Study describes molecular cause of common cerebrovascular disease

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:52pm
Cerebral cavernous malformations are clusters of dilated, thin-walled blood vessels in the brain that can cause stroke and seizures, yet exactly how they form is somewhat of a mystery. Now, a research team has discovered the molecular mechanism that underlies this common cerebrovascular disease.
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Eating beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils may help lose weight and keep it off

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:52pm
Eating one serving a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils could contribute to modest weight loss, a new study suggests. Eating about 3/4 cup (130 grams) each day of these foods known as pulses led to a weight loss of 0.34 kilograms (just over half a pound), in a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available clinical trials on the effects of eating pulses.
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Successful dying: Researchers define the elements of a 'good death'

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:52pm
For most people, the culmination of a good life is a 'good death,' though what that means exactly is a matter of considerable consternation. Researchers now report qualitative and quantitative studies defining a 'good death,' ultimately identifying 11 core themes associated with dying well.
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Why neural stem cells may be vulnerable to Zika infection

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:52pm
Zika's hypothesized attraction to human neural stem cells may come from its ability to hijack a protein found on the surface of these cells, using it as an entryway to infection. Researchers show that the AXL surface receptor, normally involved in cell division, is highly abundant on the surface of neural stem cells, but not on neurons in the developing brain.
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Why Hospitals Are the Perfect Targets for Ransomware

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:31pm
As a third hospital gets hit with what is likely ransomware, experts explain why they are such vulnerable marks for ransomware and what they need to do to fight back. The post Why Hospitals Are the Perfect Targets for Ransomware appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

MIT Media Lab Defaults To Free and Open Source Software

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:20pm
Reader alphadogg cites a report on NetworkWorld: MIT Media Lab, that 30-year-old tech innovation factory that has had a huge hand in churning out everything from LEGO MindStorms to the Guitar Hero video game, has now wowed the open source and free software crowd. Lab Director Joi Ito over the weekend revealed that MIT Media Lab has changed its approach to software releases to FLOSS (free/libre/open-source software) by default.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Sea-level rise could nearly double over earlier estimates in next 100 years

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:08pm
A new study from climate scientists suggests that the most recent estimates by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for future sea-level rise over the next 100 years could be too low by almost a factor of two.
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New Alien Planet Boasts Rare Triple Suns

Space.com - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:54pm
Triple sunsets occur on one newly spotted exoplanet, though two of the suns only set every 2,000 years or so.
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Birth control pills may increase risk of seizures

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:45pm
Could certain types of hormonal contraceptives cause an increase in seizures in women with epilepsy? A recent study suggests that ethinyl estradiol, the primary component of oral contraceptives, could be detrimental to the epileptic brain.
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Girls benefit from extra lessons, but what about boys?

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:41pm
Plans to extend the school day to increase achievement might not have the desired effect on all children, suggests the results of a study. The new article provides some evidence as to how differing approaches to risk, motivation, commitment and discipline between girls and boys can lead to different outcomes when both are given the same extra tuition.
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Amazon.com Now Bans USB Type-C Cables That Aren't Up To Spec

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:40pm
Google engineer, Benson Leung has been on a mission to get rid of USB Type-C cables that aren't compliant with Type-C 1.1 spec. He reminds us that these cables could potentially lead to damage. Over the past few months, he has reviewed over a dozen of USB Type-C cables on Amazon.com and concluded that the vast majority of them aren't compliant with the aforementioned standard. Now he reports: Amazon.com has just made a change to their "Prohibited listings" for Electronics. They've added the following line: Any USB-C (or USB Type-C) cable or adapter product that is not compliant with standard specifications issued by "USB Implementers Forum Inc." What does this mean? It means that cable manufacturers who sell poorly made or intentionally deceptive USB Type-C cables and adapters are banned from Amazon, officially. Really great news, but we all have to continue to be vigilant and call out any bad products we find on Amazon and other stores (both online and brick and mortar) as we find them.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

For the first time scientists can observe the nano structure of food in 3-D

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:35pm
Scientists have, for the first time, created a 3-D image of food on the nanometer scale. The method the scientists used is called Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography. It has promising prospects as a more detailed knowledge of the structure of complex food systems could potentially save the food industry large sums of money and reduce food waste that occurs because of faulty production.
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Longer maternity leave linked to better infant health

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:35pm
For each additional month of paid maternity leave offered in low- and middle-income countries, infant mortality is reduced by 13 percent, according to a new study.
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Race biases teachers' expectations for students

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:35pm
When evaluating the same black student, white teachers expect significantly less academic success than black teachers, a new study concludes. This is especially true for black boys.
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Transparent wood could one day help brighten homes and buildings

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:34pm
When it comes to indoor lighting, nothing beats the sun's rays streaming in through windows. Soon, that natural light could be shining through walls, too. Scientists have developed transparent wood that could be used in building materials and could help home and building owners save money on their artificial lighting costs. Their material also could find application in solar cell windows.
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New details emerge on deep sea, marine-submerged bodies

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:34pm
Findings of a new study could benefit investigators when bodies are recovered in deep water. It's the first to document carcass (pig) taphonomy (the study of what happens to organisms after death) in the open, well-oxygenated waters of the Strait of Georgia. A criminologist says the research demonstrates 'a dramatically different scavenging progression' than that seen earlier in nearby waters.
Categories: Science

Basketball games mimic nature

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:34pm
Behind the apparent randomness of a basketball game, a process of self-organization is actually taking place amid the teams. The interactions between team mates and opponents are constantly influencing each other while the game itself allows for creative behaviors to emerge. This phenomenon, detected by researchers after analyzing over 6,000 NBA games, resembles the way in which living things must continually evolve in order to survive in nature.
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Personality influences how one reacts to email errors

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:29pm
When reading emails, do you become the 'grammar police?' You no who you aer: the person who thinks its her job too catch every typo or gramatical errur?
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Late-life economic inequality has risen sharply in recent decades, study finds

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:29pm
Economic conditions have caused older Americans to see significant increases in financial inequality over the past three decades, according to the results of a new study.
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Parents' binge eating, restrictive feeding practices may be reactions to kids' emotions

Science Daily - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 4:29pm
A new study of more than 440 parents and their preschoolers offers insight into why some parents who binge eat also may try to restrict their children's food intake, placing their children at higher risk for unhealthy eating habits and weight problems.
Categories: Science