Most UK coastal flooding caused by moderate, not extreme storms

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 5:02pm
Scientists have found that the majority of instances of coastal flooding around the United Kingdom in the last 100 years have been due to moderate storm events combined with high spring tides, rather than extreme storms.
Categories: Science

The New Fifty Shades Darker Trailer Will Fulfill Your Sexpectations

Wired News - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 4:56pm
These two are young, glum, and full of (bad) come-ons. The post The New Fifty Shades Darker Trailer Will Fulfill Your Sexpectations appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Google Further Shrinks the Size of Android App Updates

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 4:40pm
Google says it has found and implemented a new way to make app updates on Android smaller. From a report on Engadget: They're introducing a new approach to app updates that promises to radically shrink the size of updates with "file-by-file" patching. The resulting patches tend to be about 65 percent smaller than the app itself, and are sometimes over 90 percent smaller. In the right circumstances, that could make the difference between updating while you're on cellular versus waiting until you find WiFi. The technique revolves around spotting changes in the uncompressed files (that is, when they're not squeezed into a typical app package). Google first decompresses the old and new app versions to determine the changes between files and create a patch. After that, updating is just a matter of unpacking the app on your device, applying changes and compressing it again.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Geminid Meteor Shower: Dust From an Asteroid

Space.com - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 4:35pm
The Geminids come from an asteroid, 3200 Phaethon, but scientists are still trying to figure out exactly how it sheds enough debris to produce the bright meteor shower.
Categories: Science

Artificial Intelligence Is More Artificial Than Intelligent

Wired News - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 4:00pm
Opinion: If AI is so smart, why does it fail at tasks that regular people take for granted? The post Artificial Intelligence Is More Artificial Than Intelligent appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

How to Make UV Light Out of Your Phone’s LED Flash

Wired News - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 4:00pm
In a recent episode of MacGyver, an improvised ultraviolet light was created from an LED. How would this work and what is a blacklight? The post How to Make UV Light Out of Your Phone's LED Flash appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Bitcoin Could Rise By 165% To $2,000 in 2017 Driven by Trump's 'Spending Binge' and Dollar Rally

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 4:00pm
The price of Bitcoin could hit more than $2,000 in 2017 driven by expectations that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump may introduce economic stimulus policies, which could send inflation soaring and propel the dollar to record highs, a report from Saxo Bank claims. An anonymous reader shares a CNBC report: Bitcoin is currently trading around $754.51, according to CoinDesk data. A handle of over $2,000 would represent 165 percent appreciation. During his election campaign Trump has talked about an increase in fiscal spending. Saxo Bank's note said that this could increase the roughly $20 trillion of U.S. national debt and triple the current budget deficit from approximately $600 billion to $1.2-1.8 trillion, or some 6-10 percent of the country's current $18.6 trillion economy. As a result, the economy will grow and inflation will "sky rocket," forcing the U.S. Federal Reserve to hike interest rates at a faster pace and causing the U.S. dollar "to hit the moon." When inflation rises the Federal Reserve may raise interest rates to bring it under control. This causes the dollar to appreciate because it would be seen as an attractive currency for foreign investors.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Microsoft Likely To See a Boost in Windows 10 Sales This New Year

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 3:20pm
Because many businesses are wary of new software updates, let alone a new operating system, Microsoft could see a significant surge in Windows 10 install base and sales in the New Year. From a report on Fortune: Businesses have been slow to upgrade all of their corporate computers to the latest Windows OS in 2016, according to research by IT services and technology company Adaptiva. Adaptiva said Tuesday that based on its findings, it believes companies are going to be upgrading to the latest version in 2017. Adaptiva based its findings from a survey it conducted over the summer of 300 IT professionals at various businesses. The company said that 41% of the companies it surveyed have been avoiding the upgrade, and some "have gone so far as to actively resist the move by using software to prevent or disable Windows 10 installation." The survey didn't say why exactly companies were avoiding the upgrade, but the majority of respondents that did upgrade "rated the Windows 10 migration process to be somewhat to extremely challenging," the survey said. According to latest figures provided by Microsoft, Windows 10 is running on over 400 million devices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Blocks of ice demonstrate levitated and directed motion

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 3:14pm
Resembling the Leidenfrost effect seen in rapidly boiling water droplets, a disk of ice becomes highly mobile due to a levitating layer of water between it and the smooth surface on which it rests and melts. The otherwise random rotation and translation (sliding) of the ice block can be directed by controlling the flow dynamics of the melted ice-turned-water close to the disk surface.
Categories: Science

40,000 waves improve sand transport models

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 3:14pm
Over the past few years, Joep van der Zanden has created perfectly identical waves – 40,000 times – in a large ‘wave flume’ (channel). Using advanced measurements, he investigated the effect of these waves on the sand at the bottom of the flume. The results of his work included a detailed description of the effect of breaking waves on the movement of water and on the shifting sands of the seabed. The knowledge obtained in this way is essential if we are to improve existing models and, ultimately, make beach nourishment operations more efficient.
Categories: Science

Half of people believe fake facts, 'remember' events that never happened

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 3:14pm
Many people are prone to 'remembering' events that never happened, according to new research.
Categories: Science

Bacterial L-forms: An independent form of life that can multiply indefinitely

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 3:13pm
Bacteria able to shed their cell wall assume new, mostly spherical shapes. Researchers have shown that these cells, known as L-forms, are not only viable but that their reproductive mechanisms may even correspond to those of early life forms.
Categories: Science

Helping children achieve more in school

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 3:13pm
Researchers show that secondary school children with normal intellectual ability but poor grades are also less effective in their learning strategies. This discovery guides teachers and parents on how to enable students to fulfil their potential, and may help reduce school drop-out rates.
Categories: Science

Sony Has Sold 50 Million PlayStation 4 Units

Slashdot - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:40pm
Sony today shared sales figures of the PlayStation 4, saying the gaming console surpassed 50 million units as of this week. The console was launched in November 2013, and hit 40 million sales mark in May this year. In a statement, the company said, via GameSpot: "We're truly delighted that the PS4 community continues to flourish since launch three years ago," Sony Interactive Entertainment boss Andrew House said in a statement. "With tremendous support from our fans and partners across the globe, this year we were able to deliver an unprecedented lineup of hardware, including the new slimmer PS4, PS4 Pro, and PlayStation VR. We will continue to provide the best gaming experiences available through our ground-breaking software lineup and network services, as we focus on accelerating our business and expanding the PS4 ecosystem."According to an estimate Nvidia provided in August, Microsoft's Xbox One has an install base of 29 million.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

New material could lead to erasable and rewriteable optical chips

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:30pm
Engineers have developed a nanomaterial that could lead to optical chips and circuits. The researchers believe they are the first to rewrite a waveguide, which is a crucial photonic component and a building block for integrated circuits, using an all-optical technique.
Categories: Science

Raising the curtain on cerebral malaria's deadly agents

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:30pm
Using state-of-the-art brain imaging technology, scientists filmed what happens in the brains of mice that developed cerebral malaria (CM). The results reveal the processes that lead to fatal outcomes of the disease and suggest an antibody therapy that may treat it.
Categories: Science

Rhythm of breathing affects memory, fear

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:30pm
The rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall, scientists have discovered for the first time. These effects on behavior depend critically on whether you inhale or exhale and whether you breathe through the nose or mouth.
Categories: Science

How our immune system targets TB

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:30pm
Researchers have seen, for the very first time, how the human immune system recognizes tuberculosis (TB). These findings are the crucial step in developing better diagnostics and perhaps even vaccines for this deadly infection.
Categories: Science

Radiation that knocks electrons out and down, one after another

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:29pm
Researchers are investigating novel ways by which electrons are knocked out of matter. Their research could have implications for radiation therapy.
Categories: Science

MRI scans detect 'brain rust' in schizophrenia

Science Daily - Wed, 07/12/2016 - 2:29pm
A damaging chemical imbalance in the brain may contribute to schizophrenia, according to research.
Categories: Science