The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

The Bizarre and Complex Story of a Failed Wikipedia Software Extension

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 5:06am
metasonix writes Originally developed by Wikia coders, "Liquid Threads" was intended to be a better comment system for use on MediaWiki talkpages. When applied to Wikipedia, then each Wikipedia talkpage or noticeboard would become something resembling a more modernized bulletin board, hopefully easier to use. Unfortunately, the project was renamed "Flow" and taken over by the Wikimedia Foundation's developers. And as documented in this very long Wikipediocracy post, the result was "less than optimal." After seven years and millions of dollars spent, even WMF Director Lila Tretikov admits "As such it is not ready for 'prime time' for us."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

An Argument For Not Taking Down Horrific Videos

Slashdot - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 2:20am
A few days ago, we posted a story that asked whether posting horrific videos online served a legitimate journalistic purpose; some images that are shocking in their violence are now routinely available, including and especially the recent video of Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kaseasbeh being burned alive. Matthew Ingram writes at GigaOm that, whatever you think of the motives or results of the traditional news media showing such videos or choosing not to, there's good reason for social media sites not to reflexively remove such content.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Superheroes, Male Strippers, and Fake Babies Star in the Week’s Best Trailers

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 2:00am

With the Sundance Film Festival all wrapped up, a trickle of trailers from films showcased in Park City is starting to run through the Internet. Pair those teasers with the ones for films coming to South by Southwest next month and eccentric indie fare abounds! But if you're not feeling art-house-y at the moment, don't worry, because Magic Mike is here to sweep you away into a happier, more frivolous world. With superheroes and strippers and cult leaders and fake babies and malevolent spirits all present and accounted for, here is the very eclectic last week in trailers.

The post Superheroes, Male Strippers, and Fake Babies Star in the Week’s Best Trailers appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

New Sleep-Tracking Wearables Help Solve Real Medical Problems

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 2:00am

To see the latest in pro-sumer wearables---consumer devices that generate clinically relevant biometric data---look no further than your bedroom.

The post New Sleep-Tracking Wearables Help Solve Real Medical Problems appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

A Pixelated Platform Game That Never Plays the Same Way Twice

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 1:30am

Every time a player starts a new session, forests, villages, and crypts are generated procedurally to ensure fresh gameplay.

The post A Pixelated Platform Game That Never Plays the Same Way Twice appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

This TV Does 3-D Without the Glasses, and It Doesn’t Look Half Bad

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 1:30am

A funny thing happened to me at the DICE Summit in Las Vegas last week: I glanced upward and found myself staring into a 3-D television.

The post This TV Does 3-D Without the Glasses, and It Doesn’t Look Half Bad appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Sorry, But Google Glass Isn’t Anywhere Close to Dead

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 1:00am

"People like to lambast it because it’s too this or not that—but it’s still a much-matured device, certainly compared to the wearable stuff coming out of startups and other companies today.”

The post Sorry, But Google Glass Isn’t Anywhere Close to Dead appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Meet the Poop-Sniffing Dogs That Are Saving Endangered Wildlife

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 1:00am

Dogs have excellent schnozzes. This we know, thanks to the proliferation of K-9 drug sniffers and bomb-detecting squads. But these masters of olfaction aren’t just good for smelling out baddies—they’re also helping ecologists protect endangered species by sniffing out their scat.

The post Meet the Poop-Sniffing Dogs That Are Saving Endangered Wildlife appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How to Turn Flowers Into Fireworks, Without Making Them Explode

Wired News - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 1:00am

The Japanese word for fireworks is hanabi—hana meaning “flower” and bi meaning “fire.” Sarah Illenberger only recently learned this, but it’s a fitting coincidence because she’s spent the last year making flowers “explode” in her studio. With a little lighting and ingenuity, her vibrant photos take floral arrangement to a new level. The idea for Flowerwork came to […]

The post How to Turn Flowers Into Fireworks, Without Making Them Explode appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

SpaceX Launch of DSCOVR Space Weather Satellite Delayed by Radar Glitch

Space.com - Mon, 09/02/2015 - 12:52am
The commercial launch company SpaceX aborted the planned launch of a long-awaited space weather satellite and a novel rocket landing test Sunday due to problems with a U.S. Air Force radar tracking system.
Categories: Science

Tracking System Bug Delays SpaceX's DSCOVR Launch

Slashdot - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 11:47pm
The SpaceX two-fer launch that was scheduled for today has been scrubbed. NBC News reports that the launch was postponed until Monday at the earliest due to a problem with the range-tracking system in Florida. That means an ambitious second attempt to land the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage on an oceangoing platform will also have to be delayed. ... Satellites such as the Advanced Composition Explorer and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, which are already located at the L1 point, can provide up to an hour's warning of major storms. Both those satellites are well past their anticipated lifetimes, however, and DSCOVR is designed to provide a much-needed backup. SpaceX's two-stage Falcon 9 rocket will boost DSCOVR into a preliminary orbit, but it will take 110 days of in-space maneuvers to get the probe into the right position. This launch would mark the first time that SpaceX has sent a spacecraft so far, and it will be judged a success if DSCOVR reaches its intended orbit. The delayed launch could take place as soon as tomorrow (Monday) evening.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Silk Road Drug Dealer Pleads Guilty After Federal Sting

Slashdot - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 10:55pm
Ars Technica reports that A 26-year-old Columbus, Ohio man has pleaded guilty to selling drugs through the Silk Road website. David Lawrence Handel apparently obtained methylone and other drugs from a supplier in China, which he then sold to buyers on the online black market. Among those buyers were Maryland federal agents, who were making undercover purchases. Handel shipped the drugs to them through the US Postal Service, according to the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Maryland. ... Handel faces up to 20 years in prison for drug trafficking and up to life for using and possessing a firearm. His sentencing is scheduled for May 15.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science