UK Computing Student Jailed After Failing To Hand Over Crypto Keys

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:28pm
stephendavion sends news that Christopher Wilson, a 22-year-old computer science student, has been sent to jail for six months for refusing to hand over his computer encryption passwords. Wilson has been accused of "phoning in a fake warning of an impending cyber attack against Northumbria Police that was convincing enough for the force to temporarily suspend its site as a precaution once a small attack started." He's also accused of trolling on Facebook. Wilson only came to the attention of police in October 2012 after he allegedly emailed warnings about an online threat against one of the staff at Newcastle University. ... The threatening emails came from computer servers linked to Wilson. Police obtained a warrant on this basis and raided his home in Washington, where they seized various items of computer equipment. ... Investigators wanted to examine his encrypted computer but the passwords supplied by Wilson turned out to be incorrect. None of the 50 passwords he provided worked. Frustration with his lack of co-operation prompted police to obtained a order from a judge compelling him to turn over the correct passphrase last year. A judge ordered him to turn over these passwords on the grounds of national security but Wilson still failed to comply, earning him six months behind bars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK Computing Student Jailed After Failing To Hand Over Crypto Keys

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:28pm
stephendavion sends news that Christopher Wilson, a 22-year-old computer science student, has been sent to jail for six months for refusing to hand over his computer encryption passwords. Wilson has been accused of "phoning in a fake warning of an impending cyber attack against Northumbria Police that was convincing enough for the force to temporarily suspend its site as a precaution once a small attack started." He's also accused of trolling on Facebook. Wilson only came to the attention of police in October 2012 after he allegedly emailed warnings about an online threat against one of the staff at Newcastle University. ... The threatening emails came from computer servers linked to Wilson. Police obtained a warrant on this basis and raided his home in Washington, where they seized various items of computer equipment. ... Investigators wanted to examine his encrypted computer but the passwords supplied by Wilson turned out to be incorrect. None of the 50 passwords he provided worked. Frustration with his lack of co-operation prompted police to obtained a order from a judge compelling him to turn over the correct passphrase last year. A judge ordered him to turn over these passwords on the grounds of national security but Wilson still failed to comply, earning him six months behind bars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK Computing Student Jailed After Failing To Hand Over Crypto Keys

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:28pm
stephendavion sends news that Christopher Wilson, a 22-year-old computer science student, has been sent to jail for six months for refusing to hand over his computer encryption passwords. Wilson has been accused of "phoning in a fake warning of an impending cyber attack against Northumbria Police that was convincing enough for the force to temporarily suspend its site as a precaution once a small attack started." He's also accused of trolling on Facebook. Wilson only came to the attention of police in October 2012 after he allegedly emailed warnings about an online threat against one of the staff at Newcastle University. ... The threatening emails came from computer servers linked to Wilson. Police obtained a warrant on this basis and raided his home in Washington, where they seized various items of computer equipment. ... Investigators wanted to examine his encrypted computer but the passwords supplied by Wilson turned out to be incorrect. None of the 50 passwords he provided worked. Frustration with his lack of co-operation prompted police to obtained a order from a judge compelling him to turn over the correct passphrase last year. A judge ordered him to turn over these passwords on the grounds of national security but Wilson still failed to comply, earning him six months behind bars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Protecting privacy online: New system would give individuals more control over shared digital data

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:16pm
Cellphone metadata has been in the news quite a bit lately, but the National Security Agency isn't the only organization that collects information about people's online behavior. Newly downloaded cellphone apps routinely ask to access your location information, your address book, or other apps, and of course, websites like Amazon or Netflix track your browsing history in the interest of making personalized recommendations. At the same time, a host of recent studies have demonstrated that it's shockingly easy to identify unnamed individuals in supposedly "anonymized" data sets, even ones containing millions of records. A new system would allow individuals to pick and choose what data to share with websites and mobile apps.
Categories: Science

New recreational travel model to help states stop firewood assisted insect travel

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:16pm
The spread of damaging invasive forest pests is only partially powered by the insects' own wings. People moving firewood for camping can hasten and widen the insects' spread and resulting forest destruction. A new study gives state planners a tool for anticipating the most likely route of human-assisted spread they can use to enhance survey and public education efforts.
Categories: Science

Not at home on the range: As hosts expand geographical range, the parasites don’t always follow

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:16pm
Do parasites accompany their hosts into neighboring territory? Not necessarily. For some species, the opposite may happen: Hosts may actually lose their parasites when the hosts shift or increase their range. Theirs is one of very few studies that examine the effects of climate change on the lives of often overlooked -- but nonetheless significant -- parasite populations.
Categories: Science

Polar bears from space: Satellite imagery a promising tool to monitor arctic polar bears

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:16pm
The potentially severe impacts of climate change in the Arctic may threaten regional wildlife. Scientists trying to develop efficient and effective wildlife monitoring techniques to track Arctic populations face great challenges, including the remoteness and associated logistical constraints of accessing wildlife. Polar bear population estimates based on satellite images are similar to aerial estimates, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Odor communication in wild gorillas: Wild gorillas signal using odor

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:16pm
Silverback gorillas appear to use odor as a form of communication to other gorillas. Mammals communicate socially through visual, auditory, and chemical signals. The chemical sense is in fact the oldest sense, shared by all organisms including bacteria, and mounting evidence suggests that humans also participate in social chemical signaling. However, not much is known about this type of signaling in closely related hominoids, like wild apes.
Categories: Science

Making quantum connections: The speed of information in a spin network

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 7:15pm
Physicists are pretty adept at controlling quantum systems and even making certain entangled states. Researchers are putting these skills to work to explore the dynamics of correlated quantum systems. Recent results investigated how information flows through a quantum many-body system.
Categories: Science

'Crater Trueblood' (US 2014): Book Excerpt

Space.com - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:46pm
Crater Trueblood has his hands full in Homer Hickam's third "Helium-3" novel.
Categories: Science

Blueprints For Taming the Climate Crisis

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:45pm
mdsolar sends this story from the NY Times: Here's what your future will look like if we are to have a shot at preventing devastating climate change. Within about 15 years every new car sold in the United States will be electric. ... Up to 60 percent of power might come from nuclear sources. And coal's footprint will shrink drastically, perhaps even disappear from the power supply. This course, created by a team of energy experts, was unveiled on Tuesday in a report for the United Nations (PDF) that explores the technological paths available for the world's 15 main economies to both maintain reasonable rates of growth and cut their carbon emissions enough by 2050 to prevent climatic havoc. It offers a sobering conclusion: We might be able to pull it off. But it will take an overhaul of the way we use energy, and a huge investment in the development and deployment of new energy technologies. Significantly, it calls for an entirely different approach to international diplomacy on the issue of how to combat climate change.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Homer Hickam: The Science Behind 'Crater Trueblood' (Op-Ed)

Space.com - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:41pm
In Homer Hickam's "Helium-3" sci-fi novels, the characters
Categories: Science

Get Out! Someone Made an Emoji of Our Jerry Seinfeld Cover

Wired News - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:35pm
In the 1990s it was the Puffy Shirt, but these days Jerry Seinfeld rocks Google Glass. Well, maybe not at his favorite diner, but definitely on the cover of WIRED—and now in emoji.






Categories: Science

A Gorgeous, Disorienting Videogame Designed by Architects

Wired News - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:35pm
Traditional game play exists in the form of puzzles and getting from point A to point B, but by and large the point of HomeMake is to simply observe your surroundings.






Categories: Science

The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data

Wired News - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:04pm
Citizenme is trying to help users make money from their own data. The company hopes to eventually enable you to sell that data directly to advertisers and others of your choosing.






Categories: Science

Amphibians can acquire resistance to deadly fungus

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:04pm
Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group, causing population declines of amphibians, bats, corals, bees and snakes. New research reveals that amphibians can acquire behavioral or immunological resistance to a deadly chytrid fungus implicated in global amphibian population declines.
Categories: Science

Bacteria hijack plentiful iron supply source to flourish

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:03pm
In an era of increasing concern about antibiotic-resistant illness, researchers have identified a new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria's access to iron. Scientists showed how bacterial siderophore, a small molecule, captures iron from two supply sources to fan bacterial growth -- as well as how the body launches a chemical counterassault against this infection process.
Categories: Science

Bee foraging chronically impaired by pesticide exposure: Study

Science Daily - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:03pm
A new study that involved fitting bumblebees with tiny radio frequency tags shows long-term exposure to a neonicotinoid pesticide hampers bees' ability to forage for pollen. The study shows how long-term pesticide exposure affects individual bees' day-to-day behavior, including pollen collection and which flowers worker bees chose to visit.
Categories: Science

Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:03pm
redletterdave writes: The Tor Project has been sued in the state of Texas over a revenge porn website that used its free encrypted communications service. The plaintiff in the case — Shelby Conklin, a criminal justice major at the University of North Texas — alleges a revenge porn site called Pinkmeth "gained unauthorized access to nude photographs" she owned and posted them to the internet. She also said Tor, which The Economist once called "a dark corner of the web," was involved in an active "civil conspiracy" with Pinkmeth because the revenge porn website used the anonymous communications service to prevent others from tracking its location.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

Slashdot - Wed, 09/07/2014 - 6:03pm
redletterdave writes: The Tor Project has been sued in the state of Texas over a revenge porn website that used its free encrypted communications service. The plaintiff in the case — Shelby Conklin, a criminal justice major at the University of North Texas — alleges a revenge porn site called Pinkmeth "gained unauthorized access to nude photographs" she owned and posted them to the internet. She also said Tor, which The Economist once called "a dark corner of the web," was involved in an active "civil conspiracy" with Pinkmeth because the revenge porn website used the anonymous communications service to prevent others from tracking its location.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science