Preventing transformer explosions

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 2:20pm
Technology used in the crumple zones of cars can avert serious explosions in transformers, believe researchers. Large oil filled transformers are found in all power and switching stations, as well as in many large buildings. If an internal short-circuit occurs, an electrical arc, gas formation and pressure increase will be the result.
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Ethnic discrimination and health: Direct link found

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:49pm
Women who experience racial discrimination while pregnant suffer significant health impacts that are passed on to their infants, new research has found.
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Algae use same molecular machinery as land plants to respond to a plant hormone

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:49pm
Land-based plants -- including the fruits and vegetables in your kitchen -- produce and respond to hormones in order to survive. Scientists once believed that hormone signaling machinery only existed in these relatively complex plants. But new research shows that some types of freshwater algae can also detect ethylene gas -- the same stress hormone found in land plants -- and might use these signals to adapt to changing environmental conditions.
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Ancient maize followed two paths into Southwest

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:49pm
DNA from archaeological samples and traditional maize varieties indicate that ancient maize moved from Mexico into the Southwest US by a highland route and later a coastal lowland route, settling a long debate over its path.
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Pathogen strains competing for same host plant change disease dynamics

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:49pm
The epidemics caused by co-infection of several pathogen strains in a plant population is more severe than epidemics caused by single strains, researchers have discovered.
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Defying the Achilles heel of 'wonder material' graphene: Resilience to extreme conditions

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:48pm
A resilience to extreme conditions by the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material for conducting electricity could help revolutionize the electronic industry, according to a new study. Researchers have discovered that a material adapted from the 'wonder material' graphene can withstand prolonged exposure to both high temperature and humidity.
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Targeting supernovae in our neighborhood of the universe

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:48pm
While many astronomical collaborations use powerful telescopes to target individual objects in the distant universe, a new project is doing something radically different: using small telescopes to study a growing portion of the nearby universe all at once. Since it officially launched in May 2014, the project has detected 89 bright supernovae and counting -- more than all other professional astronomical surveys combined.
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Nutrition intervention leads to dietary behavior changes in Latina breast cancer survivors

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:48pm
An intervention designed to provide Latina breast cancer survivors with the knowledge and skills needed to change and sustain dietary behaviors helps survivors adhere to recommended guidelines to eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables. Using a culturally based hands-on educational approach, the program is geared toward Latina breast cancer survivors whose are at higher risk of high obesity rates, low physical activity rates, and poorer access to quality healthcare.
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Study suggests worsening trends in headache management

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:48pm
Each year more than 12 million Americans visit their doctors complaining of headaches, which result in lost productivity and costs of upward of $31 billion annually. A new study suggests some of that cost could be offset by physicians ordering fewer tests and an increased focus on counseling about lifestyle changes.
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Algae blooms create their own favorable conditions

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:48pm
Fertilizers are known to promote the growth of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater and oceans worldwide, but a new multi-institution study shows the aquatic microbes themselves can drive nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in a combined one-two punch in lakes.
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Text Editor Created In Minecraft

Slashdot - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:47pm
jones_supa writes: The redstone mechanics in Minecraft can be pushed surprisingly far to create rather advanced digital circuits. Thanks to a user nicknamed Koala_Steamed, there now exists a text editor inside the game (YouTube demonstration). It comes with a 5 x 10 character matrix in which each character uses a starburst (16-segment) display. There are 7.357 x 10^92 different combinations the screen can show, all of which can be controlled from a single line. The scale of the workings used to make this piece of logic, using only redstone, is dauntingly huge.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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Sophisticated system prevents self-fertilization in petunias

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:44pm
Plants use genetic mechanisms to prevent inbreeding by recognizing self and non-self pollen. Researchers have now found evidence that a group of 18 male proteins recognize 40 female proteins between them -- in contrast to one-to-one relationships studied to date. The self-recognition mechanism in petunia shows similarities to the immune defense in vertebrates. 
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Marine life in deep-sea canyon more varied than expected

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:44pm
Research into the sediment-dwelling marine life in deep-sea canyons may help to predict how marine ecosystems will respond to human disturbance of the ocean, such as deep-sea mining and trawling. By studying the density and composition of groups of small marine animals, such as; small crustaceans, bivalves and worms, within this highly disturbed environment, researchers have gained a better idea of how marine ecosystems may respond to disturbances created by human intervention.
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Researchers succeed in measuring the temperature at the heart of stars

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:44pm
Researchers have succeeded, for the first time, in measuring the temperature at the heart of certain stars, as well as dating them. In 1926, astrophysicist Sir Arthur Eddington wrote in his work The internal constitution of the stars: “At first sight it would seem that the deep interior of the Sun and stars is less accessible to scientific investigation than any other region of the universe. What appliance can pierce through the outer layers of a star and test the conditions within?” Nearly 90 years later, this question has now gained an answer, thanks to the work of a team of six astrophysicists who have managed to measure the temperature at the heart of specific stars and to estimate their age.
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Magic numbers of quantum matter revealed by cold atoms

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:44pm
Topology, a branch of mathematics classifying geometric objects, has been exploited by physicists to predict and describe unusual quantum phases: the topological states of matter. These intriguing phases, generally accessible at very low temperature, exhibit unique conductivity properties which are particularly robust against external perturbations, suggesting promising technological applications. The great stability of topological states relies on a set of magic integers, the so-called Chern numbers, which remain immune to defects and deformations. For the first time scientists have succeeded in measuring the topological Chern number in a non-electronic system with high precision.
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Suitcase laboratory developed for rapid detection of the Ebola virus

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:44pm
No electricity, no reliable cold chain, no diagnostic equipment available -- scientists in field laboratories who diagnose and deal with Ebola infections often work under challenging conditions. Researchers have now developed Diagnostics-in-a-Suitcase, which contains all reagents and equipment to detect the Ebola virus within 15 minutes at point-of-need. They report that the new method is 6 to 10 times faster than the current techniques with equal sensitivity.
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How plankton survives typhoons

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:44pm
It is no secret that typhoons are capable of churning the seas and wreaking destruction. But it is tough to examine what exactly happens during a typhoon, particularly in the ocean. An underwater observatory has now been created to monitor what happens in the ocean over long periods of time, specifically observing what happens to plankton during a typhoon.
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Researchers work to counter a new class of coffee shop hackers

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:37pm
If you’re sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn’t connect to the shop’s wifi, think again. Hackers may be able to see what you’re doing just by analyzing the low-power electronic signals your laptop emits even when it’s not connected.
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New recommendation for cervical cancer screening, using HPV test alone

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:37pm
HPV testing alone is an effective alternative to current cervical cancer screening methods that use a Pap smear, or Pap smear-plus HPV test, according to new new interim guidance written by a group of cervical cancer screening experts.
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New study findings help physicians and patients determine prostate cancer risk

Science Daily - Thu, 08/01/2015 - 1:37pm
Looking at whether a man’s uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer. A more complete family history would give physicians a new tool to decide whether or not a PSA test was appropriate, experts say.
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