How Chet Faker Turned a Dream Into a Hit Song

Wired News - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 2:00pm

Australian singer-songwriter Chet Faker breaks down his process for making the song "Gold."

The post How Chet Faker Turned a Dream Into a Hit Song appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Association between breastfeeding, reduced risk of aggressive breast cancer

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 1:51pm
Breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of developing an aggressive form of breast cancer called hormone-receptor negative, a large international study shows. Hormone-receptor-negative (HRN) breast cancers are more likely to be aggressive and life-threatening. This subtype is more commonly diagnosed in women under age 50.
Categories: Science

Making heads and tails of embryo development: Lessons from the humble fly

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 1:51pm
Proteins usually responsible for the destruction of virally infected or cancerous cells in our immune system have been found to control the release from cells of a critical growth factor governing head and tail development in fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster). This may help explain how these perforin-like proteins function in human brain development and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Categories: Science

'Virtual Week' brain game has potential to help older adults remain independent longer

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 1:51pm
Just one month of training on a 'Virtual Week' computer brain game helps older adults significantly strengthen prospective memory -- a type of memory that is crucial for planning, everyday functioning and independent living, an international team of scientists has demonstrated.
Categories: Science

Radiotherapeutic bandage shows potential as treatment for skin cancer

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 1:51pm
A radiotherapeutic bandage is being evaluated by researchers for efficacy against squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in an animal model. These results could confirm the viability of a new and improved strategy for the radiotherapeutic treatment of skin cancer in the clinic.
Categories: Science

$70k Salaries Didn't 'Backfire'; Gravity Payments' Profits Have Doubled

Slashdot - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 1:46pm
AmiMoJo writes: In April, Dan Price, CEO of the credit card payment processor Gravity Payments, announced that he will eventually raise minimum pay for all employees to at least $70,000 a year. The move sparked not just a firestorm of media attention, but also a lawsuit from Price's brother and co-founder Lucas, claiming that the pay raise violated his rights as a minority shareholder. But six months later, the financial results are starting to come in: Price told Inc. Magazine that revenue is now growing at double the rate before the raises began and profits have also doubled since then. On top of that, while it lost a few customers in the kerfuffle, the company's customer retention rate rose from 91 to 95 percent, and only two employees quit. Two weeks after he made the initial announcement, the company was flooded with 4,500 resumes and new customer inquiries jumped from 30 a month to 2,000 a month.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

China May Have Hacked International Hague Tribunal Over South China Sea Dispute

Slashdot - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 1:05pm
An anonymous reader writes: In July, the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague conducted a hearing on the territorial dispute in the South China Sea between the Philippines and China. On the third day of the hearing, the Court's website was suddenly knocked offline. The attack reportedly originated from China and infected the page with malware, leaving anyone interested in the landmark legal case at risk of data theft. "By infecting the computers of journalists, diplomats, lawyers, and others who are involved or interested in the case, Chinese cyber units may be able to find out the names of people who are following the case and anticipate what their response might be if the court rules against China. For example, if Vietnamese or Japanese diplomats visited the website and their computers were infected, China could have access to internal documents and understand that country’s next moves over the disputed islands."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Historian examines environmental cost of tapping alternate sources for water, oil

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:52pm
Saudi Arabia is one of the top oil producing countries in the world. However, a professor of history says it may have never earned that reputation if not for a quest to find drinking water in the late 19th century, because of drought and repeated cholera outbreaks.
Categories: Science

Scientists use exhaled breath to detect hypoxia

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:51pm
Researchers have demonstrated a technique that may enable real-time, in-flight detection of hypoxia in pilots. The findings indicate that volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis could identify biomarkers of hypoxia.
Categories: Science

Revolutionary research work on glassy materials

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
Scientists have discovered a new method of manufacturing glass.
Categories: Science

Prevention of mental disorders through physical activity

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
Adults who perform high or mild levels of total physical activity present higher levels of mental health than those performing low levels of physical activity, a study concludes. They also found that the level of exercise performed in leisure time is inversely related to vulnerability to mental disorders.
Categories: Science

Could your job be making you obese?

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
Research reveals link between having to make lots of decisions at work and increased BMI. The findings suggest for the first time that these two psychological measures of control at work may actually have very different effects on our waistlines, so should be assessed separately.
Categories: Science

Learning in your sleep, the right way

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
You can swot up on vocabulary in your sleep, but only if you don’t confuse your brain in the process. Researchers have invited people to their sleep lab for a Dutch language course.
Categories: Science

Oldest DNA sequences may reveal secrets of ancient animal ancestors

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
Researchers have discovered early conserved DNA sequences from almost 700 million years ago.
Categories: Science

Scientists synthesize hexagonal boron nitride

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
Researchers have assiduously studied the relationship between insulators and conductors. The international team has extensively tested layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) – an insulating two-dimensional material (2-D) of remarkable properties. All the atoms in 2-D layer materials are exposed to the surface, the related physical and chemical properties are strongly influenced by adjoining materials and sometimes surface corrugation.
Categories: Science

Scientists develop a new method for predicting volcanic eruptions

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
Researchers have developed a new method which could more accurately determine the conditions needed for a volcano to erupt.
Categories: Science

Nordic Seas cooled 500,000 years before global oceans

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:49pm
The cooling of the Nordic Seas towards modern temperatures started in the early Pliocene, half a million years before the global oceans cooled. A new study of fossil marine plankton demonstrates this.
Categories: Science

Brain imaging can predict success of large public health campaigns

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:40pm
In a new study, brain activity in 50 smokers in Michigan was able to predict the outcome of an anti-smoking advertising campaign sent to 800,000 in New York, demonstrating the promise of neuroscience to inform and improve public health campaigns.
Categories: Science

New component of Milky Way discovered

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:40pm
Astronomers have discovered a previously unknown component of the Milky Way. By mapping out the locations of a class of stars that vary in brightness called Cepheids, a disc of young stars buried behind thick dust clouds in the central bulge has been found.
Categories: Science

Alerting the immune system's watchmen to improve vaccines

Science Daily - Wed, 28/10/2015 - 12:40pm
As the days get colder and shorter, we carve jack-o-lanterns and drink pumpkin spice lattes. But one fall tradition can actually keep you healthy: getting your flu shot. Like all vaccines, the flu shot trains the immune system to fend off infection, but some need help to produce the full effect. Researchers now report a new way to help improve vaccines using molecules that more effectively direct the immune system.
Categories: Science