Cells engineered from muscular dystrophy patients offer clues to variations in symptoms

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:48pm
Researchers have inadvertently found a way to make human muscle cells bearing genetic mutations from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
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Genes that increase children's risk of blood infection identified

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:45pm
Genes that make certain children more susceptible to invasive bacterial infections have been identified by performing a large genome-wide association study in African children.
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Researchers show experience plays strong role in early stages of brain circuit development

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:45pm
A new study suggests that external stimulation guides certain neurons' early development so that inhibitory neurons split into two different types of neurons, each with a different job, adding another level of complexity and regulation to the brain's circuitry.
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Why malnutrition is an immune disorder

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:45pm
Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation. New experimental evidence indicates that even with a healthy diet, defects in immune system function from birth could contribute to a malnourished state throughout life. Researchers speculate that targeting immune pathways could be a new approach to reduce the poor health and mortality caused by under- and overnutrition.
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Cuing environmental responses in fungi

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:45pm
Sensory perception lies at the heart of adaptation to changing conditions, and helps fungi to improve growth and recycle organic waste, and to know when and how to infect a plant or animal host. New results based on characterizing and then conducting a comparative analysis of two genome sequences shed new light on the evolution of sensory perception in fungi.
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Harbour porpoises are skilled hunters and eat almost constantly

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:45pm
Harbour porpoises have sometimes been described as 'living in the fast lane.' Being smaller than other cetaceans and living in cold northern waters means that the porpoises require a lot of energy to survive, making them prone to starvation. Now researchers have monitored harbour porpoises in the wild with tiny computers attached to them by suction cups show that the animals hunt and eat almost constantly.
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Virtual Assistants Such As Amazon's Echo Break US Child Privacy Law, Experts Say

Slashdot - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:45pm
Mark Harris, reporting for The Guardian: An investigation by the Guardian has found that despite Amazon marketing the Echo to families with young children, the device is likely to contravene the US Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), set up to regulate the collection and use of personal information from anyone younger than 13. Along with Google, Apple and others promoting voice-activated artificial intelligence systems to young children, the company could now face multimillion-dollar fines. "This is part of the initial wave of marketing to children using the internet of things," says Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, a privacy advocacy group that helped write the law. "It is exactly why the law was enacted in the first place, to protect young people from pervasive data collection."

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Scientists discover mechanism that turns mutant cells into aggressive cancers

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:43pm
Scientists have caught a cancer-causing mutation in the act. A new study shows how a gene mutation found in several human cancers, including leukemia, gliomas and melanoma, promotes the growth of aggressive tumors.
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Lenovo: Motorola Acquisition 'Did Not Meet Expectations'

Slashdot - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:05pm
Lenovo acquired Motorola from Google in 2014. Since then, the Chinese technology conglomerate has been trying to merge Motorola's offering into its large portfolio. But things aren't going as planned. Lenovo on Thursday announced that the "integration efforts did not meet expectations". The company, however, insists that it has drawn many lessons from the experience since the close of the Motorola acquisition, and it is making changes to them quickly. It's not the best time in the market if you're an Android smartphone maker. There's an increasingly growing competition especially from companies such as Xiaomi, Meizu, Micromax, Yu and others that are making premium smartphones with a razor-thin margin. Any unique feature a smartphone maker introduces is seen replicated in others' offerings within weeks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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How researchers make a battery in seven easy steps

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:03pm
Learn how researchers assemble experimental batteries.
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Women may be able to reduce breast cancer risk predicted by their genes

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:03pm
Women with a high risk of developing breast cancer based on family history and genetic risk can still reduce the chance they will develop the disease in their lifetimes by following a healthy lifestyle, new research suggests.
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Watch Two Heroes Race to Chop a Car in Half With an Ax

Wired News - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:02pm
We need a professional league. The post Watch Two Heroes Race to Chop a Car in Half With an Ax appeared first on WIRED.
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Clever Flat Furniture Folds Into Place Like a Pop-Up Book

Wired News - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 4:00pm
Even in its flatpack form, this furniture uses perspective to convey the height, width, and depth of its "assembled" shape. The post Clever Flat Furniture Folds Into Place Like a Pop-Up Book appeared first on WIRED.
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Exploring the rise and fall of alcohol-related mortality in Scotland: Affordability

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:58pm
The rise and fall of alcohol-related mortality in Scotland is partly due to changes in affordability, according to recent reports.
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Study reveals the impact of the giant reed, an exotic invader plant in the riverbeds, on the ground arthropods

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:58pm
The reed, an abundant plant in the riverbanks around the world, alters the ground arthropods communities and it reduces the body size of these invertebrates in the natural habitats it colonizes, according to a study.
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Researchers identify critical factors that determine drought vulnerability of wheat, maize

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:56pm
Researchers have identified critical information about the environmental variables and agronomic factors that determine the vulnerability of maize and wheat production to drought.
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Party on(line): The link between social media, alcohol use

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:56pm
One of the undeniable powers of social media is its ability to influence people and their behaviors. This is especially true, a study finds, when it comes to alcohol use. Researchers found that when participants in a study were exposed to ads touting beer, as opposed to those selling bottled water, they were more inclined to consider drinking alcohol.
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Mothers' parenting stress impacts both parents' sexual satisfaction

Science Daily - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:56pm
First-time parents are only somewhat satisfied with their sex lives according to health researchers who checked in with parents regularly after their baby was born. And one factor that appears to be reducing their sexual satisfaction is mothers' stress as a new parent.
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SpaceX's First Two Droneship Landings - Highlight Reel | Video

Space.com - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:46pm
The private spaceflight company landed the Falcon 9 rocket first stage on their droneship "Of Course I Still Love You' on April 8, 2016 and May 6, 2016 after successful launches. The landings with different angles are shown.
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Comcast Users Must Now Pay $50 Per Month Extra To Avoid Caps

Slashdot - Thu, 26/05/2016 - 3:25pm
Karl Bode, reporting for DSLReports: In a letter being sent to Comcast customers in usage capped markets, the company says that with the recent announcement of usage caps being bumped to 1 terabyte, the company is also capping the amount of additional charges capped users can incur -- to $200 in a single month. As it stands, customers that cross the 1 terabyte limit face overage fees of $10 per each additional 50 GB consumed. But under the revised plans, customers have to pay $50 (up from $30 to $35) extra per month to avoid usage caps entirely. "Because you are an unlimited data customer, we will maintain your current rate of $35 until the end of 2016," the letter reads. Comcast's recent decision to bump their caps to 1 terabyte weren't driven by altruism. With the FCC preventing Charter from imposing caps for seven years as a merger condition, the agency has signaled that it may start getting more serious about cracking down on usage caps in the broadband market.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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