How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Open Government Data Saved New Yorkers Thousands On Parking Tickets

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:54pm
jfruh (300774) writes "Ben Wellington is a New Yorker and city planner with an interest in NYC Open Data, the city's online open government initiative. One thing he noticed in this vast dataset was that just two fire hydrants in the city generated tens of thousands of dollars a year in tickets. The sleuthing by which he figured out why is a great example of how open government data can help citizens in concrete ways."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Crows' memories are made of this: Scientists discover neurons allowing crows to remember short-term

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:53pm
Researchers have discovered neurons allowing crows to remember short-term, although their brains are different from ours. An important prerequisite for intelligence is a good short-term memory which can store and process the information needed for ongoing processes. This "working memory" is a kind of mental notepad -- without it, we could not follow a conversation, do mental arithmetic, or play any simple game.
Categories: Science

Small-molecule drugs moved through blood-brain barrier in new study

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:53pm
A recently developed synthetic peptide carrier is a potential delivery vehicle for brain cancer chemotherapy drugs and other neurological medications, researchers have demonstrated in a mouse model. The blood-brain barrier is meant to protect the brain from numerous undesirable chemicals circulating in the body, but it also obstructs access for treatment of brain tumors and other conditions. Too often the only recourse is invasive, which often limits a drug's effectiveness or causes irreversible damage to an already damaged brain.
Categories: Science

Chemicals found that treat citrus greening in the lab

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:53pm
A possible treatment in the lab for citrus greening, a disease devastating Florida’s $9 billion citrus industry, has been found by a cautiously optimistic research team. It is the first step in a years-long process to bring a treatment to market. The team sprayed greenhouse tree shoots separately with one of the three biochemicals and were successful in stopping the bacteria’s spread, particularly with benzbromarone, which halted the bacteria in 80 percent of the infected trees’ shoots.
Categories: Science

Netflix Ditches Silverlight For HTML5 On Macs

Slashdot - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 2:13pm
An anonymous reader writes "Netflix yesterday furthered its plans to ditch Silverlight for HTML5 on Macs, having already done so last year in IE11 on Windows 8.1. HTML5 video is now supported by Netflix in Safari on OS X Yosemite, meaning you can stream your favorite movies and TV shows without having to install any plugins." Courtesy of encrypted media extensions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Unlocking the potential of stem cells to repair brain damage

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:41pm
Scientists are hoping to unlock the potential of stem cells as a way of repairing neural damage to the brain. They are manipulating adult stem cells from bone marrow to produce a population of cells that can be used to treat brain damage.
Categories: Science

Black hole 'batteries' keep blazars going and going

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:41pm
Astronomers studying two classes of black-hole-powered galaxies have found evidence that they represent different sides of the same cosmic coin. By unraveling how these objects, called blazars, are distributed throughout the universe, the scientists suggest that apparently distinctive properties defining each class more likely reflect a change in the way the galaxies extract energy from their central black holes.
Categories: Science

Light treatment improves sleep, depression, agitation in Alzheimer's

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:41pm
Light treatment tailored to increase circadian stimulation during the day may improve sleep, depression and agitation in people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia, research suggests. Results show that exposure to the tailored light treatment during daytime hours for four weeks significantly increased sleep quality, efficiency and total sleep duration. It also significantly reduced scores for depression and agitation.
Categories: Science

Humans, not climate, to blame for Ice Age-era disappearance of large mammals, study concludes

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:41pm
Was it humankind or climate change that caused the extinction of a considerable number of large mammals about the time of the last Ice Age? Researchers have carried out the first global analysis of the extinction of the large animals, and the conclusion is clear -- humans are to blame. The study unequivocally points to humans as the cause of the mass extinction of large animals all over the world during the course of the last 100,000 years.
Categories: Science

App paired with sensor measures stress, delivers advice to cope in real time

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:41pm
A system that combines a mobile application and sensor to detect stress in parents has been developed by computer scientists. It delivers research-based strategies to help decrease parents' stress during emotionally charged interactions with their children. The system was initially tested on a small group of parents of children with ADHD.
Categories: Science

Genes, adversity linked to crime in incarcerated sample

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:39pm
A genetic characteristic that interacts with childhood adversity has been found to predict higher rates of crime in an incarcerated sample, researchers report. The study is the first in a series that will examine contributions of genetic and environmental variations to criminal behavior. "These findings indicate that gene-by-environment interactions are important for understanding variation in crime amongst populations with high base rates of criminal activity," said the principal investigator of the study.
Categories: Science

Short intervals between pregnancies result in decreased pregnancy length

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:39pm
Women who have short intervals between pregnancies of less than 18 months are more likely to see a decrease in the length of subsequent pregnancies, finds a new study. The study looked at 454,716 live births from women with two or more pregnancies over a six year period. The researchers looked at the influence of inadequate birth spacing on the duration of the subsequent pregnancy.
Categories: Science

Wing design proves key factor in determining migration success of Monarch butterflies

Science Daily - Wed, 04/06/2014 - 1:35pm
Each fall, millions of monarch butterflies make a spectacular journey from the eastern parts of North America to reach their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Researchers have long known that not all butterflies successfully reach their destination. Now scientists provide some crucial answers on what it takes for Monarchs to complete the trip. It turns out - it's all in the wings.
Categories: Science