Predicting future course of psychotic illness

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:03pm
Psychiatry researchers have developed a model that could help to predict a patient's likelihood of a good outcome from treatment -- from their very first psychotic episode.
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Fall in monsoon rains driven by rise in air pollution, study shows

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:03pm
Emissions produced by human activity have caused annual monsoon rainfall to decline over the past 50 years, a study suggests. In the second half of the 20th century, the levels of rain recorded during the Northern Hemisphere's summer monsoon fell by as much as 10 per cent, researchers say. Changes to global rainfall patterns can have serious consequences for human health and agriculture.
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Keeping your eyes on the prize can help with exercise, study finds

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:03pm
The adage that encourages people to keep their 'eyes on the prize' may be on target when it comes to exercise. When walking, staying focused on a specific target ahead can make the distance to it appear shorter and help people walk there faster, psychology researchers have found.
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Is Australia prepared for Ebola?

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:02pm
Australia needs to be proactive about potential disease outbreaks like Ebola and establish a national center for disease control, an expert says, while he questions Australia's preparation for public health crises.
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Immunotherapy could stop resistance to radiotherapy

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:02pm
Treating cancers with immunotherapy and radiotherapy at the same time could stop them from becoming resistant to treatment, scientists report. Radiotherapy is a very successful treatment for many forms of cancer, but in cancer cells that it doesn't kill it can switch on a 'flag' on their surface, called PD-L1, that tricks the body's defences into thinking that cancerous cells pose no threat.
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Astronomy: Wild ducks take flight in open cluster

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:02pm
The Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile has taken this beautiful image, dappled with blue stars, of one of the most star-rich open clusters currently known -- Messier 11, also known as NGC 6705 or the Wild Duck Cluster.
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Semen secrets: How a previous sexual partner can influence another male's offspring

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:02pm
Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother's previous sexual partner -- in flies at least. Researchers manipulated the size of male flies and studied their offspring. They found that the size of the young was determined by the size of the first male the mother mated with, rather than the second male that sired the offspring.
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Effect of topical antibiotics on antibiotic resistance, patient outcomes in ICUs

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:02pm
A comparison of prophylactic antibiotic regimens applied to an area in the mouth and throat and digestive tract were associated with low levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and no differences in patient survival and intensive care unit length of stay, according to a study.
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Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:01pm
Having the possibility to measure magnetic properties of materials at atomic precision is one of the important goals of today's experimental physics. Such measurement technique would give engineers and physicists an ultimate handle over magnetic properties of nano-structures for future applications. Researchers now propose a new method, utilizing properties of the quantum world – the phase of the electron beam – to detect magnetism with atom-by-atom precision.
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Power can corrupt even the honest

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:01pm
When appointing a new leader, selectors base their choice on several factors and typically look for leaders with desirable characteristics such as honesty and trustworthiness. However once leaders are in power, can we trust them to exercise it in a prosocial manner? New research looked to discover whether power corrupts leaders.
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Omega-3 fatty acids may prevent some forms of depression

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:01pm
Patients with increased inflammation, including those receiving cytokines for medical treatment, have a greatly increased risk of depression. For example, a 6-month treatment course of interferon-alpha therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection causes depression in approximately 30% of patients. Omega-3 fatty acids have a long list of health benefits, including lowering the risk of heart disease and reducing triglyceride levels. These nutritional compounds are also known to have anti-depressant and anti-inflammatory properties.
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Students astonished by stuttering star

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 1:00pm
Secondary school students in Australia have helped reveal weird, jittery behavior in a pulsar called PSR J1717-4054. Pulsars are super-dense, highly magnetized balls of ‘neutron matter’ the size of a small city. They form when stars with more than 10 times the mass of our Sun explode as supernovae, leaving behind a compact remnant made of material far denser than ordinary matter. The name pulsar is given to these objects because they spin and emit pulses of radio waves.
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Ethical filament: Can fair trade plastic save people and the planet?

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:59pm
It’s old news that open-source 3-D printing is cheaper than conventional manufacturing, not to mention greener and incredibly useful for making everything from lab equipment to chess pieces. Now it’s time add another star to the 3-D printing constellation. It may help lift some of the world’s most destitute people from poverty while cleaning up a major blight on the earth and its oceans: plastic trash.
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Non-traditional donor lungs appear safe for transplant

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:59pm
Patients receiving lungs from donors whose cause of death was asphyxiation or drowning have similar outcomes and long-term survival as patients receiving lungs from traditional donors, researchers report.
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Strict blood sugar control after heart surgery may not be necessary

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:59pm
Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery may not have to follow a strict blood sugar management strategy after surgery, experts suggest.
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Microbes in Central Park soil: If they can make it there, they can make it anywhere

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:59pm
Researchers have uncovered more than 167,000 kinds of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes in the soil beneath one of the nation's iconic urban environments. That’s 260 times as many species of birds, plants and invertebrates that live in New York City's Central Park -- combined.
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Gene interacts with stress, leads to heart disease in some people

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:59pm
Some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease, a new genetic finding suggests. An estimated 13 percent of people, all of whom are Caucasian, might carry the genetic susceptibility, and knowing this could help them reduce heart disease with simple interventions such as a healthy diet, exercise and stress management.
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To improve oral health of adults with developmental disabilities, improve support for caregivers

Science Daily - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:59pm
The first large-scale study in the U.S. to investigate at-home oral care for adults with developmental disabilities suggests that future policy initiatives should focus on improving sources of support for caregivers, in addition to addressing access to care.
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Tetris To Be Made Into a Live Action Film

Slashdot - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:56pm
SchrodingerZ writes: Threshold Entertainment has announced that it will be producing a live action film based on the Russian stacking game Tetris. Designed in 1984 by Alexey Pajitnov, Tetris has sold over 35 million copies worldwide. Threshold CEO Larry Kasanoff promises "a very big, epic sci-fi movie," explaining, "this isn't a movie with a bunch of lines running around the page. We're not giving feet to the geometric shapes." Kasanoff is known for his work with the video game films Mortal Kombat, and Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, collectively grossing $105 million in revenue. The studio is planning "a story behind Tetris which makes it a much more imaginative thing," though no directors nor cast have been connected to the film. Threshold Entertainment teased the idea, saying "What you [will] see in Tetris is the teeny tip of an iceberg that has intergalactic significance."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

3 Big Ideas from a Visionary Architect

Wired News - Wed, 01/10/2014 - 12:52pm

Bjarke Ingels is an architect who isn’t afraid to think weird. When a competition solicited ideas for what to do with a huge trash-munching power plant soon to be built in his native Copenhagen, Ingels’ studio, BIG, submitted the sort of idea you’d expect from a precocious first-grader: They suggested turning it into an massive […]

The post 3 Big Ideas from a Visionary Architect appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science