Unplanned births out-of-hospital increases risk of infant mortality

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:21pm
Unplanned births out-of-hospital in Norway are associated with higher infant mortality, new research reveals. The findings indicate that young women who have given birth at least once before and those living in remote areas are more likely to have unplanned deliveries, which may increase the risk of death in newborns.
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Is your restaurant server’s smile genuine?

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:20pm
New research really makes one think about the old adage service with a smile as it examines counterproductive work behavior (CWB) by restaurant workers towards customers they serve. CWB refers to “volitional acts by employees that harm or intend to harm organizations and their stakeholders,” according to the study. It is often considered a form of behavioral strain that may be used to cope with or express negative emotions, or it may be used to directly address the source of the problem.
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Crowdsourcing is vulnerable to malicious behavior

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:20pm
New research has found that malicious behavior is the norm in crowdsourcing competitions -- even when it is in everyone’s interest to cooperate.
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How much may German beers be contaminated by microplastics?

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:19pm
If you’re going to Oktoberfest next month to enjoy the delights of German beer, you might get more than you bargained for. New research has revealed the extent to which German beers may be contaminated by foreign substances, most notably, microplastics.
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Ultracold atoms juggle spins with exceptional symmetry

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:19pm
Scientists have succeeded in revealing a highly symmetric exchange of spins between ytterbium atoms in different electronic orbital states.
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Dad is important for his children's development

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:19pm
A sensitive and attentive father has a positive influence on his child’s development, but only if he spends a considerable amount of time with the child during its first year, research shows.
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Switching clicks in polymers: Thermoset materials acquire thermoplastic properties with the aid of triazolinediones

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:19pm
A new type of so-called ‘click’ chemistry has now been introduced. Like with most of click chemistry, it is based on a long-known efficient chemical reaction, which was now also found to be very practical for diverse and demanding applications. In particular, the unique reactivity of the studied 1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (TAD) reagents has been harnessed to reversibly crosslink polyurethanes, or almost any other polymer matrix. At higher temperatures the TAD-induced crosslinks can temporarily open up, giving the thermoset the ability to be reshaped or even extruded like a typical thermoplastic polymer.
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Why HIV patients develop dementia

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:19pm
Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. Researchers have now successfully identified mechanisms how infected cells can activate brain-specific immune cells which subsequently display harmful behaviour and lead to the destruction of neurons.
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Fingerprints for freight items

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
Security is a top priority in air freight logistics but screening procedures can be very time consuming and costly. Researchers intend to boost efficiency with a new approach to digital logistics, without sacrificing the security of air freight operations.
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Touchscreens and solar cells: Simulations for better transparent oxide layers

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
Touchscreens and solar cells rely on special oxide layers. However, errors in the layers’ atomic structure impair not only their transparency, but also their conductivity. Using atomic models, researchers have found ways of identifying and removing these errors.
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Greater safety and security at Europe's train stations

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
When a suspicious individual fleas on a bus or by train, then things usually get tough for the police. This is because the security systems of the various transportation companies and security services are typically incompatible. A new project aims at creating remedies and establishing better collaboration within the same city.
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Central biobank for drug research

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
For the development of new drugs it is crucial to work with stem cells, as these allow scientists to study the effects of new active pharmaceutical ingredients. But it has always been difficult to derive enough stem cells of the right quality and in the right timeframe. A central biobank is about to remedy the situation.
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Ethanol fireplaces: The underestimated risk

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
Ethanol fireplaces are becoming more and more popular. However, they are not only  highly combustible -- in the past, severe accents have occurred repeatedly with decorative fireplaces. The devices also pollute the air in the rooms.
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On the way to a safe and secure Smart Home

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
A growing number of household operations can be managed via the Internet. Today’s “Smart Home” promises efficient building management. But often the systems are not secure and can only be retrofitted at great expense. Scientists are working on a software product that defends against hacker attacks before they reach the building.
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Ship ahoy! 3-D yacht walk-arounds and other innovations

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
There are new developments in the area of seafaring and navigation. Among the novelties is a 3-D configurator that makes it possible for owners to experience cruise ships and yachts in real time, down to the last detail – even before the shipbuilding begins. Researchers will additionally display a new software program for crew management, and a ship and logistics system so that inland water routes become more feasibly useable.
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Cosmic forecast: Dark clouds will give way to sunshine

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:17pm
Lupus 4, a spider-shaped blob of gas and dust, blots out background stars like a dark cloud on a moonless night in this intriguing new image. Although gloomy for now, dense pockets of material within clouds such as Lupus 4 are where new stars form and where they will later burst into radiant life.
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Allergic reaction to antibiotic residues in foods? You may have to watch what your fruits and veggies eat

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:14pm
People with food allergies always have to watch what they eat. Now, they may have to watch what their fruits and vegetables eat, as it seems it’s possible to have an allergic reaction to antibiotic residues in food.
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For kids with both asthma and obesity, which came first?

Science Daily - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 1:14pm
The premise that obesity contributes to childhood asthma -- rather than the other way around -- is the focus of a new study.
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Appeals Court Clears Yelp of Extortion Claims

Slashdot - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 12:57pm
jfruh writes A U.S. appeals court cleared Yelp of charges of extortion related to its interaction with several small businesses who claim Yelp demanded that they pay for advertising or face negative reviews. While Yelp says it never altered a business rating for money, the court's finding was instead based on a strict reading of the U.S. extortion law, classifying Yelp's behavior as, at most, "hard bargaining." Interestingly, the EFF supported Yelp here, arguing that "Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA) protects online service providers from liability and lawsuits over user-generated content, except in very narrow circumstances where the providers created or developed content themselves. In its amicus brief, EFF argued that mere conjecture about contributing content – like there was in this case – is not enough to allow a lawsuit to go forward."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Long Does It Take for a Pencil to Tip Over?

Wired News - Wed, 03/09/2014 - 12:52pm
Henry from Minute Physics has another great video. In this one, he talks about balancing a pencil on it’s point. He makes the claim that if a 10 cm long pencil was pushed at the top a distance of 0.0001 atoms from equilibrium, it would only take 3.1 seconds to fall over. Someone once said: […]






Categories: Science