Vivaldi Hits Its First Beta

Slashdot - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:17pm
An anonymous reader writes: Following well over 50 developer snapshots and 4 technical previews (Alpha), the new browser upstart has hit its first Beta release today. Following almost a year of work on alpha, Vivaldi is coming out with many unique features such as tab stacking and tiling, notes, and quick commands for navigating and feature use. Other features are in the works, such as sync and built-in mail client that will be introduced when they hit a more stable state. It's a refreshing take on the browser: as many others are diverging to a common design template, Vivaldi is taking a more feature-rich and customization-heavy approach. (We linked to a hands-on report about Vivaldi earlier this year, too.)

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Categories: Science

New research demands rethink on Darwin's theory of 'fecundity selection'

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:03pm
A key concept in Darwin's theory of evolution which suggests nature favors larger females that can produce greater numbers of off-spring must be redefined according to scientists behind ground-breaking new research.
Categories: Science

Healthier indoor climate for heavy industry

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:03pm
A dust extraction unit that exploits the laws of nature has made the indoor climate on the ‘shop-floor’ of the Thamshavn smelter in Norway 75 percent cleaner.
Categories: Science

'Magic' plant discovery could lead to growing food in space

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:02pm
A plant geneticist has discovered the gene in the ancient Australian native tobacco plant Nicotiana benthamiana, known as Pitjuri to Australian indigenous Aboriginals tribes. The discovery was made while tracing the history of the Pitjuri plant, which for decades has been used by geneticists as a model plant upon which to test viruses and vaccines.
Categories: Science

The complexity of modeling

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:02pm
In recent years, advances in materials synthesis techniques have enabled scientists to produce increasingly complex functional materials with enhanced or novel macroscopic properties.
Categories: Science

Military sexual trauma: Prevalent and under-treated

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:02pm
Rates of military sexual trauma among men who served in the military may be as much as 15 times higher than has been previously reported, largely because of barriers associated with stigma, beliefs in myths about male rape, and feelings of helplessness, according to a collection of new articles.
Categories: Science

Oil-based pesticides most effective at killing contents of brown widow spider egg sacs

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 3:02pm
Pesticides in oil-based formulations are better than water-based formulations at penetrating the silk fibers of brown widow spider egg sacs, report scientists.
Categories: Science

The Return of OS/2 Warp Set For 2016

Slashdot - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:36pm
An anonymous reader writes: We all know the ill-fated history of IBM's OS/2 Warp, while some others may not know about the first OS/2-OEM distribution called eComStation. Now a new company called Arca Noae, not happy with the results of this last distribution, has signed an agreement with IBM to create a new OS/2 version. They announced a new OS, codenamed "Blue Lion," at Warpstock 2015 this last October; this will be based on OS/2 Warp 4.52 and the SMP kernel. The OS/2 community has taken this news with positivism and the OS2World community is now requesting everybody that has developed for OS/2 on the past to open source their source code to collaborate.

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Categories: Science

Soon, Gmail’s AI Could Reply to Your Email for You

Wired News - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:30pm

Want a better way to get to Inbox Zero? How about not having to type a reply at all?

The post Soon, Gmail’s AI Could Reply to Your Email for You appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Living alone can dent healthy diets

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:09pm
People who live alone are more likely to have unhealthy diets lacking key foods, research has found. The study reported inadequate cooking skills, no partner to go shopping with, the increasing cost of food and a lack of motivation to cook were among the reasons people living alone had different eating practices.
Categories: Science

Cow-calf grazing practices could determine, mitigate greenhouse gas emissions

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:09pm
Reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the Southern Great Plains could require a change of grazing management by traditional cow-calf producers, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Rotting oaks lead to hazardous voids in Indiana's Mount Baldy sand dune

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:09pm
Mount Baldy, a sand dune in Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, may appear to be no more than an innocent pile of sand grains speckled with vegetation, but the rolling slopes hide narrow, deep holes, which are evidence of entombed oak trees.
Categories: Science

Saving Green: Computer Program Saves Nurseries Water, Plants and Money

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:07pm
A web-based irrigation system saved 21 percent in water use without reducing growth of container-grown landscape plants, a new study shows.
Categories: Science

Cancer-associated mutations are common in patients with unexplained low blood counts

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:07pm
Patients with unexplained low blood counts and abnormally mutated cells who do not fit the diagnostic criteria for recognized blood cancers should be described as having clonal cytopenias of undetermined significance (CCUS), suggest researchers in a recent paper. The researchers found the condition surprisingly common in older patients with low blood counts.
Categories: Science

Restoration project recreates variation in the Vindel River, Sweden

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:05pm
Vindel River LIFE is aimed at restoring tributaries in northern Sweden that were affected by a century-long timber-floating era. The project spanned over nearly six years and came to an end on 31 October 2015.
Categories: Science

Storms fuel blooms of marine plants

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:05pm
Autumn storms help the ocean absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide and stimulate marine life by ‘stirring-up’ the nutrients that feed blooms of tiny marine plants. These microscopic marine plants, or phytoplankton, play a key role in moving carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into the deep ocean, as well as forming the base of the marine food-web. To fuel their growth they absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide and nutrients from the top hundred meters of the ocean. This depletes the upper ocean of nutrients. Understanding the processes of replenishment has preoccupied oceanographers for generations, partly because of suggestions that global environmental change might suppress it.
Categories: Science

New study reveals how specialized cells help each other survive during times of stress

Science Daily - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 2:05pm
For the first time, researchers show how one set of specialized cells survives under stress by manipulating the behavior of key immune system cells.
Categories: Science

FCC Fines Another Large Firm For Blocking WiFi

Slashdot - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 1:56pm
AmiMoJo writes: Another company is learning about the fine points of Section 333 of the Communications Act, which prohibits willful interference with any licensed or authorized radio communications. This time, M.C. Dean, who provided the Baltimore Convention Center's in-house WiFi service, were caught by the FCC sending deauthentication frames to prevent hotspot users maintaining a connection. The complainant alleged that M.C. Dean's actions were identical to those that had earned Marriott a $600,000 fine only weeks earlier.

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Categories: Science

LEGO Won't Be Making Fan's Space Station Despite 10,000 Votes

Space.com - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 1:38pm
LEGO will not be producing a model of the International Space Station, having passed on the orbiting outpost in its most recent review of projects that are designed and supported by fans.
Categories: Science

EPA Finds More VW Cheating Software, Including In a Porsche

Slashdot - Tue, 03/11/2015 - 1:14pm
schwit1 writes with this news from the Times that Volkswagen's emissions scandal just expanded to include more expensive vehicles with larger diesel engines, including Porsche, and Audi sport-utility vehicles. According to the article: "The Environmental Protection Agency said on Monday that it had discovered emissions-cheating software on more Volkswagen and Audi cars than previously disclosed and, for the first time, also found the illegal software in one of the carmaker's high-end Porsche models. The German carmaker disputed the claims, however, saying it had not installed defeat software on the models in question that would 'alter emissions characteristics in a forbidden manner.' The company pledged in a short statement that it would cooperate with the E.P.A. 'to clarify the matter in its entirety.' The latest findings by environmental regulators put significant new pressure on Volkswagen and its new chief executive, Matthias Müller, who was previously the head of Volkswagen's Porsche division. E.P.A. officials indicated the latest violations were found during testing performed by federal regulators and their counterparts in California and Canada. The implication is that Volkswagen did not provide the information."

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Categories: Science