Dietary anti-cancer compound may work by influence on cellular genetics

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Sulforaphane, a dietary compound from broccoli that's known to help prevent prostate cancer, may work through its influence on long, non-coding RNAs, report scientists. This is another step forward in a compelling new area of study on the underlying genetics of cancer development and progression.
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Water conservation messaging effectiveness during California's ongoing drought

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
The results of a state-wide study on the communication campaigns California has been employing to address its ongoing drought. The study looked at current message strategies aimed to reduce residential water use in California.
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Next-gen steel under the microscope

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Next-generation steel and metal alloys are a step closer to reality, thanks to an international research project. The work could overcome the problem of hydrogen alloy embrittlement that has led to catastrophic failures in major engineering and building projects.
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Empathy from the sick may be critical to halting disease outbreaks

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks. That's a conclusion from researchers who used a networked variation of game theory to study how individual behavior during an outbreak of influenza -- or other illness -- affects the progress of the disease, including how rapidly the outbreak dies out.
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Autism: New analysis method of metabolites accurately predicts whether a child has autism

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Scientists have developed a new, highly accurate method that analyzes metabolic biomarkers to assess whether a child is on the autism spectrum.
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Nose form was shaped by climate

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Big, small, broad, narrow, long or short, turned up, pug, hooked, bulbous or prominent, humans inherit their nose shape from their parents, but ultimately, the shape of someone's nose and that of their parents was formed by a long process of adaptation to our local climate, according to an international team of researchers.
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Earth's first example of recycling: its own crust!

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Rock samples from northeastern Canada retain chemical signals that help explain what Earth's crust was like more than 4 billion years ago.
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Grasses: The recipe for especially efficient stomata

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Scientists have identified a key element underlying the superior function of stomata -- or tiny, gas-exchanging pores -- in grasses, where stomata function more efficiently than they do in other plant types.
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Old target, new mechanism for overcoming tuberculosis resistance

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
In strains of tuberculosis that have developed drug resistance mutations, researchers have identified a secondary pathway that can be activated to reinstate drug sensitivity.
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How gut inflammation drives the evolution of harmful bacteria

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Inflammation in the gut helps bacterial viruses spread to other strains of bacteria and promotes their success, a new study in mice finds.
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Repeated eye injections for age-related macular degeneration associated with increased risk for glaucoma

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Patients with age-related macular degeneration who received seven or more eye injections of the drug bevacizumab annually had a higher risk of having glaucoma surgery, according to a study.
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Operation of ancient biological clock uncovered

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
The operation of one of the oldest biological clocks in the world has, which is crucial for life on earth as we know it, has now been discovered by scientists. The researchers applied a new combination of cutting-edge research techniques. They discovered how the biological clock in cyanobacteria works in detail. Important to understand life, because cyanobacteria were the first organisms on earth producing oxygen via photosynthesis.
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Three experts explain how economics can shape precision medicines

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Many public and private efforts focus on research in precision medicine. Scientific initiatives alone, however, will not deliver such medicines without strong incentives.
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Buying a Samsung TV Online Could Jeopardize Your Data

Slashdot - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:00pm
An anonymous reader shares a CNET report: If you buy a product from Samsung's online store, your name, address, order information and other data may be accessible to anyone who cares to look. Matt Metzger, a self-described "application security engineer" who said he has worked in shipping-industry compliance, wrote Wednesday on Medium about an accidental discovery. Metzger said he ordered a TV from the Samsung online store and was sent a URL to track his delivery. When he followed the URL, he discovered that his tracking number was the same one used for someone else's previous delivery and that he could see sensitive information, such as the person's name and items ordered, without any security measures getting in the way. Metzger also discovered that more information was attached in a TIFF file to his own order after the delivery was completed. The file included his full name, address and signature.Samsung told CNET it is aware of the issue and is looking into it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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That Deleted McDonald’s Tweet? Too Surreal, Even For Fast-Food Twitter

Wired News - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 5:45pm
From surreal Denny's to nihilist Arby's, a journey through the deliciously dark underbelly of social media. (Mmm, underbelly.) The post That Deleted McDonald's Tweet? Too Surreal, Even For Fast-Food Twitter appeared first on WIRED.
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Using MP3-like code, engineers spot hospital alarm 'masking'

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 5:33pm
The failure of hospital caregivers to respond to medical alerts is often attributed to “alarm fatigue.” Another possible explanation: alarms sounding simultaneously can blend together, making one or more of them inaudible. The phenomenon, known as masking, makes it difficult to differentiate alarms, including those that signal life-threatening emergencies. A research team is developing a computer-based tool — using the same principles as MP3 audio files — to identify these auditory blind spots.
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Swatch Takes on Google, Apple With Watch Operating System

Slashdot - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 5:20pm
Corinne Gretler, reporting for Bloomberg: Swatch said it's developing an alternative to the iOS and Android operating systems for smartwatches as Switzerland's largest maker of timepieces vies with Silicon Valley for control of consumers' wrists. The company's Tissot brand will introduce a model around the end of 2018 that uses the Swiss-made system, which will also be able to connect small objects and wearables, Swatch Chief Executive Officer Nick Hayek said in an interview Thursday. The technology will need less battery power and it will protect data better, he said later at a press conference. Switzerland's four-century-old watch industry has been adjusting to new competition since Apple entered its territory with the Apple Watch in 2015. Hayek faces the uphill challenge of trying to outsmart Google and Apple, which have fended off would-be rivals to their operation systems in smartphones and watches.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Is spring getting longer? Lengthening 'vernal window'

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 4:56pm
When spring arrives, temperatures begin to rise, ice is melts, and the world around us starts to blossom. Scientists sometimes refer to this transition from winter to the growing season as the 'vernal window,' and a new study shows this window may be opening earlier and possibly for longer.
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Preventing lead spread

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 4:56pm
While lead pipes were banned decades ago, they still supply millions of American households with water each day. A team of engineers has developed a new way to track where dangerous lead particles might be transported in the drinking water supply during a common abatement procedure.
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Effectiveness of Federal Reserve emergency lending 2007-09

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 4:56pm
For the first time ever, new research examines data from the 2007-2009 financial crisis to show how the US Federal Reserve can effectively assist banks in times of financial uncertainty.
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