Climate change: Greenland melting tied to shrinking Arctic sea ice

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 12:49pm
Vanishing Arctic sea ice. Dogged weather systems over Greenland. Far-flung surface ice melting on the massive island. These dramatic trends and global sea-level rise are linked, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Breastfeeding, vaccinations help reduce ear infection rates in babies

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 12:49pm
In what would be considered good news for many parents, a new study finds the rates of ear infections during a baby's first year have declined; the investigators suggested that higher rates of breastfeeding, use of vaccinations and lower rates of smoking may be the major contributors.
Categories: Science

Cigarettes cheaper than e-cigarettes in 44 of 45 countries studied

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 12:49pm
Combustible tobacco cigarettes cost less to purchase than equivalent amounts of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in 44 of 45 countries sampled around the world.
Categories: Science

Choosing to die at home does not hasten death for patients with terminal cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 12:48pm
A large study from Japan found that cancer patients who died at home tended to live longer than those who died in hospitals.
Categories: Science

Ubuntu Tablet Now Available For Pre-Order

Slashdot - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 12:06pm
prisoninmate writes: During last month's MWC 2016 event, Canonical had the BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet on display at their huge booth, along with the superb Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition smartphone, and the Sony Xperia Z1 and OnePlus One Ubuntu Phones. The company teased users last week with the availability for pre-order of the first ever Ubuntu tablet for March 28, and that day has arrived. Probably the most important aspect of the BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet, which interested many users, was the price, and we can tell you now that it costs €289.90 for the Full HD version, and €249.90 for the HD model. It can be pre-ordered now from BQ's online store.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Definitive Ranking of the Best Batmen of All Time Don’t Even Argue With Us

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 12:00pm
Many have played the Caped Crusader—some good, some bad. Here's who did it best. The post The Definitive Ranking of the Best Batmen of All Time Don't Even Argue With Us appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Viva 'Mars World': Las Vegas May Get Red Planet Experience

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:36am
With expertise from a renowned space exhibit designer, a consortium wants to bring the Mars experience to Las Vegas.
Categories: Science

By the Light of the Moon: Luna and Lighthouse Meet in Amazing Photo

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:30am
Astrophotographer Steve Scanlon took this image of the moon from the Twin Lights lighthouse in the Navesink Highlands, New Jersey, on Jan. 11, 2016.
Categories: Science

Your State Could Lose Big Bucks by Stalling on Clean Energy

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
States that wait for the courts to rule on a federal emissions rule could lose economic clout to early adopting neighbors. The post Your State Could Lose Big Bucks by Stalling on Clean Energy appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Steve Urkel’s Isetta Finds Second Life as a Teensy Electric Car

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
A Swiss scooter company redesigned the funky Isetta as a 21st-century urban dwelling EV. The post Steve Urkel's Isetta Finds Second Life as a Teensy Electric Car appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Cosplayers Are Just Like You! Only They Buy Lots of Spandex

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
Cosplay convention prep is a lot of fun, but it's also a lot of work. Just ask the guy who had to fit giant Fauno horns into a suitcase. The post Cosplayers Are Just Like You! Only They Buy Lots of Spandex appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Life's Building Blocks Form In Replicated Deep Sea Vents

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
Chimney-like mineral structures on the seafloor could have helped create the RNA molecules that gave rise to life on Earth.
Categories: Science

Endor's End: How the 'Star Wars' Death Star Wiped Out the Ewoks After All

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
The destruction of the Death Star in Return of the Jedi didn't help the Ewoks. Debris crashing down to the surface of the moon would have wiped out the adorable race.
Categories: Science

Fog Detected on Surface of Saturn Moon Titan

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
More evidence has emerged, so to speak, of fog over a very special place: Titan.
Categories: Science

Space Station Flies Over Roman Ruins in Stunning Skywatcher Photo

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 11:00am
The International Space Station flies over the ancient Roman city of Ammaia in this image taken by astrophotographer Miguel Claro in the summer of 2015.
Categories: Science

It’s 2016. Why Can’t Anyone Make a Decent Freaking To-Do App?

Wired News - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 10:15am
There is no end of apps to help you make a to-do list. But none of them has ever solved the problem of having too much to do and too little time to do it. The post It's 2016. Why Can't Anyone Make a Decent Freaking To-Do App? appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Lego 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' Gameplay Trailer Reveals Features | Video

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 9:56am
Blaster battles, multi-builds and flight gameplay are highlights of the new game, available June 28th, 2016. Standard and Deluxe editions are available for pre-order on Amazon.
Categories: Science

Researchers use optogenetic light to block tumor development

Kurzweil AI - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 9:30am

 

Setup for delivering spatio-temporally precise light stimulation of optogenetic proteins expressed in tadpole embryo induced tumor-like structures. (credit: Brook T. Chernet et al./Oncotarget)

Tufts University biologists have demonstrated (using a frog model*) for the first time that it is possible to prevent tumors from forming (and to normalize tumors after they have formed) by using optogenetics (light) to control bioelectrical signalling among cells.

Light/bioelectric control of tumors

Virtually all healthy cells maintain a more negative voltage in the cell interior compared with the cell exterior. But the opening and closing of ion channels in the cell membrane can cause the voltage to become more positive (depolarizing the cell) or more negative (polarizing the cell). That makes it possible to detect tumors by their abnormal bioelectrical signature before they are otherwise apparent.

The study was published online in an open-access paper in Oncotarget on March 16.

The use of light to control ion channels has been a ground-breaking tool in research on the nervous system and brain, but optogenetics had not yet been applied to cancer.

Optogenetics modulation of membrane voltage to control induced tumor-like structures. (Top) Tumor induced in tadpole embryo. (Bottom left) Control embryo not injected with light-sensitive protein is highly fluorescent, indicating relative depolarization. (Bottom right) Embryo injected with light-sensitive protein exhibits hyperpolarization, significantly lowering the incidence of tumor formation. Scale bar = 150 micrometers. (credit: Brook T. Chernet et al./Oncotarget)

The researchers first injected  cells in Xenopus laevis (frog) embryos with RNA that encoded a mutant RAS oncogene known to cause cancer-like growths.

The researchers then used blue light to activate positively charged ion channels,which induced an electric current that caused the cells to go from a cancer-like depolarized state to a normal, more negative polarized state. The did the same with a green light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin (Arch). Activation of both agents significantly lowered the incidence of tumor formation and also increased the frequency with which tumors regressed into normal tissue.

“These electrical properties are not merely byproducts of oncogenic processes. They actively regulate the deviations of cells from their normal anatomical roles towards tumor growth and metastatic spread,” said senior and corresponding author Michael Levin, Ph.D., who holds the Vannevar Bush chair in biology and directs the Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology at Tufts School of Arts and Sciences.

“Discovering new ways to specifically control this bioelectrical signaling could be an important path towards new biomedical approaches to cancer. This provides proof of principle for a novel class of therapies which use light to override the action of oncogenic mutations,” said Levin. “Using light to specifically target tumors would avoid subjecting the whole body to toxic chemotherapy or similar reagents.”

This work was supported by the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Charitable Foundation.

* Frogs are a good model for basic science research into cancer because tumors in frogs and mammals share many of the same characteristics. These include rapid cell division, tissue disorganization, increased vascular growth, invasiveness and cells that have an abnormally positive internal electric voltage.

Abstract of Use of genetically encoded, light-gated ion translocators to control tumorigenesis

It has long been known that the resting potential of tumor cells is depolarized relative to their normal counterparts. More recent work has provided evidence that resting potential is not just a readout of cell state: it regulates cell behavior as well. Thus, the ability to control resting potential in vivo would provide a powerful new tool for the study and treatment of tumors, a tool capable of revealing living-state physiological information impossible to obtain using molecular tools applied to isolated cell components. Here we describe the first use of optogenetics to manipulate ion-flux mediated regulation of membrane potential specifically to prevent and cause regression of oncogene-induced tumors. Injection of mutant-KRAS mRNA induces tumor-like structures with many documented similarities to tumors, in Xenopus tadpoles. We show that expression and activation of either ChR2D156A, a blue-light activated cation channel, or Arch, a green-light activated proton pump, both of which hyperpolarize cells, significantly lowers the incidence of KRAS tumor formation. Excitingly, we also demonstrate that activation of co-expressed light-activated ion translocators after tumor formation significantly increases the frequency with which the tumors regress in a process called normalization. These data demonstrate an optogenetic approach to dissect the biophysics of cancer. Moreover, they provide proof-of-principle for a novel class of interventions, directed at regulating cell state by targeting physiological regulators that can over-ride the presence of mutations.

Categories: Science

Slaughter At The Bridge: Uncovering A Colossal Bronze Age Battle

Slashdot - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 9:22am
schwit1 quotes a report from the American Association for the Advancement of Science via Sciencemag.org: About 3200 years ago, two armies clashed at a river crossing near the Baltic Sea. The confrontation can't be found in any history books -- the written word didn't become common in these parts for another 2000 years -- but this was no skirmish between local clans. Thousands of warriors came together in a brutal struggle, perhaps fought on a single day, using weapons crafted from wood, flint, and bronze, a metal that was then the height of military technology. "If our hypothesis is correct that all of the finds belong to the same event, we're dealing with a conflict of a scale hitherto completely unknown north of the Alps," says dig co-director Thomas Terberger, an archaeologist at the Lower Saxony State Service for Cultural Heritage in Hannover. "There's nothing to compare it to." It may even be the earliest direct evidence -- with weapons and warriors together -- of a battle this size anywhere in the ancient world.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Twin Suns Hurl Tatooine-Like Planets into Interstellar Space

Space.com - Mon, 28/03/2016 - 9:00am
Planets that orbit double star systems, like the fictional world Tatooine from "Star Wars," could be in great danger of being flung into space by their parent stars, a new study shows.
Categories: Science