New Nicotine Vaccine May Succeed Where Others Have Failed

Slashdot - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:54pm
Zothecula writes: If you're a smoker who's trying to quit, you may recall hearing about vaccines designed to cause the body's immune system to treat nicotine like a foreign invader, producing antibodies that trap and remove it before it's able to reach receptors in the brain. It's a fascinating idea, but according to scientists at California's Scripps Research Institute, a recent high-profile attempt had a major flaw. They claim to have overcome that problem (abstract), and are now developing a vaccine of their own that they believe should be more effective.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is this the Earnest, Fast-Paced Future of Science Communication?

Wired News - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:10pm

Jason Silva is bringing his guileless sense of wonder—and taste for scientific rigor—to a new show on National Geographic.

The post Is this the Earnest, Fast-Paced Future of Science Communication? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Data Encryption On the Rise In the Cloud and Mobile

Slashdot - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:09pm
dkatana writes: Overall, demand for encryption is growing. Cloud encryption services provider CipherCloud recently received a $50 million investment by Deutsche Telekom, which the company said positions it for "explosive growth" this year. The services are designed to allow corporations to benefit from the cost savings and elasticity of cloud-based data storage, while ensuring that sensitive information is protected. Now, both Apple and Google are providing full encryption as a default option on their mobile operating systems with an encryption scheme they are not able to break themselves, since they don't hold the necessary keys. Some corporations have gone as far as turning to "zero-knowledge" services, usually located in countries such as Switzerland. These services pledge that they have no means to unlock the information once the customer has entered the unique encryption keys. This zero-knowledge approach is welcomed by users, who are reassured that their information is impossible to retrieve — at least theoretically — without their knowledge and the keys.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Boston's leaky pipes release high levels of heat-trapping methane

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
A research team estimates that each year about 15 billion cubic feet of natural gas, worth some $90 million, escapes the Boston region's delivery system. The findings have implications for other regions, especially cities that, like Boston, are older and rely on natural gas for a significant and increasing portion of their energy needs. While policymakers have focused on the production end of the natural gas supply chain--wells, off-shore drilling platforms, and processing plants--much less attention has been paid to the downstream gas delivery infrastructure.
Categories: Science

Silver nanowires demonstrate unexpected self-healing mechanism: Potential for flexible electronics

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
Researchers found that silver nanowires can withstand strong cyclic loads, which is a key attribute needed for flexible electronics.
Categories: Science

Calculating the future of solar-fuel refineries

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
A team of engineers has developed a new tool to help engineers better gauge the overall yield, efficiency and costs associated with scaling solar-fuel production processes up into large-scale refineries.
Categories: Science

New technique helps probe performance of organic solar cell materials

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
Researchers have developed a technique for determining the role that a material's structure has on the efficiency of organic solar cells, which are candidates for low-cost, next generation solar power. The researchers used the technique to determine that materials with a highly organized structure at the nanoscale are not more efficient at creating free electrons than poorly organized structures -- a finding which will guide future research and development efforts.
Categories: Science

New technique for producing cheaper solar energy suggested by research

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
Pioneering new research could pave the way for solar energy to be converted into household electricity more cheaply than ever before. The global PV market has experienced rapid growth in recent years due to renewable energy targets and CO2 emission controls.
Categories: Science

Unusually elastic protein found by researchers; may have originated in cnidarian elastomer

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
An unusually elastic protein has been discovered in one of the most ancient groups of animals, the over 600-million-year-old cnidarians. The protein is a part of the "weapons system" that the cnidarians use: a kind of harpoon launched from their body at extremely high speed. The discovery of the hitherto unknown protein in the freshwater polyp Hydra suggests that the molecular mechanism of elasticity could have originated in the cnidarians and evolved to discharge a deadly weapon. Due to the similarity of the protein's amino acid sequence to spidroin of spider silk, the researchers dubbed the elastic protein cnidoin.
Categories: Science

Stalking versus cyberstalking: Effects on victims, their responses compared

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 4:07pm
The devastating effects of stalking and cyberstalking – harassing or threatening communication via the Internet – are explored in a new study. Key among the findings is that victims of cyberstalking engage in more 'self-protective' behaviours -- such as changing their normal routines or getting a new email address -- than victims of stalking.
Categories: Science

An Ode to SkyMall as It Files for Bankruptcy

Wired News - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:44pm

SkyMall was a tradition. An absurd, capitalistic embodiment of everything that was shallow and wrong with our lives, and yet it also brought us comfort.

The post An Ode to SkyMall as It Files for Bankruptcy appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Planet Labs Raises $95 Million for Tiny Earth-Observation Satellites

Space.com - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:28pm
Planet Labs has raised $95 million from investors in its latest round of financing. The company designs and builds sharp-eyed Earth-observation satellites that are just 12 inches long by 4 inches wide by 4 inches tall.
Categories: Science

Alamo impact crater: New study could double its size

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:25pm
Carbonate rock deposits found within the mountain ranges of south-central Nevada, USA, record evidence of a catastrophic impact event known as the Alamo impact. This event occurred roughly 382 million years ago when the ancient seafloor was struck and a submarine crater was formed. The crater was filled-in with fragmented rock, and later with more typical ocean deposits, as the energy from the impact lessened and the environment returned to normal.
Categories: Science

Telomere extension turns back aging clock in cultured human cells, study finds

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:25pm
A new procedure can quickly and efficiently increase the length of human telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that are linked to aging and disease, according to scientists.
Categories: Science

Climate affects development of human speech

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:25pm
A correlation between climate and the evolution of language has been uncovered by researchers. To find a relationship between the climate and the evolution of language, one needs to discover an association between the environment and vocal sounds that is consistent throughout the world and present in different languages. And that is precisely what a group of researchers has done.
Categories: Science

Efficient methylating enzyme identified for cancer development

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:25pm
A recent study may help begin to explain how cancer develops though the abnormal turning on and off of genes. Researchers have discovered that the increase of methyl tags in cancer cells is due to highly efficient DNA methyl transferase 1 (DNMT1) enzymes found in these cells.
Categories: Science

Live broadcast from inside the nerve cell

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:22pm
Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's are caused by defect and aggregated proteins accumulating in brain nerve cells that are thereby paralyzed or even killed. In healthy cells this process is prevented by the proteasome, which removes the defective proteins. Recently, for the first time, researchers observed and structurally characterized proteasomes at work inside healthy brain cells.
Categories: Science

How does the universe creates reason, morality?

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:22pm
Recent developments in science are beginning to suggest that the universe naturally produces complexity. The emergence of life in general and perhaps even rational life, with its associated technological culture, may be extremely common, argues a scientist.
Categories: Science

Yes, black holes exist in gravitational theories with unbounded speeds of propagation

Science Daily - Fri, 23/01/2015 - 3:22pm
Gravitational theories with broken Lorentz invariance have attracted a great deal of interest as they provide a test-bed of LI and offer a mechanism to improve their ultraviolet behavior, so that the theories may be renormalizable. However in such theories, particles can travel with arbitrary velocities and black holes may not exist at all. In contrast to this expectation, it has been shown that an absolute horizon exists, which traps signals despite infinitely large velocities.
Categories: Science