Mediterranean, semi-arid ecosystems prove resistant to climate change

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:15pm
Climate change predictions for the Middle East, like other arid regions of the world, are alarming. But in testing these dire predictions, ecologists found that, contrary to expectations, no measurable changes in annual vegetation could be seen. None of the crucial vegetation characteristics -- neither species richness and composition, nor density and biomass -- had changed appreciably in the course of the rainfall manipulations.
Categories: Science

Developers, IT Still Racking Up (Mostly) High Salaries

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:15pm
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes Software development and IT remain common jobs among those in the higher brackets, although not the topmost one, according to a new study (with graph) commissioned by NPR. Among those earning between $58,000 and $72,000, IT was the sixth-most-popular job, while software developers came in tenth place. In the next bracket up (earning between $72,000 and $103,000), IT rose to third, with software development just behind in fourth place. As incomes increased another level ($103,000 to $207,000), software developers did even better, coming in second behind managers, although IT dropped off the list entirely. In the top percentile ($207,000 and above), neither software developers nor IT staff managed to place; this is a segment chiefly occupied by physicians (in first place), managers, chief executives, lawyers, and salespeople who are really good at their jobs. In other words, it seems like a good time to be in IT, provided you have a particular skillset. If those high salaries are in Silicon Valley or New York, though, they might not seem as high as half the same rate would in Omaha, or Houston, or Raleigh.

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Categories: Science

User-friendly electronic 'Eyecane' enhances navigational abilities for blind

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:14pm
White Canes provide low-tech assistance to the visually impaired, but some blind people object to their use because they are cumbersome, fail to detect elevated obstacles, or require long training periods to master. Electronic travel aids (ETAs) have the potential to improve navigation for the blind, but early versions had disadvantages that limited widespread adoption. A new ETA, the "EyeCane," expands the world of its users, allowing them to better estimate distance, navigate their environment, and avoid obstacles, according to a new study
Categories: Science

Selenium effective treatment against breast cancer, study suggests

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:14pm
Selenium, when attached to a monoclonal antibody presently used to treat breast cancer, has shown greater success in destroying cancer cells in a patient who has developed resistance to the chemotherapy, research demonstrates. Almost a quarter of a million people were diagnosed with breast cancer this year, while another 3 million are living with the disease.
Categories: Science

Fish just want to have fun, according to a new study that finds even fish 'play'

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 4:14pm
Biologists have documented fish playing with a bottom-weighted thermometer and other objects. Play, like much of animals' psychology including emotions, motivations, perceptions and intellect, is part of their evolutionary history and not just random, meaningless behavior.
Categories: Science

Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 3:34pm
mrspoonsi writes Google has announced changes to its search engine in an attempt to curb online piracy. The company has long been criticised for enabling people to find sites to download entertainment illegally. The entertainment industry has argued that illegal sites should be "demoted" in search results. The new measures, mostly welcomed by music trade group the BPI, will instead point users towards legal alternatives such as Spotify and Google Play. Google will now list these legal services in a box at the top of the search results, as well as in a box on the right-hand side of the page. Crucially, however, these will be adverts — meaning if legal sites want to appear there, they will need to pay Google for the placement.

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Categories: Science

Why your brain makes you reach for junk food

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 3:12pm
Will that be a pizza for you or will you go for a salad? Choosing what you eat is not simply a matter of taste, conclude scientists in a new study. As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, your brain is making decisions based more on a food's caloric content.
Categories: Science

Brain activity provides evidence for internal 'calorie counter'

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:55pm
As you think about how a food will taste and whether it's nutritious, an internal calorie counter of sorts is also evaluating each food based on its caloric density, according to findings from a new neuroimaging study.
Categories: Science

John Lennon commemorated by naming a new tarantula species from South America after him

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:55pm
A newly described tarantula species from Western Brazilian Amazonia was named Bumba lennoni in honor of John Lennon, a founder member of the legendary band the Beatles. The new species is part of the tarantula family Theraphosidae which comprises the largest sized spider species in the world.
Categories: Science

Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:55pm
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
Categories: Science

Wild molecular interactions in a new hydrogen mixture

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:55pm
Hydrogen responds to pressure and temperature extremes differently. Under ambient conditions hydrogen is a gaseous two-atom molecule. As confinement pressure increases, the molecules adopt different states of matter -- like when water ice melts to liquid. Scientists have now combined hydrogen with its heavier sibling deuterium and created a novel, disordered, 'Phase IV'-material. The molecules interact differently than have been observed before, which could be valuable for controlling superconducting and thermoelectric properties of new materials.
Categories: Science

Fairness is in the brain, scientists say

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:53pm
Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new brain study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income.
Categories: Science

Crystallography: Towards controlled dislocations

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:53pm
Scientists have used atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to explore dislocations in the binary II-VI semiconductor CdTe, commercially used in thin-film photovoltaics. The results may lead to eventual improvement in the conversion efficiency of CdTe solar cells. These novel insights into atomically resolved chemical structure of dislocations have potential for understanding many more defect-based phenomena.
Categories: Science

Breathing sand: New measurement technique detects oxygen supply to bottom of North Sea

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:53pm
New analytical methods show for the first time, how the permeable, sandy sediment at the bottom of the North Sea is supplied with oxygen and which factors determine the exchange. Based on the detailed investigation and new measurement technology, the turnover of organic matter and nutrients at the sea floor as well as future changes within the dynamic ecosystem can be better assessed.
Categories: Science

Biomarkers uPA/PAI-1 in breast cancer: Benefit, harm of test unclear

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:53pm
Since studies are lacking, it remains unclear whether certain patients have a benefit if the decision for or against adjuvant chemotherapy is based on the concentration of uPA and PAI-1, a new report states.
Categories: Science

Sexual preference for masculine men, feminine women is an urban habit

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:53pm
A groundbreaking new study suggests that, rather than being passed down through a long process of social and sexual selection, preferences for masculine men and feminine women is a relatively new habit that has only emerged in modern, urbanized societies.
Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science