Positive effect of winter dormancy on cold-blooded cognition

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:19pm
Researchers discovered that brumation – the period of winter dormancy that is observed in cold-blooded animals, similar to the process of hibernation in mammals – does not seem to adversely affect the memory of salamanders.
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How far do invasive species travel?

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:19pm
As a result of the globalization of trade and transport, in the past decades, tens of thousands of species have spread into regions where they were not originally at home. Potentially serious consequences of this include the displacement or extinction of native species and the spread of health risks. Even though trade flows are known to represent an important path for the introduction of invasive species, this fact alone is not enough to explain the observed distribution patterns of species.
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Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:19pm
Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. The increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even 4 years later.
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Tucatinib (ONT-380) progressing in pivotal trial against HER2+ breast cancer

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
Twenty-seven percent of 50 heavily pretreated patients with stage IV HER2+ breast cancer saw clinical benefit from the drug Tucatinib (ONT-380) , with at least 'stable disease' at 24 or more weeks after the start of treatment.
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Connectivity is key for preserving isolated sage-grouse populations

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
Greater sage-grouse depend on large, intact tracts of the sagebrush habitat. Current sage-grouse conservation plans focus on protecting selected 'priority areas,' but these areas vary in size and proximity to each other -- will they be able to sustain thriving, interconnected populations over time? A new study evaluates this approach.
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Using E. coli to detect hormone disruptors in the environment

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been implicated in the development of obesity, diabetes and cancer and are found in a wide array of products including pesticides, plastics and pharmaceuticals. EDCs are potentially harmful, even at low concentrations, equal in some cases to mere milligrams dissolved in in a swimming pool full of water. Now researchers report that they can quickly detect environmentally relevant concentrations of EDCs using engineered E. coli bacteria.
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Nutritional quality of kids' menus at chain restaurants not improving

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
US chain restaurants participating in an initiative to improve the nutritional quality of their children's menus have made no significant changes compared with restaurants not participating in the program.
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Rural dementia: We need to talk

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
English research into the experience of dementia in farming and farming families, and its impact on their businesses and home lives, has identified four areas of concern which need to be addressed if dementia in the countryside is to be managed. It is the first time that research has addressed this issue in farming.
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Scientists pave the way for enhanced detection and treatment of vascular graft infections

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
A study reports the detrimental aftereffects of infected grafts, including the formation of biofilms that can shelter bacteria and function as a source of recurrent infection. This new research should enable researchers to develop better strategies to diagnose and manage vascular graft infections.
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Tree-bark thickness indicates fire-resistance in a hotter future

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
A new study has found that trees worldwide develop thicker bark when they live in fire-prone areas. The findings suggest that bark thickness could help predict which forests and savannas will survive a warmer climate in which wildfires are expected to increase in frequency.
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Important bio-chemical, serine, produced on a large scale by E.coli

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
E. coli cells have now been engineered into producing large quantities of serine, which is used in detergents, tube feeding formula, and as building blocks for many important chemicals. Using the evolutionary technique ALE, scientists managed to develop this robust and commercially interesting cell line.
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Struggle to escape distant galaxies creates giant halos of scattered photons

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
Astronomers have discovered giant halos around early Milky Way type galaxies, made of photons (elementary particles of light) that have struggled to escape them.
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More older Americans using cannabis, underscoring need for research

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
Cannabis use among older adults in the US is on the rise, yet there is currently a lack of biomedical, clinical, and public health research to inform policy related to this trend, according to a new article.
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First study to show chair yoga as effective alternative treatment for osteoarthritis

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
The first randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of chair yoga on pain and physical function in older adults with osteoarthritis is proving to be an effective way to reduce pain and improve quality of life while avoiding pharmacologic treatment or adverse events for the millions who suffer from the disease in their lower extremities (hip, knee, ankle or foot).
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Pumping iron is good for the heart, researchers show

Science Daily - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:14pm
Just one session of interval weight-training can improve the risk of Type 2 diabetes complications, according to a new study. This is encouraging news for those starting the New Year with good intentions.
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Instagram Races to Make Money Ahead of Snap’s IPO

Wired News - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:00pm
Instagram now has 150 million daily users—just as many as Snap. So what do you do when you have that many eyeballs trained on your app? Monetize. The post Instagram Races to Make Money Ahead of Snap’s IPO appeared first on WIRED.
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Amazon Still Lags Behind Apple, Google in Greenpeace Renewable Energy Report

Slashdot - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 2:00pm
Amazon's cloud-computing unit says that one day it will rely solely on renewable power. But Greenpeace reports that a ramp-up in data-center construction in Virginia, where electricity comes mostly from coal and nuclear plants, makes that goal elusive. From the report: Apple, Google, Facebook, and newcomer Switch are taking some of the greatest strides towards 100% renewable energy, while companies such as Netflix, Amazon Web Services, and Samsung are lagging. The findings in Greenpeace USA's report outlines the energy footprints of large data center operators and nearly 70 of the most popular websites and applications. "Amazon continues to talk a good game on renewables but is keeping its customers in the dark on its energy decisions. This is concerning, particularly as Amazon expands into markets served by dirty energy," said Greenpeace USA Senior IT Analyst, Gary Cook. "Like Apple, Facebook, and Google, Netflix is one of the biggest drivers of the online world and has a critical say in how it is powered. Netflix must embrace the responsibility to make sure its growth is powered by renewables, not fossil fuels and it must show its leadership here," continued Cook.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Mission Control Houston - A Flight Director's Walkthrough | Video

Space.com - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 1:32pm
NASA flight director Mary Lawrence answers questions about the day to day operations of mission control in Houston.
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Alcohol Switches the Brain Into Starvation Mode In Mice, Increasing Hunger and Appetite, Study Finds

Slashdot - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 1:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from BBC: In tests on mice, alcohol activated the brain signals that tell the body to eat more food. The UK researchers, who report their findings in the journal Nature Communications, believe the same is probably true in humans. The mice were given generous doses of alcohol for three days -- a dose being equivalent to around 18 units or a bottle-and-a-half of wine for a person. The alcohol caused increased activity in neurons called AGRP. These are the neurons that are fired when the body experiences starvation. The mice ate more than normal too. When the researchers repeated the experiment but blocked the neurons with a drug, the mice did not eat as much which, the researchers say, suggests that AGRP neurons are responsible for the alcohol-induced eating. The study authors, Denis Burdakov and colleagues, say understanding how alcohol changes the body and our behavior could help with managing obesity. Around two-thirds of adults in the UK are overweight or obese.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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'Garnet Planets' Would Be Hostile to Life

Space.com - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 12:37pm
With a slightly different ratio of elements in the sun, Earth could have been far less forgiving. Take, for instance, the case of "garnet planets."
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