Punching cancer with RNA knuckles

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:10pm
Researchers achieved an unexpected eye-popping reduction of ovarian cancer during a successful test of targeted nanohydrogel delivery in vivo in mice. Adding cisplatin eliminated or starkly diminished tumors, report investigators.
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New understanding of rip currents could help to save lives

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:10pm
A new link between breaking waves and the hazard posed by rip currents has been uncovered by a new study. The research could result in more lives being saved, say authors.
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Common food additive promotes colon cancer in mice

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:06pm
Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter intestinal bacteria in a manner that promotes intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer, according to a new study.
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Increasing cost of natural hazards as climate changes

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:06pm
A new comprehensive study of Australian natural hazards paints a picture of increasing heatwaves and extreme bushfires as this century progresses, but with much more uncertainty about the future of storms and rainfall.
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Drug shows promise for preventing pre-term birth

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:06pm
A drug that is showing some early promise in efforts to prevent pre-term birth has been successfully tested by a team of investigators.
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Insect-like microrobots move just like real insects

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:03pm
Researchers have not only built microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices the size of insects, but have also created them to move just like real insects.
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Andeans with altitude sickness produce massive amounts of red blood cells

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:03pm
To better understand why some people adapt well to life at high altitude while others don’t, researchers studied red blood cells derived from representatives of both groups living in the Andes Mountains. The study reveals that high-altitude, low-oxygen dwellers prone to chronic mountain sickness produce massive amounts of red blood cells thanks to overproduction of the enzyme SENP1.
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Study identifies new biomarkers for Huntington's disease

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:03pm
Researchers have identified several new biological markers to measure the progression of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder Huntington’s disease. Their findings could benefit clinical trials that test new treatments for the disease.
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Low vitamin D levels linked to increased risk of bladder cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:03pm
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of developing bladder cancer, according to a systematic review of seven studies. Though further clinical studies are needed to confirm the findings, the study adds to a growing body of evidence on the importance of maintaining adequate vitamin D levels.
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Ophthalmologist emphasizes care in dim-light driving as time change brings darkness to evening commute

Science Daily - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:03pm
As the end of daylight saving time draws near, ophthalmologists want to focus on a real issue—dim-light driving situations that can endanger drivers and pedestrians.
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China Adopts Controversial Cybersecurity Law; Experts Say It Will Hurt Businesses

Slashdot - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 4:00pm
The Chinese government today passed new cybersecurity regulations that will put stringent new requirements on technology companies operating in the country. The proposed Cybersecurity Law comes with data localization, surveillance, and real-name requirements. From a TechCrunch report:The regulation would require instant messaging services and other internet companies to require users to register with their real names and personal information, and to censor content that is "prohibited." Real name policies restrict anonymity and can encourage self-censorship for online communication. The law also includes a requirement for data localization, which would force "critical information infrastructure operators" to store data within China's borders. According to Human Rights Watch, an advocacy organization that is opposing the legislation, the law does not include a clear definition of infrastructure operators, and many businesses could be lumped into the definition. "The law will effectively put China's Internet companies, and hundreds of millions of Internet users, under greater state control," said Sophie Richardson, Human Rights Watch's China director. HRW maintains that, while many of the regulations are not new, most were informal or only laid out in low-level law -- and implementing the measures on a broader level will lead to stricter enforcement.

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Global Warming - Natural vs. Manmade Causes Compared By NASA | Video

Space.com - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 3:49pm
When you compare possible natural causes (orbital, solar and volcanic activity) over the course of the last 100+ years, to manmade causes (aerosols, deforestation and greenhouses gases), the winner is clear.
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Astronaut Don Pettit's 'Spaceborne' Offers Other-Worldly Look at Earth

Space.com - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 3:26pm
Astronaut Don Pettit created a mesmerizing portfolio of photographs during his 370 days on the International Space Station. Now he's sharing his star trail images and other bits of visual space intrigue in a coffee table book, "Spaceborne" (PSG, 2016).
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Wikipedia's Not as Biased as You Might Think, Say Harvard Researchers

Slashdot - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 3:20pm
An anonymous reader shares a report on Quartz:In a sea of biased content, Wikipedia is one of the few online outlets that strives for neutrality. After 15 years in operation, it's starting to see results. Researchers at Harvard Business School evaluated almost 4,000 articles in Wikipedia's online database against the same entries in Encyclopedia Brittanica to compare their biases. They focused on English-language articles about US politics, especially controversial topics, that appeared in both outlets in 2012. In its initial years, Wikipedia's crowdsourced articles were tinted very blue, slanting more toward Democratic views and displayed greater bias than Britannica. However, with more revisions and more moderators volunteering on the platform, the bias wore away. In fact, the upper quartile of the Wikipedia's sample had enough revisions that there was no longer any difference in slant and bias from its offline counterpart. More surprisingly, the authors found that the 2.8 million registered volunteer editors who were reviewing the articles also became less biased over time.

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Watch What Happens When Cars from Mexico and the US Collide Head-On

Wired News - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 3:00pm
This crash test video shows two cars in a collision. One of these cars meets USA safety standards and the other for Mexico. The post Watch What Happens When Cars from Mexico and the US Collide Head-On appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Nvidia Adds Telemetry To Latest Drivers

Slashdot - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 2:40pm
An anonymous reader shares a report on Ghack: Telemetry -- read tracking -- seems to be everywhere these days. Microsoft pushes it on Windows, and web and software companies use it as well. While there is certainly some benefit to it on a larger scale, as it may enable these companies to identify broader issues, it is undesirable from a user perspective. Part of that comes from the fact that companies fail to disclose what is being collected and how data is stored and handled once it leaves the user system. In the case of Nvidia, Telemetry gets installed alongside the driver package. While you may customize the installation of the Nvidia driver so that only the bits that you require are installed, there is no option to disable the Telemetry components from being installed. These do get installed even if you only install the graphics driver itself in the custom installation dialog.Further reading on MajorGeeks.

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Saturn's Moon Titan - Moving Methane Clouds Captured By Spacecraft | Video

Space.com - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 2:35pm
A time-lapse of 11 hours of observations by NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows the clouds moving across the Titan's northern region. The imagery was taken on Oct. 29 and 30, 2016.
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LeEco's CEO Jia Yueting Says Company Overstretched, Now Running Out of Cash

Slashdot - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 2:00pm
LeEco is a giant conglomerate in China. The company offers a range of services -- from online streaming service, to smartphones, to TV, to electric cars. On top of that, the company has been aggressively expanding into different markets with India and the United States being the two notable ones. How does it make so much cash? You wonder. It doesn't actually, according to the CEO, who has informed the employees that the company is quickly running out of cash. An anonymous reader shares a Bloomberg report: The billionaire chairman of China's LeEco has admitted his technology empire is running out of cash to sustain a headlong rush into businesses from electric cars to smartphones. In a lengthy letter to employees, company co-founder Jia Yueting apologized to shareholders and pledged to slash his income to 1 yuan (15 cents), slow LeEco's madcap pace of expansion, and move the company toward a more moderate phase of growth. LeEco is the umbrella holding company for a sprawling family of businesses that includes sports media, automobiles, smartphones and TVs. The company known for its LeTV streaming service has aggressively pursued funding and placed bets on new ventures, from an electric car plant in Nevada to a $2 billion acquisition of California TV maker Vizio Inc. "No company has had such an experience, a simultaneous time in ice and fire," Jia wrote in a letter, obtained by Bloomberg News, describing LeEco's rise and subsequent issues. "We blindly sped ahead, and our cash demand ballooned. We got over-extended in our global strategy. At the same time, our capital and resources were in fact limited."

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Silly Mudskipper. Fish Aren’t Supposed to Be Walking on Land

Wired News - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 1:00pm
One particular fish hasn't seemed to make up its mind about living in the water or on land: the mudskipper. The post Silly Mudskipper. Fish Aren't Supposed to Be Walking on Land appeared first on WIRED.
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Security Firm Shows How To Hack a US Voting Machine

Slashdot - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 12:34pm
An anonymous reader writes: "Three days before the US Presidential Election takes place, California-based security firm Cylance showed the world how easy it is to hack one of the many [electronic] voting machine models that will be deployed at voting stations across the US on Election Day." Bleeping Computer reports that "The machine that Cylance researchers chose for their test was the Sequoia AVC Edge Mk1, one of the most popular models... The technique researchers created modifies the Public Counter, but also the Protective Counter, which is a backup mechanism that acts as a redundant verification system to ensure the first vote results are valid." Physical access is needed to hack the machine, but the hack takes a short time to perform. FBI Director James Comey said in September that America's voting machines would be hard to compromise because they're not connect to the internet, but these researchers simply used a PCMCIA card to reflash the machine's firmware. Comey also made the reassuring point that it's hard to "hack into" America's voting system because "it's so clunky and dispersed. It's Mary and Fred putting a machine under the basketball hoop at the gym."

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