Vintage NASA Spacecraft May Be Out of Gas, Private Team Says

Space.com - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:30pm
Efforts to redirect a 36-year-old NASA spacecraft are in flux as controllers fear the spacecraft may have run out of fuel while performing maneuvers on Tuesday (July 9).
Categories: Science

Link between antibiotics, bacterial biofilms and chronic infections found

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:15pm
The link between antibiotics and bacterial biofilm formation leading to chronic lung, sinus and ear infections has been found, researchers report. The study results illustrate how bacterial biofilms can actually thrive, rather than decrease, when given low doses of antibiotics. Results of this study may lead to new approach for chronic ear infections in children.
Categories: Science

Mobile phone bling may be personal, and also cultural thing

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:15pm
Choosing mobile phone cases and customizing phones with charms and decorations may reveal a lot about a person's culture, as well as increase attachment to the devices, according to researchers. "The more you customize your phone for aesthetic reasons the more it reflects who you are," said one author. "You see your phone as your self."
Categories: Science

Invasion of yellow crazy ant in a Seychelles UNESCO palm forest: Threats and solutions

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:15pm
The yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes is ranked amongst the top 100 worst global invasive species and is responsible for catastrophic ecological impacts on islands. A new study examines and assesses the effects and dangers of the introduction of the yellow crazy ant to the unique and often endemic ecosystems of the mature palm forest of the Vallée de Mai, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, on the Seychelles.
Categories: Science

What's a concussion? Review identifies four evidence-based indicators

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:14pm
A research review identifying the clinical indicators most strongly associated with concussion is an important first step in the process of developing evidence-based guidelines for concussion diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, according to a new report. Concussion is a common and familiar problem, yet one that has been defined in different ways. Since there's no objective test or universally accepted definition, establishing a set of indicators based on the best available research is an important first step to developing evidence-based concussion guidelines.
Categories: Science

Hubble spots spiral bridge of young stars linking two ancient galaxies

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:14pm
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has photographed an unusual structure 100,000 light-years long, which resembles a corkscrew-shaped string of pearls and winds around the cores of two colliding galaxies. The unique structure of the star spiral may yield new insights into the formation of stellar superclusters that result from merging galaxies and gas dynamics in this rarely seen process.
Categories: Science

For children with pacemakers, 'self-competence' affects quality of life

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:14pm
For children and teens living with a cardiac pacemaker, a low sense of self-competence seems to contribute to decreased quality of life, reports a study. For children with cardiac arrhythmias, pacemaker implantation is a standard treatment that leads to positive health outcomes. As survival improves for infants with congenital heart abnormalities, more children are living with pacemakers, which may affect their lives in many ways. However, these children may have to limit their physical activity level. They may have scars and a visible chest bulge, and may require repeated surgeries.
Categories: Science

UK Gov't Plans To Push "Emergency" Surveillance Laws

Slashdot - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 2:07pm
beaker_72 (1845996) writes The Guardian reports that the UK government has unveiled plans to introduce emergency surveillance laws into the UK parliament at the beginning of next week. These are aimed at reinforcing the powers of security services in the UK to force service providers to retain records of their customers phone calls and emails. The laws, which have been introduced after the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that existing laws invaded individual privacy, will receive cross-party support and so will not be subjected to scrutiny or challenged in Parliament before entering the statute books. But as Tom Watson (Labour backbench MP and one of few dissenting voices) has pointed out, the ECJ ruling was six weeks ago, so why has the government waited until now to railroad something through. Unless of course they don't want it scrutinised too closely.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

How antioxidants can accelerate cancers, and why they don't protect against them

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:44pm
Two cancer researchers have proposed why antioxidant supplements might not be working to reduce cancer development, and why they may actually do more harm than good. Their insights are based on recent advances in the understanding of the system in our cells that establishes a natural balance between oxidizing and anti-oxidizing compounds. These compounds are involved in so-called redox (reduction and oxidation) reactions essential to cellular chemistry.
Categories: Science

Working to loosen the grip of severe mental illness

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:43pm
The underlying brain architecture of a person at rest is basically the same as that of a person performing a variety of tasks, a researcher has found. This is important to the study of mental illness, he says, because it is easier to analyze a brain at rest. "We can now observe people relaxing in the scanner and be confident that what we see is there all the time," says the lead researcher, who feared that the study might find that the brain reorganizes itself for every task.
Categories: Science

Depressed men with prostate cancer are diagnosed with later stage disease, and get less effective therapies

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:43pm
Depressed men with localized prostate cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with more aggressive prostate cancer, received less effective treatments and survived for shorter times than prostate cancer patients who were not depressed, a study has found.
Categories: Science

Decreasing font size enhances reading comprehension among children who have already developed proficient reading skills

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:43pm
Decreasing the font size helps to improve reading comprehension among fifth graders who have mastered the technical skills of reading, a new study has demonstrated. "This study demonstrates the difference between children at different stages of reading proficiency, and it is important to understand that difficulty impairs comprehension at one stage, while at another it actually facilitates comprehension. After mastering reading skills, an effective way to improve comprehension could be to decrease the text's font size," said an author.
Categories: Science

Comprehensive concussion literature analysis lays foundation for evidence-based guidelines

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:43pm
There has been heightened public concussion awareness in the last few years related to professional sports, in particular, the NFL. The most underreported, under diagnosed and underestimated head injury is concussion, with the number of cases ranging in the millions every year. The term “concussion” is not well defined in clinical or research contexts, contributing to confusion among patients, families, and health providers.
Categories: Science

Drought, poor wheat harvest in Kansas has effects on national economy, says climatologist

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:43pm
The anticipated record low wheat harvest in Kansas will affect food availability and the national economy, says a climatologist. That isn't just disappointing for Kansas farmers, but could affect other food availability and the overall economy. Drought conditions lead to poor pasture conditions and hay production, which then impacts the number of cattle ranchers can graze, she says.
Categories: Science

The bigger the better: Cigarette warning labels prompt quit attempts

Science Daily - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:43pm
Cigarette warning labels can influence a smoker to try to quit even when the smoker is trying to avoid seeing the labels, according to a survey of thousands of adult smokers in four countries. "Warning labels vary widely from country to country but it's clear that once people see the labels, the same psychological and emotional processes are involved in making people consider quitting smoking," said the study's lead author.
Categories: Science

Mathematicians Solve the Topological Mystery Behind the "Brazuca" Soccer Ball

Slashdot - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:26pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "In the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, teams used a new kind of ball called the Telstar made from 12 black pentagonal panels and 20 white hexagonal panels. This ball has icosahedral symmetry and its own molecular analogue in the form of C60, the famous soccer ball-shaped fullerene. In 2006, a new ball called the TeamGeist was introduced at the World Cup in Germany. This was made of 14 curved panels that together gave it tetrahedral symmetry. This also had a molecular analogue with tetrahedral symmetry among the fullerenes. Now teams at the current World Cup in Brazil are playing with yet another design: the Brazuca, a ball constructed from six panels each with a four-leaf clover shape that knit together like a jigsaw to form a sphere. This has octahedral symmetry. But here's question that has been puzzling chemists, topologists and..errr...soccer fans: is there a molecular analogue of the Brazuca? Or put another way, can fullerenes have octahedral symmetry? Now a pair of mathematicians have finally solved this problem. They've shown that fullerenes can indeed have octahedral symmetry just like the Brazuca, although in addition to hexagonal and pentagonal carbon rings, the ball-shaped molecules must also have rings of 4 and 8 carbon atoms. The next stage is to actually synthesis one of these fullerenes, perhaps something to keep chemists occupied until the 2018 World Cup in Russia."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Mathematicians Solve the Topological Mystery Behind the "Brazuca" Soccer Ball

Slashdot - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:26pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "In the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, teams used a new kind of ball called the Telstar made from 12 black pentagonal panels and 20 white hexagonal panels. This ball has icosahedral symmetry and its own molecular analogue in the form of C60, the famous soccer ball-shaped fullerene. In 2006, a new ball called the TeamGeist was introduced at the World Cup in Germany. This was made of 14 curved panels that together gave it tetrahedral symmetry. This also had a molecular analogue with tetrahedral symmetry among the fullerenes. Now teams at the current World Cup in Brazil are playing with yet another design: the Brazuca, a ball constructed from six panels each with a four-leaf clover shape that knit together like a jigsaw to form a sphere. This has octahedral symmetry. But here's question that has been puzzling chemists, topologists and..errr...soccer fans: is there a molecular analogue of the Brazuca? Or put another way, can fullerenes have octahedral symmetry? Now a pair of mathematicians have finally solved this problem. They've shown that fullerenes can indeed have octahedral symmetry just like the Brazuca, although in addition to hexagonal and pentagonal carbon rings, the ball-shaped molecules must also have rings of 4 and 8 carbon atoms. The next stage is to actually synthesis one of these fullerenes, perhaps something to keep chemists occupied until the 2018 World Cup in Russia."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Mathematicians Solve the Topological Mystery Behind the "Brazuca" Soccer Ball

Slashdot - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:26pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "In the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, teams used a new kind of ball called the Telstar made from 12 black pentagonal panels and 20 white hexagonal panels. This ball has icosahedral symmetry and its own molecular analogue in the form of C60, the famous soccer ball-shaped fullerene. In 2006, a new ball called the TeamGeist was introduced at the World Cup in Germany. This was made of 14 curved panels that together gave it tetrahedral symmetry. This also had a molecular analogue with tetrahedral symmetry among the fullerenes. Now teams at the current World Cup in Brazil are playing with yet another design: the Brazuca, a ball constructed from six panels each with a four-leaf clover shape that knit together like a jigsaw to form a sphere. This has octahedral symmetry. But here's question that has been puzzling chemists, topologists and..errr...soccer fans: is there a molecular analogue of the Brazuca? Or put another way, can fullerenes have octahedral symmetry? Now a pair of mathematicians have finally solved this problem. They've shown that fullerenes can indeed have octahedral symmetry just like the Brazuca, although in addition to hexagonal and pentagonal carbon rings, the ball-shaped molecules must also have rings of 4 and 8 carbon atoms. The next stage is to actually synthesis one of these fullerenes, perhaps something to keep chemists occupied until the 2018 World Cup in Russia."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Mathematicians Solve the Topological Mystery Behind the "Brazuca" Soccer Ball

Slashdot - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:26pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "In the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, teams used a new kind of ball called the Telstar made from 12 black pentagonal panels and 20 white hexagonal panels. This ball has icosahedral symmetry and its own molecular analogue in the form of C60, the famous soccer ball-shaped fullerene. In 2006, a new ball called the TeamGeist was introduced at the World Cup in Germany. This was made of 14 curved panels that together gave it tetrahedral symmetry. This also had a molecular analogue with tetrahedral symmetry among the fullerenes. Now teams at the current World Cup in Brazil are playing with yet another design: the Brazuca, a ball constructed from six panels each with a four-leaf clover shape that knit together like a jigsaw to form a sphere. This has octahedral symmetry. But here's question that has been puzzling chemists, topologists and..errr...soccer fans: is there a molecular analogue of the Brazuca? Or put another way, can fullerenes have octahedral symmetry? Now a pair of mathematicians have finally solved this problem. They've shown that fullerenes can indeed have octahedral symmetry just like the Brazuca, although in addition to hexagonal and pentagonal carbon rings, the ball-shaped molecules must also have rings of 4 and 8 carbon atoms. The next stage is to actually synthesis one of these fullerenes, perhaps something to keep chemists occupied until the 2018 World Cup in Russia."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Mathematicians Solve the Topological Mystery Behind the "Brazuca" Soccer Ball

Slashdot - Thu, 10/07/2014 - 1:26pm
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "In the 1970 World Cup in Mexico, teams used a new kind of ball called the Telstar made from 12 black pentagonal panels and 20 white hexagonal panels. This ball has icosahedral symmetry and its own molecular analogue in the form of C60, the famous soccer ball-shaped fullerene. In 2006, a new ball called the TeamGeist was introduced at the World Cup in Germany. This was made of 14 curved panels that together gave it tetrahedral symmetry. This also had a molecular analogue with tetrahedral symmetry among the fullerenes. Now teams at the current World Cup in Brazil are playing with yet another design: the Brazuca, a ball constructed from six panels each with a four-leaf clover shape that knit together like a jigsaw to form a sphere. This has octahedral symmetry. But here's question that has been puzzling chemists, topologists and..errr...soccer fans: is there a molecular analogue of the Brazuca? Or put another way, can fullerenes have octahedral symmetry? Now a pair of mathematicians have finally solved this problem. They've shown that fullerenes can indeed have octahedral symmetry just like the Brazuca, although in addition to hexagonal and pentagonal carbon rings, the ball-shaped molecules must also have rings of 4 and 8 carbon atoms. The next stage is to actually synthesis one of these fullerenes, perhaps something to keep chemists occupied until the 2018 World Cup in Russia."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science