Paleontologists discover new species of titanosaurian dinosaur in Tanzania

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:35pm
Paleontologists have identified a new species of titanosaurian, a member of the large-bodied sauropods that thrived during the final period of the dinosaur age, in Tanzania. Although many fossils of titanosaurians have been discovered around the globe, especially in South America, few have been recovered from the continent of Africa.
Categories: Science

Book Review: Architecting the Cloud

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:31pm
benrothke writes Most books about cloud computing are either extremely high-level quasi-marketing tomes about the myriad benefits of the cloud without any understanding of how to practically implement the technology under discussion. The other type of cloud books are highly technical references guides, that provide technical details, but for a limited audience. In Architecting the Cloud: Design Decisions for Cloud Computing Service Models, author Michael Kavis has written perhaps the most honest book about the cloud. Make no doubt about it; Kavis is a huge fan of the cloud. But more importantly, he knows what the limits of the cloud are, and how cloud computing is not a panacea. That type of candor makes this book an invaluable guide to anyone looking to understand how to effective deploy cloud technologies. Keep reading below for the rest of Ben's review.

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Categories: Science

Ex-Googler Shares His Big-Data Secrets With the Masses

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:23pm
Google’s search engine makes it wonderfully easy to locate stuff on the web, whether it’s in a news article, a corporate website, or a video on YouTube. But that only begins to describe Google’s ability to find information. Inside the company, engineers use several uniquely powerful tools for searching and analyzing its own massive trove […]






Categories: Science

Beastly 24TB TiVo Mega Has 8 Times the Capacity of Any Other TiVo

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:23pm
Want to hoard 4,000 hours of Hoarders episodes? The new TiVo Mega is for you.






Categories: Science

Trailer Roundup: Julianne Moore and Steve Carell Have Attitude Problems

Wired News - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 6:07pm
September has brought a lot with it a lot of interesting trailer subjects: Kirk Cameron, S.H.I.E.L.D. agents, Channing Tatum, Dan Harmon, a scary feral child, an even scarier clown, and a grip of fantastical monsters. We've got them all right here.






Categories: Science

Brain damage caused by severe sleep apnea is reversible

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:54pm
A neuroimaging study is the first to show that white matter damage caused by severe obstructive sleep apnea can be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure therapy. The results underscore the importance of the 'Stop the Snore' campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project, a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Sleep Research Society and other partners.
Categories: Science

How conversion of forests to cropland affects climate

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:54pm
The conversion of forests into cropland worldwide has triggered an atmospheric change to emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds that -- while seldom considered in climate models -- has had a net cooling effect on global temperatures, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Too many kids with asthma, food allergies lack school emergency plans

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:54pm
Only one in four students with asthma and half of children with food allergies have emergency health management plans in school, leaving schools inadequately prepared to manage daily needs and handle medical emergencies related to often life-threatening medical conditions, reports a new study.
Categories: Science

Declines in central line infections, ventilator pneumonias, American study shows

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:54pm
Hospitals across the country have seen sharp declines in rates of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) among critically ill neonates and children, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Bone cancer surgical team sees success in new application of surgical aid

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:54pm
An ortho-oncology team successfully adapted a shoulder surgical aid (the Spider Limb Positioner) to conduct a left hip disarticulation on a melanoma patient as described in a new case report.
Categories: Science

Faces are more likely to seem alive when we want to feel connected

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:54pm
Feeling socially disconnected may lead us to lower our threshold for determining that another being is animate or alive, according to new research. "This increased sensitivity to animacy suggests that people are casting a wide net when looking for people they can possibly relate to -- which may ultimately help them maximize opportunities to renew social connections," explains psychological scientist and lead researcher of the study.
Categories: Science

New genetic target for a different kind of cancer drug found

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:53pm
The protein RBM4, a molecule crucial to the process of gene splicing, is drastically decreased in multiple forms of human cancer, including lung and breast cancers, researchers have discovered. The finding offers a new route toward therapies that can thwart the altered genetic pathways that allow cancer cells to proliferate and spread.
Categories: Science

Popular cancer drug target implicated in cardiovascular defects

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:53pm
Researchers have discovered an unlikely relationship between CXCR7 -- a protein implicated in tumor growth and metastasis -- and adrenomedullin -- a hormone involved in cardiovascular health. Deleting CXCR7 allows adrenomedullin to run rampant, triggering the development of an enlarged heart and the overgrowth of the lymphatic vessels that traffic immune cells and fluids throughout the body.
Categories: Science

Coral trout pick their collaborators carefully

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:53pm
Coral trout not only work with moray eels to improve their chances of a meal, but they can also be choosy when it comes to picking the best moray partner. The findings show that such sophisticated collaborative abilities are not limited to apes and humans. The fish's behavior is remarkable in other ways too, the researchers say.
Categories: Science

Bird-pollinated flower with a rather ingenious twist

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:53pm
When researchers studying several bird-pollinated species of Impatiens flowers in the mountains of western Cameroon noticed one with an odd, upwardly curving nectar spur, they couldn't imagine how any sunbird could ever sip from it. After recording visitors to the flower continuously for a period of days, they had their answer.
Categories: Science

No need to leave home: New system of tele-medical assistance for people with mobility problems

Science Daily - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:52pm
Medical researchers have designed a remote medical care system that supports the rehabilitation of people with spasticity, an alteration of the nervous system related to increased tone muscle making motor skills difficult or impossible for those affected.
Categories: Science

Private Police Intelligence Network Shares Data and Targets Cash

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:48pm
Advocatus Diaboli writes Operating in collaboration with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other federal entities, Black Asphalt members exchanged tens of thousands of reports about American motorists, many of whom had not been charged with any crimes, according to a company official and hundreds of internal documents obtained by The Post. For years, it received no oversight by government, even though its reports contained law enforcement sensitive information about traffic stops and seizures, along with hunches and personal data about drivers, including Social Security numbers and identifying tattoos. Black Asphalt also has served as a social hub for a new brand of highway interdictors, a group that one Desert Snow official has called 'a brotherhood.' Among other things, the site hosts an annual competition to honor police who seize the most contraband and cash on the highways. As part of the contest, Desert Snow encouraged state and local patrol officers to post seizure data along with photos of themselves with stacks of currency and drugs. Some of the photos appear in a rousing hard-rock video that the Guthrie, Okla.-based Desert Snow uses to promote its training courses.

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Categories: Science

Private Police Intelligence Network Shares Data and Targets Cash

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:48pm
Advocatus Diaboli writes Operating in collaboration with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other federal entities, Black Asphalt members exchanged tens of thousands of reports about American motorists, many of whom had not been charged with any crimes, according to a company official and hundreds of internal documents obtained by The Post. For years, it received no oversight by government, even though its reports contained law enforcement sensitive information about traffic stops and seizures, along with hunches and personal data about drivers, including Social Security numbers and identifying tattoos. Black Asphalt also has served as a social hub for a new brand of highway interdictors, a group that one Desert Snow official has called 'a brotherhood.' Among other things, the site hosts an annual competition to honor police who seize the most contraband and cash on the highways. As part of the contest, Desert Snow encouraged state and local patrol officers to post seizure data along with photos of themselves with stacks of currency and drugs. Some of the photos appear in a rousing hard-rock video that the Guthrie, Okla.-based Desert Snow uses to promote its training courses.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Private Police Intelligence Network Shares Data and Targets Cash

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:48pm
Advocatus Diaboli writes Operating in collaboration with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other federal entities, Black Asphalt members exchanged tens of thousands of reports about American motorists, many of whom had not been charged with any crimes, according to a company official and hundreds of internal documents obtained by The Post. For years, it received no oversight by government, even though its reports contained law enforcement sensitive information about traffic stops and seizures, along with hunches and personal data about drivers, including Social Security numbers and identifying tattoos. Black Asphalt also has served as a social hub for a new brand of highway interdictors, a group that one Desert Snow official has called 'a brotherhood.' Among other things, the site hosts an annual competition to honor police who seize the most contraband and cash on the highways. As part of the contest, Desert Snow encouraged state and local patrol officers to post seizure data along with photos of themselves with stacks of currency and drugs. Some of the photos appear in a rousing hard-rock video that the Guthrie, Okla.-based Desert Snow uses to promote its training courses.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Private Police Intelligence Network Shares Data and Targets Cash

Slashdot - Mon, 08/09/2014 - 5:48pm
Advocatus Diaboli writes Operating in collaboration with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other federal entities, Black Asphalt members exchanged tens of thousands of reports about American motorists, many of whom had not been charged with any crimes, according to a company official and hundreds of internal documents obtained by The Post. For years, it received no oversight by government, even though its reports contained law enforcement sensitive information about traffic stops and seizures, along with hunches and personal data about drivers, including Social Security numbers and identifying tattoos. Black Asphalt also has served as a social hub for a new brand of highway interdictors, a group that one Desert Snow official has called 'a brotherhood.' Among other things, the site hosts an annual competition to honor police who seize the most contraband and cash on the highways. As part of the contest, Desert Snow encouraged state and local patrol officers to post seizure data along with photos of themselves with stacks of currency and drugs. Some of the photos appear in a rousing hard-rock video that the Guthrie, Okla.-based Desert Snow uses to promote its training courses.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science