Major family of gene-regulating proteins has drug-sized pocket

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:12pm
An entire class of proteins called transcription factors has largely been ignored by the pharmaceutical industry because it’s difficult to design and screen drugs against them. But a new study suggests that a key group of transcription factors are in fact ‘druggable,’ including several that could be targeted to treat cancer, metabolic disease, or autoimmune conditions.
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Can radioactive waste be immobilized in glass for millions of years?

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:12pm
How do you handle nuclear waste that will be radioactive for millions of years, keeping it from harming people and the environment? It isn’t easy, but a researcher has discovered ways to immobilize such waste – the offshoot of decades of nuclear weapons production – in glass and ceramics.
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Scientists successfully tune the brain to alleviate pain

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
If the brain is ‘tuned-in’ to a particular frequency, pain can be alleviated, scientists have shown for the first time.
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High demand for psychological services for children demands new approach

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
Psychological wellbeing services for children must be fundamentally rethought and reconfigured if we are to provide help for all those who need it, say authors of a new report.
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Music therapy reduces depression in children, adolescents, research finds

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems, researchers have discovered.
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Blood pressure may open door to personalized medicine for PTSD

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
Treatment with the drug prazosin effectively reduces symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for many people, but about one third of patients don't respond to the treatment at all. Attempts to understand why people respond differently have fallen short. Now, a new study reports that soldiers with higher blood pressure before beginning prazosin treatment see better results from the medication.
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Female fish judge males on DIY skills, study shows

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
Male fish build nests to suit local environments - and females judge males on their ability to respond to changing conditions, an international team of scientists shows.
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Stable biological coating for implants

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
The extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates all important cell functions and is an interesting biomaterial for scientists. An ECM has been created that contains artificial chemical groups which supports natural cell behavior outside the body. It can be applied as a stable coating on implants or be used in cell culture dishes.
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Global hot spot maps link consumers with impacts

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:10pm
A new model creates global hot spot maps to illuminate how what we buy pollutes the planet and where. The idea is to help governments, industries and individuals target areas for cleanup.
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Safe navigation through the Northwest Passage

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:09pm
The Northwest Passage is becoming navigable for longer periods of the year. Ship traffic, however, still bears hazardous risks. A German-Canadian research team wants to change that: it is conducting the preparatory work for a safe navigation through the icy waters.
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Energy-saving data glasses

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:09pm
Data glasses mirror information to the eye without interfering with the wearer‘s vision, report researchers.
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Adding hydrogen to graphene

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:08pm
Adding hydrogen to graphene could improve its future applicability in the semiconductor industry, when silicon leaves off. Researchers have recently gained further insight into this chemical reaction. These findings extend the knowledge of the fundamental chemistry of graphene and bring scientists perhaps closer to realizing new graphene-based materials.
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Not eating enough in hospital: Risk factors are the same all over the world

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:07pm
Inadequate food intake and malnourishment in sick people is an area of concern for health policy and Public Health and one which impacts upon the social economics of countries with both high and low incomes.
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Automated assessment of early autism

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:07pm
Autism Spectrum Disorder is usually diagnosed in early childhood, but genetic detection of this brain disorder could mean more timely interventions that improve life for the patient and their carers. Research suggests that machine learning might be used to analyze genetic data that points to an ASD diagnosis before symptoms become obvious.
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Simulation brings global 100% renewable electricity system alive for the first time

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:07pm
A new model shows how an electricity system mainly based on solar and wind works in all regions of the world. It shows the functioning of an electricity system that fulfils the targets set by the Paris agreement by using only renewable energy sources.
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Kids continue to consume too much salt, putting them at risk

Science Daily - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:07pm
Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, kills more than 800,000 Americans each year. We know that too much salt may contribute to high blood pressure and increased cardiovascular risk. According to a new study, American children are consuming sodium at levels that far exceed the daily recommended limit. Taste preferences for high sodium foods, formed as children, follow individuals into adulthood and put them at increased risk for developing cardiovascular problems later in life.
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Review: Google Home

Wired News - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:00pm
Home is where the heart is, or at least where the Google Assistant is. The post Review: Google Home appeared first on WIRED.
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US Government Sues AT&T/DirecTV, Calls It 'Ringleader' of Collusion Scheme

Slashdot - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 1:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The Department of Justice today sued DirecTV and its owner, ATT, saying the satellite TV company colluded with competitors during contentious negotiations to broadcast Los Angeles Dodgers games. Dodgers games have been blacked out in much of Los Angeles because pay-TV providers have been unwilling to pay the price demanded by SportsNet LA, the Dodgers channel operated by the baseball franchise and Time Warner Cable. But the DOJ's antitrust division placed the blame for this situation on ATT and DirecTV. In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in California, it alleges that DirecTV was a "ringleader" in a coordinated scheme with cable companies Cox and Charter, according to a DOJ announcement. ATT completed its purchase of DirecTV in July 2015, but the complaint covers a dispute that began before the merger and continues to this day. The Dodgers channel owners offered carriage licenses to the pay-TV companies in January 2014, but the channel is still not available on DirecTV, Cox, or ATT's wireline TV service. (Games are now available on Charter, which purchased Time Warner Cable this year.) The lawsuit "alleges that DirecTV unlawfully exchanged competitively-sensitive information with Cox, Charter, and ATT during the companies' negotiations for the right to telecast the Dodgers Channel," the DOJ announcement said. "Specifically, the complaint alleges that DirecTV and each of these competitors agreed to and did exchange non-public information about their companies' ongoing negotiations to telecast the Dodgers Channel, as well as their companies' future plans to carry -- or not carry -- the channel." The companies used this strategy "to obtain bargaining leverage and to reduce the risk that they would lose subscribers if they decided not to carry the channel but a competitor chose to do so." The information these companies learned from each other "through these unlawful agreements" was a major factor in their decision not to carry the Dodgers channel, the complaint said. ATT said it will fight the lawsuit and blamed Time Warner Cable for charging unreasonably high prices. The asking price was reportedly about $5 a month per subscriber regardless of how many people watch the games.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The Ocean’s Robots May Soon Enjoy High-Speed Internet

Wired News - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 12:00pm
For scientists talking to submarines, robots, and other instruments, data travels at dial-up speeds of single bytes per minute---far slower than the megabits per second we use in the office or at home. The post The Ocean’s Robots May Soon Enjoy High-Speed Internet appeared first on WIRED.
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Uber’s Discrimination Problem Is Bad News for Public Transit

Wired News - Thu, 03/11/2016 - 11:00am
Government alliances make the sharing economy's implicit bias problem a much bigger deal. The post Uber's Discrimination Problem Is Bad News for Public Transit appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science