Get Ready for A Beautiful Planet, a Jaw-Dropping IMAX Movie From Space

Wired News - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 9:14pm
The new IMAX documentary A Beautiful Planet relies on shooting with digital cameras. The post Get Ready for A Beautiful Planet, a Jaw-Dropping IMAX Movie From Space appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Scientists establish first map of the sea lion brain

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:55pm
Despite considerable evidence for the California sea lion's intelligence, very little is known about how their brain is organized. Now, a team of neuroscientists has taken an important step toward uncovering this mystery by conducting the first comprehensive study of the California sea lion's central nervous system, concentrating on the somatosensory system, which is concerned with conscious perception of touch, pressure, pain, temperature, position and vibration.
Categories: Science

Faith-based health promotion program successful with older Latinas

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:53pm
Abuelas en Accion, a faith-based program that connects healthy behaviors with lives of Catholic saints, successful at helping older Latinas eat healthier and exercise, say researchers.
Categories: Science

Protecting diversity on coral reefs: DNA may hold the key

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:53pm
Scientists have discovered that large areas of intact coral reef with extensive live coral cover, not disturbed by humans or climate change, harbor the greatest amount of genetic diversity. With this work, the researchers uncovered a link between species diversity of an ecosystem and the genetic diversity encoded within the DNA of those species.
Categories: Science

All hairstyles are not created equal: Scalp-pulling and hair loss

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:53pm
In a review of 19 studies, researchers say they can confirm a 'strong association' between certain scalp-pulling hairstyles -- many common among African-Americans -- and the development of traction alopecia, gradual hair loss caused by damage to the hair follicle from prolonged or repeated tension on the hair root.
Categories: Science

One-step graphene patterning method created

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:53pm
Researchers have developed a one-step, facile method to pattern graphene by using stencil mask and oxygen plasma reactive-ion etching, and subsequent polymer-free direct transfer to flexible substrates.
Categories: Science

Tiny fossil horses put their back into it

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:53pm
A new study reveals that tiny fossil ancestors of modern horses may have moved quite differently to their living counterparts.
Categories: Science

Analysis of dog genome will provide insight into human disease

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:41pm
An important model in studying human disease, the non-coding RNA of the canine genome is an essential starting point for evolutionary and biomedical studies, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Short-term language learning aids mental agility, study suggests

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:41pm
Mental agility can be boosted by even a short period of learning a language, a study suggests. Tests carried out on students of all ages suggest that acquiring a new language improves a person's attention, after only a week of study. Researchers also found that these benefits could be maintained with regular practice.
Categories: Science

Early humans may have been food for carnivores 500,000 years ago

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:41pm
Tooth-marks on a 500,000-year-old hominin femur bone found in a Moroccan cave indicate that it was consumed by large carnivores, likely hyenas, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Influenza in the tropics shows variable seasonality

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:41pm
Whilst countries in the tropics and subtropics exhibit diverse patterns of seasonal flu activity, they can be grouped into eight geographical zones to optimise vaccine formulation and delivery timing, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Uber's New Policy Fines Riders Who Are Two Minutes Late

Slashdot - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:39pm
Uber says it has revised some of its policies to better compensate its drivers. As part of which, the company is testing charging customers a fee if they make a driver wait for more than two minutes (current waiting time is five minutes). Furthermore, the taxi aggregator says it is changing the ride cancellation grace period from five minutes to two minutes, adding that the fees can range from $5 to $10, depending on your city. Our very own Logan Abbott aka Whipslash faced this issue today. Though he tells us that the company refunded his money after he emailed and filed a complaint. The Verge reports:The feature was built in response to drivers' complaints about waiting for passengers, Uber said. In a statement released to The Verge and TechCrunch, Uber noted that these updated terms would ensure that "the whole system runs more smoothly and the Uber experience improves for everyone." Reduced wait times and the ability to charge for idle time, as well as compensation if riders cancel after two minutes, obviously benefit drivers, earning them a few extra dollars and allowing them to move onto the next fare sooner. But how this will make the passenger experience smoother is unclear. Traffic, wrong turns, and faulty GPS all contribute to making pick-up times unreliable. This can leave passengers out in the cold, waiting for drivers to arrive. Uber explained that if a driver is more than five minutes late for an estimated arrival, users can cancel the ride with no penalty.

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Categories: Science

WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: The Shield

Wired News - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:30pm
Want a "cop who makes his own rules" show that actually goes beyond its trope? We have a show for you to binge. The post WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: The Shield appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Even N00bs Can Rock Out on Magic Instruments’ New Guitar

Wired News - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:09pm
Magic Instruments' guitar isn't a guitar, exactly. But it sounds like one. The post Even N00bs Can Rock Out on Magic Instruments' New Guitar appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Intel Declares Independence From PC, Prioritizes Cloud, IoT and 5G Efforts

Slashdot - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 8:00pm
A week after announcing 12,000 job cuts, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has shared vision for the company, hinting a shift in its prime focus away from PC business. In a blog post, Krzanich said that the company will be actively growing its data center business. The chip maker also plans to focus on chips and technologies for IoT devices. "The biggest opportunity in the Internet of Things is that it encompasses just about everything in our lives today-- it's ubiquitous," Krzanich said. The company also plans to boost its memory chips business and make a push towards utilizing them in data centers and various cloud services. Intel said that it has made several investments in this field, noting the $16 billion acquisition of Altera last year. The company says it will be playing a big role in the move to 5G connectivity. "Connectivity is fundamental to every one of the cloud-to-thing segments we will drive," he writes. Over the years, Intel has failed to keep up with Moore's Law, an axiom that semiconductor density will double about every two years. The company previously extended the timeframe to 2.5 years, but Krzanich assures customers that the they are working to make further advances in order to meet the goal. "Moore's Law is fundamentally a law of economics, and Intel will confidently continue to harness its value," Krzanich said. PCWorld has extensively reported on this.

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Culture Podcast: Beyoncé Helps Soothe Our Woes After the Loss of Prince

Wired News - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:30pm
Some weeks on the podcast, things are pretty leisurely. This was not one of those weeks. The post Culture Podcast: Beyoncé Helps Soothe Our Woes After the Loss of Prince appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

German Nuclear Plant Infected With Computer Virus

Slashdot - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:20pm
archatheist shares a Reuters report: A nuclear power plant in Germany has been found to be infected with computer viruses, but they appear not to have posed a threat to the facility's operations because it is isolated from the Internet, the station's operator said on Tuesday. The Gundremmingen plant, located about 120 km (75 miles) northwest of Munich, is run by the German utility RWE. The viruses, which include "W32.Ramnit" and "Conficker", were discovered at Gundremmingen's B unit in a computer system retrofitted in 2008 with data visualization software associated with equipment for moving nuclear fuel rods, RWE said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Experimental drug cancels effect from key intellectual disability gene in mice

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:16pm
A researcher who studies the most common genetic intellectual disability has used an experimental drug to reverse -- in mice -- damage from the mutation that causes the syndrome. The condition, called fragile X, has devastating effects on intellectual abilities.
Categories: Science

Rare transit of Mercury to take place on 9 May

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:12pm
On 9 May there will be a rare transit of Mercury, when the smallest planet in our Solar System will pass directly between the Earth and the Sun. The last time this happened was in 2006, and the next two occasions will be in 2019 and 2032. During the transit, which takes place in the afternoon and early evening in the UK, Mercury will appear as a dark silhouetted disk against the bright surface of the Sun.
Categories: Science

Teeth vs. tools: Neandertals and Homo sapiens had different dietary strategies

Science Daily - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 7:12pm
Over hundreds of thousands of years, the Neandertal lineage developed successfully in western Eurasia and survived severe fluctuations between colder and warmer climactic cycles of the Ice Age. The Neandertals disappeared at the high point of the last glacial period around 40 thousand years ago, at approximately the same time that modern humans migrated into Europe.
Categories: Science