FBI Paid More Than $1 Million For San Bernardino 'Hack'

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:43pm
An anonymous reader writes: FBI Director James Comey has indicated the bureau paid more than $1 million for the method used to hack into the iPhone 5c belonging to one of the San Bernadino shooters. How did he allude to it? He said the FBI paid more money than he would make in the time left as FBI director. He makes just under $200,000 a year based on public files and has over seven years left on his term. "How much did you pay for this software?" Comey was asked. "A lot," he said. "More -- let's see. More than I will make in the remainder of this job, which is seven years and four months, for sure," Comey said. "And so it's a -- but it was in my view, worth it, because it's a tool that helps us with a 5c running iOS 9, which is a bit of a corner case, increasingly as the devices develop and move on to the 6 and 6s and whatnot and iOS's change, but I think it's very, very important that we get into that device." Comey said.

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Categories: Science

Longitudinal trial of safety, efficacy of calcium supplement used to enhance bone mineral density

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:14pm
A recent study examines the safety and efficacy of a vitamin/mineral enhanced plant-sourced calcium supplement in female consumers who had taken the supplement from 1 to 7 years.
Categories: Science

Study points to how low-income, resource-poor communities can reduce substance abuse

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
Cocaine use has increased substantially among African Americans in some of the most underserved areas of the United States. Interventions designed to increase connection to and support from non-drug using family and friends, with access to employment, the faith community, and education, are the best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans and other minorities in low-income, resource-poor communities, a study concludes.
Categories: Science

Plastic below the ocean surface

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
Current measurement methods skim the surface of the ocean while computer modeling shows ocean turbulence may force plastics far below the surface despite their buoyancy.
Categories: Science

Outwitting poachers with artificial intelligence

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
Human patrols serve as the most direct form of protection of endangered animals, especially in large national parks. However, protection agencies have limited resources for patrolling.With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Army Research Office, researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) and game theory to solve poaching, illegal logging and other problems worldwide, in collaboration with researchers and conservationists in the U.S., Singapore, Netherlands and Malaysia.
Categories: Science

New study shows electronic health records often capture incomplete mental health data

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
This study compares information available in a typical electronic health record (EHR) with data from insurance claims, focusing on diagnoses, visits, and hospital care for depression and bipolar disorder.
Categories: Science

Study links neighborhood greenness to reduction in chronic diseases

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
Higher levels of greenness (trees, park space and other vegetation) in neighborhoods is linked with significantly lower chronic illnesses, diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, public health researchers has shown. The findings were based on 250,000 Medicare recipients age 65 and vegetation presence measured by NASA satellite imagery.
Categories: Science

In child heart patients, novel approach improves symptoms of hazardous lymph blockage

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. Physician-researchers developed new imaging tools to treat plastic bronchitis -- in which abnormal circulation causes lymphatic fluid to dry into solid casts that clog a child's airways.
Categories: Science

Researchers find moderate vascular risk in southwest native population

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:13pm
A relatively low prevalence of vascular risk has been reported among participants of the Southwest Heart Mind Study, especially among those treated for hypertension and hyperlipidemia despite overweight and obesity.
Categories: Science

Water color, phytoplankton growth in the Gulf of Maine are changing

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:12pm
The amount of dissolved organic carbon from rivers emptying into the Gulf of Maine has increased over the last 80 years, a trend they predict will continue through 2100 if annual precipitation continues to increase, warn researchers. Runoff is changing the color of the seawater, reducing the light available to phytoplankton for photosynthesis, causing a decline in overall productivity.
Categories: Science

Immune cells in organ cavities play essential role in fast tissue repair

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:12pm
While scientists have known for many years that there are cells living in the cavities surrounding various organs such as the heart, lung and liver, their function has remained unknown. A recent study examined these cells, and discovered they play an integral role in fast tissue repair.
Categories: Science

Advances in extracting uranium from seawater

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:12pm
The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium -- enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have now been made.
Categories: Science

Tighter enforcement along the US-Mexico border backfired, researchers find

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:11pm
The rapid escalation of border enforcement over the past three decades has backfired as a strategy to control undocumented immigration between Mexico and the United States, according to new research that suggests further militarization of the border is a waste of money.
Categories: Science

Young adult survivors of childhood cancer report feeling middle-aged

Science Daily - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:11pm
Do survivors of childhood cancer return to normal health as they grow up? New research finds young adult survivors of childhood cancer, age 18-29, report health-related quality of life that resembles that of adults, 40-49, in the general population, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Is the $400 Billion F-35's 'Brain' Broken?

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 9:00pm
Zachary Cohen, reporting for CNN News: Almost 2,500 of the world's most advanced warplanes, with a total price tag of $400 billion, and they may not have a "brain" in the bunch? That's the fear of federal watchdogs who say problems with the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's complex logistics software system could lead to a grounding of the entire fleet, not to mention future cost increases and schedule delays. Documenting risks to the F-35's Autonomic Logistics Information System, which Department of Defense officials have described as the "brains" of the fifth-generation fighter, an April 14 Government Accountability Office report says a failure "could take the entire fleet offline," (PDF) in part, due to the lack of a backup system. The report also outlines concerns related to the lack of testing done to ensure the software will work properly by the time the Air Force plans to declare its version of the aircraft ready for deployment this August and the Navy reaches that milestone in 2018. The Marine Corps declared the first squadron of its F-35 variant ready for combat in July 2015, with the intention of upgrading and resolving the software issues before its first planned deployment in 2017.

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Categories: Science

New Maps Make Aftershocks Look Scarier Than the Main Quake

Wired News - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 8:47pm
USGS releases maps that show the seismic parades happening in Ecuador and Japan. Here's how they're wreaking havoc. The post New Maps Make Aftershocks Look Scarier Than the Main Quake appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

FBI Hints It Paid Hackers $1 Million to Get Into San Bernardino iPhone

Wired News - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 8:26pm
If correct, this would mean that taxpayers shelled out more than $1 million for a solution that reportedly produced nothing useful for the investigation. The post FBI Hints It Paid Hackers $1 Million to Get Into San Bernardino iPhone appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Available To Download; Mozilla To Offer 0-Day Firefox Releases Via Snaps

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 8:13pm
Reader prisoninmate writes: The latest, and hopefully, the greatest version of Ubuntu is now available to download. On the sidelines, Mozilla today announced the availability of future releases of its popular Firefox web browser in the snap package format for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Earlier today, Canonical unleashed the final release of the highly anticipated Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, bringing users a great set of new features and improvements. Also today, it looks like Canonical has renewed its partnership with Mozilla to offer Firefox as the default web browser on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and upcoming releases of the Linux kernel-based operating systems. As part of the new partnership, Mozilla is committed to distributing future versions of Firefox as a snap package. Having Firefox distributed in the snap format means that you'll have 0-day releases in Ubuntu 16.04. Yes, just like Windows and Mac OS X, users are enjoying their 0-day releases of Mozilla Firefox and don't have to wait for package maintainers of a particular GNU/Linux distribution to update the software in the main repositories. For Mozilla, having Firefox as a snap package means that they'll be able to continually optimize it for Ubuntu.

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Categories: Science

VC, Entrepreneur Says Basic Income Would Work Even If 90% People 'Smoked Pot' and Didn't Work

Slashdot - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:33pm
An anonymous reader cites a story on TI: The chief complaint people lodge at universal basic income -- a form of income distribution that gives people money to cover basic needs regardless of whether they work or not -- is that it'll make them lazy. Sam Altman doesn't buy it. In a recent episode of the Freakonomics podcast, entitled "Is the World Ready for a Guaranteed Basic Income?" Altman argued basic income could support huge amounts of productivity loss and still carry the economy on its shoulders. "Maybe 90% of people will go smoke pot and play video games, but if 10% of the people go create incredible new products and services and new wealth, that's still a huge net-win," Altman says. "And the American puritanical ideal that hard work for its own sake is valuable -- period -- and that you can't question that, I think that's just wrong." [...] The complaint Altman addressed on the Freakonomics podcast is a common one. Study after study, however, has shown that giving people extra money makes them feel financially secure. That security ends up leading to empowerment, not de-motivation.

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Categories: Science

We’ll Never Understand Prince, and That’s Why We Love Him

Wired News - Thu, 21/04/2016 - 7:15pm
The most enthralling—and often most frustrating—aspect of being a fan of Prince was this: No matter what, you were never going to figure him out. The post We'll Never Understand Prince, and That's Why We Love Him appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science