Rarely Snow-Covered Sicily Seen From Space | Video

Space.com - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 3:30pm
A false color image of the region was processed using the near-infrared channel of ESA’s Sentinel-2A satellite. It shows rare snow cover on the island over the mountainous regions on Jan. 8, 2017, including active volcano Mount Etna.
Categories: Science

Intel Confirms 8th Gen Core On 14nm, Data Center First To New Nodes

Slashdot - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 3:20pm
Ian Cutress, writing for AnandTech: Intel's 8th Generation Core microarchitecture will remain on the 14nm node. This is an interesting development with the recent launch of Intel's 7th Generation Core products being touted as the 'optimization' behind the new 'Process-Architecture-Optimization' three-stage cadence that had replaced the old 'tick-tock' cadence. With Intel stringing out 14nm (or at least, an improved variant of 14nm as we've seen on 7th Gen) for another generation, it makes us wonder where exactly Intel can promise future performance or efficiency gains on the design unless they start implementing microarchitecture changes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Troubled F-35 Fighter Jet Rules the Skies in Its Toughest Test Yet

Wired News - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 3:00pm
Notching a 15:1 kill ratio in Red Flag, though, may not forgive blown budgets and timelines. The post The Troubled F-35 Fighter Jet Rules the Skies in Its Toughest Test Yet appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

BepiColombo: Joint Mission to Mercury

Space.com - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 2:45pm
BepiColombo is a planned European-Japanese mission to Mercury. It is set to launch in 2018.
Categories: Science

Most of the Web Really Sucks If You Have a Slow Connection

Slashdot - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Dan Luu, hardware/software engineer at Microsoft, writes in a blog post: While it's easy to blame page authors because there's a lot of low-hanging fruit on the page side, there's just as much low-hanging fruit on the browser side. Why does my browser open up 6 TCP connections to try to download six images at once when I'm on a slow satellite connection? That just guarantees that all six images will time out! I can sometimes get some images to load by refreshing the page a few times (and waiting ten minutes each time), but why shouldn't the browser handle retries for me? If you think about it for a few minutes, there are a lot of optimizations that browsers could do for people on slow connections, but because they don't, the best current solution for users appears to be: use w3m when you can, and then switch to a browser with ad-blocking when that doesn't work. But why should users have to use two entirely different programs, one of which has a text-based interface only computer nerds will find palatable?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

How Much Energy Does Iron Fist Pack Into His Superpowered Punch?

Wired News - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 2:30pm
In the latest trailer for the Netflix show <em>Iron Fist</em>, we get to see the superhero's power punch. Here is an estimate of its energy and power. The post How Much Energy Does Iron Fist Pack Into His Superpowered Punch? appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Review: Samsung Chromebook Pro

Wired News - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 2:00pm
The ultra-diverse laptop of the future is here. But it's not quite what we were promised. The post Review: Samsung Chromebook Pro appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Status profiling: Research suggests simply wearing a police uniform changes the way the brain processes information

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 2:00pm
Simply putting on a uniform, similar to one the police might wear, automatically affects how we perceive others, creating a bias towards those considered to be of a low social status, new research from a team of cognitive neuroscientists suggests.
Categories: Science

Slashdot Asks: How Do You Know a Developer is Doing a Good Job?

Slashdot - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 2:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: One of the easiest ways to evaluate a developer is keeping a tab on the amount of value they provide to a business. But the problem with this approach is that the nature of software development does not make it easy to measure the value a single developer brings. Some managers are aware of this, and they look at the number of lines of code a developer has written. The fewer, the better, many believe. I recently came across this in a blog post, "If you paid your developers per line of code, you would reward the inefficient developers. An analogy to this is writing essays, novels, blog posts, etc. Would you judge a writer solely on the number of words written? Probably not. There are a minimum number of words needed to get a complex point across, but those points get lost when a writer clutters their work with useless sentences. So the lines of code metric doesn't work. The notion of a quantifiable metric for evaluating developers is still attractive though. Some may argue that creating many code branches is the mark of a great developer. Yet I once worked with a developer who would create code branches to hide the fact that he wasn't very productive." Good point. But then, what other options do we have?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

What you didn't know about our watchmaking history

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:55pm
New research brings the commonly accepted date for the birth of mass production of watches forwards by nearly 100 years, and, will change the way many people view the watch industry as it stands today.
Categories: Science

Gut bacteria may play a role in Alzheimer’s disease

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:55pm
New research has shown that intestinal bacteria can accelerate the development of Alzheimer’s disease. According to the researchers behind the study, the results open up the door to new opportunities for preventing and treating the disease.
Categories: Science

Digging deeper: Using new archaeological techniques to uncover more about our past

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:47pm
Researchers are using new archaeological techniques and technologies to learn more about an iconic Islamic palace in Southern Spain.
Categories: Science

Traffic light in the brain

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:47pm
New insights into the roles of different subareas in the prefrontal cortex have been uncovered by researchers. Whether the brain responds to an external stimulus or not depends significantly on the balance between areas of excitation and inhibition in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Synaptic connections in the front of the cerebral cortex enable the brain to make a conscious decision on whether to react to a stimulus with movement or not. However, the roles of the individual regions in the PFC and how they work together in this decision-making process were unknown until now.
Categories: Science

Mitochondrial lipids as potential targets in early onset Parkinson's disease

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:47pm
A team of researchers has identified an underlying mechanism in early onset Parkinson’s. Using flies, mice and patient cells, the team focused on cardiolipin, a fat unique to cells’ mitochondria, organelles that produce energy. They demonstrated that reducing the effects of the protein FASN influences the mitochondria, leading to increased cardiolipin levels and reduced Parkinson’s symptoms. These results could pave the way to therapies for Parkinson’s disease that target lipids.
Categories: Science

Explosion in species diversity due to hybridization

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:47pm
No less than 500 new species of cichlids, brightly coloured perch-like fish, evolved in Lake Victoria (East Africa) over the past 15,000 years -- a record in the animal and plant world. This evolutionary puzzle has now been solved by scientists. They demonstrate for the first time that this rapid evolution was facilitated by earlier hybridization between two distantly related cichlid species from the Upper Nile and Congo drainage systems.
Categories: Science

Poverty, high neighborhood murder rates increase depression in older adults

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:45pm
Older adults who live in poor and violent urban neighborhoods are at greater risk for depression, a study has found.
Categories: Science

Chinese air pollution linked to respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:45pm
In the largest epidemiological study conducted in the developing world, researchers found that as exposures to fine particulate air pollution in 272 Chinese cities increase, so do deaths from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.
Categories: Science

One step closer to personalized antibiotic treatment

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:45pm
A new super-fast and cheap method called poreFUME can now shed light on the pool of resistance genes in the gut faster than before. This can lead to treatment of infections sooner and with better results.
Categories: Science

Monkey fights help explain tipping points in animal societies

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:45pm
Previous studies of flocks, swarms, and schools suggest that animal societies may verge on a "critical" point -- in other words, they are extremely sensitive and can be easily tipped into a new social regime. A new analysis of pigtail macaque monkeys sheds light on these social 'tipping points' in animal societies.
Categories: Science

Brazilian peppertree packs power to knock out antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Science Daily - Fri, 10/02/2017 - 1:45pm
The red berries of the Brazilian peppertree -- a weedy, invasive species common in Florida -- contain an extract with the power to disarm dangerous antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, scientists have discovered.
Categories: Science