Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Could Get $23M Exit Payment, Ex-IAC Executive Will Become CEO

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 5:20pm
Yahoo has named a replacement for CEO Marissa Mayer once the merger with Verizon becomes official. The next leader of the Sunnyvale-based tech giant will be Thomas J. McInerney, a former chief financial officer of IAC. From a report: Yahoo said Monday that after it completes the sale of its core search business to Verizon and Marissa Mayer and co-founder David Filo step down as board members of Altaba (the new name for the remaining holdings), Mayer could get a $23 million "golden parachute" payment, and Thomas McInerney will run the remaining part of the business as CEO. Mayer's golden parachute, a large payment for top executives if they lose their position as a result of a deal, would include $19.97 million in equity and more than $3 million in cash, according to a regulatory filing. It would kick in if there is a change in control, as will be the case in the deal, and she is terminated "without cause" or "leaves for good reason" within a year.

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Categories: Science

'We Didn't Lose Control Of Our Personal Data -- It Was Stolen From Us By People Farmers'

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 4:40pm
Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the worldwide web, wrote an open-letter over the weekend to mark the 28th anniversary of his invention. In his letter, he shared three worrisome things that happened over the last twelve months. In his letter, Berners-Lee pointed out three things that occurred over the past 12 months that has him worried: we do not assume control of our personal data anymore; how easy it is for misinformation to spread on the web; and lack of transparency on political advertising on the web. Cyborg rights activist Aral Balkan wrote a piece yesterday arguing that perhaps Berners-Lee is being modest about the things that concern him. From the article: It's important to note that these (those three worrisome things) are not trends and that they've been in the making for far longer than twelve months. They are symptoms that are inextricably linked to the core nature of the Web as it exists within the greater socio-technological system we live under today that we call Surveillance Capitalism. Tim says we've "lost control of our personal data." This is not entirely accurate. We didn't lose control; it was stolen from us by Silicon Valley. It is stolen from you every day by people farmers; the Googles and the Facebooks of the world. It is stolen from you by an industry of data brokers, the publishing behavioural advertising industry ("adtech"), and a long tail of Silicon Valley startups hungry for an exit to one of the more established players or looking to compete with them to own a share of you. The elephants in the room -- Google and Facebook -- stand silently in the wings, unmentioned except as allies later on in the letter where they're portrayed trying to "combat the problem" of misinformation. Is it perhaps foolish to expect anything more when Google is one of the biggest contributors to recent web standards at the W3C and when Google and Facebook both help fund the Web Foundation? Let me state it plainly: Google and Facebook are not allies in our fight for an equitable future -- they are the enemy. These platform monopolies are factory farms for human beings; farming us for every gram of insight they can extract. If, as Tim states, the core challenge for the Web today is combating people farming, and if we know who the people farmers are, shouldn't we be strongly regulating them to curb their abuses?

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Categories: Science

'Alien: Covenant' Android is 'For Sale' in New Movie Promo Video

Space.com - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 4:32pm
The android ’Walter,’ played by Michael Fassbender, is built and put on the market in this new promotional video for ‘Alien: Covenant.’
Categories: Science

Enormous Radio Telescope in China Subject of 'Impossible Engineering' | Video

Space.com - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 4:03pm
The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is the largest single dish radio telescope int the world. The Science Channel explores the telscope in a new episode of 'Impossible Engineering." Premieres on March 30, 2017.
Categories: Science

Plants Might Have Saved Earth From Permanent Ice Age

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 4:00pm
It's plants, its rocks, its microscopic organisms living deep in the sea—it's why most humans get to enjoy glacier-free lifestyles. The post Plants Might Have Saved Earth From Permanent Ice Age appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

An Ambitious New Program Wants To Support the Democrats’ Surge

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 4:00pm
Think of the Arena Fellows program as a sort of accelerator for the left. The post An Ambitious New Program Wants To Support the Democrats' Surge appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Why Is the Vatican at a Tech Conference?

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 4:00pm
An anonymous reader shares a BBC report: As Bishop Paul Tighe sat down for our interview, he joked that not only is he probably the only priest at South by Southwest, but also the only person with grey hair. His presence here marks the first time the Vatican has attended the South by Southwest Interactive conference, and their panel - titled Compassionate Disruption - is one of this year's most talked about events. "In a world where increasingly [we're] not invited to part of conversations, I think if people are interested in having us, we're delighted to be here. "I want to learn and get a feeling for what are the things that are driving a generation of people who are in many ways shaping the world as we know it. He glanced around the room. "Really deep down, I see a lot of people looking for some sort of connectivity." That's certainly true -- though I get the sense for delegates here that means good wi-fi, rather than a strong sense of faith. So Bishop Tighe's mission is to get this industry to find real value in both.

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Categories: Science

ShatChat: How Facebook's Bizarre Obsession With Snapchat Is Ruining User Experience On Messenger

Slashdot - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:20pm
Columnist MG Siegler writes: "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should." I often find myself pointing to this quote from Dr. Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park. It's just so succinctly perfect for so many things. This week's example: Facebook Messenger's new 'Day' functionality. [...] They've [Facebook] decided to weaponize all of these networks [Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp, Instagram], user experience be damned. On Messenger, people have their list of contacts and/or groups that they chat with. The most recent conversations -- likely the most important -- are at the top of that feed. But if you're anything like me, you're often scrolling down a bit because you have many regular conversations. And so this screen real estate is insanely valuable. And Messenger puked up this new 'Day' nonsense all over it. Yes, people share photos on Messenger. Undoubtedly a ton. That's maybe how you try to justify this move to yourself if you're Facebook. But Messenger is fundamentally about chatting; it's a utility. Photos may be additive, but they're not core. You could try to pivot your service into making them core, but that doesn't mean you should.As of last year, Facebook Messenger has over a billion active users.

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Categories: Science

World’s first 'lip password' utilizes a user's lip motions to create password

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:07pm
Scientists have invented a new technology entitled “lip motion password” (lip password) which utilizes a person’s lip motions to create a password.
Categories: Science

Uncompromising on organic solar cells

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:06pm
Researchers developed a semi-transparent organic solar cell that achieves better efficiency and transparency than existing ones.
Categories: Science

Urine-based biomarkers for early cancer screening test

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:06pm
A new study has introduced a new technique that validates urine-based biomarkers for early detection of cancer.
Categories: Science

Looking for signs of the first stars

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:06pm
It may soon be possible to detect the universe's first stars by looking for the blue colour they emit on explosion.
Categories: Science

Neighboring termite colonies re-invade, expose themselves to deadly bait

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:03pm
Even after an insecticide bait weakens Formosan subterranean termites, a neighboring colony will invade the same area and meet the identical lethal fate, new research shows. The research finding is key for a pest that accounts for much of the $32 billion annual cost caused by subterranean termites worldwide.
Categories: Science

Nudging consumers into making better purchases online

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:03pm
Small changes in the website design of online shops could significantly reduce the risk of incompatible purchases by customers, concludes a recent study. Warning messages appealing to the customer's emotions and information provided at check-out were the most effective methods of avoiding disappointment.
Categories: Science

Kong: Skull Island Wins Where Almost Every Other Reboot Fails Miserably

Wired News - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 3:00pm
Turns out that if you're not chained to the past, you might just be able to make something interesting. The post Kong: Skull Island Wins Where Almost Every Other Reboot Fails Miserably appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Simultaneous detection of multiple spin states in a single quantum dot

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:59pm
Researchers have achieved single-shot readout of three two-electron spin states of a single quantum dot. This is the first example of simultaneous detection of multiple spin states in a single quantum dot. The team measured the change in current of a quantum point contact charge sensor near a quantum dot, which depended on both spin state and spin-orbital interactions. Their findings represent a step forward on the path to realizing quantum computing.
Categories: Science

How to brew high-value fatty acids with brewer's yeast

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:59pm
Researchers have succeeded in producing fatty acids in large quantities from sugar or waste containing sugar with the help of yeasts.
Categories: Science

Yes, she's smiling: Mona Lisa's facial expression

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:59pm
Scientists have found out that test subjects almost always perceive the facial expression on Leonardo da Vinci's famous painting as happy, thus calling into question a long-held assumption in art history.
Categories: Science

One synthetic molecule, two doorways into cell

Science Daily - Mon, 13/03/2017 - 2:58pm
A synthetic ion channel provides different-shaped paths into a cell. This could offer insight into how these unique channels function in living organisms.
Categories: Science