A single species of gut bacteria can reverse autism-related social behavior in mice

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 6:07pm
The absence of a one specific species of gut bacteria causes social deficits in mice, researchers report. By adding this bacteria species back to the guts of affected mice, the researchers were able to reverse some of their behavioral deficits, which are reminiscent of symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in humans. The investigators are now looking to explore the effects of probiotics on neurodevelopmental disorders in future work.
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Life as we know it most likely arose via 'long, slow dance'

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 6:07pm
The first eukaryote is thought to have arisen when simpler archaea and bacteria joined forces. But researchers now propose that new genomic evidence derived from a deep-sea vent on the ocean floor suggests that the molecular machinery essential to eukaryotic life was probably borrowed, little by little over time, from those simpler ancestors.
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Need to remember something? Exercise four hours later!

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 6:07pm
A new study suggests an intriguing strategy to boost memory for what you've just learned: hit the gym four hours later. The findings show that physical exercise after learning improves memory and memory traces, but only if the exercise is done in a specific time window and not immediately after learning.
Categories: Science

Municipal Fiber Network Will Let Customers Switch ISPs In Seconds

Slashdot - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 6:00pm
An anonymous reader shares an Ars Technica report: Most cities and towns that build their own broadband networks do so to solve a single problem: that residents and businesses aren't being adequately served by private cable companies and telcos. But there's more than one way to create a network and offer service, and the city of Ammon, Idaho, is deploying a model that's worth examining. Ammon has built an open access network that lets multiple private ISPs offer service to customers over city-owned fiber. The wholesale model in itself isn't unprecedented, but Ammon has also built a system in which residents will be able to sign up for an ISP -- or switch ISPs if they are dissatisfied -- almost instantly, just by visiting a city-operated website and without changing any equipment. Ammon has completed a pilot project involving 12 homes and is getting ready for construction to another 200 homes. Eventually, the city wants to wire up all of its 4,500 homes and apartment buildings, city Technology Director Bruce Patterson told Ars. Ammon has already deployed fiber to businesses in the city, and it did so without raising everybody's taxes.

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Categories: Science

GM CEO: The Bolt EV Will Take Us to a Self-Driving Future

Wired News - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 5:42pm
Mary Barra says the Chevy Bolt EV will straddle the line between the way we use cars today and how'll we'll use them 5, 15, even 50 years from now. The post GM CEO: The Bolt EV Will Take Us to a Self-Driving Future appeared first on WIRED.
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A Video Game Explores A Family’s Battle With Son’s Cancer

Wired News - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 5:41pm
"All the tricks you learn as a father to comfort your child don't work." The post A Video Game Explores A Family's Battle With Son's Cancer appeared first on WIRED.
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38 Community Colleges Launch Entire Degree Programs With Open Educational Resources

Slashdot - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 5:20pm
Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, writing for The Washington Post: A community college reform group has selected a handful of schools in Virginia and Maryland to develop degree programs using open-source materials in place of textbooks, an initiative that could save students as much as $1,300 a year (could be paywalled; alternate source). Such open educational resources -- created using open licenses that let students download or print materials for free -- have gained popularity as the price of print textbooks have skyrocketed, but courses that use the materials remain a novelty in higher education. Achieving the Dream, an education advocacy groups based in Silver Spring, Md., aims to change that by offering $9.8 million in grants to support the development of open-source degree programs at 38 colleges in 13 states.

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The Next List: The Future of Business Is Anything But Bleak

Wired News - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 5:12pm
Tech bubble? What tech bubble? WIRED sat down with some of tech's sharpest minds to get their read on the future of the industry and the nature of success. The post The Next List: The Future of Business Is Anything But Bleak appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Coursera Commits 'Cultural Vandalism' As Old Platform Shuts

Slashdot - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:40pm
Reader mikejuk writes: Coursera has announced that 30 June is the date when it will shut down the servers hosting courses that were the first, free, offerings on its platform. The new model isn't just a revised interface, it is also a new monetization model, and presumably the decision to throw out all the original free content, by shutting the platform, is motivated by greedy commercialism. You could say that the golden age of the MOOC (a course of study made available over the Internet without charge to a very large number of people) is over with the early enthusiastic pioneers doing it because they were passionate about their subject and teaching it being replaced by a bunch of "lets teach a course because it's good for my career and ego" with subjects being selected by what will sell.Closing down the old platform is an unnecessary destruction of irreplaceable content. Coursera needs to rethink this policy that goes against everything it originally stood for. The courses affected are from the early days of the MOOC that are likely to be important in the history of their subject. The most relevant for us, but far from the only one, is Geoffrey Hinton's Neural Networks for Machine Learning which gave a "deep" insight into the way he thinks and how neural networks work. Something has to be done to preserve this important record -- they don't have to turn off the servers just because they have a new platform.Dhawal Shah, founder of Class Central has written about ways one can download Coursera's courses before they're gone.

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Tech’s Biggest Names Are Giving Millions to Crisis Text Line

Wired News - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:39pm
You'll now be able to reach counselors with the text-based crisis counseling service via Facebook and Facebook Messenger. The post Tech's Biggest Names Are Giving Millions to Crisis Text Line appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Vitamin D may not be the great solution to health problems

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
A new review examines the evidence for 10 common beliefs about vitamin D. The beliefs range from the ability of vitamin D to reduce falls and fractures, improve depression and mental well-being, prevent rheumatoid arthritis, treat Multiple Sclerosis, and lessen incidences of cancer and mortality. The review finds little evidence though that supplementation with this vitamin has much of an effect at all.
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Innovative approach makes for a smoother ride

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
Moving through water can be a drag, but the use of supercavitation bubbles can reduce that drag and increase the speed of underwater vehicles. Sometimes these bubbles produce a bumpy ride, but now a team of engineers has an approach that smooths out the ride and stabilizes the bubble.
Categories: Science

Diverting redirection spam

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
Web browsers might soon use fuzzy logic to spot redirection spam and save users from being scammed, phished or opening malicious sites unwittingly, according to researchers.
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Study underscores ongoing need for HIV safety net program

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
A new study of insurance coverage of more than 28,000 people with HIV concludes that a decades-old program that offers free medical care remains a critical necessity despite the availability of coverage under the Affordable Care Act.
Categories: Science

Climate scientists are more credible when they practice what they preach

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
Americans are more likely to follow advice about personal energy use from climate scientists who minimize their own carbon footprint, according to new research. Scientists used two large online surveys to determine that scientists should practice what they preach if they want their advice on reducing energy use to have greater credibility.
Categories: Science

Eye-tracking system uses ordinary cellphone camera

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
For the past 40 years, eye-tracking technology -- which can determine where in a visual scene people are directing their gaze -- has been widely used in psychological experiments and marketing research, but it's required pricey hardware that has kept it from finding consumer applications. Researchers now hope to change that, with software that can turn any smartphone into an eye-tracking device.
Categories: Science

Extent of resection associated with likelihood of survival in glioblastoma

Science Daily - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:05pm
The extent of resection in patients with glioblastoma, an aggressive and often fatal brain tumor, was associated with the likelihood of survival and disease progression, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Pirate Bay Co-Founder Must Pay Record Labels $395,000

Slashdot - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 4:00pm
Pirate Bay co-founder Peter Sunde has run into another setback. The Helsinki District Court has ordered him to pay $395,000 to record labels including Sony, Universal, Warner and EMI, after the music of 60 of their artists has been shared illegally through The Pirate Bay. From a TorrentFreak report:Sunde did not appear in Helsinki to defend himself so the Court handed down a default judgment. He is now ordered to pay the full amount plus costs of around $62,000 (55,000 euros) to the local branch of IFPI. He also faces a fine of one million euros if the content continues to be shared via The Pirate Bay but how he is supposed to do anything about that isn't clear. Sunde and Pirate Bay co-founders Fredrik Neij and Gottfrid Svartholm owe large sums of money to copyright holders following adverse decisions in cases dating back years. None of those judgments have been satisfied and there's no reason to believe this one will be any different.

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Categories: Science

Activision’s First Videogame Show Is Coming to Netflix

Wired News - Thu, 16/06/2016 - 3:30pm
The publisher's new studio hopes to make videogame movies and shows that don't suck—and it's starting with an animated series on the streaming platform. The post Activision's First Videogame Show Is Coming to Netflix appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science