leg cramps, researchers looked at the number of new quinine prescriptions for adults over 50 years of age in British Columbia, Canada, from Dec. 1, 2001 to Oct. 31, 2007. They found that prescriptions for quinine peaked in British Columbia in July as did Google searches for leg cramps.
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Geothermal microbial reservoirs: Staircase fractures in microbialites and travertines

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:45pm
Geologists have come up with a new model of the development of fractures showing a stairway trajectory, commonly occurring in finely laminated rock, such microbialites and travertines. These fractures strongly enhance permeability by connecting several highly porous zones enveloped in tight impermeable levels. Understanding and predicting this fracture pattern geometry, distribution, and interconnection is valuable not only for locating water supplies, but also for oil, gas, and geothermal exploration.
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Got bees? Got vitamin A? Got malaria? Loss of pollinators increases risk of malnutrition, disease

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:44pm
More than half the people in some developing countries could become newly at risk for malnutrition if crop-pollinating animals -- like bees -- continue to decline, experts say. Despite popular reports that pollinators are crucial for human nutritional health, no scientific studies have actually tested this claim -- until now.
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Lung cancer: Study finds potential new drug target

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:44pm
Targeting a key enzyme and its associated metabolic programming may lead to novel drug development to treat lung cancer, researchers report. Cancer cells undergo metabolic alterations to meet the increased energy demands that support their excess growth and survival. The Krebs cycle in the mitochondria of cells is used to supply both energy and building materials for cell growth. Two mitochondrial enzymes -- pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and glutaminase replenish carbon to the Krebs cycle.
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Metabolic mystery solved, lending insight into Lafora disease

Science Daily - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:44pm
The metabolic function of the essential enzyme laforin has been identified by researchers, which opens new pathways to treating the deadly Lafora's disease. Lafora disease occurs as a result of the laforin gene being mutated. Mutations in the gene encoding the laforin protein result in the accumulation aberrant glycogen-like accumulations called Lafora bodies that resemble plant starch more than human glycogen.
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Massive Blizzard 'Juno' Seen Developing From Space | Time-Lapse Video

Space.com - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:28pm
The NOAA GOES-13 satellite captured the massive winter storm bearing down on the east coast of the United States on Jan. 26th, 2015. GOES ‘sees’ infrared radiant energy and reflected visible light.
Categories: Science

Windows 10: Charms Bar Removed, No Start Screen For Desktops

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:19pm
jones_supa writes Late last week, Microsoft pushed out a new build (9926) of Windows 10 to those of you who are running the Technical Preview. The latest version comes with many new features, some easily accessible, others bubbling under, but two big changes are now certain: the Charms bar is dead, and Start Screen for large devices is no more. Replacing the Charms bar is the Action Center, which has many of the same shortcuts as the Charms bar, but also has a plethora of other information too. Notifications are now bundled into the Action Center and the shortcuts to individual settings are still easily accessible from this window. The Start Screen is no longer present for desktop users, the options for opening it are gone. Continuum is the future, and it has taken over what the Start Screen initiated with Windows 8.

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Categories: Science

Google Lunar XPrize Milestone Awards Announced

Space.com - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 5:18pm
Five teams just hit their milestones — totaling more than $5 million — in the race for the Google Lunar XPrize.
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Scientists Determine New Way To Untangle Proteins By Unboiling an Egg

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 4:38pm
An anonymous reader sends word of this biotech breakthrough. "Univ. of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) and Australian chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites—an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to findings published in ChemBioChem. 'Yes, we have invented a way to unboil a hen egg,' said Gregory Weiss, UCI professor of chemistry and molecular biology & biochemistry. 'In our paper, we describe a device for pulling apart tangled proteins and allowing them to refold. We start with egg whites boiled for 20 min at 90 C and return a key protein in the egg to working order.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Scientists Determine New Way To Untangle Proteins By Unboiling an Egg

Slashdot - Mon, 26/01/2015 - 4:38pm
An anonymous reader sends word of this biotech breakthrough. "Univ. of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) and Australian chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites—an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to findings published in ChemBioChem. 'Yes, we have invented a way to unboil a hen egg,' said Gregory Weiss, UCI professor of chemistry and molecular biology & biochemistry. 'In our paper, we describe a device for pulling apart tangled proteins and allowing them to refold. We start with egg whites boiled for 20 min at 90 C and return a key protein in the egg to working order.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science