Youth just as likely to try e-cigarettes as smoking

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:32pm
Young people are just as likely to try electronic cigarettes as smoking, according to a new report. The findings reveal that approximately 20 per cent of youth between the ages of 15 and 19 experiment with vaping, the same number who try cigarettes.
Categories: Science

Why Scientists Love 'Lord of the Rings'

Slashdot - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:16pm
HughPickens.com writes: Julie Beck writes in The Atlantic that though science and fantasy seem to be polar opposites, a Venn diagram of "scientists" and "Lord of the Rings fans" have a large overlap which could (lovingly!) be labeled "nerds." Several animal species have been named after characters from the books, including wasps, crocodiles, and even a dinosaur named after Sauron, "Given Tolkien's passion for nomenclature, his coinage, over decades, of enormous numbers of euphonious names—not to mention scientists' fondness for Tolkien—it is perhaps inevitable that Tolkien has been accorded formal taxonomic commemoration like no other author," writes Henry Gee. Other disciplines aren't left out of the fun—there's a geologically interesting region in Australia called the "Mordor Alkaline Igneous Complex," a pair of asteroids named "Tolkien" and "Bilbo," and a crater on Mercury also named "Tolkien." "It has been documented that Middle-Earth caught the attention of students and practitioners of science from the early days of Tolkien fandom. For example, in the 1960s, the Tolkien Society members were said to mainly consist of 'students, teachers, scientists, or psychologists,'" writes Kristine Larsen, an astronomy professor at Central Connecticut State University, in her paper "SAURON, Mount Doom, and Elvish Moths: The Influence of Tolkien on Modern Science." "When you have scientists who are fans of pop culture, they're going to see the science in it," says Larson. "It's just such an intricate universe. It's so geeky. You can delve into it. There's the languages of it, the geography of it, and the lineages. It's very detail oriented, and scientists in general like things that have depth and detail." Larson has also written papers on using Tolkien as a teaching tool, and discusses with her astronomy students, for example, the likelihood that the heavenly body Borgil, which appears in the first book of the trilogy, can be identified as the star Aldebaran. "I use this as a hook to get students interested in science," says Larson. "I'm also interested in recovering all the science that Tolkien quietly wove into Middle Earth because there's science in there that the casual reader has not recognized."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Cost-effective expert recommended asthma test underutilized by physicians, study shows

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:10pm
For the first time, researchers have found that spirometry was underutilized for asthma diagnosis and management in US adults from 2001 to 2011, despite its accuracy, cost effectiveness and the publication of national guidelines advocating its use. Spirometry is a common test that allows physicians to determine how well a person's lungs work by measuring how much air is inhaled and exhaled as well as how quickly the air is exhaled.
Categories: Science

Revolutionary method of making RNAs

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:10pm
Scientists -- and ultimately patients -- could benefit from a new approach to making ribonucleic acids.
Categories: Science

Fjords are 'hotspots' in global carbon cycling

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:10pm
While fjords are celebrated for their beauty, these ecosystems are also major carbon sinks that likely play an important role in the regulation of the planet's climate, new research reveals.
Categories: Science

Study points to possible treatment for lethal pediatric brain cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:10pm
Using brain tumor samples collected from children in the United States and Europe, an international team of scientists found that the drug panobinostat and similar gene regulating drugs may be effective at treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas, an aggressive and lethal form of pediatric cancer.
Categories: Science

Defects in atomically thin semiconductor emit single photons

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:10pm
Researchers have shown that defects on an atomically thin semiconductor can produce light-emitting quantum dots. The quantum dots serve as a source of single photons and could be useful for the integration of quantum photonics with solid-state electronics -- a combination known as integrated photonics.
Categories: Science

Mystery of India’s rapid move toward Eurasia 80 million years ago explained

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:08pm
In the history of continental drift, India has been a mysterious record-holder. More than 140 million years ago, India was part of an immense supercontinent called Gondwana, which covered much of the Southern Hemisphere. Around 120 million years ago, what is now India broke off and started slowly migrating north, at about 5 centimeters per year.
Categories: Science

School competitive food policies appears tied to neighborhood socioeconomics

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:08pm
Policy changes in California to make the food and beverages that compete with school meal programs more healthy for students appear to have improved childhood overweight/obesity prevalence trends, although improvement was better among students attending schools in socioeconomically advantaged neighborhoods.
Categories: Science

Study examines incidence of concussion in youth, high school, college football

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:08pm
A slight majority of concussions happened during youth football games but most concussions at the high school and college levels occurred during practice, according to a new article.
Categories: Science

Kids likely to sleepwalk if parents have history of nocturnal strolls

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:08pm
More than 60 percent of children developed sleepwalking when both their parents were sleepwalkers in a study among children born in the Canadian province of Quebec.
Categories: Science

Scientists reconcile three unrelated theories of schizophrenia

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:08pm
A new study in mice links three previously unrelated hypotheses about the causes of schizophrenia, a debilitating mental disorder that affects how people think, act and perceive reality. The new findings may eventually lead to treatment strategies targeted for the underlying causes of schizophrenia and related disorders.
Categories: Science

Foundations of heart regeneration uncovered: Outer layer of heart must be healed first

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:08pm
Medical researchers have found that a key to the zebrafish's ability to regenerate cardiac tissue lies in the outer layer of the heart known as the epicardium. When this critical layer is damaged, the whole repair process is delayed as the epicardium undergoes a round of self-healing before tending to the rest of the heart. The finding points to a possible target for repairing the damage caused by a heart attack.
Categories: Science

Juvenile shale gas in Sweden

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:05pm
Considering geological time scales, the occurrence of biogenic shale gas in Sweden´s crust is relatively young. Geoscientists found that biogenic methane in the Alum Shale in South Sweden formed due to deglaciation around 12 years ago. Moreover, the formation processes were due to complex interactions between neotectonic activity and the occurrence of a deep biosphere. Applying a new hydrogeochemical modelling approach, the specific methane generation process was unraveled and quantified for the first time in Europe.
Categories: Science

Human clinical trials begin for deadly hendra virus therapy

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:05pm
The world’s first human clinical trials for a treatment against Hendra virus, a rare but deadly viral disease, have just begun in Australia, using a human monoclonal antibody.
Categories: Science

Evidence of briny water on Mars

Science Daily - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:05pm
Data collected on Mars by NASA's Curiosity rover indicate that water, in the form of brine, may exist under certain conditions on the planet's surface.
Categories: Science

Google Backs Rival of Docker, the Cloud’s Next Big Thing

Wired News - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 4:00pm

Google has joined the Rocket open source project and rolled the technology into one of its cloud computing tools.

The post Google Backs Rival of Docker, the Cloud’s Next Big Thing appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Pinterest Welcomes New Apps with Developer API

Wired News - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 3:53pm

Your Pinterest board is about to get a lot more interesting.

The post Pinterest Welcomes New Apps with Developer API appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Mad Men Recap: On the Road

Wired News - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 3:39pm

The team makes the transition to McCann Erickson.

The post Mad Men Recap: On the Road appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

To Boldly Brew: Astronaut Uses ISSpresso to Make 1st Cup of Coffee in Space

Space.com - Mon, 04/05/2015 - 3:38pm
Space: the final frontier — for coffee. Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, dressed in a 'Star Trek' captain's uniform, became the first person in space to sip from a freshly-brewed cup of coffee, using the ISS's new espresso machine.
Categories: Science