Hackers Target Pro-Clinton Phone Banks—But Hit Trump’s Too

Wired News - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 7:52pm
4chan's trolls appear to have hit a key company for get-out-the-vote phone banks---one used by both sides of the political aisle. The post Hackers Target Pro-Clinton Phone Banks---But Hit Trump’s Too appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Web of Trust, Downloaded 140M Times, Pulled From Extension Stores After Revelations That It Sells Users' Data

Slashdot - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 7:20pm
According to multiple reports, Web of Trust, one of the top privacy and security extensions for web browsers with over 140 million downloads, collects and sells some of the data of its users -- and it does without properly anonymizing it. Upon learning about this, Mozilla, Google and Opera quickly pulled the extension off their respective extension stores. From a report on The Register: A browser extension which was found to be harvesting users' browsing histories and selling them to third parties has had its availability pulled from a number of web browsers' add-on repositories. Last week, an investigative report by journalists at the Hamburg-based German television broadcaster, Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR), revealed that Web of Trust Services (WoT) had been harvesting netizens' web browsing histories through its browser add-on and then selling them to third parties. While WoT claimed it anonymised the data that it sold, the journalists were able to identify more than 50 users from the sample data it acquired from an intermediary. NDR quoted the data protection commissioner of Hamburg, Johannes Caspar, criticising WoT for not adequately establishing whether users consented to the tracking and selling of their browsing data. Those consent issues have resulted in the browser add-on being pulled from the add-on repositories of both Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, although those who have already installed the extension in their browsers will need to manually uninstall it to stop their browsing being tracked.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Problem With This Election? It’s Been Too Entertaining

Wired News - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 7:06pm
Sure, we got some LOLs out of this election. But were they worth it? The post The Problem With This Election? It's Been Too Entertaining appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Teachers 'Unwittingly' Spying On School Children With Surveillance Software

Slashdot - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: A thousand schools across the UK are monitoring children's classroom activities through surveillance software, according to a new report released by privacy advocate group Big Brother Watch. The paper claims that schools have spent an estimated 2.5 million pound ($3.1 million USD) on monitoring solutions to keep an eye on pupils. The technology, known as 'Classroom Management Software', tracks computer usage, including pupil internet activity, browser history, and even keyboard strokes. The report found that 70% of secondary schools (PDF) in Britain have installed monitoring systems, across more than 800,000 school-owned devices and near to 1,500 privately-owned devices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Archaeologists study earliest recorded human burial site in Ireland

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:19pm
Archaeologists have shed new light on the belief systems of early Mesolithic hunter-gatherers after analyzing cremated remains and artifacts given as grave offerings from the earliest recorded human burial site in Ireland.
Categories: Science

Tailored, dense-dose chemotherapy for early breast cancer does not result in significant improvement

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:16pm
Among women with high-risk early breast cancer, the use of tailored dose-dense chemotherapy compared with standard adjuvant chemotherapy did not result in a statistically significant improvement in breast cancer recurrence-free survival, and nonhematologic toxic effects were more frequent in the tailored dose-dense group, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Supplemental, nutrient-enriched donor milk does not improve neurodevelopment in very low-birth-weight infants

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:16pm
Among very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants, the use of supplemental donor milk compared with formula did not improve neurodevelopment at 18 months, according to a study.
Categories: Science

More frequent vaping among teens linked to higher risk of heavy cigarette smoking

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:15pm
Scientists examined associations of e-cigarette vaping with subsequent smoking frequency and heavy smoking among adolescents. E-cigarette vaping is reported by 37 percent of U.S. 10th-grade adolescents and is associated with subsequent initiation of combustible cigarette smoking, say investigators.
Categories: Science

Genetically engineering disease-fighting cells

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:12pm
The human body produces T cells to recognize and fight disease. Each T cell has a unique T cell receptor (or TCR) on its surface that surveils small fragments of proteins presented by other cells. Upon detecting evidence of cancer or infection, a subset of T cells binds the diseased cells and orchestrates their elimination. When tumors and infections cannot be eradicated naturally, researchers employ immunotherapies to boost the immune system's effectiveness.
Categories: Science

Peat bog reveals more than 1,000 years of Tanzanian history

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:04pm
Scientists have charted more than 1,000 years of Tanzanian environmental history using sediments extracted from a peat bog. Working in the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, where only 15% of the tropical forests remain compared to 1,000 years ago, the team aimed to identify if the region's rich biodiversity had altered over the years and what major events in history, such as the emergence of the ivory trade in the Victorian period, might have contributed to changes in the forests.
Categories: Science

Massive 'lake' discovered under volcano could unlock why and how volcanoes erupt

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:01pm
A huge magmatic lake has been discovered, 15 kilometers below a dormant volcano in Bolivia, South America. The body of water, which is dissolved into partially molten rock at a temperature of almost 1,000 degrees Celsius, is the equivalent to what is found in some of the world's giant freshwater lakes, such as Lake Superior.
Categories: Science

Tesla Crash Won't Stop Driverless Car Progress: Renault-Nissan CEO

Slashdot - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 6:00pm
Problems Issues with Tesla's self-driving software that were linked to the death of a driver this year would not block the development of autonomous vehicles, Carlos Ghosn, the chief executive of Renault-Nissan, said on Tuesday. From a report on CNBC: In September, Tesla revealed the death of a man in one of its cars in a crash in the Netherlands and said that the "autopilot" software's role in the accident was being investigated. "In the moments leading up to the collision, there is no evidence to suggest that Autopilot was not operating as designed and as described to users: specifically, as a driver assistance system that maintains a vehicle's position in lane and adjusts the vehicle's speed to match surrounding traffic," Tesla said in a blog post at the time. This incident shone a spotlight on autonomous driving features currently in cars as automakers are in a race to bring fully driverless cars on the road. During an interview at the Web Summit technology conference in Lisbon, Ghosn said that the teething problems with Tesla's autonomous software would not derail the industry's push.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Mobs are, sometimes, good

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:59pm
Submitting to mob mentality is always a risky endeavor, for humans or hyenas. A new study focusing on the latter, though, shows that when it comes to battling for food, mobbing can be beneficial.
Categories: Science

The messenger in Huntington's disease

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:58pm
A research effort reveals new molecular mechanisms of Huntington’s disease. The results question the approaches used up to now for treatment of the disease. They also point to messenger RNA as a key pathogenic component that will make it possible to define new therapeutic strategies.
Categories: Science

Genetic signaling pathway blocks formation of a cancer in the cerebellum

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:41pm
A signaling pathway has the potential to block a type of cancer in the cerebellum, suggests new research. The work is focused on brain tumor formation in animal models of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor diagnosed in children.
Categories: Science

Carbon-hungry plants impede growth rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide 

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:40pm
The rate at which carbon dioxide is accumulating in the atmosphere has plateaued in recent years because Earth's vegetation is grabbing more carbon from the air than in previous decades, new research indicates.
Categories: Science

First cellular atlas of DNA-binding molecule could advance precision therapies

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:40pm
Biochemists have created the first atlas that maps where molecular tools that can switch genes on and off will bind to the human genome. It is a development they say could enable these tools to be targeted to specific parts of an individual’s genome for use in precision medicine, developing therapies and treating disease.
Categories: Science

Lab-grown mini lungs successfully transplanted into mice

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:40pm
Scientists can now grow 3-D models of lungs from stem cells, creating new ways to study respiratory diseases, report scientists.
Categories: Science

Pancreatitis reduced by nearly 50% after gene therapy to treat lipoprotein lipase deficiency

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:38pm
Over a 6-year period, patients with the genetic disease lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LPLD) who received a single gene therapy treatment of alipogene tiparvovec had a marked reduction in the severity and frequency of pancreatitis. No cases of severe pancreatitis and only one admission to the intensive care unit for an LPLD-related abdominal event were reported in the study.
Categories: Science

Studying structure to understand function within 'material families'

Science Daily - Tue, 08/11/2016 - 5:38pm
Carbon, silicon, germanium, tin and lead are all part of a family that share the same structure of their outermost electrons, yet range from acting as insulators to semiconductors to metals.Is it possible to understand these and other trends within element families? In a new article, researchers describe probing the relationship between the structure (arrangement of atoms) and function (physical properties) of a liquid metal form of the element bismuth.
Categories: Science