Book Review: Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboards

Slashdot - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:24pm
benrothke writes There is a not so fine line between data dashboards and other information displays that provide pretty but otherwise useless and unactionable information; and those that provide effective answers to key questions. Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboards is all about the later. In this extremely valuable book, authors Jay Jacobs and Bob Rudis show you how to find security patterns in your data logs and extract enough information from it to create effective information security countermeasures. By using data correctly and truly understanding what that data means, the authors show how you can achieve much greater levels of security. Keep reading for the rest of Ben's review.

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Categories: Science

Dodging dots helps explain brain circuitry

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:17pm
Neuroscientists looked cell by cell at the brain circuitry that tadpoles, and possibly other animals, use to avoid collisions. The study produced a model of how individual inhibitory and excitatory neurons can work together to control a simple behavior. The basic circuitry involved is present in a wide variety of animals, including people, which is no surprise given how fundamental collision avoidance is across animal behavior.
Categories: Science

Satellites reveal possible catastrophic flooding months in advance

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:17pm
Data from NASA satellites can greatly improve predictions of how likely a river basin is to overflow months before it does, according to new findings. The use of such data, which capture a much fuller picture of how water is accumulating, could result in earlier flood warnings, potentially saving lives and property.
Categories: Science

Moral beliefs a barrier to HPV vaccine, researchers find

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:17pm
The biggest barrier to receiving a human papillomavirus vaccine was moral or religious beliefs, a survey of first-year students has indicated. The HPV vaccines are commonly recommended for children ages 11-12 to protect against cervical cancers in women, and genital warts and other cancers in men.
Categories: Science

Infant toenails reveal in utero exposure to low-level arsenic, study finds

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:17pm
Infant toenails are a reliable way to estimate arsenic exposure before birth, a study shows. A growing body of evidence suggests that in utero and early-life exposure to arsenic may have detrimental effects on children, even at the low to moderate levels common in the United States and elsewhere. The fetus starts to develop toenails during the first trimester, making them an accurate measure of exposure to arsenic during the entire gestation.
Categories: Science

Support team aiding caregivers of cancer patients shows success, researchers report

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:17pm
Many caregivers of terminal cancer patients suffer depression and report regret and guilt from feeling they could have done more to eliminate side effects and relieve the pain. So researchers devised and tested an intervention that quickly integrates a cancer support team to guide caregivers and their patients through difficult end-of-life treatment and decisions.
Categories: Science

Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV medical studies examined by researchers

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:17pm
Social/behavioral intervention vastly increased the number of African American and Latino individuals living with HIV/AIDS who enrolled in HIV/AIDS medical studies, a study has found. Nine out of 10 participants who were found eligible for studies decided to enroll, compared to zero participants among a control group.
Categories: Science

Rats use their whiskers in a similar way to how humans use their hands and fingers

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:16pm
The way rats use their whiskers is more similar to how humans use their hands and fingers than previously thought, new research has found. Rats deliberately change how they sense their environment using their facial whiskers depending on whether the environment is novel, if there is a risk of collision and whether or not they can see where they are going.
Categories: Science

Sitting too much, not just lack of exercise, is detrimental to cardiovascular health

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 6:16pm
Cardiologists have found that sedentary behaviors may lower cardiorespiratory fitness levels. New evidence suggests that two hours of sedentary behavior can be just as harmful as 20 minutes of exercise is beneficial.
Categories: Science

Mechanism that prevents lethal bacteria from causing invasive disease is revealed

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered by scientists. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 'commensal', which can live harmlessly in the nasopharynx as part of the body's natural bacterial flora. However, in the very young and old it can invade the rest of the body, leading to serious diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, which claim up to a million lives every year worldwide.
Categories: Science

Non-diet approach to weight management more effective in worksite wellness programs

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
Researchers have found that 'Eat for Life,' a new wellness approach that focuses on mindfulness and intuitive eating as a lifestyle, is more effective than traditional weight-loss programs in improving individuals' views of their bodies and decreasing problematic eating behaviors.
Categories: Science

Antarctic climate and food web strongly linked

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
A long-term study of the links between climate and marine life along the rapidly warming West Antarctic Peninsula reveals how changes in physical factors such as wind speed and sea-ice cover send ripples up the food chain, with impacts on everything from single-celled algae to penguins.
Categories: Science

Climate change: IPCC must consider alternate policy views, researchers say

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
The Summary for Policymakers recently produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has triggered a public debate about excessive governmental intrusion in the IPCC process. The IPCC cannot avoid alternative political interpretations of data and must involve policy makers in finding out how to address these implications, according to a team of researchers.
Categories: Science

Solid-state physics: Consider the 'anticrystal'

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
For the last century, the concept of crystals has been a mainstay of solid-state physics. Crystals are paragons of order; crystalline materials are defined by the repeating patterns their constituent atoms and molecules make. Physicists now have evidence that a new concept should undergird our understanding of most materials: the anticrystal, a theoretical solid that is completely disordered.
Categories: Science

Obesity, large waist size risk factors for COPD

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
Obesity, especially excessive belly fat, is a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to a new article. Excessive belly fat and low physical activity are linked to progression of the disease in people with COPD, but it is not known whether these modifiable factors are linked to new cases.
Categories: Science

Why 'whispers' among bees sometimes evolve into 'shouts'

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:43pm
Let's say you're a bee and you've spotted a new and particularly lucrative source of nectar and pollen. What's the best way to communicate the location of this prize cache of food to the rest of your nestmates without revealing it to competitors, or 'eavesdropping' spies, outside of the colony? One risky way is to "shout" to warn would-be competitors that their prime source of food will be fiercely defended if they show up to the site.
Categories: Science

Less exercise, not more calories, responsible for expanding waistlines

Science Daily - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:42pm
Sedentary lifestyle and not caloric intake may be to blame for increased obesity in the US, according to a new analysis. A study reveals that in the past 20 years there has been a sharp decrease in physical exercise and an increase in average body mass index (BMI), while caloric intake has remained steady. Investigators theorized that a nationwide drop in leisure-time physical activity, especially among young women, may be responsible for the upward trend in obesity rates.
Categories: Science

IBM Tries To Forecast and Control Beijing's Air Pollution

Slashdot - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:37pm
itwbennett writes Using supercomputers to predict and study pollution patterns is nothing new. And already, China's government agencies, and the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, publicly report real-time pollution levels to residents. But IBM is hoping to design a better system tailored for Beijing that can predict air quality levels three days in advance, and even pinpoint the exact sources of the pollution down to the street level, said Jin Dong, an IBM Research director involved in the project.

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Categories: Science

Solar Observatories To Fly Behind Sun | Video

Space.com - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 5:27pm
NASA STEREO-A and STEREO-B solar probes' orbits will take them out of view from Earth at different times in 2015 making communication very difficult.
Categories: Science

Airbus Patents Windowless Cockpit That Would Increase Pilots' Field of View

Slashdot - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 4:50pm
Zothecula writes Imagine showing up at the airport to catch your flight, looking at your plane, and noticing that instead of windows, the cockpit is now a smooth cone of aluminum. It may seem like the worst case of quality control in history, but Airbus argues that this could be the airliner of the future. In a new US patent application, the EU aircraft consortium outlines a new cockpit design that replaces the traditional cockpit with one that uses 3D view screens instead of conventional windows.

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Categories: Science