Phthalate compounds contaminating your glass of wine

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Alcohol may be even more damaging to your health then you first thought, researchers report. Phthalate compounds are extremely widespread in our environment, and have major potential as hormone disruptors. The use of phthalates is regulated on an international level and includes those likely to come into contact with food and drink packaging. A study has analysed phthalate concentrations in a variety of French wines and spirits.
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Work-related stress a risk factor for type 2 diabetes

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Workplace stress can have a range of adverse effects on health with an increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in the first line. However, to date, convincing evidence for a strong association between work stress and incident Type 2 diabetes mellitus is missing. Researchers have now discovered that individuals who are under a high level of pressure at work face an about 45 percent higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who are subjected to less stress at their workplace.
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Still hot inside the Moon: Tidal heating in the deepest part of the lunar mantle

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Scientists have found that there is an extremely soft layer deep inside the Moon and that heat is effectively generated in the layer by the gravity of the Earth. These findings suggest that the interior of the Moon has not yet cooled and hardened, and also that it is still being warmed by the effect of the Earth on the Moon. This research provides a chance to reconsider how both the Earth and the Moon have been evolving since their births through mutual influence until now.
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Pictures in five seconds: Digital x-ray imaging

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Wanting to replace the medical equipment for taking X-rays, experts in Mexico have created a system of digital x-ray imaging, which replaces the traditional plaque by a solid detector, which delivers results in five seconds. Analog equipment take six minutes to develop the traditional film.
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Best way to brush teeth? Even dentists, dental associations don't agree

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Advice on how we should brush our teeth from dental associations and toothpaste companies is ‘unacceptably inconsistent’, finds new research. "The public needs to have sound information on the best method to brush their teeth," says the senior author of the study. "If people hear one thing from a dental association, another from a toothbrush company and something else from their dentist, no wonder they are confused about how to brush. In this study we found an unacceptably inconsistent array of advice from different sources.
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Stem cells show promise for stroke in pilot study

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
A stroke therapy using stem cells extracted from patients’ bone marrow has shown promising results in the first trial of its kind in humans. The therapy uses a type of cell called CD34+ cells, a set of stem cells in the bone marrow that give rise to blood cells and blood vessel lining cells. Rather than developing into brain cells themselves, the cells are thought to release chemicals that trigger the growth of new brain tissue and new blood vessels in the area damaged by stroke.
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Electrons moving in a magnetic field exhibit strange quantum behavior

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Researchers have made the first direct observations of free-electron Landau states -— a form of quantized states that electrons adopt when moving through a magnetic field- — and found that the internal rotational dynamics of quantum electrons, or how they move through the field, is surprisingly different from the classical model, and in line with recent quantum-mechanical predictions.
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Most misdiagnosed form of dementia leaves patients, doctors unprepared

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:06pm
Even though Lewy body dementia is second only to Alzheimer’s disease as the most common cause of progressive dementia, affecting 1.3 million Americans, the symptoms of LBD are not well recognized by many physicians, especially primary care physicians and other general practitioners. Unfortunately, then, most people are not diagnosed until they are at moderate or severe states, leaving their caregivers unprepared and the patient vulnerable to potentially deadly medication side effects.
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Diabetes education improves health, quality of life

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:06pm
Diabetes education significantly improves outcomes among people with the condition, leading to reduced blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The patients in a recent study worked with diabetes educators as part of their care through a holistic patient-centered medical home approach, including coordination of care between providers and culturally competent communication. More than 29 million Americans – nearly one in 10 – have diabetes, a disorder in which the body doesn’t effectively process glucose, which provides the body fuel for energy and growth.
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Few juvenile suspects exercise constitutional rights during interrogations

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:00pm
Even when not under arrest, juvenile suspects being interrogated for a crime may be strikingly unaware of their constitutional rights and confess without legal counsel or even a parent present, according to research.
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Parents part of problem in distracted teen driving, study finds

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:00pm
Parents play a direct role in distracted teen driving, with more than half of teens talking on cellphones with their mother or father while driving, according to new research. "Teens said parents expect to be able to reach them, that parents get mad if they don't answer their phone and they have to tell parents where they are," said one investigator.
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Grass really is greener on TV, computer screens, thanks to quantum dots


Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:00pm
High-tech specks called quantum dots could bring brighter, more vibrant color to mass market TVs, tablets, phones and other displays. A new technology called 3M quantum dot enhancement film (QDEF) that efficiently makes liquid crystal display (LCD) screens more richly colored is described by an expert.
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Musical training offsets some academic achievement gaps, research says

Science Daily - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 3:00pm
Learning to play a musical instrument or to sing can help disadvantaged children strengthen their reading and language skills, according to research. The findings, which involved hundreds of kids participating in musical training programs, highlight the role learning music can have on the brains of youth in impoverished areas.
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Red Hat CEO: Open Source Goes Mainstream In 2014

Slashdot - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 2:45pm
ashshy (40594) writes Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst likes to post "state of the union" addresses at the end of every year. Last December, he said that open source innovation is going mainstream in 2014. In an interview with The Motley Fool, Whitehurst matches up his expectations against mid-year progress. Spoiler alert: It's mostly good news.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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Why President Obama Cares About Net Neutrality in Africa

Wired News - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 2:15pm
What's been lost in the debate over his statements to African leaders is a much more important issue: whether the internet's openness as a worldwide platform is under siege.






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Network Hijacker Steals $83,000 In Bitcoin

Slashdot - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 2:04pm
An anonymous reader writes with news that bogus BGP announcements can be used to hijack work done by cryptocurrency mining pools. Quoting El Reg: Researchers at Dell's SecureWorks Counter Threat Unit (CTU) have identified an exploit that can be used to steal cryptocurrency from mining pools — and they claim that at least one unknown miscreant has already used the technique to pilfer tens of thousands of dollars in digital cash. The heist was achieved by using bogus Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) broadcasts to hijack networks belonging to multiple large hosting companies, including Amazon, Digital Ocean, and OVH, among others. After sending the fake BGP updates miners unknowingly contributed work to the attackers' pools.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

'Unparticles' May Hold the Key To Superconductivity

Slashdot - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 1:23pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes One curious property of massless particles like photons is that their energy or momentum can take any value across many orders of magnitude, a property that physicists call scale invariance. By contrast, massive particles like electrons always have the same mass regardless of their energy or momentum. So massive particles are not scale invariant. The concept of unparticles is the idea that some "stuff" may have mass, energy and momentum and yet also be scale invariant. This stuff must be profoundly different from ordinary particles, hence the name: unparticles. Nobody has ever seen an unparticle but now physicists are suggesting that unparticles may hold the key to understanding unconventional superconductivity. Their thinking is that at very low temperatures, ordinary particles can sometimes behave like unparticles. In other words, their properties become independent of the scale at which they're observed. So if an unparticle moves without resistance on a tiny scale, then it must also move without resistance at every scale, hence the phenomenon of superconductivity. That could provide some important insights into unconventional superconductivity which has puzzled physicists since it was discovered in the 1980s.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Where Is the Center of Population for the Southeastern Conference?

Wired News - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 12:44pm
At some point in the introductory physics class, the students look at the idea of center of mass. The usual explanation is that when you are dealing with a rigid object, you need to know what forces are acting on the object and where these forces are acting. The difficult force is the gravitational force. […]






Categories: Science

Yahoo To Add PGP Encryption For Email

Slashdot - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 12:42pm
Bismillah (993337) writes Yahoo is working on an easy to use PGP interface for webmail, the company's chief information security officer Alex Stamos said at Black Hat 2014. This could lead to some interesting standoffs with governments and law enforcement wanting to read people's messages. From the article: "'We are working to design a key server architecture that allows for automatic discovery of public keys within Yahoo.com and other participating mail providers and to integrate encryption into the normal mail flow,' Stamos said."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

IBM Creates Custom-Made Brain-Like Chip

Slashdot - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 12:02pm
An anonymous reader writes In a paper published Thursday in Science, IBM describes its creation of a brain-like chip called TrueNorth. It has "4,096 processor cores, and it mimics one million human neurons and 256 million synapses, two of the fundamental biological building blocks that make up the human brain." What's the difference between TrueNorth and traditional processing units? Apparently, TrueNorth encodes data "as patterns of pulses". Already, TrueNorth has a proven 80% accuracy in image recognition with a power consumption efficiency rate beating traditional processing units. Don't look for brain-like chips in the open market any time soon, though. TrueNorth is part of a DARPA research effort that may or may not translate into significant changes in commercial chip architecture and function.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science