Group B streptococcus incidence rises significantly among newborns despite widespread adoption of prevention initiatives

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:01pm
Group B streptococcus, a major cause of serious infectious diseases including sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia, has increased by about 60% among infants younger than 3 months in the Netherlands over the past 25 years despite the widespread use of prevention strategies, new research has found.
Categories: Science

Work to improve children's health should start before mother becomes pregnant

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:01pm
The key to making future generations healthier could lie before the mother becomes pregnant, researchers believe. In a new article, they say that a greater understanding is needed of the role of maternal nutrition in preconception and its impact on the child, adding that while the evidence published to date provides useful ways to improve the health of children, it also raises many questions.
Categories: Science

Later supper for blackbirds in the city: Artificial light gives birds longer to forage for food

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:01pm
Artificial light increases foraging time in blackbirds. Birds in city centers are active not just considerably earlier, but also for longer than their relatives in darker parts of the city. The study showed that artificial light has a considerable influence on the activity times of blackbirds in the city and therefore on their natural cycles.
Categories: Science

A Click Above

Wired News - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm

[HTML1] WIRED Best e-ink screen yet. Auto-brightness control adjusts illumination based on ambient light. Clicky touch-strips speed page-flips. No micro USB cord included—because you have 10 of them floating around your house and bravo, Amazon, for not creating even more e-waste. TIRED Expensive. Still not waterproof. “Thank God Amazon created a new flagship e-reader. The […]

The post A Click Above appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

In between red light and blue light: New functionality of molecular light switches

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Diatoms play an important role in water quality and in the global climate. They generate about one fourth of the oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere and perform around one-quarter of the global carbon dioxide assimilation, i.e. they convert carbon dioxide into organic substances. Their light receptors are a crucial factor in this process. Researchers have now discovered that blue and red light sensing photoreceptors control the carbon flow in these algae.
Categories: Science

Pediatric allergology: Fresh milk keeps infections at bay

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Infants fed on fresh rather than UHT cow’s milk are less prone to infection, new research suggests. The authors recommend the use of alternative processing methods to preserve the protectants found in the natural product.
Categories: Science

New test to help brain injury victims recover

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
A new assessment can help patients suffering from traumatic brain injury, aneurism, dementia, stroke and more between ages 18-74, experts say. The test is suitable for measuring concentration, memory retention, motor performance, language skills and spatial awareness in patients.
Categories: Science

Novel solutions developed to fight obesity gene

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Individuals who are genetically predisposed to obesity may soon have a therapeutic solution to combat their condition. A research team has identified several potent inhibitors that selectively target FTO, the common fat mass and obesity-associated gene. These FTO-specific inhibitors pave the way for the development of novel anti-obesity drugs and treatments.
Categories: Science

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealed

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Iron is the most abundant trace element in humans. As a cofactor of certain proteins, it plays an essential role in oxygen transport and metabolism. Due to the major importance of iron in a wide variety of cellular processes, and the harm caused by its uncontrolled accumulation in the body, its uptake and storage is strictly regulated. In mammals, iron is imported into cells by the membrane transport protein DMT1. Mutations of DMT1, which affect its transport properties, lead to iron-related metabolic disorders such as anemia and the iron storage disease hemochromatosis.
Categories: Science

New molecule from herb discovered, potential for drug development

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
A new molecule that can join together chains of amino acids – the building blocks of protein – has been discovered by researchers. Only three other known molecules have been discovered to be able to perform this function, which is an important process in the development of new drugs. The new molecule is able to do the same process 10,000 times faster than the other three and “cleanly” without leaving any residue behind, scientists report.
Categories: Science

Roman Gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank a tonic of ashes after training

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos.
Categories: Science

Earlier unknown molecular-level mechanism may contribute to growth rate of breast cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
A previously unknown molecular-level mechanism that may partly explain the increased growth of cancer cells has been discovered by researchers. The study showed that high levels of miRNA-378a-5p molecule cause cell division anomalies. This renders the number of chromosomes in cancer cells abnormal, which is known to promote growth and the spread of cancer.
Categories: Science

Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.
Categories: Science

Medication frequently, unintentionally given incorrectly to young children

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:51pm
A new study shows how often adults make mistakes when giving medication to children. The study found that medication errors occur in a child every eight minutes in the United States, on average, and the numbers are increasing.
Categories: Science

Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:51pm
A genetic variant common in Latina women protects against breast cancer, an international research collaboration has found. The variant, a difference in just one of the three billion "letters" in the human genome known as a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), originates from indigenous Americans and confers significant protection from breast cancer, particularly the more aggressive estrogen receptor-negative forms of the disease, which generally have a worse prognosis.
Categories: Science

Irritable bowel syndrome: Males report more social stress than females

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:51pm
One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition. “Our findings underscore the significance of studying gender-based differences in how people experience the same disease or condition,” says one expert.
Categories: Science

Highly Connected CEOs More Likely to Broker Mergers and Acquisitions That Harm Firms

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:51pm
A new study shows that CEOs with extensive social connections initiate mergers and acquisitions more frequently, and these deals result in greater financial losses for both the acquiring firm and the combined entity.
Categories: Science

3D printed facial prosthesis offers new hope for eye cancer patients following surgery

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:51pm
A fast and inexpensive way to make facial prostheses for eye cancer patients has been developed using facial scanning software and 3-D printing, according to researchers. Their novel process can create more affordable prosthetics for any patients who have hollow sockets resulting from eye surgery following cancer or congenital deformities.
Categories: Science

IBM Pays GlobalFoundries $1.5 Billion To Shed Its Chip Division

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:48pm
helix2301 writes with word that Big Blue has become slightly smaller: IBM will pay $1.5 billion to GlobalFoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. IBM will make payments to the chipmaker over three years, but it took a $4.7 billion charge for the third quarter when it reported earnings Monday. The company fell short of Wall Street profit expectations and revenue slid 4 percent, sending shares down 8 percent before the opening bell.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

IBM Pays GlobalFoundries $1.5 Billion To Shed Its Chip Division

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 12:48pm
helix2301 writes with word that Big Blue has become slightly smaller: IBM will pay $1.5 billion to GlobalFoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. IBM will make payments to the chipmaker over three years, but it took a $4.7 billion charge for the third quarter when it reported earnings Monday. The company fell short of Wall Street profit expectations and revenue slid 4 percent, sending shares down 8 percent before the opening bell.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science