The Unlikely Effort To Build a Clandestine Cell Phone Network

Slashdot - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 9:24pm
Lashdots writes: Electronic surveillance has raised concerns among Americans and pushed an estimated 30% of them to protect their privacy in some form. Artist Curtis Wallen has taken that effort to dramatic lengths, documenting how to create a "clandestine communications network" using pre-paid phones, Tor, Twitter, and encryption. The approach, which attempts to conceal any encryption that could raise suspicions, is "very passive" says Wallen, so "there's hardly any trace that an interaction even happened." This is not easy, of course. In fact, as he discovered while researching faulty CIA security practices, it's really, comically hard. "If the CIA can't even keep from getting betrayed by their cell phones, what chance do we have?" he says. Still, he believes his system could theoretically keep users' activities hidden, and while it's hard, it's not impossible.

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Categories: Science

Game|Life Podcast: Can Star Citizen Possibly Satisfy Fans?

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 9:13pm

WIRED's Angry Nerd Chris Baker returns to talk about his recent feature on Star Citizen, the most crowdfunded project of any kind ever.

The post Game|Life Podcast: Can Star Citizen Possibly Satisfy Fans? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How This $7,000 E-Bike’s GPS Tech Thwarted a Thief

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 8:56pm

With the help of some built in theft-deterrent technology Bill Kiriakis was reunited his brand new e-bike just two hours after discovering it was stolen.

The post How This $7,000 E-Bike’s GPS Tech Thwarted a Thief appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

EFF Fighting Automakers Over Whether You Own Your Car

Slashdot - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 8:42pm
An anonymous reader writes: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act contains anti-circumvention prohibitions that affect everything from music files to cell phones. The EFF noticed that it could apply to cars as well, so they asked for an exemption to be put in place so car owners would be free to inspect and modify the code running on their vehicles. It turns out U.S. automakers don't agree — they filed opposition comments through trade associations. "They say you shouldn't be allowed to repair your own car because you might not do it right. They say you shouldn't be allowed to modify the code in your car because you might defraud a used car purchaser by changing the mileage. They say no one should be allowed to even look at the code without the manufacturer's permission because letting the public learn how cars work could help malicious hackers, "third-party software developers" (the horror!), and competitors. John Deere even argued that letting people modify car computer systems will result in them pirating music through the on-board entertainment system, which would be one of the more convoluted ways to copy media (and the exemption process doesn't authorize copyright infringement, anyway)."

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Categories: Science

Shortest Total Lunar Eclipse of the Century Visible Early Saturday

Space.com - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 8:34pm
Don't forget to look skyward in the early hours of the morning tomorrow (April 4), to catch a glimpse of the shortest total lunar eclipse of the century, and the third of a four-eclipse "tetrad" visible from the United States.
Categories: Science

NSA's Former General Council Talks Privacy, Security, and Snowden's 'Betrayal'

Slashdot - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 8:07pm
blottsie writes: In his first interview since retiring as general council to the NSA, Rajesh De offers detailed insights into the spy agency's efforts to find balance between security and privacy, why the NSA often has trouble defending itself in public, the culture of "No Such Agency," and what it was like on the inside when the Snowden bombshell went off. He describes the mood after the leaks: "My sense of it was that there were two overriding emotions among the workforce. The first was a deep, deep [feeling] of betrayal. Someone who was sitting next to them—being part of the team helping keep people safe, which is really what people at the agency think they are doing—could turn around and do something so self-aggrandizing and reckless. There was also a deep sense of hurt that a lot of what was in the media was not entirely accurate. Questioning the motives and legality of what NSA employees were being asked to do to keep Americans safe—all within the legal policy construct that we've been given—that was difficult for the NSA workforce."

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Categories: Science

The 10 Coolest Cars at the New York Auto Show

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 7:45pm

The New York International Auto Show is the biggest car show on the continent, and this year doesn't disappoint.

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Categories: Science

John Travolta to 'Share Space' with Apollo Astronaut Buzz Aldrin at Gala

Space.com - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 7:27pm
Actor John Travolta will lead a celebration of the first manned moon landing this summer, joining with astronaut Buzz Aldrin to launch a new education initiative. Travolta will host the gala for Aldrin's ShareSpace Foundation at the Kennedy Space Center i
Categories: Science

Why the Framework Nuclear Agreement With Iran Is Good For Both Sides

Slashdot - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 7:16pm
Lasrick writes: Ariane Tabatabai breaks down the details of the framework agreement between Iran and the P5+1 that was announced Thursday. It appears to be better than most analysts expected, with positive outcomes for both sides. It truly seems historic: "A number of these steps will, in effect, be irreversible. They will not just limit Iran's nuclear capability for 10 to 15 years, but will reshape it entirely and indefinitely. ... [B]oth sides stand to gain from the framework agreement, which should also be considered a victory for the global nonproliferation regime. Ahead of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference that begins in late April, where no major achievements in nonproliferation are likely to be announced, the framework agreement is a very important success."

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Categories: Science

Empirical Zeal Has A New Home

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 7:10pm

Hi there. This is a quick note to say that Empirical Zeal has moved back to my home base at empiricalzeal.com I’ve had a blast blogging here at Wired, made a lot of new friends, and learnt a lot from my colleagues and my readers here. It’s been an honor and a privilege to have […]

The post Empirical Zeal Has A New Home appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Quantum material, frustrated magnets: New experiment reveals clues to their discontent

Science Daily - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 7:07pm
An experiment has revealed an unlikely behavior in a class of materials called frustrated magnets, addressing a long-debated question about the nature of these discontented quantum materials. The work represents a surprising discovery that down the road may suggest new research directions for advanced electronics. The study also someday may help clarify the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity, the frictionless transmission of electricity.
Categories: Science

Want a quick 3-D copy of something? Camera chip for smartphone provides superfine 3-D resolution

Science Daily - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 7:07pm
Imagine you need to have an almost exact copy of an object. Now imagine that you can just pull your smartphone out of your pocket, take a snapshot with its integrated 3-D imager, send it to your 3-D printer, and within minutes you have reproduced a replica accurate to within microns of the original object. This feat may soon be possible because of a new tiny high-resolution 3-D imager.
Categories: Science

Microsoft To Stop Enabling 'Do Not Track' By Default

Slashdot - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 6:30pm
An anonymous reader writes: The history of the do-not-track setting for web browsers has been rife with debate. It took a long time for web experts to come to anything resembling a consensus on how it should be implemented, and the process isn't over yet. Microsoft took criticism for enabling the do-not-track setting by default in Internet Explorer. While it sounds good in theory, many worried it would just spur websites to completely disregard the setting (and some, like Yahoo, did just that). Now, Microsoft has reversed their stance. The do-not-track setting will not be enabled by default in the company's future browsers. They say, "Put simply, we are updating our approach to DNT to eliminate any misunderstanding about whether our chosen implementation will comply with the W3C standard. ... As a result, DNT will not be the default state in Windows Express Settings moving forward, but we will provide customers with clear information on how to turn this feature on in the browser settings should they wish to do so."

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Categories: Science

Final Fantasy Soundtrack Covers Are Getting Ridiculous

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 6:27pm

Here's a cover from the 1994 Super Nintendo game Final Fantasy VI, performed by vocalist Jillian Aversa and produced to high heaven.

The post Final Fantasy Soundtrack Covers Are Getting Ridiculous appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Hot, Young Star 'Missing Link' of Stellar Evolution

Space.com - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 6:12pm
A massive protostar connects young stars that have spherical winds to those that push through extended columns.
Categories: Science

Breaking Bad Meets Where’s Waldo? in a Pop Culture Art Show

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 5:50pm

Max Dalton's first solo show in the US features dozens of the artist's limited-edition prints (and plenty of love for ’80s and ’90s movies).

The post Breaking Bad Meets Where’s Waldo? in a Pop Culture Art Show appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Google: Less Than One Percent of Android Devices Are Affected By Harmful Apps

Slashdot - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 5:48pm
jfruh writes: One of the selling points of iOS is that its more restrictive nature makes it more secure. But even though it's easier for users to accidentally install malicious apps on Android, data collected by Google (PDF) indicates that less than one percent of Android users have actually done so. Quoting: "During October 2014, the lowest level of device hygiene was 99.5% and the highest level was 99.65%, so less than 0.5% of devices had a Potentially Harmful Application (PHA) installed (excluding non-malicious Rooting apps). During that same time period, approximately 0.25% of devices had a non-malicious Rooting application installed. ... Worldwide, excluding non-malicious Rooting applications, PHAs are installed on less than 0.1% of devices that install applications only from Google Play. Non-rooting PHAs are installed on approximately 0.7% of devices that are configured to permit installation from outside of Google Play. Additionally, the second graph shows devices with any PHA (including Rooting applications). Rooting applications are installed on about 0.5% of devices that allow sideloading of applications from outside of Google Play."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Science Blogs, Twitter Feeds, and Channels We Love

Wired News - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 5:16pm

Who to follow for science-y words and pictures on Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook and beyond.

The post The Science Blogs, Twitter Feeds, and Channels We Love appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

One dollar blood test using gold nanoparticles outperforms PSA screen for prostate cancer, study suggests

Science Daily - Fri, 03/04/2015 - 5:08pm
A test that uses gold nanoparticles to detect early-stage prostate cancer costs less than $1, returns results in minutes and is more accurate than standard PSA screening, pilot studies show. The new technique leverages the ability of gold nanoparticles to attract cancer biomarkers.
Categories: Science