Five Floating Facts for the 50th Anniversary of the 1st American Spacewalk

Space.com - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 3:21pm
50 years ago, astronaut Ed White became the first American to walk in space. There's more to White's spacewalk than the floating feat alone.
Categories: Science

Valve Introduces Steam Refunds In Advance of Summer Sale

Slashdot - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 3:14pm
Deathspawner writes: Despite all of its competition, Valve's Steam service remains the most popular digital PC game store around. While Steam does do a lot of things right, it can sometimes stumble in the worst of ways. Look no further than April's Skyrim mod debacle as a good example. Well, just as Valve fixed up that issue, it's gone ahead and fixed another: it's making refunds dead simple. While refunds have been possible in the past, it's required gamers to jump through hoops to get them. Now, Valve has set certain criteria for granting a refund, no questions asked: if you've bought the game within the past two weeks and played it for two hours or less, your refund is guaranteed. The changes are being welcomed by most, but not all: some developers of smaller games that take less time to play through are worried that this will lead to abuse, and the system may enable more risk-free review-bombing as well.

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Categories: Science

Diphtheria Returns To Spain For Lack of Vaccination

Slashdot - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 2:32pm
TuringTest writes: A six-year-old child was admitted to a hospital in Barcelona and diagnosed with diphtheria, which hasn't occurred in Spain since 1986 and was largely unheard of in western Europe. The boy had not been vaccinated despite the vaccine being available in free vaccination programs. Spanish general health secretary called anti-vaccination campaigns "irresponsible" and said: "The right to vaccination is for children, not for the parents to decide." The child is in critical condition, though he's now being treated with a serum expressly brought from Russia through an emergency procedure.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

How Dinosaurs Shrank and Became Birds

Slashdot - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 2:11pm
An anonymous reader writes: Discoveries have shown that bird-specific features like feathers began to emerge long before the evolution of birds, indicating that birds simply adapted a number of pre-existing features to a new use. And recent research suggests that a few simple changes — among them the adoption of a more babylike skull shape into adulthood — likely played essential roles in the final push to bird-hood. Not only are birds much smaller than their dinosaur ancestors, they closely resemble dinosaur embryos. Adaptations such as these may have paved the way for modern birds' distinguishing features, namely their ability to fly and their remarkably agile beaks. The work demonstrates how huge evolutionary changes can result from a series of small evolutionary steps.

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Categories: Science

WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Hannibal

Wired News - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 2:00pm

Hannibal is back this week. Here's how to catch up so you, too, can have one gruesome summer.

The post WIRED Binge-Watching Guide: Hannibal appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Typing 'http://:' Into a Skype Message Trashes the Installation Beyond Repair

Slashdot - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:50pm
An anonymous reader writes: A thread at the Skype community forums has brought to light a critical bug in Microsoft's Skype clients for Windows, iOS and Android: typing the incorrect URL initiator http://: into a text message on Skype will crash the client so badly that it can only be repaired by installing an older version and awaiting a fix from Microsoft. The bug does not affect OS X or the 'Metro'-style Windows clients — which means, effectively, that Mac users could kill the Skype installations on other platforms just by sending an eight-character message.

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Categories: Science

Gone fishing? Box jellyfish catch fish deliberately

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:39pm
The first feeding study of tropical Australia's Irukandji box jellyfish has found that they actively fish. They attract larval fish by twitching their extended tentacles, highlighting their nematocyst clusters (stinging structures) and using them as lures. It's an impressive feat by any standards, but particularly so for an animal that doesn't have a defined brain.
Categories: Science

Triple treatment keeps cancer from coming back

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:39pm
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, responsible for some 1.59 million deaths a year. That figure is due, in part, to the fact that the cancer often returns after what, at first, seems to be successful treatment, with recurring cancer often resistant to chemotherapy. A new strategy involving a three-pronged approach might keep an aggressive form of lung cancer from returning, scientists say.
Categories: Science

New knowledge about parental break-up, conflicts

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:38pm
Do maternal couple relationships change throughout the child-rearing years and can the likelihood of parental break-up be predicted? A new doctoral study has investigated these questions.
Categories: Science

World's smallest spirals could guard against identity theft

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:37pm
Researchers have made the world's smallest spirals and found they have unique optical properties that are nearly impossible to counterfeit if they were added to identity cards, currency and other objects.
Categories: Science

Scientists use new 'tool sled' to collect sea sponges that have potential to combat various diseases

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:37pm
Sea sponges appeared more than 600 million years ago, and many of the genes they have are the same as those involved in cancer. Scientists have developed a new 'tool sled' to collect these sponges to take advantage of the similarity in human and sponge genomes to develop medicines for the treatment of human diseases.
Categories: Science

Cyberbullying less emotionally harmful to kids than traditional in-person harassment, study finds

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:37pm
Contrary to popular belief, cyberbullying that starts and stays online is no more emotionally harmful to youngsters than harassment that only occurs in-person and may actually be less disturbing because it's likelier to be of shorter duration and not involve significant power imbalances, according to a study.
Categories: Science

'Highly effective' new biomarker for lung cancer discovered

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:37pm
Scientists have found a protein that circulates in the blood that appears to be more accurate at detecting non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than currently available methods used for screening.
Categories: Science

Early bird catches more than just the worm

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:37pm
Compared with early birds, late risers are more likely to be cuckolded, a group of international researchers has found. The study's lead author said they found that early risers used that time to mate with birds not in their social pair. Melatonin-implanted birds did not sire as many birds and later cared for nestlings fathered by an early riser in their nest. Study results provide insight into the evolution of the body clock.
Categories: Science

nmap Maintainer Warns He Doesn't Control nmap SourceForge Mirror

Slashdot - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 1:10pm
vivaoporto writes: Gordon Lyon (better known as Fyodor, author of nmap and maintainer of the internet security resource sites insecure.org, nmap.org, seclists.org, and sectools.org) warns on the nmap development mailing list that he does not control the SourceForge nmap project. According to him the old Nmap project page (located at http://sourceforge.net/projects/nmap/, screenshot) was changed to a blank page and its contents were moved to a new page (http://sourceforge.net/projects/nmap.mirror/, screenshot) which is controlled by sf-editor1 and sf-editor3, in a pattern mirroring the much discussed takeover of the GIMP-Win page discussed last week on Ars Technica, IT World and eventually this week on Slashdot. On Monday, Sourceforge promised to stop "presenting third party offers for unmaintained SourceForge projects," and to their credit Fyodor states, "So far they seem to be providing just the official Nmap files," but reiterates "that you should only download Nmap from our official SSL Nmap site: https://nmap.org/download.html." To browse the projects and mirrors currently controlled by SourceForge, you can look at these account pages: sf-editor1, sf-editor2, and sf-editor3.

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Categories: Science

Paleo study shows how elevation may affect evolution

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 12:33pm
About 34 million years ago, global temperatures took a dive, causing a sudden wave of extinctions among European mammals. In North America, however, life went on largely unscathed. A new study explains why: the rise of the Rocky Mountains had forced North American mammals to adapt to a colder, drier world.
Categories: Science

Intravenous nutrition source could reduce side effects of chemotherapy

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 12:33pm
A single dose of an FDA-approved intravenous nutrition source may be able to significantly reduce the toxicity and increase the bioavailability of platinum-based cancer drugs, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Cooking up cognition: Study suggests chimps have cognitive capacity for cooking

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 12:33pm
Many of the cognitive capacities that humans use for cooking -- a preference for cooked food, the ability to understand the transformation of raw food into cooked food, and even the ability to save and transport food over distance for the purposes of cooking -- are also shared with chimpanzees, new research suggests.
Categories: Science

Hippocampus: In search of memory storage

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 12:32pm
The hippocampus plays a crucial role in memory formation. However, it is not yet fully understood in what way that brain structure's individual regions are involved in the formation of memories. Neuroscientists have recreated this process with the aid of computer simulations. Their findings challenge the model of memory forming in the hippocampus established to date.
Categories: Science

Fast charging electric bus does overtime

Science Daily - Wed, 03/06/2015 - 12:32pm
Electric buses are an eco-friendly alternative to diesel. Researchers have developed a concept to swiftly recharge buses while they operate routes. System testing in Dresden has been underway since November, 2014, with encouraging results.
Categories: Science