Popular Transmission BitTorrent Client Released For Windows

Slashdot - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 3:08pm
An anonymous reader quotes an article on The Next Web: Transmission, one of the most popular BitTorrent clients for OS X and Linux, has finally arrived on Windows after roughly a decade in existence. The open-source file sharing app, developed by volunteers and available without ads for free, boasts a small footprint (about 25MB on Windows), support for encryption, a Web interface so you can control it through your browser, as well as the ability to set different speed limits for individual torrents. The current version isn't yet being actively promoted -- to download it, you'll need to head to Transmission's download directory page.

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Categories: Science

The Nameless Mouse Behind the Largest-Ever Neural Network

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 3:00pm
This is the true story of a Harvard lab mouse, whose brain is now at the center of one of the most impressive functional brain maps ever. The post The Nameless Mouse Behind the Largest-Ever Neural Network appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Japanese Astronomy Satellite Hitomi Malfunctions, Generates Debris

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 3:00pm
JAXA is working to restore communications with a new astronomy satellite that malfunctioned March 26, generating debris.
Categories: Science

Study highlights importance of multimodal communication in higher education

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:57pm
Research finds that 'multimodal' communication -- using a mix of words, images and other resources - is important for students and faculty in higher education, a finding that argues for increased instruction in multimodal communication for undergraduates.
Categories: Science

Conspicuous consumption may drive fertility down

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:57pm
A new mathematical model shows how fertility goes down as the cost of achieving social status goes up. The study authors developed a mathematical model showing that their argument is plausible from a biological point of view.
Categories: Science

Why BART Is Falling Apart

Slashdot - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:48pm
HughPickens.com writes: Matthias Gafni writes in the San Jose Mercury News that the engineers who built BART, the rapid transit system serving the San Francisco Bay Area that started operation in 1972, used principles developed for the aerospace industry rather than tried-and-true rail standards. And that's the trouble. "Back when BART was created, (the designers) were absolutely determined to establish a new product, and they intended to export it around the world," says Rod Diridon. "They may have gotten a little ahead of themselves using new technology. Although it worked, it was extremely complex for the time period, and they never did export the equipment because it was so difficult for other countries to install and maintain." The Space Age innovations have made it more challenging for the transit agency to maintain the BART system from the beginning. Plus, the aging system was designed to move 100,000 people per week and now carries 430,000 a day, so the loss of even a single car gets magnified with crowded commutes, delays and bus bridges. For example, rather than stick to the standard rail track width of 4 feet, 8.5 inches, BART engineers debuted a 5-foot, 6-inch width track, a gauge that remains to this day almost exclusive to the system. Industry experts say the unique track width necessitates custom-made wheel sets, brake assemblies and track repair vehicles. Another problem is the dearth of readily available replacement parts for BART's one-of-a-kind systems. Maintenance crews often scavenge parts from old, out-of-service cars to avoid lengthy waits for orders to come in; sometimes mechanics are forced to manufacture the equipment themselves. "Imagine a computer produced in 1972," says David Hardt. "No one is supporting that old equipment any longer, but those same microprocessors are what we have controlling our logic systems." Right now BART needs 100 thyristors at a total cost of $100,000. BART engineers said it could take 22 weeks to ship them to the San Francisco Bay Area to replace in BART's "C" cars, which make up the older cars in the fleet. Right now, the agency has none. Nick Josefowitz says it makes no sense to dwell on design decisions made a half-century ago. "I think we need to use what we have today and build off that, rather than fantasize what could have been done in the past. The BART system was state of the art when it was built, and now it's technologically obsolete and coming to the end of its useful life."

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Categories: Science

Research shows positive side to pricing below cost

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:17pm
A new reason has been found for firms to price below cost and it’s not to undercut the competition. Turns out exchange rates and currency fluctuations may actually cause a corporation to price below cost to ensure consistent profit margins across a global supply chain.
Categories: Science

View of the colorful microcosm within a proton

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:17pm
The proton sounds like a simple object, but it's not. Inside, there's a teeming microcosm of quarks and gluons with properties such as spin and "color" charge that contribute to the particle's seemingly simplistic role as a building block of visible matter. By analyzing the particle debris emitted from collisions of polarized protons at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), scientists say they've found a new way to glimpse that internal microcosm.
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New hope for a type 2 diabetes cure

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:16pm
Gleevec, which is used in leukemia medications, holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, report scientists.
Categories: Science

CEO personality traits play role in incentive pay, compensation

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:16pm
Companies appear to structure compensation contracts and incentive pay based on a manager's personality traits, and not just firm characteristics, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Water bears do not have extensive foreign DNA, new study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:16pm
Tardigrades, also known as moss piglets or water bears, are eight-legged microscopic animals that have long fascinated scientists for their ability to survive extremes of temperature, pressure, lack of oxygen, and even radiation exposure. Tardigrades have not acquired a significant proportion of their DNA from other organisms, a new study shows.
Categories: Science

New materials: Metal foam handles heat better than steel

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:16pm
A new study finds that novel light-weight composite metal foams are significantly more effective at insulating against high heat than the conventional base metals and alloys that they're made of, such as steel. The finding means the CMF is especially promising for use in storing and transporting nuclear material, hazardous materials, explosives and other heat-sensitive materials, as well as for space exploration.
Categories: Science

How cancer stem cells thrive when oxygen is scarce

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:01pm
Working with human breast cancer cells and mice, scientists say new experiments explain how certain cancer stem cells thrive in low oxygen conditions. Proliferation of such cells, which tend to resist chemotherapy and help tumors spread, are considered a major roadblock to successful cancer treatment.
Categories: Science

Review: Oculus Rift

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:01pm
The famous face-computer finally begins shipping this week. Will it change everything? The post Review: Oculus Rift appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Galaxy Cluster Collisions: Biggest Train-Wrecks In The Cosmos | Video

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:01pm
The Chandra X-Ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, NSF's Very Large Array and India’s Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope are studying MACS J0416 and MACS J0717, two sites where entire clusters of galaxies are combining.
Categories: Science

Zero-Rating Harms Poor People, Public Interest Groups Tell FCC

Slashdot - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 2:00pm
An anonymous reader links to an article on Motherboard: The nation's largest internet service providers are undermining US open internet rules, threatening free speech, and disproportionately harming poor people by using a controversial industry practice called "zero-rating," a coalition of public interest groups wrote in a letter to federal regulators on Monday. Companies like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T use zero-rating, which refers to a variety of practices that exempt certain services from monthly data caps, to undercut "the spirit and the text" of federal rules designed to protect net neutrality, the principle that all content on the internet should be equally accessible, the groups wrote. Zero-rated plans "distort competition, thwart innovation, threaten free speech, and restrict consumer choice -- all harms the rules were meant to prevent," the groups wrote. "These harms tend to fall disproportionately on low-income communities and communities of color, who tend to rely on mobile networks as their primary or exclusive means of access to the internet."

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Categories: Science

Scientists call for new strategy to study climate change impacts on coral reefs

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 1:52pm
An international research team calls for a targeted research strategy to better understand the impact multiple stressors will have on coral reef in the future due to global climate change.
Categories: Science

Researchers identify SH2 domains as lipid-binding modules for cell signaling

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 1:52pm
Majority of human Src homology 2 (SH2) domains not only bind to proteins, but also interact with membrane lipids with high affinity and specificity. The SH2 domain-containing proteins play important roles in various physiological processes and are involved in cancer development. This study reveals how lipids control SH2 domain-mediated cellular protein interaction networks and suggests a new strategy for the therapeutic modulation of pY-signaling pathways.
Categories: Science

Doubts about career potential can pave way for immoral professional conduct

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 1:52pm
For those highly determined to pursue a profession, receiving negative feedback may lead to the endorsement of immoral behavior, a team of researchers has found.
Categories: Science

Moons of Saturn may be younger than the dinosaurs

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 1:47pm
New research suggests that some of Saturn's icy moons, as well as its famous rings, might be modern adornments. Their dramatic birth may have taken place a mere hundred million years ago, more recent than the reign of many dinosaurs.
Categories: Science