How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan To Combat Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:51pm
An anonymous reader writes Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Protocells and information strings: Self-organizing autocatalytic network created in computer model

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:50pm
Protocells are the simplest, most primitive living systems, you can think of. However, creating an artificial protocell is far from simple. One of the challenges is to create the information strings that can be inherited by cell offspring, including protocells. Such information strings are like modern DNA or RNA strings, and they are needed to control cell metabolism and provide the cell with instructions about how to divide. Now using a a virtual computer experiment, researchers in Denmark have discovered information strings with peculiar properties.
Categories: Science

No added benefit proven for umeclidinium/vilanterol in COPD

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:50pm
There are hardly any evaluable data for patients with moderate COPD severity and for patients with few exacerbations; for higher severity grades with more exacerbations, evaluable data are lacking completely, studies show.
Categories: Science

Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:50pm
Physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam, bright around the edges and dark in its center. It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam, 100 times larger than previous ones.
Categories: Science

1980s American aircraft helps quantum technology take flight

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:50pm
The X-29, an American experimental aircraft has inspired quantum computing researchers in a development which will bring the technology out of the lab.
Categories: Science

Winning the war against Human parainfluenza virus

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:50pm
Researchers have moved a step closer to identifying a treatment for the dreaded Human parainfluenza virus. These highly-infectious viruses are the leading cause of upper and lower respiratory tract disease in young children, including Croup, responsible for thousands of hospitalizations in the developed world, and hundreds of thousands of deaths each year in developing countries.
Categories: Science

New antidepressant: Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:50pm
A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of -- and ahead of -- its other antidepressant effects. Within 40 minutes after a single infusion of ketamine, treatment-resistant depressed bipolar disorder patients experienced a reversal of a key symptom -- loss of interest in pleasurable activities -- which lasted up to 14 days. Brain scans traced the agent's action to boosted activity in areas at the front and deep in the right hemisphere of the brain.
Categories: Science

Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:49pm
A new study looks at how teachers and students use technology inside and outside the classroom. It turns out that members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music, say experts.
Categories: Science

Design of micro, nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:49pm
Techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Both disorders affect the neurones: their structure and function is lost, and this in turn leads to the deterioration in the patient's motor, cognitive, sensory and emotional functions.
Categories: Science

New class of drugs shows promise in treating chronic diarrhea

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:49pm
A pilot study testing a new type of drug in patients with chronic diarrhea has shown promising effects on reducing their symptoms. Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is a common cause of chronic diarrhea that is estimated to affect one in 100 adults in western countries, but is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by doctors. Many patients are not diagnosed correctly and undergo repeated unnecessary tests.
Categories: Science

Cold sores increase risk of dementia, research suggests

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:49pm
Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease, researchers claim. "Our results clearly show that there is a link between infections of herpes simplex virus and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. This also means that we have new opportunities to develop treatment forms to stop the disease," says one of the researchers behind the study.
Categories: Science

Earthquakes in the ocean: Towards a better understanding of their precursors

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:49pm
New research offers the first theoretical model that, based on fluid-related processes, explains the seismic precursors of an underwater earthquake. Using quantitative measurements, this innovative model established a link between observed precursors and the mainshock of an earthquake. The results open a promising avenue of research for guiding future investigations on detecting earthquakes before they strike.
Categories: Science

Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:47pm
Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create “smart materials,” cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3D printing.
Categories: Science

Over-organizing repair cells set the stage for fibrosis

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:47pm
The excessive activity of repair cells in the early stages of tissue recovery sets the stage for fibrosis by priming the activation of an important growth factor, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Advances in creating treatment for common childhood blood cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:47pm
A new drug in development may offer first alternative to standard chemotherapy for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, scientists report. An estimated quarter of the 500 U.S. adolescents and young adults diagnosed each year with this aggressive disease fail to respond to standard chemotherapy drugs that target cancer cells.
Categories: Science

Origins of sex discovered: Side-by-side copulation in distant ancestors

Science Daily - Mon, 20/10/2014 - 2:38pm
A palaeontologist has revealed how the intimate act of sexual intercourse first evolved in our deep distant ancestors. In one of the biggest discoveries in the evolutionary history of sexual reproduction, scientists have found that internal fertilization and copulation appeared in ancient armored fishes, called placoderms, about 385 million years ago in what is now Scotland.
Categories: Science