Students design prosthetic foot for high heels

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
After losing a leg to injury or disease, women adjusting to life with a prosthetic limb face the same challenges as men, with perhaps one added complication: how to wear high-heels? Students have developed an early version of a potential solution.
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Fixing cystic fibrosis: In vitro studies show therapeutically robust correction of the most common CF gene mutation

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
In experiments with isolated cystic fibrosis lung cells, researchers have partially restored the lost function of those cells to therapeutic levels.
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Study examines suicide attempt risk factors, methods and timing, related to deployment among active duty soldiers

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:41pm
Suicide attempts, like suicides, have increased in the U.S. Army over the last decade. To better understand and prevent suicidal behavior, researchers examined timing and risk factors for suicide attempts among U.S. Army enlisted Soldiers. They found the highest risk was among those who never deployed, and those who never deployed were at greatest risk during their second month of service.
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Antiretroviral therapy may not be enough to reduce HIV-associated arterial inflammation

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:39pm
Initiating antiretroviral therapy soon after diagnosis of an HIV infection did not prevent the progression of significant arterial inflammation in a small group of previously untreated patients.
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Study finds elevated cancer risk among women with new-onset atrial fibrillation

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:39pm
Among nearly 35,000 initially healthy women who were followed-up for about 20 years, those with new-onset atrial fibrillation had an increased risk of cancer, according to a new study.
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'Star Wars' Jams - 'Moe.' Takes Audience To Galaxy Far, Far, Away - Gallery

Space.com - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:23pm
The jam Band Moe. delivered a Star Wars-themed set, with costumes props and all to a sold-out crowd at the Pilmore in Philadephia, PA on Oct. 31st. 2015.
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Scientists explore new concepts of plant behavior, interactions

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
While a lot is already known about plant perception, our ecological understanding of plants has largely focused on seeing plants as the sum of a series of building blocks or traits. A new collection of articles gathers researchers who have taken a different approach, theorizing plant activity in terms of behavior.
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Thermal modification of wood and a complex study of its properties by magnetic resonance

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Researchers conducted an investigation of various thermally treated wood species from the Central European part of Russia by magnetic resonance methods and revealed important changes in wood structure which were not available for observation by other methods.
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Australian cricket team uses guided missile technology to improve bowling

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Researchers have developed a revolutionary algorithm using submarine and guided missile technology to reduce injury and improve performance in cricket fast bowlers. The 'torpedo technology' is being used by the Australian team in preparations for the upcoming Sri Lanka Series. Sports scientists developed the algorithm as the current manual reporting of professional cricketers' workloads -- which only measures how many deliveries a bowler balls, and not the intensity of the effort -- was inadequate.
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Could optical clocks redefine the length of a second?

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
GPS-based navigation, communication systems, electrical power grids and financial networks all rely on the precise time kept by a network of around 500 atomic clocks located around the world. Researchers now present a way to use optical clocks for more accurate timekeeping than is possible with today's system of traditional atomic clocks. The researchers also measured an optical clock's frequency -- analogous to it's 'ticking' -- with unprecedented precision.
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Lung function may affect vocal health for women

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Vocal fatigue is a common complaint among teachers and one of the most debilitating conditions that can lead to vocal damage. The typical symptoms include hoarseness, vocal tiredness, muscle pains and lost or cracked notes. However, the actual physiological mechanism of vocal fatigue is still being explored. Now, a group of researchers have found a potential link between pulmonary function and the symptoms of voice fatigue unique to women, the predominate population of teaching workforce.
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The future of sonar in semiheated oceans

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:12pm
Light doesn't travel very far underwater so the navy uses sound to transmit messages. The speed of underwater sound depends on a combination of temperature, salinity and pressure. Understanding sound speed is crucial for transmitting messages, detecting enemy submarines and avoiding marine animals. As climate change elevates temperatures, understanding underwater sound speed will become increasingly important.
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Facebook Could Be Eavesdropping On Your Phone Calls

Slashdot - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 3:10pm
An anonymous reader writes: Facebook is not just looking at user's personal information, interests, and online habits but also to your private conversations, revealed a new report. According to NBC report, this may be the case as Kelli Burns, a professor at University of South Florida states, "I don't think that people realize how much Facebook is tracking every move we're making online. Anything that you're doing on your phone, Facebook is watching." the professor said. Now how do you prove that? Professor Kelli tested out her theory by enabling the microphone feature, and talked about her desire to go on a safari, informing about the mode of transport she would take. "I'm really interested in going on an African safari. I think it'd be wonderful to ride in one of those jeeps," she said aloud, phone in hand. The results were shocking, as less than 60 seconds later, the first post on her Facebook feed was about a safari story out of nowhere, which was then revealed that the story had been posted three hours earlier. And, after mentioning a jeep, a car ad also appeared on her page. On a support page, Facebook explains how this feature works: "No, we don't record your conversations. If you choose to turn on this feature, we'll only use your microphone to identify the things you're listening to or watching based on the music and TV matches we're able to identify. If this feature is turned on, it's only active when you're writing a status update." I wonder how many people are actually aware of this.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Microsoft Is Laying Off 1,850 to Streamline Its Smartphone Business

Slashdot - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:30pm
Microsoft is making more changes to its smartphone business. The company, which sold its feature phone business last week, on Wednesday announced that it is scaling back hardware -- laying off 1,850 staff and take a charge of $950 million including $200 million in severance payments in a memo to all employees. The company insists that "great new devices" are in the works. From Myerson's memo: Last week we announced the sale of our feature phone business. Today I want to share that we are taking the additional step of streamlining our smartphone hardware business, and we anticipate this will impact up to 1,850 jobs worldwide, up to 1,350 of which are in Finland. These changes are incredibly difficult because of the impact on good people who have contributed greatly to Microsoft. Speaking on behalf of Satya and the entire Senior Leadership Team, we are committed to help each individual impacted with our support, resources, and respect. For context, Windows 10 recently crossed 300 million monthly active devices, our Surface and Xbox customer satisfaction is at record levels, and HoloLens enthusiasts are developing incredible new experiences. Yet our phone success has been limited to companies valuing our commitment to security, manageability, and Continuum, and with consumers who value the same. Thus, we need to be more focused in our phone hardware efforts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Researchers make a key discovery in how malaria evades the immune system

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:21pm
The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum hijacks an immune system process to invade red blood cells, according to a study. Understanding how malaria invades the cells could lead to a more effective vaccine.
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Consumer knowledge gap on genetically modified food

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:21pm
While consumers are aware of genetically modified crops and food, their knowledge level is limited and often at odds with the facts, according to a newly published study.
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Downed World War II aircraft missing for 72 years located in Pacific Islands

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:21pm
An American aircraft missing since July 1944 was recently located off Palau by effort to combine advanced oceanographic technology with archival research to locate MIAs and military aircraft.
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More lines are usually better when it comes to worker speed

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:21pm
When customers wait in one long line and go to the next available server, those servers work more slowly than when servers each have their own queue, new operations management research finds.
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Could wearable technology impact our healthcare, fashion, and even sport?

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:18pm
With the rapid proliferation of smart mobile devices, and the subsequent increase in data that is being gathered, the challenge is: how do we harness it?
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Blockade of histamine receptors suppresses intestinal anaphylaxis in peanut allergy

Science Daily - Wed, 25/05/2016 - 2:17pm
Simultaneous pre-treatment with antihistamines that block both the H1 and H4 antihistamine receptors suppressed the gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy in mice, according to researchers.
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