Common insecticides are riskier than thought to predatory insects

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 8:12pm
Neonicotinoids -- the most widely used class of insecticides -- significantly reduce populations of predatory insects when used as seed coatings, according to researchers. The team's research challenges the previously held belief that neonicotinoid seed coatings have little to no effect on predatory insect populations. In fact, the work suggests that neonicotinoids reduce populations of insect predators as much as broadcast applications of commonly used pyrethroid insecticides.
Categories: Science

Disruption of the body's internal clock causes disruption of metabolic processes

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 8:12pm
Chronobiologists have shown that the body's carbon monoxide metabolism is closely linked to the body's circadian (internal) clock. An article discussing the close reciprocal relationship between these two regulatory mechanisms has just been published.
Categories: Science

Information Overload No Problem For Most Americans: Survey

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 8:00pm
About 20 percent of American adults feel the burden of information overload, with that figure at least doubling among those from poorer or less educated backgrounds, Pew Research Center said in a new report. Reuters adds: "Generally, Americans appreciate lots of information and access to it," said the report into how U.S. adults cope with information demands. Roughly four in five Americans agree that they are confident about using the internet to keep up with information demands, that a lot of information gives them a feeling of more control over their lives, and that they can easily determine what information is trustworthy. Americans who are 65 or older, have a high school diploma or less and earn less than $30,000 a year are more likely to say they face a glut of information. Eighty-four percent of Americans with online access through three sources -- home broadband, smartphone and tablet computer -- say they like having so much information available. By contrast, 55 percent of those with no online source felt overwhelmed by the amount of possible information.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Plan to Remake the American Port With Better Data

Wired News - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:49pm
The Port of LA is working with GE to make everything it does more efficient. The post The Plan to Remake the American Port With Better Data appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Diabetes drug slows experimental Parkinson's disease progression, human trials to begin next year

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:32pm
A new investigational drug originally developed for type 2 diabetes is being readied for human clinical trials in search of the world's first treatment to impede the progression of Parkinson's disease following publication of new research.
Categories: Science

Chemical mosquito controls ineffective in Zika fight

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:27pm
Some existing methods for controlling Zika-carrying mosquitoes are not effective and may even be counter-productive, according to research.
Categories: Science

Pebble Gets Acquired By Fitbit - Ends Production and Ceases Support Of Its Existing Lineup of Smartwatches

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:20pm
Reader phorm writes: In a notice to Kickstarter backers, pebble has stated that -- following the acquisition by Fitbit (official now) -- they will no longer promote, manufacture, or sell devices. Further, while existing functionality may continue, it is likely to be degraded and warranty support will no longer be provided. This includes any recently shipped Pebble models. For those that were eagerly awaiting shipment of Pebble Time 2 and other newer devices, those devices will not ship at all. Pebble has indicated refunds will be made within 4-8 weeks. Those expecting their money may not want to hold their breath, however, because a contradictory statement made by to backers by email says that refunds will be made via Kickstarter by March 2017.Fitbit said it is only purchasing software assets from Pebble.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Fishy Caribbean 'juveniles' to be recognized as a new species, the Hourglass basslet

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:07pm
Living in deep reefs in the Atlantic Ocean, the banded basslet has long been thought to undergo significant changes during its growth into an adult. Recently, however, American scientists figured out that the 'juveniles' were in fact a new species. They describe two new basslet species discovered in the Caribbean off the southern coast of Curaçao.
Categories: Science

New discovery may lead to the development of super premium gasoline

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:07pm
In contradicting a theory that's been the standard for over eighty years, researchers have made a discovery holding major promise for the petroleum industry. The research has revealed that in the foreseeable future products such as crude oil and gasoline could be transported across country 30 times faster, and the several minutes it takes to fill a tank of gas could be reduced to mere seconds.
Categories: Science

3-D structure of cell's inflammation sensor, its inhibitors revealed

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:07pm
Researchers have now determined the 3-D structure of CCR2 simultaneously bound to two inhibitors. Understanding how these molecules fit together may better enable pharmaceutical companies to develop anti-inflammatory drugs that bind and inhibit CCR2 in a similar manner.
Categories: Science

New approach may open up speech recognition to more languages

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:07pm
Researchers have developed a new approach to training speech-recognition systems that doesn't depend on transcription. Instead, their system analyzes correspondences between images and spoken descriptions of those images, as captured in a large collection of audio recordings. The system then learns which acoustic features of the recordings correlate with which image characteristics.
Categories: Science

Despite evolutionary inexperience, northern sockeye manage heat stress

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 7:07pm
Sockeye salmon that evolved in the generally colder waters of the far north still know how to cool off if necessary, an important factor in the species' potential for dealing with global climate change.
Categories: Science

Super-Hacker Builds Atari 2600 Emulator… In Minecraft?!

Wired News - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:52pm
We still can't wrap our heads around how this guy is running the actual Atari version of <em>Donkey Kong</em> using only standard Minecraft blocks. The post Super-Hacker Builds Atari 2600 Emulator... In Minecraft?! appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

YouTube's $1 Billion Royalties Are Not Enough, Says Music Industry

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:40pm
YouTube said Tuesday that it has paid the music industry over one billion dollars in advertising revenue in the past 12 months. The music industry thinks that sum is not enough. From a report on BBC: "Google has issued more unexplained numbers on what it claims YouTube pays the music industry," said a spokesperson for the global music body, the IFPI. "The announcement gives little reason to celebrate, however. With 800 million music users worldwide, YouTube is generating revenues of just over $1 per user for the entire year. "This pales in comparison to the revenue generated by other services, ranging from Apple to Deezer to Spotify. For example, in 2015 Spotify alone paid record labels some $2bn, equivalent to an estimated $18 per user." In his blog post, Mr Kyncl conceded that the current model was not perfect, arguing: "There is a lot of work that must be done by YouTube and the industry as a whole. "But we are excited to see the momentum," he added.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Conservation effort spreads seeds of destruction across the Midwest

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:36pm
Weed scientists in at least two Midwestern states have been reporting for years that a conservation program meant to provide habitat for pollinating insects is sowing bad seeds -- including seeds of the potentially devastating agricultural weed Palmer amaranth -- along with the good. Now, researchers have traced the weed seeds to at least one source: pollinator habitat seed sold by a company in the Midwest.
Categories: Science

Novel label-free microscopy enables dynamic, high-resolution imaging of cell interactions

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:36pm
Researchers have invented a novel live-cell imaging method that could someday help biologists better understand how stem cells transform into specialized cells and how diseases like cancer spread. The Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscope (PCEM) is capable of monitoring and quantitatively measuring cell adhesion, a critical process involved cell migration, cell differentiation, cell division, and cell death.
Categories: Science

Knowing one's place in a social hierarchy

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:35pm
When you start a new job, it's normal to spend the first day working out who's who in the pecking order, information that will come in handy for making connections in the future. In an fMRI study, researchers now provide insights into how we acquire knowledge about social hierarchies, and reveal the specific mechanisms at play when that hierarchy is our own (as compared to that of another person).
Categories: Science

Unique visual stimulation may be new treatment for Alzheimer's

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:35pm
Using LED lights flickering at a specific frequency, researchers have shown that they can significantly reduce the beta amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease in the visual cortex of mice. This treatment appears to work by stimulating brain waves known as gamma oscillations, which the researchers discovered help the brain suppress beta amyloid production and invigorate cells responsible for destroying the plaques.
Categories: Science

Most of Greenland ice melted to bedrock in recent geologic past, says study

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:34pm
Scientists have found evidence in a chunk of bedrock drilled from nearly two miles below the summit of the Greenland ice sheet that the sheet nearly disappeared for an extended time in the last million years or so. The finding casts doubt on assumptions that Greenland has been relatively stable during the recent geological past, and implies that global warming could tip it into decline more precipitously than previously thought.
Categories: Science

Greenland on thin ice?

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 6:34pm
First-of-their-kind studies provide new insight into the deep history of the Greenland Ice Sheet, looking back millions of years farther than previous techniques allowed. However, the two studies present some strongly contrasting evidence about how Greenland's ice sheet may have responded to past climate change.
Categories: Science