Could poor stomach absorption of drugs reduce autism medications' effectiveness?

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:47pm
Many children and adults with autism experience gastrointestinal symptoms, research shows, and such symptoms can impact the absorption and availability of medications. "There are a number of variables that can influence medication response but given how common gastrointestinal issues are for those with autism, it seems the relationship should be examined more closely," said the senior author.
Categories: Science

Modern population boom traced to pre-industrial roots

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:47pm
The foundation of the human population explosion, commonly attributed to a sudden surge in industrialization and public health during the 18th and 19th centuries, was actually laid as far back as 2,000 years ago, suggests an extended model of detailed demographic and archeological data.
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New name for symptoms associated with menopause

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:47pm
Experts who reviewed the terminology associated with genitourinary tract symptoms related to menopause -- currently referred to as vulvovaginal atrophy -- have agreed that the term genitourinary syndrome of menopause is a medically more accurate, all-encompassing, and a more publicly acceptable term.
Categories: Science

Magnetic substorms may sometimes be driven by different process than generally thought

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:47pm
Magnetic substorms, the disruptions in geomagnetic activity that cause brightening of aurora, may sometimes be driven by a different process than generally thought, a new study shows.
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Aging gracefully: Diving seabirds shed light on declines with age

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:47pm
Scientists who studied long-lived diving birds, which represent valuable models to examine aging in the wild, found that blood oxygen stores, resting metabolism and thyroid hormone levels all declined with age, although diving performance did not. Apparently, physiological changes do occur with age in long-lived species, but they may have no detectable effect on behavioral performance.
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Over-the-counter pain reliever may restore immune function in old age

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:47pm
New research involving mice suggests that the key to more youthful immune function might already be in your medicine cabinet. Scientists have shown that macrophages from the lungs of old mice had different responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis than macrophages from young mice, but these changes were reversed by ibuprofen.
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Clean air halves health costs in Chinese city

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:46pm
Air pollution regulations over the last decade in Taiyuan, China, have substantially improved the health of people living there, accounting for a greater than 50 percent reduction in costs associated with loss of life and disability between 2001 and 2010, according to researchers in the United States and China.
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Rediscovering mundane moments brings us unexpected pleasure

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:46pm
We like to document the exciting and momentous occasions in our lives, but new research suggests there is value in capturing our more mundane, everyday experiences, which can bring us unexpected joy in the future.
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Hidden infection route of major bacterial pathogen uncovered

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:46pm
The pattern of infection of the bacterium responsible for causing severe lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis has been uncovered by scientists. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is usually harmless to humans, but in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) or who have weakened immune systems -- such as those who have had an operation or treatment for cancer -- it can cause infections that are resistant to antibiotics.
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Sweden: More than one third of booked operations are re-booked

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
More than one third of all planned orthopaedic surgery procedures are re-booked, postponed or cancelled completely. The most common reasons are cancellation at the patient’s own request or emergency cases having to be prioritized.
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Protein may provide key to arresting development of diabetes

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
The STK25 protein contributes to cell growth. Now researchers have discovered that the protein also affects metabolism, demonstrating that elevated levels accelerate the progress of diabetes in mice.
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Many nurses unprepared to meet dying patients, study suggests

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
Most nurses in their work care for patients who are dying. A study of more than 200 students has shown that many nurses in training feel unprepared and anxious when faced with the prospect of meeting patients during end-of-life care.
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Scientists create renewable fossil fuel alternative using bacteria

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:44pm
Researchers have engineered the harmless gut bacteria E.coli to generate renewable propane. The development is a step towards commercial production of a source of fuel that could one day provide an alternative to fossil fuels. Propane is an appealing source of cleaner fuel because it has an existing global market.
Categories: Science

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:42pm
In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.
Categories: Science

Whose to blame for ocean trash? Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries

Science Daily - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:40pm
Researchers have created a new model that could help determine what area of the world is to blame for each ocean garbage patch of floating debris – a difficult task for a system as complex and massive as the ocean.
Categories: Science

Code.org Discloses Top Donors

Slashdot - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:21pm
theodp (442580) writes "Under the leadership of Code.org, explained the ACM, it joined CSTA, NCWIT, NSF, Microsoft and Google in an effort "to reshape the U.S. education system," including passing a federal law making Computer Science a "core subject" in schools. If you're curious about whose money helped fuel the effort, Code.org's Donors page now lists those who gave $25,000+ to $3,000,000+ to the K-12 CS cause (the nonprofit plans to raise $20-30 million for 2015-16 operations). Microsoft is at the top of the list as a Platinum Supporter ($3,000,000+), while Bill Gates is Gold ($1,000,000+), and Steve Ballmer is Silver ($500,000+). Interestingly, six of Code.org's ten biggest donors are also Founders of Mark Zuckerberg's FWD.us tech immigration reform PAC."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Skywatching Planets and the Harvest Moon In September 2014 | Video

Space.com - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 3:02pm
In the evening, Mars and Saturn can be seen in the southwestern sky. Jupiter can be viewed in the eastern sky in the early morning hours. Also, the Moon adds additional light for farmers to harvest their crops.
Categories: Science

'Wet' Constellations Featured In September 2014 Skywatching Video

Space.com - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 2:47pm
The constellations of Aquarius (God of the Waters) and Capricornus (The Water Goat) hold a bevy of skywatching targets. The M2 star cluster in Aquarius harbors about 150,000 stars.
Categories: Science

In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Slashdot - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 2:42pm
An anonymous reader writes A 23-year-old teacher at a Cambridge, Md. middle school has been placed on leave and—in the words of a local news report — "taken in for an emergency medical evaluation" for publishing, under a pseudonym, a novel about a school shooting. The novelist, Patrick McLaw, an eighth-grade language-arts teacher at the Mace's Lane Middle School, was placed on leave by the Dorchester County Board of Education, and is being investigated by the Dorchester County Sheriff's Office, according to news reports from Maryland's Eastern Shore. The novel, by the way, is set 900 years in the future."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Unusual 'Pyramid Of Light' Brightens September 2014 Skywatching | Video

Space.com - Tue, 02/09/2014 - 2:18pm
The reflection of sunlight off of cosmic dust particle creates the effect known as "zodiacal light", sometimes called the "false dawn." (Best seen from mid-September to early October).
Categories: Science