Poor sleep linked to toxic buildup of Alzheimer's protein, memory loss

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
Sleep may be a missing piece of the Alzheimer's puzzle. The toxic protein that is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease blocks the deepest stages of sleep, resulting in memory decline, according to new research.
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New anti-microbial compounds evade resistance with less toxicity

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
New compounds that specifically attack fungal infections without attacking human cells could transform treatment for such infections and point the way to targeted medicines that evade antibiotic resistance.
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Scientists reveal epigenome maps of the human body's major organs

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
While the genome of an individual is the same in every cell, epigenomes vary since they are closely related to the genes a cell is actually using at any given time. A new atlas of human organ epigenomes provides a starting place to understand the role of chemical markers in development, health and disease.
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Researcher discovers metabolite of prostate cancer drug more effective at treating aggressive tumors

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
A metabolite of an FDA-approved drug for metastatic prostate cancer, abiraterone, has more anti-cancer properties than its precursor, researchers have discovered for the first time. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with nearly 240,000 new cases diagnosed each year in the United State.
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Medical home intervention with shared savings shows quality, utilization improvements

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
By paying bonuses to participating medical practices based on reaching quality and spending benchmarks, shared savings contracts created direct financial incentives to contain the costs and utilization of care without compromising the quality of care. This intervention also helped practices develop care management systems, and health plans gave participating practices timely data on their patients' use of hospitals and emergency departments.
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Breastfeeding may lower risk of childhood leukemia, study suggests

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
Breastfeeding for six months or longer was associated with a lower risk of childhood leukemia compared with children who were never breastfed or who were breastfed for a shorter time, according to an article.
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Happiest university graduates are more likely to land a good first job

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:24pm
Happy graduates have a greater chance of being hired for a high quality first job. The study points out that promoting learning and practice of attitudes that encourage happiness could improve the employability of graduates.
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Study explores reasons behind alcohol abuse in non-heterosexual women

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:23pm
Non-heterosexual women who feel a disconnect between who they are attracted to and how they identify themselves may have a higher risk of alcohol abuse, according to a new study.
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How does human behavior lead to surgical errors? Researchers count the ways

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:23pm
Why are major surgical errors called "never events?" Because they shouldn't happen -- but do. Researchers identified 69 never events among 1.5 million invasive procedures performed over five years and detailed why each occurred.
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1-Pixel Pac-Man

Slashdot - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:23pm
szczys writes: Retro games just aren't the same since the display technology resolution has exploded. I went the opposite direction and chose a display with less resolution than the original. This reinvention of Pac-Man uses a 32x32 RGB LED module which are made for LED billboards. This makes the player just one pixel. Add in an Atari joystick and we have a winner.This is a great programming challenge. If you've never looked at Pac-Man AI before, it's fascinating and worth your time!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Eying the Future Data Center, Intel Buys Chip Maker Altera

Wired News - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 4:21pm

Intel is seeking to stay relevant as data centers move away from the traditional CPUs.

The post Eying the Future Data Center, Intel Buys Chip Maker Altera appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

'Heroes and Legends' NASA Attraction to Feature Astronaut Hall of Fame

Space.com - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:53pm
A quarter century after its founding, the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame is being re-launched as a high-tech attraction designed to inspire the next generation of explorers. Heroes and Legends will open at Kennedy Space Center in Florida in 2016.
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Malware Attribution: Should We Identify the Crooks Who Deploy It?

Slashdot - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:41pm
Brian Krebs asks: What makes one novel strain of malicious software more dangerous or noteworthy than another? Is it the sheer capability and feature set of the new malware, or are these qualities meaningless without also considering the skills, intentions and ingenuity of the person wielding it? Most experts probably would say it's important to consider attribution insofar as it is knowable, but it's remarkable how seldom companies that regularly publish reports on the latest criminal innovations go the extra mile to add context about the crooks apparently involved in deploying those tools.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Thin coating on condensers could make power plants more efficient

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Most of the world's electricity-producing power plants -- whether powered by coal, natural gas, or nuclear fission -- make electricity by generating steam that turns a turbine. That steam then is condensed back to water, and the cycle begins again. But the condensers that collect the steam are quite inefficient, and improving them could make a big difference in overall power plant efficiency. A thin coating on condensers could make power plants more efficient, scientists now report.
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Scientists discover protein that plays key role in streptococcal infections

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
The effort to identify new ways of fighting infections has taken a step forward now that scientists have identified a key protein involved in the host's response to strep infections, scientists report.
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Trials show immune drugs effective in advanced melanomas

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Results of two clinical trials show continued promise of immune therapies nivolumab and pembrolizumab against advanced melanomas, specifically in the context of PD1 signaling that some tumors use to avoid immune system attack.
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Insulin degludec: No hint of added benefit in children and adolescents

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
With regard to insulin degludec, no added benefit for adolescents and children with diabetes mellitus can be derived from the drug manufacturer dossier. In girls with type 1 diabetes, severe side effects were more frequent.
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New sensing tech could help detect diseases, fraudulent art, chemical weapons

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Discovered in the 1970s, SERS is a sensing technique prized for its ability to identify chemical and biological molecules in a wide range of fields. It has been commercialized, but not widely. That may soon change. An international research of engineers has developed nanotechnology that promises to make SERS simpler and more affordable.
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Highly explosive volcanism at Galapagos

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
Eight to 16 million years ago, highly explosive volcanism occurred in the area of today's Galapagos Islands. This is shown for the first time by analyses of core samples obtained by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program in the eastern Pacific Ocean.
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Researchers' discovery may explain difficulty in treating Lyme disease

Science Daily - Mon, 01/06/2015 - 3:22pm
The bac­terium that causes Lyme dis­ease forms dor­mant per­sister cells, which are known to evade antibi­otics, researchers have discovered. This sig­nif­i­cant finding, they said, could help explain why it's so dif­fi­cult to treat the infec­tion in some patients.
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