Small drains mean big problems at 'baby beaches'

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:53pm
High fecal counts frequently detected at so-called 'baby beaches' may not be diaper-related. Researchers found that during summer months, small drainpipes emptying into enclosed ocean bays have a disproportionate impact on calmer waters.
Categories: Science

Mapping human disease: 'Not all pathogens are everywhere'

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:53pm
For the first time, researchers have mapped human disease-causing pathogens, dividing the world into a number of regions where similar diseases occur. The findings show that the world can be separated into seven regions for vectored human diseases -- diseases that are spread by pests, like mosquito-borne malaria -- and five regions for non-vectored diseases, like cholera.
Categories: Science

Tinkering with the Tao of pandas

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:53pm
Good news on the panda front: Turns out they're not quite as delicate -- and picky -- as thought. Up until now, information gleaned from 30 years worth of scientific literature suggested that pandas were inflexible about habitat. Those conclusions morphed into conventional wisdom and thus have guided policy in China. But a new researcher has led a deep dive into aggregate data and emerged with evidence that the endangered animal is more resilient and flexible than previously believed.
Categories: Science

Low-grade waste heat regenerates ammonia battery

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:53pm
An efficient method to harvest low-grade waste heat as electricity may be possible using reversible ammonia batteries, according to engineers. Low-grade waste heat is an artifact of many energy-generating methods. In automobiles, waste heat generated in winter is diverted to run the vehicle heating system, but in the summer, that same waste heat must be dissipated to the environment.
Categories: Science

Geckos are sticky without effort: Death has no impact on strength geckos use to adhere to surfaces

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:53pm
Scientists have studied a variety of features in geckos such as the adhesive toe pads on the underside of the feet with which geckos attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. Biologists have now conducted experiments in the lab on live and dead geckos that show, for the first time, that dead geckos can adhere to surfaces with the same strength as living geckos. The research could have applications in the field of robotics.
Categories: Science

People in unhappy places are depressed more than a week a month

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:53pm
People in the country's unhappiest communities spend about a quarter of the month so far down in the dumps that it can harm their productivity, according to economists.
Categories: Science

Glass houses: Your personality helps predict your real estate choices

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:51pm
According to a new study, personality traits are strong indicators of real-estate decisions. The study finds a correlation between personality and individual real estate choices, and a follow-up study by the same team finds an identical link between local personality types in America and statewide real estate trends.
Categories: Science

Clothes that can monitor, transmit biomedical info developed

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:51pm
Smart textiles are able to monitor and transmit wearers' biomedical information via wireless or cellular networks, developers report. This technological breakthrough clears a path for a host of new developments for people suffering from chronic diseases, elderly people living alone, and even firemen and police officers.
Categories: Science

Are There Safe, Effective Treatments for Hereditary Angioedema in Children?

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:50pm
Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare genetic disease that causes recurrent swelling under the skin and of the mucosal lining of the gastrointestinal tract and upper airway, usually first appears before 20 years of age. A comprehensive review of the therapies currently available to treat HAE in adults shows that some of these treatments are also safe and effective for use in older children and adolescents.
Categories: Science

Extraordinary throughput at supercomputing conference

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:48pm
Computer scientists moved 65 terabytes of data in under just 100 minutes at a recent supercomputing conference.
Categories: Science

Online tool to help cities in Great Lakes Region plan for climate impacts

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:48pm
Reduced water availability and quality, floods and problems related to heat stress are some of the potential impacts cities face with a changing climate.
Categories: Science

'Mirage Earth' exoplanets may have burned away chances for life

Science Daily - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:48pm
Planets orbiting close to low-mass stars — easily the most common stars in the universe — are prime targets in the search for extraterrestrial life. But new research led by an astronomy graduate student indicates some such planets may have long since lost their chance at hosting life because of intense heat during their formative years.
Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Android Policy For Nexus and Google Play Devices Updated To Excuse Carrier Delay

Slashdot - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 5:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google has quietly updated its Android update policy for both Nexus and Google Play edition devices. In short, if you bought either type of smartphone or tablet from a carrier, you may experience delays that result in waiting longer than two weeks to get the latest version. Google has tweaked the "Android updates: Nexus & Google Play edition devices" support page to add, "Based on your carrier, it may take longer than two weeks after release to get an update." It's worth emphasizing this won't stop you from downloading a given Android update directly from Google or your device's manufacturer, and installing it yourself on your device. This is mainly for over-the-air updates, which carriers can choose to delay on their own networks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science