In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 11:13pm
An anonymous reader writes with this news from The Guardian about a proposed change in UK law that would greatly increase the penalties for online incivility: Internet trolls who spread "venom" on social media could be jailed for up to two years, the justice secretary Chris Grayling has said as he announced plans to quadruple the maximum prison sentence. Grayling, who spoke of a "baying cybermob", said the changes will allow magistrates to pass on the most serious cases to crown courts. The changes, which will be introduced as amendments to the criminal justice and courts bill, will mean the maximum custodial sentence of six months will be increased to 24 months. Grayling told the Mail on Sunday: "These internet trolls are cowards who are poisoning our national life. No one would permit such venom in person, so there should be no place for it on social media. That is why we are determined to quadruple the six-month sentence.

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Categories: Science

Gigabit Cellular Networks Could Happen, With 24GHz Spectrum

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 10:03pm
An anonymous reader writes A Notice of Inquiry was issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Friday that focuses research on higher frequencies for sending gigabit streams of mobile data. The inquiry specifically states that its purpose is to determine "what frequency bands above 24 GHz would be most suitable for mobile services, and to begin developing a record on mobile service rules and a licensing framework for mobile services in those bands". Cellular networks currently use frequencies between 600 MHz to 3 GHz with the most desirable frequencies under 1 GHz being owned by AT&T and Verizon Wireless. The FCC feels, however, that new technology indicates the potential for utilizing higher frequency ranges not necessarily as a replacement but as the implementation necessary to finally usher in 5G wireless technology. The FCC anticipates the advent of 5G commercial offerings within six years.

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Categories: Science

Hagel orders formation of military Expeditionary Ebola Support Team

Kurzweil AI - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 9:01pm

(Credit: USAMRIID)

On Sunday (Oct. 18), U.S. Secretary of Defense  Chuck Hagel ordered his Northern Command Commander, Gen. Chuck Jacoby, to “prepare and train a 30-person expeditionary medical support team that could, if required, provide short-notice assistance to civilian medical professionals in the United States.”

The team will consist of 20 critical care nurses, five doctors trained in infectious disease, and five trainers in infectious disease protocols.

Team members will get up to seven days of specialized training in infection control and personal protective equipment (PPE) at Fort Sam Houston in Texas, starting “next week or so.”

Training will be provided by the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) at Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland, famous for its discovery of the Reston ebolavirus in monkeys that reportedly got the virus via an airborne route.

After training, the team members will remain in a “prepare to deploy” status for 30 days, available to be sent to other continental U.S. locations as required, “if deemed prudent by our public health professionals” (but not overseas).

 

 

Categories: Science

Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 9:01pm
BarbaraHudson writes Those free soft drinks at your last start-up may come with a huge hidden price tag. The Toronto Sun reports that researchers at the University of California — San Francisco found study participants who drank pop daily had shorter telomeres — the protective units of DNA that cap the ends of chromosomes in cells — in white blood cells. Short telomeres have been associated with chronic aging diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and some forms of cancer. The researchers calculated daily consumption of a 20-ounce pop is associated with 4.6 years of additional biological aging. The effect on telomere length is comparable to that of smoking, they said. "This finding held regardless of age, race, income and education level," researcher Elissa Epel said in a press release.

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Categories: Science

Spacecraft Watched the Lunar Eclipse from Mercury

Space.com - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 8:07pm
Last week's lunar eclipse wasn't just a show for Earthlings, NASA's MESSENGER mission was also watching from Mercury, 66 million miles away.
Categories: Science

NASA Cancels "Sunjammer" Solar Sail Demonstration Mission

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:50pm
An anonymous reader writes "Space News reports that NASA has cancelled its solar sail demonstration mission (also known as Sunjammer) citing "a lack of confidence in its contractor's ability to deliver." "Company president Nathan] Barnes said that in 2011 he reached out to several NASA centers and companies that he believed could build the spacecraft and leave L'Garde free to focus on the solar sail. None of those he approached — he only identified NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California — took him up on the offer. Rather than give up on the opportunity to land a NASA contract, L'Garde decided to bring the spacecraft development in house. It did not work out, and as of Oct. 17, the company had taken delivery of about $2 million worth of spacecraft hardware including a hydrazine tank from ATK Space Systems of Commerce, California, and four mono-propellant thrusters from Aerojet Rocketdyne of Sacramento, California."

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Categories: Science

Comet Buzzes Mars in Once-in-a-Lifetime Flyby

Space.com - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:40pm
Comet Siding Spring came within just 87,000 miles of the Martian surface at 2:27 p.m. EDT today — about one-third of the distance between Earth and the moon. The comet barreled by at 126,000 mph relative to the Red Planet, NASA officials said.
Categories: Science

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:18pm
Physicists report that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive human-made material.
Categories: Science

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:18pm
For the last 20 years, scientists have tried to design large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depth and complex features -- a design quest just fulfilled by scientists. The team built 32 DNA crystals with precisely-defined depth and an assortment of sophisticated three-dimensional features.
Categories: Science

Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:18pm
Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Scientists said that, through additional translational research, the findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.
Categories: Science

Improved electricity access has little impact on climate change

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:17pm
Expanding access to household electricity services accounts for only a small portion of total emission growth, shows a new study, shedding light on an ongoing debate on potential conflicts between climate and development.
Categories: Science

Major breakthrough could help detoxify pollutants

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:15pm
A major breakthrough could lead to more effective methods for detoxifying dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins, scientists say. The result is a culmination of 15 years of research. It details how certain organisms manage to lower the toxicity of pollutants. 
Categories: Science

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain, inflammation in cataract surgery patients

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:15pm
The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study. The device, known as a punctum plug, automatically delivers the correct amount of postoperative medication in patients, potentially solving the issue of poor compliance with self-administering eye drops.
Categories: Science

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:15pm
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research. Mutations in the body's cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless. For some people, genetic changes in blood cells can develop in genes that play roles in initiating leukemia and lymphoma even though such people don't have the blood cancers, scientists report.
Categories: Science

'Mega' cells control growth of blood-producing cells

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:15pm
While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these “mega” cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).
Categories: Science

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

Science Daily - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 7:15pm
The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span. While it has long been known that there is an association between the eye condition and MS, this is the first study to provide a detailed description of the relative onset of uveitis and MS and to calculate the likelihood of an MS diagnosis among uveitis patients.
Categories: Science

Brain Patterns Give Clues To Why Some People Just Keep Gambling

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 6:50pm
Research from several UK universities, as reported by Time, indicates that the brain activity of compulsive gamblers shows a marked difference in response to pleasure-triggering behavior, which may help explain why they have trouble stopping: [The participants] took an amphetamine capsule, which unleashes endorphins with similar effects to the rush you get from exercise or alcohol, the study says. An additional PET scan revealed that pathological gamblers responded differently to the drug. They released fewer endorphins than those who didn't gamble, and they also reported lower levels of euphoria on a questionnaire afterward. This might help explain the addictive part of pathological gambling: to get pleasure from the act, problem gamblers might need more of it or to work harder for it.

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Categories: Science

Brain Patterns Give Clues To Why Some People Just Keep Gambling

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 6:50pm
Research from several UK universities, as reported by Time, indicates that the brain activity of compulsive gamblers shows a marked difference in response to pleasure-triggering behavior, which may help explain why they have trouble stopping: [The participants] took an amphetamine capsule, which unleashes endorphins with similar effects to the rush you get from exercise or alcohol, the study says. An additional PET scan revealed that pathological gamblers responded differently to the drug. They released fewer endorphins than those who didn't gamble, and they also reported lower levels of euphoria on a questionnaire afterward. This might help explain the addictive part of pathological gambling: to get pleasure from the act, problem gamblers might need more of it or to work harder for it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Brain Patterns Give Clues To Why Some People Just Keep Gambling

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 6:50pm
Research from several UK universities, as reported by Time, indicates that the brain activity of compulsive gamblers shows a marked difference in response to pleasure-triggering behavior, which may help explain why they have trouble stopping: [The participants] took an amphetamine capsule, which unleashes endorphins with similar effects to the rush you get from exercise or alcohol, the study says. An additional PET scan revealed that pathological gamblers responded differently to the drug. They released fewer endorphins than those who didn't gamble, and they also reported lower levels of euphoria on a questionnaire afterward. This might help explain the addictive part of pathological gambling: to get pleasure from the act, problem gamblers might need more of it or to work harder for it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Brain Patterns Give Clues To Why Some People Just Keep Gambling

Slashdot - Sun, 19/10/2014 - 6:50pm
Research from several UK universities, as reported by Time, indicates that the brain activity of compulsive gamblers shows a marked difference in response to pleasure-triggering behavior, which may help explain why they have trouble stopping: [The participants] took an amphetamine capsule, which unleashes endorphins with similar effects to the rush you get from exercise or alcohol, the study says. An additional PET scan revealed that pathological gamblers responded differently to the drug. They released fewer endorphins than those who didn't gamble, and they also reported lower levels of euphoria on a questionnaire afterward. This might help explain the addictive part of pathological gambling: to get pleasure from the act, problem gamblers might need more of it or to work harder for it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science