Palliative care important for prison population, too

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:41pm
With an increasingly aging prison population, end-of-life care for inmates is becoming a more prominent issue, according to researchers. End-of-life care can be complicated, no matter who the patient is, but can be especially challenging for those behind bars.
Categories: Science

108 million people have correctable vision impairment, global study estimates

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:41pm
Uncorrected refractive error -- nearsightedness, farsightedness, and other focusing problems correctable by prescription lenses -- is responsible for moderate to severe vision impairment in 101 million people and blindness in seven million people worldwide, reports a new study.
Categories: Science

The couple that sings together stays together, at least with birds

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:39pm
The courtship and mating behaviors of the perky Australian red-backed fairy-wren have evolved into nothing short of a free-for-all. The rampant promiscuity of both sexes is legendary.What's a fairy-wren to do to keep from wasting energy raising another male's chicks? New research provides a surprising answer: sing with your mate.
Categories: Science

First in-human vaccine study for malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:39pm
Researchers recently published the results of testing a Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine candidate in a human challenge model.
Categories: Science

How plants protect photosynthesis from oxygen

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:39pm
During the daytime, plants convert the Sun's energy into sugars using photosynthesis, a complex, multi-stage biochemical process. New work identifies a protein needed for assembling the photosynthetic apparatus that may help us understand the history of photosynthesis back in the early days of life on Earth, a time when oxygen was not abundant in the atmosphere.
Categories: Science

Insecticide-treated nets may still prevent malaria despite mosquito resistance

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:39pm
Insecticide-treated nets may still help prevent malaria despite mosquitoes developing resistance, which may provide a clue to why it has been hard to demonstrate the impact of this resistance on malaria as a public health problem, according to new research.
Categories: Science

New research unveils graphene 'moth eyes' to power future smart technologies

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:39pm
New research has shown how graphene can be manipulated to create the most light-absorbent material for its weight, to date.
Categories: Science

Artificial control of exciplexes opens possibilities for new electronics

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:39pm
Demonstrating a strategy that could form the basis for a new class of electronic devices with uniquely tunable properties, researchers were able to widely vary the emission color and efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes based on exciplexes simply by changing the distance between key molecules in the devices by a few nanometers.
Categories: Science

Illumina, the Google of Genetic Testing, Has Plans for World Domination

Wired News - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:27pm
You could say that Illumina is to DNA sequencing is what Google is to Internet search, but that would be underselling the San Diego-based biotech company. The post Illumina, the Google of Genetic Testing, Has Plans for World Domination appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

LIGO Ain’t a Gravitational Wave Detector—It’s an Observatory

Wired News - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:25pm
In order to use LIGO for astronomy, you need to know the location of the source of the gravitational waves. Here's how that works. The post LIGO Ain't a Gravitational Wave Detector—It's an Observatory appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

How Donald Trump Uses Twitter As a Weapon of Fear

Slashdot - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 7:07pm
HughPickens.com writes: Alexander Burns and Maggie Haberman write in the NYT that with his enormous online platform of six million followers, Donald Trump has used Twitter to badger and humiliate those who have dared cross him during the presidential race, latching on to their vulnerabilities, mocking their physical characteristics, personality quirks and, sometimes, their professional setbacks. Trump has made statements that have later been exposed as false or deceptive — only after they have ricocheted across the Internet. For example, Cheri Jacobus, a Republican political strategist, did not think she had done anything out of the ordinary: On a cable television show, she criticized Donald J. Trump for skipping a debate in Iowa in late January and described him as a "bad debater." Trump took to Twitter, repeatedly branding Jacobus as a disappointed job seeker who had begged to work for his campaign and had been rejected. "We said no and she went hostile," Trump wrote. "A real dummy!" Trump's campaign manager told the same story on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." For days, Trump's followers replied to his posts with demeaning, often sexually charged insults aimed at Jacobus, including several with altered, vulgar photographs of her face.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Twitter Goes Crazy Over Christie’s ‘Yuge’ Trump Endorsement

Wired News - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:44pm
Today, Donald Trump made an announcement at a press conference in Forth Worth, Texas, and it was yuuuuge: Chris Christie is endorsing him for president. The post Twitter Goes Crazy Over Christie's 'Yuge' Trump Endorsement appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

How to make a tiny volcanic island

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:38pm
On Nov. 20 2013, the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force discovered a small islet near Nishinoshima volcano, Ogasawara Islands, Japan. The exact date of the initial eruption that spawned the islet is unknown, but a thermal anomaly was detected in the area in early November 2013. Researchers are investigating the creation of this islet, which on the day of its discovery was about 150 by 80 meters in size.
Categories: Science

Metabolism protein found to also regulate feeding behavior in the brain

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:38pm
Feeling hungry or full leads us to change how much we eat, but the molecular wiring of this process is not well understood. Scientists have identified a new player in this circuit called amylin, which contributes to reducing food consumption in mice.
Categories: Science

Shark research produces the unexpected

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:38pm
In a surprise result, scientists have found female blacktip reef sharks and their young stay close to shore over long time periods, with adult males only appearing during the breeding season.
Categories: Science

Being overweight linked to poorer memory

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:38pm
Overweight young adults may have poorer episodic memory -- the ability to recall past events -- than their peers, suggests new research, adding to increasing evidence of a link between memory and overeating. Researchers found an association between high body mass index and poorer performance on a test of episodic memory.
Categories: Science

Immune cell 'switch' discovery raises hopes in cancer fight

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:36pm
Researchers have discovered the mechanism that drives specialized immune cells that detect and kill cancer cells in the body, offering scientists a new way to develop potential drug targets and cancer treatments.
Categories: Science

Consumers care about carbon footprint

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:36pm
How much do consumers care about the carbon footprint of the products they buy? Would they care more if the goods were labeled with emissions data? Does it matter at which stage in the lifecycle of a product the carbon is emitted? New research offers a way to find out.
Categories: Science

Barrow neurosurgeon helps pave way for deep brain stimulation and Alzheimer's

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:36pm
Neurosurgeons at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix are involved with testing the viability of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat Alzheimer's disease, a disorder that currently has few treatment options. Results from the Phase 2 study, reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery on Dec. 18, 2015, demonstrated the safety of DBS in Alzheimer's patients.
Categories: Science

Study finds 36 percent increase in number of male smokers in India

Science Daily - Fri, 26/02/2016 - 6:36pm
The number of men smoking tobacco in India rose by more than one-third to 108 million between 1998 and 2015, according to a new study.
Categories: Science