World's challenges demand science changes -- and fast, experts say

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:49pm
The world has little use -- and precious little time -- for detached experts. A group of scientists -- each of them experts -- makes a compelling case that the growing global challenges has rendered sharply segregated expertise obsolete. Disciplinary approaches to crises like air pollution, climate change, food insecurity, and energy and water shortages, are not only ineffective, but also making many of these crises worse.
Categories: Science

Minipool technology to prepare immunoglobulins to fight viral infections in developing countries

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:49pm
Researchers have described a new, pragmatic, method for the production of immunoglobulin G from human plasma in developing countries.
Categories: Science

Fighting Colorado potato beetle with RNA interference

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:48pm
Colorado potato beetles are a dreaded pest of potatoes. Since they do not have natural enemies in most regions, farmers try to control them with pesticides. However, this strategy is often ineffective because the pest has developed resistances against nearly all insecticides. Now, scientists have shown that potato plants can be protected from herbivory using RNA interference.
Categories: Science

New Space Telescope Tech Could Be 1,000 Times Sharper Than Hubble

Space.com - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:25pm
The Aragoscope would consist of an orbiting space telescope sitting behind an opaque disc up to 0.5 miles (0.8 kilometers) wide. This disc would be made of a black plastic material, similar to a garbage bag.
Categories: Science

Hospitals face growing active shooter threat in United States

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:14pm
The number of active shooter incidents in US hospitals has increased over the last decade to a frequency of more than one a month. In a new article, authors suggest that hospitals examine their security plans.
Categories: Science

Living in genetic comfort zone: How to avoid influence of genetic variation

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:14pm
The phenotype of organisms is shaped by the interaction between environmental factors and their genetic constitution. A recent study by a team of population geneticists shows that fruit flies live in a sort of genetic comfort zone at a specific temperature. The scientists found that, despite their underlying genetic differences, two separate strains of flies had a very similar gene expression pattern at 18°C. This effect of 'canalization', which has also been described in humans, allows organisms to continue to grow and develop stable even in the face of genetic and environmental stress.
Categories: Science

African Americans who fled the South during great migration led shorter lives

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:14pm
Millions of African Americans moved from the South in the early 20th century to seek better job opportunities and higher wages, but a new study on the historic Great Migration shows that with improved economic conditions came a greater risk of mortality.
Categories: Science

Asian Herb Holds Promise as Treatment for Ebola Virus Disease

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:13pm
New research focuses on the mechanism by which Ebola virus infects a cell and the discovery of a promising drug therapy candidate. A small molecule called Tetrandrine derived from an Asian herb has shown to be a potent small molecule inhibiting infection of human white blood cells in vitro or petri dish experiments and prevented Ebola virus disease in mice.
Categories: Science

FCC Approves Net Neutrality Rules

Slashdot - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:12pm
muggs sends word that the U.S. Federal Communications Commission has voted 3-2 to approve an expansion of their ability to regulate ISPs by treating them as a public utility. Under the rules, it will be illegal for companies such as Verizon or Cox Communications to slow down streaming videos, games and other online content traveling over their networks. They also will be prohibited from establishing "fast lanes" that speed up access to Web sites that pay an extra fee. And in an unprecedented move, the FCC could apply the rules to wireless carriers such as T-Mobile and Sprint -- a nod to the rapid rise of smartphones and the mobile Internet. ... The FCC opted to regulate the industry with the most aggressive rules possible: Title II of the Communications Act, which was written to regulate phone companies. The rules waive a number of provisions in the act, including parts of the law that empower the FCC to set retail prices — something Internet providers feared above all. However, the rules gives the FCC a variety of new powers, including the ability to: enforce consumer privacy rules; extract money from Internet providers to help subsidize services for rural Americans, educators and the poor; and make sure services such as Google Fiber can build new broadband pipes more easily.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Google Opens the Play Store to Ads to Keep Up With Facebook

Wired News - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:01pm

Google announced today that it will begin running ads in Google Play, in an apparent attempt to compete in a mobile advertising race that includes other frontrunners like Facebook.

The post Google Opens the Play Store to Ads to Keep Up With Facebook appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Neill Blomkamp Takes Us Behind the Scenes of Chappie

Wired News - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 7:01pm

It’s been just about 18 months since Neill Blomkamp followed up District 9 with Elysium, and in doing so left his native South Africa behind as a backdrop. Next weekend, however, he returns to theaters—and Johannesburg—with his new film, Chappie. Back is his friend and frequent collaborator Sharlto Copley, though in decidedly nonhuman form; Copley […]

The post Neill Blomkamp Takes Us Behind the Scenes of Chappie appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

The Father of SETI: Q&A with Astronomer Frank Drake

Space.com - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:43pm
An interview with Frank Drake, who conducted the first search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) experiment in 1960 and came up with a famous equation that estimates the possible number of alien civilizations.
Categories: Science

Digital Wallets: End of the Beginning or Beginning of the End?

Wired News - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:41pm

Apple Pay is up and running and digital wallets are back in the limelight. Are merchants, consumers, and the market ready for mass adoption of digital wallets? Google Wallet’s poor early uptake comes to mind four years after its launch in 2011. We believe a combination of factors – part structural, part user experience – […]

The post Digital Wallets: End of the Beginning or Beginning of the End? appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

US Needs a Mars Colony, Buzz Aldrin Tells Senators

Space.com - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:39pm
Going to Mars without setting up a colony — round-trip manned missions, in other words — would not be enough for the U.S. to reclaim its leadership in space, nor would setting up human outposts on the moon, Aldrin said.
Categories: Science

Schneier: Everyone Wants You To Have Security, But Not From Them

Slashdot - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:30pm
An anonymous reader writes: Bruce Schneier has written another insightful piece about the how modern tech companies treat security. He points out that most organizations will tell you to secure your data while at the same time asking to be exempt from that security. Google and Facebook want your data to be safe — on their servers so they can analyze it. The government wants you to encrypt your communications — as long as they have the keys. Schneier says, "... we give lots of companies access to our data because it makes our lives easier. ... The reason the Internet is a worldwide mass-market phenomenon is that all the technological details are hidden from view. Someone else is taking care of it. We want strong security, but we also want companies to have access to our computers, smart devices, and data. We want someone else to manage our computers and smart phones, organize our e-mail and photos, and help us move data between our various devices. ... We want our data to be secure, but we want someone to be able to recover it all when we forget our password. We'll never solve these security problems as long as we're our own worst enemy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The FCC’s Vote to Protect Net Neutrality Is a Huge Win for the Internet

Wired News - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:28pm

The FCC voted today to change the way it regulates internet providers in the United States. Net Neutrality advocates say it's a major victory for the internet.

The post The FCC’s Vote to Protect Net Neutrality Is a Huge Win for the Internet appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Traditional forms of media coverage valued over advertising

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:21pm
In an age where digital media is constantly changing, public relations practitioners and business professionals still see the benefits of traditional media coverage, according to a recent study.
Categories: Science

How mantis shrimp evolved many shapes with same powerful punch

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:21pm
The miniweight boxing title of the animal world belongs to the mantis shrimp, a cigar-sized crustacean whose front claws can deliver an explosive 60-mile-per-hour blow akin to a bullet leaving the barrel of a gun. A study of 80 million years of mantis shrimp evolution reveals how these fast weapons evolved their dizzying array of shapes -- from spiny and barbed spears to hatchets and hammers -- while still managing to pack their characteristic punch.
Categories: Science

Method for mapping neuron clusters developed

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:20pm
A method for identifying clusters of neurons that work in concert to guide the behavior has been developed by researchers. Their findings address a long-standing mystery about the organization of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) -- one of the most recently evolved parts of the primate brain that underlies complex cognitive functions.
Categories: Science

GLP-1 secretion is reduced in overweight, pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes

Science Daily - Thu, 26/02/2015 - 6:20pm
The world's largest study looking at the secretion of the gut hormone GLP-1 has found that the secretion is reduced among overweight and obese people, people with pre-diabetes and newly diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes.
Categories: Science