The Science of Social Participation

Slashdot - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 3:06am
cold fjord writes in with this story about research that breaks down Twitter conversations in 6 basic types."The Pew Research Center and the Social Media Research Foundation analyzed thousands of twitter conversations going back to 2010. They found these conversations occurred based on the structure of the individual's Twitter network. For example, the subjects and content that a person tweets about, the people they follow, the people who follow them and the way they network creates a structure of social activity. In a recently released report Pew reports that they uncovered six distinct patterns for these structures. 'These are data-driven early steps in understanding Twitter discussion structures that contribute to the emerging science of social participation,' Ben Shneiderman professor of computer science at the University of Maryland ... 'This new field is emerging right before our eyes and could eventually have a large impact on our understanding of everything from health to community safety, from business innovation to citizen science and from civic engagement to sustainable energy programs.' ... 'These maps provide insights into people's behavior in a way that complements and expands on traditional research methods ... '"

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Categories: Science

Ubuntu 14.04 Brings Back Menus In Application Windows

Slashdot - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 1:37am
sfcrazy writes "Canonical is bringing back menu integration with application windows. In 14.04 there will be an option for users to enable menus in application windows. That's a huge u-turn from Mark's stand on Global Menus which upset a lot of Ubuntu users."

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Categories: Science

You May Not Use WhatsApp, But the Rest of the World Sure Does

Wired News - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 1:17am
If you did a double-take yesterday when Facebook announced that it was spending an astounding $19 billion to buy mobile messaging software company WhatsApp, you're forgiven. After all, the software isn't widely used in the United States, and WhatsApp is a 32-engineer company that's kept a decidedly low profile. In India, however, it's the bomb. Mobile ...
    





Categories: Science

Dogs' Brains Have Human-like "Voice Area"

Slashdot - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:56am
sciencehabit writes "When you hear a friend's voice, you immediately picture her, even if you can't see her. And from the tone of her speech, you quickly gauge if she's happy or sad. You can do all of this because your human brain has a 'voice area.' Now, scientists using brain scanners and a crew of eager dogs have discovered that dog brains, too, have dedicated voice areas. The finding helps explain how canines can be so attuned to their owners' feelings."

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Categories: Science

Planet-sized space weather explosions at Venus

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:40am
Researchers recently discovered that a common space weather phenomenon on the outskirts of Earth's magnetic bubble, the magnetosphere, has much larger repercussions for Venus. The giant explosions, called hot flow anomalies, can be so large at Venus that they're bigger than the entire planet and they can happen multiple times a day.
Categories: Science

Legal harvest of marine turtles tops 42,000 each year

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:35am
A new study has found that 42 countries or territories around the world permit the harvest of marine turtles -- and estimates that more than 42,000 turtles are caught each year by these fisheries. All seven marine turtle species are currently listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The direct take of turtles has continued legally in many regions and countries, often for traditional coastal communities to support themselves or small-scale fisheries supplying local markets with meat, and sometimes shell. The fisheries are an important source of finance, protein and cultural identity, but information can be scarce on their status -- despite often being listed as one of the major threats to turtle populations.
Categories: Science

Genetic screening can identify men with advanced prostate cancer

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:35am
Screening men with a family history of prostate cancer for a range of gene mutations can identify those who are at high risk of aggressive forms of the disease and in need of lifelong monitoring, a new study has shown. The findings are important because they demonstrate not only that some men have a genetic profile that puts them at higher risk of prostate cancer, but that particular genetic profiles match to a higher risk of advanced, invasive disease. A big challenge facing prostate cancer researchers is to find ways of predicting which men will have life-threatening forms of the disease, to allow treatment to be tailored more effectively.
Categories: Science

Skin tumor vaccine shows promise in wild mice, rising hope for transplant patients

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:35am
Papillomaviruses (linked to cervical cancer when they infect the mucosal tissue in the female reproductive tract) can also infect normal skin, where they cause warts and possibly non-melanoma skin cancer, mostly in immune-suppressed organ transplant patients. A new article suggests that vaccination might prevent virus-associated benign and malignant skin tumors.
Categories: Science

Greece's deepening health crisis a result of continued healthcare budget cuts, says study

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:34am
Greece’s health crisis is worsening as a result of continued healthcare budget cuts, says a new study. Researchers say the harmful effects of austerity are linked to the increasing inability of patients to access the health system, large rises in the incidence of infectious disease, and a deterioration in the overall mental health of Greek people.
Categories: Science

Vibration energy the secret to self-powered electronics

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:33am
Engineers have developed what could be a promising solution for charging smartphone batteries on the go -- without the need for an electrical cord. Incorporated directly into a cell phone housing, the team's nanogenerator could harvest and convert vibration energy from a surface, such as the passenger seat of a moving vehicle, into power for the phone.
Categories: Science

New York takes lead in state efforts to end ivory trade

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:33am
A bill introduced into the New York State Legislature proposing a sweeping ban on the sale of ivory in New York State, Assembly bill A8824, has been welcomed by the Wildlife Conservation Society. "This legislation is a key component to global efforts to stopping the killing, stopping the trafficking, and stopping the demand of elephant ivory. But much more needs to be done, and we are hopeful that New York will be helping lead the charge to protect Africa’s elephants," the WCS states.
Categories: Science

Could PTSD involve immune cell response to stress? Study in mice raises question

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:33am
Chronic stress that produces inflammation and anxiety in mice appears to prime their immune systems for a prolonged fight, causing the animals to have an excessive reaction to a single acute stressor weeks later, new research suggests. After the mice recovered from the effects of chronic stress, a single stressful event 24 days later quickly returned them to a chronically stressed state in biological and behavioral terms. Mice that had not experienced the chronic stress were unaffected by the single acute stressor.
Categories: Science

Biopsies before transplantation do not determine success of donated kidneys

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:33am
Biopsy-detected injury in donated kidneys was modestly associated with a delay in organ function in the first week after transplantation, but only for donor kidneys already known to be at high risk. Donor kidney biopsies frequently underreported kidney injury with substantial variability. The study also showed that there was a large degree of overlap between the results of biopsies from kidneys that were deemed unsuitable for transplantation and kidneys that were approved for transplantation. The quality of biopsies used in acceptance decisions was low.
Categories: Science

Many kidney disease patients experience hazardous events related to their medical care

Science Daily - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:33am
In a study of 267 patients with chronic kidney disease, 69% of participants experienced at least one hazardous event related to their outpatient care. Hypoglycemia (in patients with diabetes) and falling or severe dizziness (in patients without diabetes) were most frequently paired with other complications of medical care. "Disease-specific adverse safety event events are strikingly common in CKD," concludes the lead author.
Categories: Science

White House Takes Steps Against Patent Trolls

Slashdot - Fri, 21/02/2014 - 12:10am
itwbennett writes "The Obama administration on Thursday launched a website with information to assist people and businesses targeted in patent lawsuits or receiving patent demand letters. The White House also announced that it would launch a new crowdsourcing initiative focused on identifying prior art (evidence of existing inventions) that the USPTO can use to reject bad patent claims and will expand a USPTO patent examiner technical training program by allowing outside technologists to help with the training."

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Categories: Science

Why Your Online Impersonation of a 16-year Old Girl Won't Last Long

Slashdot - Thu, 20/02/2014 - 11:26pm
An anonymous reader writes "Can computers pick up your age and gender from your tweets? If you want to give it a try, here's your chance: 'To develop your software for age and gender identification, we provide you with a training data set that consists of blog posts, Twitter tweets, social media texts, as well as hotel reviews.' Well, at least my paid Amazon reviews are safe for the time being..."

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Categories: Science

Why Your Online Impersonation of a 16-year Old Girl Won't Last Long

Slashdot - Thu, 20/02/2014 - 11:26pm
An anonymous reader writes "Can computers pick up your age and gender from your tweets? If you want to give it a try, here's your chance: 'To develop your software for age and gender identification, we provide you with a training data set that consists of blog posts, Twitter tweets, social media texts, as well as hotel reviews.' Well, at least my paid Amazon reviews are safe for the time being..."

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Categories: Science

Why Your Online Impersonation of a 16-year Old Girl Won't Last Long

Slashdot - Thu, 20/02/2014 - 11:26pm
An anonymous reader writes "Can computers pick up your age and gender from your tweets? If you want to give it a try, here's your chance: 'To develop your software for age and gender identification, we provide you with a training data set that consists of blog posts, Twitter tweets, social media texts, as well as hotel reviews.' Well, at least my paid Amazon reviews are safe for the time being..."

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Categories: Science

Why Your Online Impersonation of a 16-year Old Girl Won't Last Long

Slashdot - Thu, 20/02/2014 - 11:26pm
An anonymous reader writes "Can computers pick up your age and gender from your tweets? If you want to give it a try, here's your chance: 'To develop your software for age and gender identification, we provide you with a training data set that consists of blog posts, Twitter tweets, social media texts, as well as hotel reviews.' Well, at least my paid Amazon reviews are safe for the time being..."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Why Your Online Impersonation of a 16-year Old Girl Won't Last Long

Slashdot - Thu, 20/02/2014 - 11:26pm
An anonymous reader writes "Can computers pick up your age and gender from your tweets? If you want to give it a try, here's your chance: 'To develop your software for age and gender identification, we provide you with a training data set that consists of blog posts, Twitter tweets, social media texts, as well as hotel reviews.' Well, at least my paid Amazon reviews are safe for the time being..."

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Categories: Science