NASA's 'Flying Saucer' Test - Heat Shield Inflates and Parachute Fails | Video

Space.com - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 1:32pm
The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) was tested over Hawaii on June 28th, 2014. It successfully tested the Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) but its second major test, the Supersonic Disk Sail Parachute, failed to deploy.
Categories: Science

NASA Launching Satellite To Track Carbon

Slashdot - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 12:50pm
An anonymous reader writes A NASA satellite being prepared for launch early on Tuesday is expected to reveal details about where carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas tied to climate change, is being released into Earth's atmosphere on a global scale. From the article: "The $468 million mission is designed to study the main driver of climate change emitted from smokestacks and tailpipes. Some of the carbon dioxide is sucked up by trees and oceans, and the rest is lofted into the atmosphere, trapping the sun's heat and warming the planet. But atmospheric CO2 levels fluctuate with the seasons and in different regions of the Earth. The natural and human activities that cause the changes are complicated. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, or OCO-2 for short, will be able to take an ultra-detailed look at most of the Earth's surface to identify places responsible for producing or absorbing the greenhouse gas."

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Categories: Science

Successful test of saucer-shaped vehicle for future Mars missions

Science Daily - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 12:12pm
NASA has successfully conducted the first of three planned tests for the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project, developed to evaluate new landing technologies for future Mars missions. While this initial test was designed to determine the flying ability of the vehicle, it also deployed two new landing technologies as a bonus. Those landing technologies will be officially tested in the next two flights, involving clones of the saucer-shaped vehicle.
Categories: Science

The Internet's Own Boy

Slashdot - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 12:02pm
theodp (442580) writes "The Internet's Own Boy, the documentary about the life and death of Aaron Swartz, was appropriately released on the net as well as in theaters this weekend, and is getting good reviews from critics and audiences. Which is kind of remarkable, since the Achilles' heel of this documentary, as critic Matt Pais notes in his review, is that "everyone on the other side of this story, from the government officials who advocated for Swartz's prosecution to Swartz's former Reddit colleagues to folks at MIT, declined participation in the film." Still, writer/director Brian Knappenberger manages to deliver a compelling story, combining interesting footage with interviews from Swartz's parents, brothers, girlfriends, and others from his Internet projects/activism who go through the stages of joy, grief, anger, and hope that one sees from loved ones at a wake. "This remains an important David vs. Goliath story," concludes Pais, "of a remarkable brain years ahead of his age with the courage and will to fight Congress-and a system built to impede, rather than encourage, progress and common sense. The Internet's Own Boy will upset you. As it should." And Quinn Norton, who inadvertently gave the film its title ("He was the Internet's own boy," Quinn said after Swartz's death, "and the old world killed him."), offers some words of advice for documentary viewers: "Your ass will be in a seat watching a movie. When it is done, get up, and do something.""

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Categories: Science

NASA Carbon Dioxide-Monitoring Satellite 'Go' for Tuesday Launch: How to Watch Live

Space.com - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 11:29am
The space agency's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 satellite passed its launch readiness review Sunday, meaning the craft is set to lift off Tuesday from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at 5:56 a.m. EDT atop a Delta 2 rocket.
Categories: Science

Cassini Probe Celebrates 10 Years at Saturn Today

Space.com - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 11:21am
NASA's Cassini spacecraft marks a big milestone today (June 30) — a decade exploring Saturn and its many moons.
Categories: Science

Grueling 39K-Mile Yacht Race Tests the Sanity of Cramped Crews

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
The Volvo Ocean Race is the world's toughest sailing competition. Here's how it goes down.






Categories: Science

Vintage Pesticide Paraphernalia From the Glory Days of DDT

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
The insecticide DDT is mostly thought of today as a bird-killing eco-nightmare. But it wasn't always so. DDT was once a Nobel Prize-worthy miracle of modern chemistry. And for decade or two in the mid-20th century, ordinary people used DDT---lots of it---in ways that seem extraordinary today.






Categories: Science

A Perfect Post-Apocalyptic Library That Offers Books and Booze

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
The folks at the Long Now Foundation are building a clock that’ll keep time for 10,000 years. But in the meantime they’ve built something more practical: A very nice bar.






Categories: Science

A Mod That Adds Co-Op Capabilities to Your StarCraft Campaign

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
Always wanted to play a StarCraft co-op game? Now you can thanks to this mod, which makes it so two players can cooperatively play through the entire game's campaign.






Categories: Science

See Outtakes From Some of History’s Most Iconic Photos

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
A new photo exhibit from the storied Magnum Photo agency allows the public to view the contact sheets of 20 renowned Magnum photographers going back to the first days of the agency. That means viewers can see the shots that were taken before and after the photos that they've come to know so well.






Categories: Science

5 Ways to Forget How Bad Transformers: Age of Extinction Is

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
Need more robots in disguise after seeing Transformers: Age of Extinction this weekend? Look no further, we've got you covered.






Categories: Science

And Now, It’s Monty Python’s 10 Brainiest Songs

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
On the eve of a massive rerelease of the comedy group's recorded material, we're diving deep into their nerdiest songs.






Categories: Science

Why United Airlines Will Track Tiny Animals From Its Jets

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
How scientists are using commercial airliners to track flocks of birds, and other animals.






Categories: Science

Why There Were So Many More Women at Google I/O This Year

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
As I turned the corner, I ran into a few thousand software developers. This was on the second floor of the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco, where Google was holding its annual developer conference, the centerpiece of its year. During a two-hour-plus conference keynote, the company had just invited thousands of coders to start […]






Categories: Science

Siri Will Soon Understand You a Whole Lot Better

Wired News - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:38am
It all started at a small academic get-together in Whistler, British Columbia. The topic was speech recognition, and whether a new and unproven approach to machine intelligence—something called deep learning—could help computers more effectively identify the spoken word. Microsoft funded the mini-conference, held just before Christmas 2009, and two of its researchers invited the world’s […]






Categories: Science

Facebook's Emotion Experiment: Too Far, Or Social Network Norm?

Slashdot - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:30am
Facebook's recently disclosed 2012 experiment in altering the tone of what its users saw in their newsfeeds has brought it plenty of negative opinions to chew on. Here's one, pointed out by an anonymous reader: Facebook's methodology raises serious ethical questions. The team may have bent research standards too far, possibly overstepping criteria enshrined in federal law and human rights declarations. "If you are exposing people to something that causes changes in psychological status, that's experimentation," says James Grimmelmann, a professor of technology and the law at the University of Maryland. "This is the kind of thing that would require informed consent." For a very different take on the Facebook experiment, consider this defense of it from Tal Yarkoni, who thinks the criticism it's drawn is "misplaced": Given that Facebook has over half a billion users, it’s a foregone conclusion that every tiny change Facebook makes to the news feed or any other part of its websites induces a change in millions of people’s emotions. Yet nobody seems to complain about this much–presumably because, when you put it this way, it seems kind of silly to suggest that a company whose business model is predicated on getting its users to use its product more would do anything other than try to manipulate its users into, you know, using its product more. ... [H]aranguing Facebook and other companies like it for publicly disclosing scientifically interesting results of experiments that it is already constantly conducting anyway–and that are directly responsible for many of the positive aspects of the user experience–is not likely to accomplish anything useful. If anything, it’ll only ensure that, going forward, all of Facebook’s societally relevant experimental research is done in the dark, where nobody outside the company can ever find out–or complain–about it."

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Categories: Science

Facebook's Emotion Experiment: Too Far, Or Social Network Norm?

Slashdot - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:30am
Facebook's recently disclosed 2012 experiment in altering the tone of what its users saw in their newsfeeds has brought it plenty of negative opinions to chew on. Here's one, pointed out by an anonymous reader: Facebook's methodology raises serious ethical questions. The team may have bent research standards too far, possibly overstepping criteria enshrined in federal law and human rights declarations. "If you are exposing people to something that causes changes in psychological status, that's experimentation," says James Grimmelmann, a professor of technology and the law at the University of Maryland. "This is the kind of thing that would require informed consent." For a very different take on the Facebook experiment, consider this defense of it from Tal Yarkoni, who thinks the criticism it's drawn is "misplaced": Given that Facebook has over half a billion users, it’s a foregone conclusion that every tiny change Facebook makes to the news feed or any other part of its websites induces a change in millions of people’s emotions. Yet nobody seems to complain about this much–presumably because, when you put it this way, it seems kind of silly to suggest that a company whose business model is predicated on getting its users to use its product more would do anything other than try to manipulate its users into, you know, using its product more. ... [H]aranguing Facebook and other companies like it for publicly disclosing scientifically interesting results of experiments that it is already constantly conducting anyway–and that are directly responsible for many of the positive aspects of the user experience–is not likely to accomplish anything useful. If anything, it’ll only ensure that, going forward, all of Facebook’s societally relevant experimental research is done in the dark, where nobody outside the company can ever find out–or complain–about it."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Facebook's Emotion Experiment: Too Far, Or Social Network Norm?

Slashdot - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:30am
Facebook's recently disclosed 2012 experiment in altering the tone of what its users saw in their newsfeeds has brought it plenty of negative opinions to chew on. Here's one, pointed out by an anonymous reader: Facebook's methodology raises serious ethical questions. The team may have bent research standards too far, possibly overstepping criteria enshrined in federal law and human rights declarations. "If you are exposing people to something that causes changes in psychological status, that's experimentation," says James Grimmelmann, a professor of technology and the law at the University of Maryland. "This is the kind of thing that would require informed consent." For a very different take on the Facebook experiment, consider this defense of it from Tal Yarkoni, who thinks the criticism it's drawn is "misplaced": Given that Facebook has over half a billion users, it’s a foregone conclusion that every tiny change Facebook makes to the news feed or any other part of its websites induces a change in millions of people’s emotions. Yet nobody seems to complain about this much–presumably because, when you put it this way, it seems kind of silly to suggest that a company whose business model is predicated on getting its users to use its product more would do anything other than try to manipulate its users into, you know, using its product more. ... [H]aranguing Facebook and other companies like it for publicly disclosing scientifically interesting results of experiments that it is already constantly conducting anyway–and that are directly responsible for many of the positive aspects of the user experience–is not likely to accomplish anything useful. If anything, it’ll only ensure that, going forward, all of Facebook’s societally relevant experimental research is done in the dark, where nobody outside the company can ever find out–or complain–about it."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Facebook's Emotion Experiment: Too Far, Or Social Network Norm?

Slashdot - Mon, 30/06/2014 - 10:30am
Facebook's recently disclosed 2012 experiment in altering the tone of what its users saw in their newsfeeds has brought it plenty of negative opinions to chew on. Here's one, pointed out by an anonymous reader: Facebook's methodology raises serious ethical questions. The team may have bent research standards too far, possibly overstepping criteria enshrined in federal law and human rights declarations. "If you are exposing people to something that causes changes in psychological status, that's experimentation," says James Grimmelmann, a professor of technology and the law at the University of Maryland. "This is the kind of thing that would require informed consent." For a very different take on the Facebook experiment, consider this defense of it from Tal Yarkoni, who thinks the criticism it's drawn is "misplaced": Given that Facebook has over half a billion users, it’s a foregone conclusion that every tiny change Facebook makes to the news feed or any other part of its websites induces a change in millions of people’s emotions. Yet nobody seems to complain about this much–presumably because, when you put it this way, it seems kind of silly to suggest that a company whose business model is predicated on getting its users to use its product more would do anything other than try to manipulate its users into, you know, using its product more. ... [H]aranguing Facebook and other companies like it for publicly disclosing scientifically interesting results of experiments that it is already constantly conducting anyway–and that are directly responsible for many of the positive aspects of the user experience–is not likely to accomplish anything useful. If anything, it’ll only ensure that, going forward, all of Facebook’s societally relevant experimental research is done in the dark, where nobody outside the company can ever find out–or complain–about it."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science