Depression doubles long-term risk of death after heart disease diagnosis, new study finds new study

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Depression is the strongest predictor of death in the first decade following a diagnosis of coronary heart disease, according to a new study.
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Protein proves influential to healthy immune system

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Researchers have discovered that the protein Myb plays a vital role in keeping our immune system healthy, and preventing the development of immune and inflammatory diseases. Preclinical findings revealed that Myb gives immune cells called regulatory T (Treg) cells the 'authority' to control the strength of the immune response depending on the level of 'threat,' from minor infections to aggressive diseases.
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Making resistant superbugs sensitive to antibiotics

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
New research is paving the way for the development of innovative drugs that restore antibiotic susceptibility in antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, a main cause of fatal lung and bloodstream infections worldwide.
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Tackling depression by changing the way you think

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
A thought is a thought. It does not reflect reality. New research shows that learning how to ruminate less on thoughts and feelings has a positive effect for individuals with depression.
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Virus lethal to amphibians is spreading across Portugal

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
A new strain of ranavirus is currently causing mass mortality in several species of amphibian in the Serra da Estrela, the highest mountain range in continental Portugal. This infectious agent is hypervirulent and also affects fish and reptiles, which complicates the situation, according to a study boasting the collaboration of the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Madrid.
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New research on Northern Lights will improve satellite navigation accuracy

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Researchers have gained new insights into the mechanisms of the Northern Lights, providing an opportunity to develop better satellite technology that can negate outages caused by this natural phenomenon.
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'Preventable' asthma attacks in Houston cost millions

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
A study shows where and when Houston students with asthma were most likely to suffer attacks that required emergency treatment over a 10-year span. The study suggests how school districts can best help students with asthma.
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Highly pathogenic A(H7N9) virus mutation does not change risk to humans

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:23pm
In February 2017, a new A(H7N9) virus -- indicating high pathogenicity in poultry -- was detected in three patients connected to Guangdong, China, as well as in environmental and poultry samples. This is an important development to be monitored, however, ECDC's updated rapid risk assessment concluded that the risk of the disease spreading within Europe via humans is still considered low, as there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission.
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To Make Us All Safer, Robocars Will Sometimes Have to Kill

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:00pm
Not only will robocars fail to completely end traffic deaths, but they'll be choosing who to sacrifice—all to make the roads of tomorrow a safer place. The post To Make Us All Safer, Robocars Will Sometimes Have to Kill appeared first on WIRED.
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Commentary On How To Make Novice Programmers More Professional

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:00pm
Over the weekend, my colleague David ran a story that sought people's suggestion on how to make (force, encourage, advice) a novice programmer to be more professional. Several people have shared their insightful comment on the topic. One such comment, which has received an unusual support on not just Slashdot but elsewhere, is from William Woody, owner of Glenview Software (and who has previously worked as CTO at Cartifact, architect at AT&T Interactive). He writes: The problem is that our industry, unlike every other single industry except acting and modeling (and note neither are known for "intelligence") worship at the altar of youth. I don't know the number of people I've encountered who tell me that by being older, my experience is worthless since all the stuff I've learned has become obsolete. This, despite the fact that the dominant operating systems used in most systems is based on an operating system that is nearly 50 years old, the "new" features being added to many "modern" languages are really concepts from languages that are between 50 and 60 years old or older, and most of the concepts we bandy about as cutting edge were developed from 20 to 50 years ago. It also doesn't help that the youth whose accomplishments we worship usually get concepts wrong. I don't know the number of times I've seen someone claim code was refactored along some new-fangled "improvement" over an "outdated" design pattern who wrote objects that bear no resemblance to the pattern they claim to be following. And when I indicate that the "massive view controller" problem often represents a misunderstanding as to what constitutes a model and what constitutes a view, I'm told that I have no idea what I'm talking about -- despite having more experience than the critic has been alive, and despite graduating from Caltech -- meaning I'm probably not a complete idiot.) Our industry is rife with arrogance, and often the arrogance of the young and inexperienced. Our industry seems to value "cowboys" despite doing everything it can (with the management technique "flavor of the month") to stop "cowboys." Our industry is agist, sexist, one where the blind leads the blind, and seminal works attempting to understand the problem of development go ignored. You can read the full comment here or here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Flight-Sized Boeing Capsule Dropped From Balloon - On-Board Camera Video

Space.com - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 1:47pm
The parachutes of the CST-100 Starliner were tested after it was dropped from an altitude of 38,300 feet. Multiple parachute deployments were captured by an on-board camera.
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Budweiser Aims to Brew First Beer on Mars, Plans Space Station Experiments

Space.com - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 1:39pm
Budweiser has committed to brewing a beer for colonists on the Red Planet. "The King of Beers" revealed its "Bud On Mars" long-term effort, including plans to launch experiments to the space station, at the SXSW festival in Austin, Texas.
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Intel Confirms $15 Billion Mobileye Deal

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 1:30pm
Intel is paying $15.3 billion to acquire Israeli computer vision company Mobileye in an effort to boost the chipmaker's position in the autonomous car market. From a report on Axios: Intel is tapping its foreign cash, paying $63.54 per share in cash for the company and said it should be immediately a boost to its per-share earnings; it is expected to close late this year. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich's letter to employees, as well as a missive from Mobileye insist "that instead of Mobileye being integrated into Intel, Intel's Automated Driving Group will be integrated into Mobileye."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Enter the SoundBox: How the SF Symphony Turned a Dreadful Room Into Sonic Paradise

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 1:00pm
San Francisco's world-renowned symphony has transformed an acoustically dreadful space into the city's hottest classical music venue. The post Enter the SoundBox: How the SF Symphony Turned a Dreadful Room Into Sonic Paradise appeared first on WIRED.
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Pandora Premium Can’t Hang With Spotify and Apple

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 1:00pm
There's really nothing groundbreaking about Pandora's new on-demand streaming service. The post Pandora Premium Can't Hang With Spotify and Apple appeared first on WIRED.
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Door and window locks are less carbon-costly and more effective than burglar alarms and CCTV, a new study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 12:58pm
A new study, which estimates the carbon footprint of burglary prevention measures, has found that the best options from both an environmental and security point of view are door and window locks. This is because they are not only more effective at preventing crime, but also more environmentally friendly, having a much lower carbon footprint than other measures, such as burglar alarms or CCTV.
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New patterns emerge in fabric when the temperature changes

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 12:58pm
Imagine a single-coloured piece of cloth that suddenly displays a colourful pattern when the ambient temperature changes. Upon further temperature change, a completely different pattern shows up.
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Never before seen images of early stage Alzheimer's disease

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 12:58pm
Researchers have used the MAX IV synchrotron in Lund – the strongest of its kind in the world - to produce images that predate the formation of toxic clumps of beta-amyloid, the protein believed to be at the root of Alzheimer’s disease. The unique images appear to contradict a previously unchallenged consensus. Instead of attempting to eliminate beta-amyloid, or so-called plaques, the researchers now suggest stabilizing the protein.
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The evidence base for Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT): what can we believe?

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 12:58pm
The 'facts' that most women and clinicians consider in making the decision to use, or not use, HRT are frequently wrong or incorrectly applied according to a professor. New research raises serious questions about the 'facts' that have led women and their doctors to believe hormone therapy (often called HRT) is unsafe.
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