Israeli Troops Who Relied On Waze Blundered Into Deadly Palestinian Firefight

Slashdot - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 9:41pm
An anonymous reader writes: Israeli forces mounted a rescue mission in a Palestinian neighborhood after gun battles erupted when two soldiers mistakenly entered the area because of an error on a satellite navigation app, Israeli authorities said Tuesday.The clashes late Monday in the Qalandiya refugee camp outside Jerusalem left at least one Palestinian dead and 10 injured, one seriously. According to initial Israeli reports, the two soldiers said they had been using Waze, a highly touted Israeli-invented navigation app bought more than two years ago by Google. The smartphone app, which has a settings option to 'avoid dangerous areas,' relies on crowdsourcing to give users the fastest traffic routes.

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Categories: Science

Watch Scott Kelly’s Historic Return to Earth From the ISS

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 9:39pm
Today, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly will squeeze into a Soyuz capsule and leave the International Space Station for the first time in more than a year. The post Watch Scott Kelly's Historic Return to Earth From the ISS appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

You Can Buy Famous People’s Dog-Eared Books—For a Good Cause

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 9:27pm
Artist Joshua Greene's project Read By Famous auctions off celebrities' personal copies of books. The post You Can Buy Famous People's Dog-Eared Books—For a Good Cause appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Here’s How Many Super Tuesday Voters Are Climate Deniers

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 9:02pm
Stats like this go a long way toward explaining why all five of the remaining GOP presidential candidates continue to reject the realities of climate science. The post Here's How Many Super Tuesday Voters Are Climate Deniers appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Crypto Gurus Diffie, Hellman Win 2015 Turing Award

Slashdot - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 8:59pm
alphadogg writes: Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman, whose names have been linked since their seminal paper introduced the concepts of public key encryption and digital signatures some 40 years ago, have been named winners of the $1M A.M. Turing Award for 2015 (a.k.a., the 'Nobel Prize of Computing'). The work of Diffie, formerly chief security officer of Sun Microsystems, and Hellman, professor emeritus of electrical engineering at Stanford University, has had a huge impact on the secure exchange of information across the Internet, the cloud and email.

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Categories: Science

Amid War With Apple, the Feds Buddy Up to Silicon Valley

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 8:46pm
As the government steps up its efforts to address security threats in cyberspace, it's also trying its best to look like a great ally of the tech industry. The post Amid War With Apple, the Feds Buddy Up to Silicon Valley appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

OpenSource.com Releases First Ever Open Source Yearbook

Slashdot - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 8:13pm
Community manager Rikki Endsley writes: The open source label was created back in 1998, not long after I got my start in tech publishing. Fast forward to late 2014, when I was thinking about how much open source technologies, communities, and business models have changed since 1998. I realized that there was no easy way (like a yearbook) to thumb through tech history to get a feel for open source. Sure, you can flip through the virtual pages of a Google search and read the "Best of" lists collected by a variety of technical publications and writers, much like you can thumb through newspapers from the 1980s to see how big we wore our shoulder pads, neon clothing, and hair back then. But neither research method is particularly efficient, nor do they provide snapshots that show diversity within communities and moments of time. The idea behind the Open Source Yearbook is to collaborate with open source communities to collect a diverse range of stories from the year. We let the writers pick the criteria, which means the yearbook isn't just full of the fastest, most popular, smartest, or best looking open source solutions. Instead, the yearbook offers a mix of open source solutions and projects, from a range of writers and communities, to offer a well-rounded (albeit incomplete) glimpse at what open source communities and projects looked like in 2015. The yearbook is now available for a free download.

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Categories: Science

But First, Coffee: Now You Can Brew Your Nespresso With an App

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:50pm
The coffee-in-a-pod company Nespresso has introduced its first machine that lets you prepare your coffee from distance anytime using the Nespresso app. The post But First, Coffee: Now You Can Brew Your Nespresso With an App appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Link between sleep and social participation may be key to healthy aging

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:48pm
Sleep may be one of the most important factors for well-being; yet, according to the CDC, one in three adults does not get enough. Lack of sleep can lead to potential cognitive declines, chronic diseases and death. Now, research finds that older adults who have trouble sleeping, could benefit from participating in social activities, in particular attending religious events.
Categories: Science

New method to stop Argentine ants

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:48pm
Researchers may have found a better, more environmentally friendly way to stop the procession of Argentine ants, which have been spreading across the United States for the past few decades, despite pest control efforts.
Categories: Science

Impact of climate change on public health

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:48pm
Doctors warn of the impending public health crisis brought on by climate change and call for action to help prepare the world for what is ahead.
Categories: Science

Less connectivity improves innovation

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:48pm
Connectivity does not always lead to more complex technology. An individual's propensity to learn from successful cultural models -- a common strategy that allows us to copy efficient solutions from others -- reduces the diversity of solutions. Partially connected groups are more likely to produce diverse solutions, allowing them to innovate by combining different solutions.
Categories: Science

The evolution of amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer's

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:47pm
Outsized human suffering is linked to 'amyloid beta,' an otherwise tiny, innocuous-looking protein molecule, as it is suspected to be a key player in neurodegenerative mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease. The molecules appear to become toxic within our bodies when they make contact with each other and form small bundles. Oddly, they may become less toxic again as the bundles grow and form ordered fibrillary plaque deposits. This begs the question: what's different about these bundles?
Categories: Science

Mars Rover Code Used For Cyber-Espionage Malware

Slashdot - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:47pm
An anonymous reader writes: Two open-source libraries used in the Mars Rover software have been integrated in the source code of a malware family (nicknamed Rover) used as part of a cyber-espionage campaign against the Indian government (Indian Ambassador to Afghanistan). The two libraries are OpenCV and OpenAL, two libraries for processing image and audio information. As such, the Rover malware can take screenshots, record video and audio.

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Categories: Science

Where to Put Your Router to Optimize Your Home Wi-Fi

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:21pm
It's not just how you use it. It's where you use it. The post Where to Put Your Router to Optimize Your Home Wi-Fi appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

MIT Develops Ultra Thin, Light Weight, Efficient Solar Cells

Slashdot - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 7:06pm
MarkWhittington writes: Researchers at MIT have developed a gossamer thin solar cell that is made of layers of flexible polymers. The cell is so light that it can rest on a soap bubble without breaking it. As a bonus, the thin, light cells puts out 400 times more power than the standard, glass covered photovoltaic cells, at about six watts per gram. According to the researchers, this new development could help power the next generation of portable electronic devices.

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Categories: Science

Gerard Butler Answers Your Burning Google Searches About Him

Wired News - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 6:30pm
When people Google things about actor Gerard Butler, they ask a lot of weird questions. We decided to get some answers. The post Gerard Butler Answers Your Burning Google Searches About Him appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Microcasting Color TV By Abusing a Wi-Fi Chip

Slashdot - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 6:24pm
szczys writes: The NTSC standard has effectively been replaced by newer digital standards, but most televisions still work with these signals. This can be done through a composite video connection, but more fun is to broadcast video directly to your television's analog tuner. This is what cnlohr has been working on, using a lowly ESP8266 module to generate and transmit the color TV signal. This board is a $3 Wi-Fi module. But the chip itself has a number of other powerful peripheral features, including I2S and DMA. This hardware makes it possible to push the TV broadcast out using hardware, taking up only about 10% of processor time. Even more impressive, cnlohr didn't want to recompile and flash (which is a relatively slow process) during prototyping so he used a web worker to implement browser-based development through the chip's Wi-Fi connection. Speaking of chip-abuse in the interest of hyperlocal signal propagation, reader fulldecent writes to point out a project on GitHub that "allows transmission of radio signals from a computer that is otherwise air gapped. Right now this could be useful for playing a quick tune or for pranks. But there are more nefarious uses as this could also be used to exfiltrate information from secure networks."

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Categories: Science

Eliminating GMOs would take toll on environment, economies

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 6:15pm
Higher food prices, a significant boost in greenhouse gas emissions due to land use change and major loss of forest and pasture land would be some results if genetically modified organisms in the United States were banned, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Autism test on the horizon as firm screens for signatures of disorder

Science Daily - Tue, 01/03/2016 - 6:15pm
A company is screening blood samples in an effort to develop a biologically based method to diagnose autism. The company specializes in detecting the byproducts of cellular activity and then applying high-powered statistics to detect patterns among thousands of metabolites.
Categories: Science