Ask Slashdot: Terminally Ill - What Wisdom Should I Pass On To My Geek Daughter?

Slashdot - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: I am a scientist and educator who has been enjoying and learning from Slashdot since the late 90s. Now I come to you, my geek brothers and sisters, for help. I've been diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer, which you will remember is what took Steve Jobs and Randy Pausch from us. My condition is incurable. Palliative chemotherapy may delay the inevitable, but a realistic assessment suggests that I have anywhere from two to six months of "quality" time left, and likely not more than a year in total. I am slowly coming to terms with my imminent death, but what bothers me most is that I will be leaving my wife alone, and that my daughter will have to grow up without her father. She is in sixth grade, has an inquisitive and sharp mind, and is interested in science and music. She seems well on the path to becoming a "girl geek" like her mother, an outcome I'd welcome. Since I will not be around for all of the big events in her life, I am going to create a set of video messages for her that she can watch at those important times or just when she's having a bad day. I would like to do this before my condition progresses to the point that I am visibly ill, so time is short. In the videos I will make clear how much I treasure the time we've spent together and the wonderful qualities I see in her. What other suggestions do you have? What did you need to hear at the different stages of your life? What wisdom would have been most helpful to you? At what times did you especially need the advice of a parent? And especially for my geek sisters, how can I help her navigate the unique issues faced by girls and women in today's world? Please note that I'm posting anonymously because I don't want this to be about me. I'd prefer that the focus be on my daughter and how I can best help her. Thank you so much for your help.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Terminally Ill - What Wisdom Should I Pass On To My Geek Daughter?

Slashdot - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: I am a scientist and educator who has been enjoying and learning from Slashdot since the late 90s. Now I come to you, my geek brothers and sisters, for help. I've been diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer, which you will remember is what took Steve Jobs and Randy Pausch from us. My condition is incurable. Palliative chemotherapy may delay the inevitable, but a realistic assessment suggests that I have anywhere from two to six months of "quality" time left, and likely not more than a year in total. I am slowly coming to terms with my imminent death, but what bothers me most is that I will be leaving my wife alone, and that my daughter will have to grow up without her father. She is in sixth grade, has an inquisitive and sharp mind, and is interested in science and music. She seems well on the path to becoming a "girl geek" like her mother, an outcome I'd welcome. Since I will not be around for all of the big events in her life, I am going to create a set of video messages for her that she can watch at those important times or just when she's having a bad day. I would like to do this before my condition progresses to the point that I am visibly ill, so time is short. In the videos I will make clear how much I treasure the time we've spent together and the wonderful qualities I see in her. What other suggestions do you have? What did you need to hear at the different stages of your life? What wisdom would have been most helpful to you? At what times did you especially need the advice of a parent? And especially for my geek sisters, how can I help her navigate the unique issues faced by girls and women in today's world? Please note that I'm posting anonymously because I don't want this to be about me. I'd prefer that the focus be on my daughter and how I can best help her. Thank you so much for your help.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Terminally Ill - What Wisdom Should I Pass On To My Geek Daughter?

Slashdot - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: I am a scientist and educator who has been enjoying and learning from Slashdot since the late 90s. Now I come to you, my geek brothers and sisters, for help. I've been diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer, which you will remember is what took Steve Jobs and Randy Pausch from us. My condition is incurable. Palliative chemotherapy may delay the inevitable, but a realistic assessment suggests that I have anywhere from two to six months of "quality" time left, and likely not more than a year in total. I am slowly coming to terms with my imminent death, but what bothers me most is that I will be leaving my wife alone, and that my daughter will have to grow up without her father. She is in sixth grade, has an inquisitive and sharp mind, and is interested in science and music. She seems well on the path to becoming a "girl geek" like her mother, an outcome I'd welcome. Since I will not be around for all of the big events in her life, I am going to create a set of video messages for her that she can watch at those important times or just when she's having a bad day. I would like to do this before my condition progresses to the point that I am visibly ill, so time is short. In the videos I will make clear how much I treasure the time we've spent together and the wonderful qualities I see in her. What other suggestions do you have? What did you need to hear at the different stages of your life? What wisdom would have been most helpful to you? At what times did you especially need the advice of a parent? And especially for my geek sisters, how can I help her navigate the unique issues faced by girls and women in today's world? Please note that I'm posting anonymously because I don't want this to be about me. I'd prefer that the focus be on my daughter and how I can best help her. Thank you so much for your help.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Terminally Ill - What Wisdom Should I Pass On To My Geek Daughter?

Slashdot - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: I am a scientist and educator who has been enjoying and learning from Slashdot since the late 90s. Now I come to you, my geek brothers and sisters, for help. I've been diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer, which you will remember is what took Steve Jobs and Randy Pausch from us. My condition is incurable. Palliative chemotherapy may delay the inevitable, but a realistic assessment suggests that I have anywhere from two to six months of "quality" time left, and likely not more than a year in total. I am slowly coming to terms with my imminent death, but what bothers me most is that I will be leaving my wife alone, and that my daughter will have to grow up without her father. She is in sixth grade, has an inquisitive and sharp mind, and is interested in science and music. She seems well on the path to becoming a "girl geek" like her mother, an outcome I'd welcome. Since I will not be around for all of the big events in her life, I am going to create a set of video messages for her that she can watch at those important times or just when she's having a bad day. I would like to do this before my condition progresses to the point that I am visibly ill, so time is short. In the videos I will make clear how much I treasure the time we've spent together and the wonderful qualities I see in her. What other suggestions do you have? What did you need to hear at the different stages of your life? What wisdom would have been most helpful to you? At what times did you especially need the advice of a parent? And especially for my geek sisters, how can I help her navigate the unique issues faced by girls and women in today's world? Please note that I'm posting anonymously because I don't want this to be about me. I'd prefer that the focus be on my daughter and how I can best help her. Thank you so much for your help.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

4 Awesome Robots Spotted at Toy Fair 2015 | Video

Space.com - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 5:15pm
Space.com writers @CallaCofield and @MiriKramer hit the fair in NYC on President's Day weekend and a few robots caught their attention.
Categories: Science

Amazon Files Patent For Mobile 3D Printing Delivery Trucks

Slashdot - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:45pm
ErnieKey writes: Amazon has been inching its way into the 3D printing space over the past 10 months or so. This week, however, the U.S. Patent office published a filing by Amazon for mobile 3D printing delivery trucks. The trucks would have 3D printers and CNC machines on board and be able to communicate with a central hub. When a product is ordered, the mobile 3D printing truck that's closest to the consumer's home or office would then get the order, print it, and deliver it as soon as possible.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Breakfast habits affect teens' metabolic responses to protein-packed morning meals

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:44pm
A researcher compared young women who habitually skip breakfast to those who routinely eat breakfast and found that their metabolic responses to eating a high-protein breakfast were different. Specifically, the habitual breakfast skippers experienced poorer glucose control throughout the day when they consumed a high-protein breakfast, whereas those who typically ate a high-carbohydrate breakfast had improved glucose control after they ate a high-protein breakfast.
Categories: Science

Cellular communication offers easy fog detection for roads and runways

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:44pm
Thick fogbanks can blanket open roads and runways and dramatically reduce visibility -- often causing devastating accidents. A new study suggests that a practical solution to fog detection can be found in cellular communication networks already in place all over the world.
Categories: Science

Biology teachers: Understanding faith, teaching evolution not mutually exclusive

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:44pm
Discussing the relationship between science and faith, rather than avoiding the discussion, may better prepare future high school biology teachers for anticipating questions about evolution, according to political scientists.
Categories: Science

Learning by eye: Silicon micro-funnels increase the efficiency of solar cells

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:44pm
A biological structure in mammalian eyes has inspired scientists to design an inorganic counterpart for use in solar cells: micron-sized vertical funnels were etched shoulder-to-shoulder in a silicon substrate. Using mathematical models and experiments, they tested how these kind of funnel arrays collect incident light and conduct it to the active layer of a silicon solar cell. Their result: this arrangement of funnels increases photo absorption by about 65 percent in a thin-film solar cell.
Categories: Science

Could an HIV drug beat strep throat, flesh-eating bacteria?

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:43pm
With antibiotic resistance on the rise, scientists are looking for innovative ways to combat bacterial infections. The pathogen that causes conditions from strep throat to flesh-eating disease is among them, but scientists have now found a tool that could help them fight it: a drug approved to treat HIV. Their work could someday lead to new treatments.
Categories: Science

Electric-car driving range and emissions depend on where you live

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:43pm
Many car buyers weighing whether they should go all electric to help the planet have at least one new factor to consider before making the switch: geography. Based on a study of a commercially available electric car, scientists report that emissions and driving range can vary greatly depending on regional energy sources and climate.
Categories: Science

Molecular mouse-trap technique sheds light on key cell processes

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:43pm
Scientists have shed new light on the fundamental biological process of cell division, thanks to an emerging analytical method.
Categories: Science

Oat breakfast cereals may contain a common mold-related toxin

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:43pm
Oats are often touted for boosting heart health, but scientists warn that the grain and its products might need closer monitoring for potential mold contamination. They report that some oat-based breakfast cereals in the US contain a mold-related toxin called ochratoxin A that's been linked to kidney cancer in animal studies.
Categories: Science

Magnetic nanoparticles enhance performance of solar cells

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:43pm
Magnetic nanoparticles can increase the performance of solar cells made from polymers -- provided the mix is right. Adding about one per cent of such nanoparticles by weight makes the solar cells more efficient, according to new findings.
Categories: Science

Postoperative mortality rates low among patients with HIV prescribed ART

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:43pm
Postoperative mortality rates were low among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus who are receiving antiretroviral therapy, and those mortality rates were influenced as much by age and poor nutritional status as CD4 cell counts, according to a report.
Categories: Science

When it comes to the digital playground we need to stop crying wolf

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:42pm
Kids are leading the transition to digital media today. But, while too much time online could cause developmental problems, media consumption habits may not be making our children less bright or sociable, after all.
Categories: Science

Cherenkov Effect improves radiation therapy for patients with cancer

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:41pm
The complex parts of the blue light known as the Cherenkov Effect can be measured and used in dosimetry to make therapies safer and more effective, scientists report.
Categories: Science

Heart surgery outcomes for pediatric and congenital patients now online

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:40pm
Continuing its commitment to increase public awareness and understanding of cardiothoracic surgical outcomes, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released the first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from its Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD).
Categories: Science

Study linking suicidal behavior, psychotic experiences may yield strategies to help prevent suicide attempts

Science Daily - Wed, 25/02/2015 - 4:40pm
Suicidal ideation and psychotic experiences have been studied among more than 11,000 adults 18 and older. The data were drawn from a large general-population based sample of U. S. households. Suicide is a leading cause of preventable death, especially among individuals with psychotic disorders, and may also be common among nonclinical populations of adults whose psychotic experiences cause less impairment. Psychotic experiences resemble the hallucinations and delusions of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia but are of lower persistence and intensity.
Categories: Science