Movements Help Measure Child Sleep Problems

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 3:00pm
Light has been shed on the complexities of child sleep, and could lead to improved diagnosis of children with sleep-related breathing problems. "Quality sleep is extremely important for children, especially at critical times of development. It can impact on the health of the brain and plays a key role in language development, for example. Poor quality sleep can result in reduced IQ, school performance and can impact overall quality of life," says the lead author.
Categories: Science

UK Announces 'Google Tax'

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 2:38pm
mrspoonsi points out that the UK has announced a "Google tax" on corporations that send a significant portion of their profits overseas to avoid local taxation. Any "economic activity" that is pushed to another country would face a 25% tax. George Osborne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer [said], "We will make sure multinationals pay their fair share of tax. We will introduce a 25% tax on profits from multinationals here in the UK which they artificially shift out of the UK. Today we're putting a stop to it. It's unfair to British people." ... [C]orporate taxes are still low, because the system does not tax sales, it taxes profits. And those profits are fiendishly difficult to pin down. Intellectual property payments to holding companies, the movement of sales activity to lower tax jurisdictions and the cost of licensing fees to holding companies all confuse the picture and allow firms with very mobile business models (such as in the technology sector) to be highly tax efficient.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Google Can Now Tell You’re Not a Robot With Just One Click

Wired News - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 2:00pm

On Wednesday, Google announced that many of its “Captchas”—the squiggled text tests designed to weed out automated spambots—will be reduced to nothing more than a single checkbox next to the statement “I’m not a robot.”

The post Google Can Now Tell You’re Not a Robot With Just One Click appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Well That Didn’t Work: Homemade Parachutes Are Amazing, Until You Jump

Wired News - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 2:00pm

In 1912, a young Austrian man jumped off the Eiffel Tower with a crowd of reporters and onlookers watching from below. He was testing his own invention: A silk parachute suit pilots could use to safely fall to earth in case of a midair failure.

The post Well That Didn’t Work: Homemade Parachutes Are Amazing, Until You Jump appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

Valve Rolls Out Game Broadcasting Service For Steam

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:56pm
An anonymous reader writes: Streaming live video game footage has become increasingly popular over the past several years — popular enough that Amazon was willing to shell out $970 million for Twitch.tv. Now, Valve has announced a rival: Steam Broadcasting. Users signing up for the beta test have the option to broadcast the game they're playing. They have several options about who can see their stream: invite-only, friends only, and publicly visible. Viewing a stream is currently supported by the Steam client itself, Google Chrome, and Apple Safari. It only works on Windows 7 and 8 at this point, but Valve promises support on Linux, OS X, and Windows Vista in the future.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Macho stereotypes put off men as well as women

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:43pm
Some men are being driven away from macho occupations like surgery and the Royal Marines because they don't feel that they are 'man enough', according to new research.
Categories: Science

Growing cooperation: First the carrot, then the stick

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:43pm
To encourage cooperation in groups, a combination of rewards and penalties is best, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Carbon dioxide warming effects felt just a decade after being emitted

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:43pm
It takes just 10 years for a single emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) to have its maximum warming effects on the Earth. This is according to researchers who have dispelled a common misconception that the main warming effects from a CO2 emission will not be felt for several decades.
Categories: Science

Diagnosis targets in primary care are misleading, unethical, UK experts say

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:42pm
Last month, there was public outcry at the news that GPs in England would be paid £55 for each case of dementia diagnosed. Now come targets for six other conditions, including diabetes coronary heart disease, asthma and depression, writes an English GP. "But the data on which they are based are flawed, and the approach incentivises potentially harmful overdiagnosis," he argues.
Categories: Science

Overweight and obesity in pregnancy linked to greater risk of infant death

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:42pm
Overweight and obesity in early pregnancy are associated with increased risks of infant mortality, with the greatest risks seen among severely obese mothers, finds a study.
Categories: Science

Mediterranean diet linked to longer life

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:42pm
Eating a Mediterranean diet might help extend your lifespan, suggests a study. The diet appears to be associated with longer telomere length -- an established marker of slower aging.
Categories: Science

Study of deadly bat disease finds surprising seasonal pattern of infections

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:41pm
The deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome has spread to bat colonies throughout eastern North America over the past seven years, causing bat populations to crash, with several species now at risk of extinction. The devastating impact of this disease is due in part to the seasonal dynamics of infection and transmission, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Brain study uncovers new clues on how cues may affect memory

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:40pm
The brain activity prior to seeing an item is related to how well it is later remembered, a new study shows. Moreover, researchers also found that the activity in different areas of the brain was unexpectedly related to how the information was remembered.
Categories: Science

Computer model enables design of complex DNA shapes

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:40pm
Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles.
Categories: Science

Many chest X-rays in children are unnecessary

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:40pm
Some children are receiving chest X-rays that may be unnecessary and offer no clinical benefit to the patient, according to a new study. "Chest X-rays can be a valuable exam when ordered for the correct indications," said a radiologist. "However, there are several indications where pediatric chest X-rays offer no benefit and likely should not be performed to decrease radiation dose and cost."
Categories: Science

Substantial improvement in England, Wales cancer survival over 40 years overshadowed by low survival for brain, stomach, lung, oesophageal, and pancreatic cancers

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:39pm
However, although some cancers have a good prognosis, the outlook for others remains extremely poor. For example, while 98% of men with testicular cancer survive from their cancer for at least a decade after diagnosis, up from 69% 40 years ago, just 1% of pancreatic cancer patients diagnosed today are expected to survive from their cancer 10 years.
Categories: Science

Animal welfare could be improved by new understanding of their emotions

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:39pm
New research looking at how goats express subtle positive emotions could lead to greater understanding of animal welfare. While there has been a great deal of research into negative emotions and stress in animals it is often hard for those who work with animals to know when they are in more subtle positive states.
Categories: Science

Increased production not the way to grow the economy

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:39pm
Continued economic growth requires an alarming – and arguably unsustainable – amount of raw material and energy. But what if there was a way to rein in production, without slowing down the economy?
Categories: Science

Colorful nano-guides to the liver

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:39pm
Highly specific nanoparticles have been produced by scientists. Depending on the bound dye the particles are guided to the liver or to the kidney and deliver their payload of active ingredients directly to the targeted tissue. Moreover, the dyes enable the tracking of the transport processes by intravital microscopy or, in a non-invasive way, by multi spectral optoacoustic tomography. The reduction of cholesterol production induced by siRNA served as the proof-of-principle for the developed method.
Categories: Science

Astronomers detect atomic hydrogen emission in galaxies at record breaking distances

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 1:38pm
Using the world's largest radio telescope, astronomers have detected the faint signal emitted by atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies three billion light years from Earth, breaking the previous record distance by 500 million light years.
Categories: Science