Mr. Know-It-All: Which Messaging Tech Should I Use When I’m Furious at My Spouse?

Wired News - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 10:34am
What's the best messaging tech to use when I'm angry at my spouse? Text, email, phone call, Snapchat, Facebook?






Categories: Science

Radiohead Releases First New Music in Three Years—Through Their App

Wired News - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 10:34am
Radiohead fans got a surprise this week when the band's PolyFauna app—released in February this year, using music and visuals from their 2011 album The King of Limbs—was updated to offer the first new music from the band in three years.






Categories: Science

Cosmic Spider Swallows Starlight in Amazing Telescope View (Video, Photos)

Space.com - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 10:22am
A dark, spider-shaped cloud of cosmic gas blocks out light from stars in a new image taken by a telescope in the Southern Hemisphere.
Categories: Science

Dark 'Blob' of Gas and Dust Spied by Powerful Telescope | Video

Space.com - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 10:15am
The La Silla Observatory's MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope observed the Lupus 4 cloud, which lies 400 light years from Earth. This light-blocking cloud will one day give birth to stars. Full Story: http://goo.gl/4omk50
Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

First US Appeals Court Hears Arguments To Shut Down NSA Database

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:10am
An anonymous reader writes: The second of two lawsuits filed against the U.S. government regarding domestic mass surveillance, ACLU vs. Clapper, was heard on Tuesday by "a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit." The proceeding took an unprecedented two hours (the norm is about 30 minutes), and C-SPAN was allowed to record the whole thing and make the footage available online (video). ACLU's lawyers argued that mass surveillance without warrants violates the 4th Amendment, while lawyers for the federal government argued that provisions within the Patriot Act that legalize mass surveillance without warrants have already been carefully considered and approved by all three branches of government. The judges have yet to issue their ruling.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Google partners with UC Santa Barbara team to build new superconductor-based quantum information processors

Kurzweil AI - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 9:05am

UC Santa Barbara Martinis Group’s superconducting five-qubit array (credit: Erik Lucero)

Hartmut Neven, Director of Engineering for the Quantum Artificial Intelligence team at Google said the team is launching a hardware initiative to design and build new quantum information processors based on superconducting electronics.

John Martinis and his team at UC Santa Barbara will join Google in this initiative. Martinis and his group have been building superconducting quantum electronic components of very high fidelity. In April, they announced in Nature that they had developed a superconducting five-qubit array with “an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92 per cent and a two-qubit gate fidelity of up to 99.4 per cent.”

“With this new integrated hardware group,  Google’s Quantum AI team will now be able to implement and test new designs for quantum optimization and inference processors based on recent theoretical insights as well as their learnings from the D-Wave quantum annealing architecture,” Neven said.

“We will continue to collaborate with D-Wave scientists and to experiment with the ‘Vesuvius’ machine at NASA Ames, which will be upgraded to a 1000 qubit ‘Washington’ processor.”

Categories: Science

The Open Source Tool That Lets You Send Encrypted Emails to Anyone

Wired News - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 7:14am
In the wake of the mass NSA surveillance scandal sparked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, all sorts of hackers, academics, startups, and major corporations are working to build tools that let us more easily secure our email messages and other online communications. Dozens of projects have emerged in recent months, ranging from the email client Mailpile […]






Categories: Science

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines In the Limelight On Stage and In Society

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 6:12am
aarondubrow writes: We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans. Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines In the Limelight On Stage and In Society

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 6:12am
aarondubrow writes: We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans. Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines In the Limelight On Stage and In Society

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 6:12am
aarondubrow writes: We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans. Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines In the Limelight On Stage and In Society

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 6:12am
aarondubrow writes: We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans. Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Robot Dramas: Autonomous Machines In the Limelight On Stage and In Society

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 6:12am
aarondubrow writes: We're entering an era where we'll increasingly coexist with robots and other intelligent machines — some of which may look like us. Not only is there a growing number of industrial robots (about 1.5 million today), there are 10 million Roombas in our homes, porter-bots in our hospitals and hotels, social robots in our nursing homes and even robot spectators at baseball games in Japan, tele-operated by remote fans. Theater is not an arena that we typically associate with robots, however, artists, musicians and producers are often early adopters and innovative users of emerging technologies. In fact, robots got their name from the 1920 play, R.U.R., by the Czech playwright, Karel Capek. An article in the Huffington Post describes a panel discussion at the National Academy of Science in June that featured the producers of three recent plays that starred robots. The plays highlight our robot anxieties, while offering new visions for human-robot interactions in the future.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science