Google Home Gets 'Beauty & The Beast' Promo But Google Says It's Not an Ad

Slashdot - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:20pm
Danny Sullivan, reporting for MarketingLand: Ask Google Home what your day is like today, and it will remind you that Disney's Beauty and the Beast is opening today. Google says this isn't an ad. But it's definitely an out-of-the-ordinary cooperation with a Google Home "partner." The promotion was spotted by Bryson Meunier, whose child was definitely excited to hear the news delivered by Google Home. "This isn't an ad; the beauty in the Assistant is that it invites our partners to be our guest and share their tales," a spokesperson said. The company doesn't list Disney as one of its partners on Google Home website, the report adds.

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Categories: Science

New drug delivery method for cancer therapy developed

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:18pm
Scientists have developed a new drug delivery method that produces strong results in treating cancers in animal models, including some hard-to-treat solid and liquid tumors.
Categories: Science

Share of women researchers grows with their research as impactful as men's

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:17pm
The share of women among researchers has increased between four and 11 percentage points between the periods 1996-2000 and 2011-2015 among 12 geographies. Across these geographies, women's scholarly articles are cited or downloaded at similar rates to men's while women tend to publish fewer articles than men on average, report researchers.
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Scientists publish groundbreaking study on new heart drug

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:17pm
Scientists have identified a drug candidate to restore heart muscle function following a heart attack. Currently, no drug exists to restore heart muscle function after a heart attack.
Categories: Science

58 million Americans are exposed to loud, frequent noises, including firearms, at work and home

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:17pm
Substantial noise exposures, with potentially serious long-term hearing health consequences, frequently occur in occupational and recreational settings, a new report explains.
Categories: Science

How improved valves let grasses 'breathe,' cope with climate change

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:16pm
New work from a joint team of plant biologists and ecologists has uncovered the factor behind an important innovation that makes grasses -- both the kind that make up native prairies and the kind we've domesticated for crops -- among the most-common and widespread plants on the planet. Their findings may enable the production of plants that perform better in warmer and dryer climate conditions.
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'Do no harm' vs 'legitimate use of force'

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:16pm
Bioethicists study whether health professionals in the Canadian Armed Forces can abide by two ethics codes, civilian and military.
Categories: Science

Animal behaviorist looks through the eyes of peafowl

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 7:16pm
One scientist uses peafowl to conduct a variety of behavioral studies, looking through the eyes of the birds to actually see what the animals are paying attention to, in this particular case, how males size up their competition.
Categories: Science

Judge Rejects Google Deal Over Email Scanning

Slashdot - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:40pm
A federal judge in San Francisco slammed a legal settlement that proposed to pay $2.2 million to lawyers, but nothing to consumers who had the contents of their email scanned by Google without their knowledge or permission. From a report: In a 6-page order, Judge Lucy Koh told Google and class action attorneys the proposed settlement was insufficient, in part because it failed to clearly tell consumers what the search giant had done. "This notice is difficult to understand and does not clearly disclose the fact that Google intercepts, scans and analyzes the content of emails sent by non-Gmail users to Gmail users for the purpose of creating user profiles of the Gmail users to create targeted advertising for the Gmail users," Koh wrote.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Using gold coating to control luminescence of nanowires

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
In electronics, the race for smaller is huge. Physicists are working to harness the power of nanowires, microscopic wires that have the potential to improve solar cells or revolutionize fiber optics.
Categories: Science

The carbon dioxide loop

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Marine biologists quantify the carbon consumption of bacterioplankton to better understand the ocean carbon cycle.
Categories: Science

Challenges veterans face when transitioning from the battlefield to the classroom

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
A research team investigating the mental health burden and treatment-seeking behaviors of student veterans attending rural community colleges in the southern United States has found that this population has difficulty integrating into the campus community and needs support to help it succeed.
Categories: Science

Hawaiian biodiversity has been declining for millions of years

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
DNA analysis led some biologists to conclude that evolutionary diversification in Hawaii has yet to peak, but a new analysis shows the opposite: biodiversity on the island chain peaked millions of years ago and has been decreasing every since. On the older islands, because of crowding caused by shrinking land area, species were being lost long before humans entered the mix.
Categories: Science

Genetic association with aggressive prostate cancer discovered

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
A genetic connection to the aggressive form of prostate cancer has been discovered by researchers. The study showed a threefold increase in the risk of aggressive prostate cancer for men with the genetic mutation. The frequency of the gene variants varied from 6 to 14 percent of the population of men with prostate cancer.
Categories: Science

Dietary anti-cancer compound may work by influence on cellular genetics

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Sulforaphane, a dietary compound from broccoli that's known to help prevent prostate cancer, may work through its influence on long, non-coding RNAs, report scientists. This is another step forward in a compelling new area of study on the underlying genetics of cancer development and progression.
Categories: Science

Water conservation messaging effectiveness during California's ongoing drought

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
The results of a state-wide study on the communication campaigns California has been employing to address its ongoing drought. The study looked at current message strategies aimed to reduce residential water use in California.
Categories: Science

Next-gen steel under the microscope

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Next-generation steel and metal alloys are a step closer to reality, thanks to an international research project. The work could overcome the problem of hydrogen alloy embrittlement that has led to catastrophic failures in major engineering and building projects.
Categories: Science

Empathy from the sick may be critical to halting disease outbreaks

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks. That's a conclusion from researchers who used a networked variation of game theory to study how individual behavior during an outbreak of influenza -- or other illness -- affects the progress of the disease, including how rapidly the outbreak dies out.
Categories: Science

Autism: New analysis method of metabolites accurately predicts whether a child has autism

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:11pm
Scientists have developed a new, highly accurate method that analyzes metabolic biomarkers to assess whether a child is on the autism spectrum.
Categories: Science

Nose form was shaped by climate

Science Daily - Thu, 16/03/2017 - 6:10pm
Big, small, broad, narrow, long or short, turned up, pug, hooked, bulbous or prominent, humans inherit their nose shape from their parents, but ultimately, the shape of someone's nose and that of their parents was formed by a long process of adaptation to our local climate, according to an international team of researchers.
Categories: Science