Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape?

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:59pm
Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape? Some prior research shows that complex packages appear larger than simple packages of equal volume, while other research has shown the opposite -- that simple packages look bigger than the more complex. Researchers believe they have resolved this dilemma.
Categories: Science

Microbes engineered for direct conversion of biomass to fuel

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:58pm
The promise of affordable transportation fuels from biomass -- a sustainable, carbon neutral route to American energy independence -- has been left perpetually on hold by the economics of the conversion process. Researchers have overcome this hurdle allowing the direct conversion of switchgrass to fuel. The study, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, documents the direct conversion of biomass to biofuel without pre-treatment, using the engineered bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii.
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Hurricanes with female names more deadly than male-named storms

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:58pm
In the coming Atlantic hurricane season, watch out for hurricanes with benign-sounding names like Dolly, Fay or Hanna. According to a new article, hurricanes with feminine names are likely to cause significantly more deaths than hurricanes with masculine names, apparently because storms with feminine names are perceived as less threatening.
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Electrical response of metals to extreme pressures predicted

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:57pm
New research makes it possible to predict how subjecting metals to severe pressure can lower their electrical resistance, a finding that could have applications in computer chips and other materials that could benefit from specific electrical resistance.
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Do Rats Know When They Don’t Know?

Wired News - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:47pm
Humans are masters of metacognition: thinking about thinking. We can evaluate what we know and what we don’t know. If you don’t know how to get somewhere, you Google directions. When studying for a test, you have an idea of which material you’re most unsure of and devote more time to it. Psychologists studying human […]






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Apple Debuts OS X Yosemite, iOS 8, and Tons of New Developer Tools

Wired News - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:16pm
Apple's annual Worldwide Developer Conference begins this morning at 10am PT. We're here at Moscone, and will be updating this post with all today's announcements.






Categories: Science

Apple WWDC 2014: Tim Cook Unveils Yosemite

Slashdot - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:12pm
An anonymous reader writes "Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) has started, and OS X 10.10, officially named Yosemite, and iOS 8 have been officially unveiled. Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering, also highlighted iCloud Drive. Although a little late to the party, Apple hopes to compete with the likes of Dropbox and Google Drive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Marijuana shows potential in treating autoimmune disease

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:09pm
Researchers have discovered a novel pathway through which marijuana's main active constituent, THC, can suppress the body's immune functions. The recent findings show that THC can change critical molecules of epigenome called histones, leading to suppression of inflammation.
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Anti-diabetic drug slows ageing and lengthens lifespan, animal study suggests

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:07pm
Researchers have provided new evidence that metformin, the world’s most widely used anti-diabetic drug, slows aging and increases lifespan. Scientists teased out the mechanism behind metformin's age-slowing effects: the drug causes an increase in the number of toxic oxygen molecules released in the cell and this, surprisingly, increases cell robustness and longevity in the long term.
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Humans' tiny cellular machines: Spliceosomes in detail

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:07pm
Like exploring the inner workings of a clock, researchers are digging into the inner workings of the tiny cellular machines called spliceosomes, which help make all of the proteins our bodies need to function. They have now captured images of this machine, revealing details never seen before.
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Gene therapy combined with IMRT reduces rate of positive prostate biopsy after treatment for intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:07pm
Combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces the risk of having a positive prostate biopsy two years after treatment in intermediate-risk prostate cancer without affecting patients’ quality of life, research has determined.
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Is the food industry really concerned with obesity? If people eat less, profits will decline

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 7:07pm
Efforts to combat obesity can be a threat to businesses that produce and sell food: If people eat less, profits will decline. But the food industry can't appear to be nonresponsive to what some have called a public health crisis, and it employs several tactics to maintain legitimacy and position itself as "part of the solution" while also protecting profits, shows a new study. Food companies frame obesity as an issue of the choices people are making rather than the choices they are being offered.
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Google to Spend Billions on Satellites for Internet Everywhere | Video

Space.com - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:27pm
Google plans to spend more than $1 billion on a fleet of 180 satellites, on its mission of spreading Internet access to unconnected regions of the world, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.
Categories: Science

Microsoft Won't Bring Back the Start Menu Until 2015

Slashdot - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:25pm
DroidJason1 (3589319) writes "Microsoft recently announced plans to reintroduce the Start Menu to Windows in an upcoming version of the operating system. While the plan was to roll out an update to Windows 8.1 and offer the Start menu later this year, it seems like this is no longer the case. Now Microsoft is reportedly looking to release the Start Menu with Windows 9, which is expected in April of 2015. Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 have faced a boat load of criticism and hatred, partly due to the removal of the Start button and Start menu. The restoration of a visible Start button on the taskbar was one of the key features of the Windows 8.1 update, released back in October of 2013."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

One in four children with leukemia not taking maintenance medication, study shows

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:17pm
An estimated 25 percent of children in remission from acute lymphocytic leukemia are missing too many doses of an essential maintenance medication that minimizes their risk of relapse, according to a study. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), a cancer of the white blood cells, is the most common form of childhood cancer. While more than 95 percent of children with ALL enter remission within a month of receiving initial cancer therapy, one in five will relapse. In order to remain cancer-free, children in remission must take a form of oral chemotherapy every day for two years.
Categories: Science

Physicists take quantum leap toward ultra-precise measurement

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:17pm
Physicists have overcome a major challenge in the science of measurement using quantum mechanics. The scientists developed a way to employ multiple detectors in order to measure photons in entangled states, with an experimental apparatus that uses a fiber ribbon to collect photons and send them to an array of 11 detectors. Their work paves the way for great advances in using quantum states to develop ultra-precise measurement technologies.
Categories: Science

Worry, behavior among teens at higher risk for breast cancer: Focus of new study

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:16pm
Teenage girls with a familial or genetic risk for breast cancer worry more about getting the disease, even when their mother has no history, compared to girls their age with no known high risks, according to new data. Early analyses suggest that such worry may increase risk behavior, such as smoking and potentially alcohol use, but does not appear to influence positive behavior, such as exercise.
Categories: Science

Sperm-inspired robots controlled by magnetic fields may be useful for drug delivery, IVF, cell sorting and other applications

Science Daily - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:16pm
A team of researchers has developed sperm-inspired microrobots, which consist of a head coated in a thick cobalt-nickel layer and an uncoated tail. When the robot is subjected to an oscillating field of less than five millitesla, it experiences a magnetic torque on its head, which causes its flagellum to oscillate and propel it forward. The researchers are then able to steer the robot by directing the magnetic field lines towards a reference point.
Categories: Science

How Do You Get a Train Moving?

Wired News - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 6:14pm
If you have ever been near a train when it starts to move, you see (and hear) something interesting. The engine car at the front starts to move and in doing so, you get this wave of compressing couplings between all the cars. There is some interesting physics here.






Categories: Science

TL;DR: All the News You Need From WWDC

Wired News - Mon, 02/06/2014 - 5:58pm
Apple unleashed a supercell of news at WWDC today. Here are the most important strikes. (For total immersion, head to our live coverage.)






Categories: Science