Sensitive genotypes yield disadvantage in poor families, but advantage in wealthier ones

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:58pm
A new study suggest that children with sensitive genotypes who come from low-income homes will be less financially successful than their same sex sibling without those genotypes. But children with those same genotypes from a high-income home would actually fare better economically as young adults than their brother or sister.
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Increased water availability from climate change may release more nutrients into soil in Antarctica

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:58pm
As climate change continues to impact the Antarctic, glacier melt and permafrost thaw are likely to make more liquid water available to soil and aquatic ecosystems in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, potentially providing a more nutrient-rich environment for life, according to a new study.
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To screen or not to screen for lung cancer?

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:58pm
Lung cancer screening using a low-dose CT scan can be a lifesaving test for high-risk patients. While it offers clear benefits, incidental findings and radiation exposure mean there are some potential risks associated with yearly screening. A new study has determined that a structured prescreening counseling and shared decision-making visit with health care professionals leads to a better understanding of the benefits and risks, as well as the eligibility criteria.
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Keeping pitchers in the game: Potential in osteopathic medicine to prevent shoulder injury

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:58pm
Researchers evaluated the effects of the Spencer technique on pitchers from Seton Hill University's men's baseball team. They found a single administration of the technique immediately restored internal rotation of the players' shoulder back toward baseline.
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Typo In IP Address Led To an Innocent Father's Arrest For Paedophilia

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:40pm
An anonymous reader has shared a shocking story about the arrest of Nigel Lang by the British police for a crime he didn't commit. It all happened because of a typo, according to a report. From the report: On a Saturday morning in July 2011, Nigel Lang, then aged 44, was at home in Sheffield with his partner and their 2-year-old son when there was a knock at the door. He opened it to find a man and two women standing there, one of whom asked if he lived at the address. When he said he did, the three strangers pushed past him and one of the women, who identified herself as a police officer, told Lang and his partner he was going to be arrested on suspicion of possessing indecent images of children. [...] He was told that when police requested details about an IP address connected to the sharing of indecent images of children, one extra keystroke was made by mistake, sending police to entirely the wrong physical location. But it would take years, and drawn-out legal processes, to get answers about why this had happened to him, to force police to admit their mistake, and even longer to begin to get his and his family's lives back on track. Police paid Lang 60,000 British Pound ($73,500) in compensation last autumn after settling out of court, two years after they finally said sorry and removed the wrongful arrest from his record.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Breast cancer drug dampens immune response, protecting light-sensing cells of the eye

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:30pm
The breast cancer drug tamoxifen appears to protect light-sensitive cells in the eye from degeneration, according to a new study in mice. The drug prevented immune cells from removing injured photoreceptors.
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New York 2140 vs. The Collapsing Empire: Which New Sci-Fi Novel Is for You?

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:30pm
Sci-fi masters Kim Stanley Robinson and John Scalzi release books this month. Here's how they stack up. The post New York 2140 vs. The Collapsing Empire: Which New Sci-Fi Novel Is for You? appeared first on WIRED.
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Switzerland could generate more energy out of used wood

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:29pm
Switzerland is not fully exploiting a significant source of clean energy: 173,000 tonnes of used wood could be re-used producing valuable heat and power energy today, in addition to the 644,000 tonnes of used wood already being used. This was the conclusion reached by a nationwide survey among 567 companies in the construction, waste management and transport sectors.
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Efforts towards treating paralysis

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Scientists report on the status of recent research and share their vision about the future of wearable neuroprosthetics.
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Convenient and easy to use glucose monitoring and maintenance

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Scientists have developed a convenient and accurate sweat-based glucose monitoring and maintenance device.
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People see black men as larger, more threatening than same-sized white men

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
People have a tendency to perceive black men as larger and more threatening than similarly sized white men, according to research.
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Pain in the neck: Engineers use CRISPR technology to prevent tissue damage, resulting chronic pain

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Researchers have discovered a way to curb chronic pain by modulating genes that reduce tissue- and cell-damaging inflammation.
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Dramatic improvement in surface finishing of 3-D printing

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Researchers have developed a process to dramatically improve the quality of 3-D printed resin products. The process combines greatly improved surface texture and higher structural rigidity with lower cost, less complexity, safer use of solvent chemicals and elimination of troublesome waste dust.
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Depression doubles long-term risk of death after heart disease diagnosis, new study finds new study

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Depression is the strongest predictor of death in the first decade following a diagnosis of coronary heart disease, according to a new study.
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Protein proves influential to healthy immune system

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Researchers have discovered that the protein Myb plays a vital role in keeping our immune system healthy, and preventing the development of immune and inflammatory diseases. Preclinical findings revealed that Myb gives immune cells called regulatory T (Treg) cells the 'authority' to control the strength of the immune response depending on the level of 'threat,' from minor infections to aggressive diseases.
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Making resistant superbugs sensitive to antibiotics

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
New research is paving the way for the development of innovative drugs that restore antibiotic susceptibility in antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, a main cause of fatal lung and bloodstream infections worldwide.
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Tackling depression by changing the way you think

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
A thought is a thought. It does not reflect reality. New research shows that learning how to ruminate less on thoughts and feelings has a positive effect for individuals with depression.
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Virus lethal to amphibians is spreading across Portugal

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
A new strain of ranavirus is currently causing mass mortality in several species of amphibian in the Serra da Estrela, the highest mountain range in continental Portugal. This infectious agent is hypervirulent and also affects fish and reptiles, which complicates the situation, according to a study boasting the collaboration of the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Madrid.
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New research on Northern Lights will improve satellite navigation accuracy

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
Researchers have gained new insights into the mechanisms of the Northern Lights, providing an opportunity to develop better satellite technology that can negate outages caused by this natural phenomenon.
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'Preventable' asthma attacks in Houston cost millions

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:24pm
A study shows where and when Houston students with asthma were most likely to suffer attacks that required emergency treatment over a 10-year span. The study suggests how school districts can best help students with asthma.
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