Growth Hormone Usage Rises Among Teens

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 12:00pm

Friday nights in the fall mean high school football. But that wholesome slice of Americana also contains a dark undercurrent–a marked rise in the use of human growth hormone by high school aged students. In a recent survey of 3,705 kids, 11 percent of teens in grades 9 through 12 reported having used synthetic human growth […]

The post Growth Hormone Usage Rises Among Teens appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Street Fighter II’s Creator Says Mobile Games Will Crush Consoles

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:45am

Yoshiki Okamoto is working with the popular Japanese social messaging service Mixi on Monster Strike, a quirky combination of billiards and Pokemon. And he says he'd put it up against anything on consoles.

The post Street Fighter II’s Creator Says Mobile Games Will Crush Consoles appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

An Interview With Darkside, Russia’s Favorite Dark Web Drug Lord

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:30am

Among the handful of black markets that have survived law enforcement’s recent crackdown on the Dark Web, the drug selling site RAMP is different: First, it’s written in the Russian language, and caters to only Russian clientele. Second, it’s the longest-surviving crypto market out there; It’s outlived both the Silk Road and Silk Road 2. […]

The post An Interview With Darkside, Russia’s Favorite Dark Web Drug Lord appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

11 Gifts Precisely Tuned for Finicky Watch Lovers

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:30am

It's possible to get the Timepiece aficionado in your life a gift that will support his living La Vida Tourbillon without a taking a trip to the loan shark. Here are some ideas.

The post 11 Gifts Precisely Tuned for Finicky Watch Lovers appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The iOS 8 Widget Restrictions Don’t Make Any Sense

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:30am

Apple is singling out some apps for their widget functionality, and it could impact the utility of Notification Center in iOS 8.

The post The iOS 8 Widget Restrictions Don’t Make Any Sense appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Sweeping Landscapes Explore the Question of What We All Want in Life

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:30am

What do you want? Fame and glory? Happiness? Security? Stacks of cash? What do we all want? The fact that humans as cannot agree upon any answers, and that new suggestions continue to emerge, has not deterred Italian photographer Francesco Jodice from pursuing the questions. The landscapes and cityscapes of Jodice’s series What We Want […]

The post Sweeping Landscapes Explore the Question of What We All Want in Life appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

A Two-Day Battle to Charge My Car Convinced Me We’re Not Ready for EVs

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:30am

Until the public infrastructure improves, people who can't plug in overnight are in for a very serious headache.

The post A Two-Day Battle to Charge My Car Convinced Me We’re Not Ready for EVs appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Review: LG G Watch R

Wired News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 11:30am

Despite being one of the first two Android Wear watches you could buy, LG didn’t really make much of a splash with the original G Watch. It was pretty bland-looking, particularly when compared to the beautiful round Moto 360. Now, LG is back with a round watch of its own.

The post Review: LG G Watch R appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How High-Tech Temporary Tattoos Will Hack Your Skin

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 10:33am
Molly McHugh writes with this story about sensors that can be attached to temporary tattoos to monitor various medical information. "The Center for Wearable Sensors at the University of California San Diego has been experimenting with attaching sensors to temporary tattoos in order to extract data from the body. The tattoos are worn exactly as a regular temporary tattoo would be worn. The sensors simply sit atop the skin without penetrating it and interact with Bluetooth or other wireless devices with a signal in order to send the data....A biofuel battery applied as a temporary tattoo converts sweat into energy, and a startup within the center has developed a strip that extracts data from sweat to explain how your body is reacting to certain types of exercise. Amay Bandodkar, a fourth year PhD student at UCSD, explains that the sensors are programmed to react to the amount of lactate the body produces."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

UK MP Says ISPs Must Take Responsibility For Movie Leaks, Sony Eyes North Korea

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 7:57am
An anonymous reader writes that the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron has laid some of the blame for the recent Sony hack at the feet of ISPs. Meanwhile, it's reported that Sony is close to officially blaming North Korea. As the fallout from the Sony hack continues, who is to blame for the leak of movies including Fury, which has been downloaded a million times? According to the UK Prime Minister's former IP advisor, as 'facilitators' web-hosts and ISPs must step up and take some blame. Mike Weatherley MP, the recent IP advisor to Prime Minister David Cameron, has published several piracy reports including one earlier in the year examining the advertising revenue on pirate sites. He believes that companies with no direct connection to the hack or subsequent leaks should shoulder some blame. 'Piracy is a huge international problem. The recent cyber-attack on Sony and subsequent release of films to illegal websites is just one high-profile example of how criminals exploit others' Intellectual Property,' Weatherley writes in an email to TF. 'Unfortunately, the theft of these films – and their subsequent downloads – has been facilitated by web-hosting companies and, ultimately, ISPs who do have to step-up and take some responsibility.' Weatherley doesn't provide detail on precisely why web-hosts and ISPs should take responsibility for the work of malicious hackers (possibly state-sponsored) and all subsequent fall out from attacks. The theory is that 'something' should be done, but precisely what remains elusive."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Why Pluto Still Matters

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 6:20am
StartsWithABang writes Nearly a century ago, Pluto was discovered, and for 48 years it remained the only known object whose orbit takes it beyond the gravitational pull of Neptune. In a single generation, we've now discovered more than 1,000 additional objects in the Kuiper Belt, but does that make Pluto any less special? Here's a strong argument for why Pluto might matter now more than ever.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NASA to Launch First Orion Deep-Space Capsule Flight Today: Watch Live

Space.com - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 6:14am
The Orion spacecraft, a capsule destined to fly NASA astronauts on deep-space missions to asteroids and Mars, is counting down to a planned 7:04 a.m. EST (1104 GMT) liftoff on Thursday. Watch it live here at Space.com.
Categories: Science

Stephen Coles 1941 — 2014

Kurzweil AI - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 5:59am

Stephen Coles, M.D., Ph.D

Stephen Coles, M.D., Ph.D, passed away on December 3 of complications of pancreatic cancer. He was 73.

L. [Leslie] Stephen Coles was a Lecturer in Gerontology at the University California, Los Angeles, in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Since he started teaching at UCLA in 1986, he taught for the Computer Science Department, the Surgical Department, and the Fiat Lux Program for Freshman.

He tracked the oldest people in the world for more than 20 years, and published the most recent five years of his research in the journal PLoS ONE. Coles performed autopsies on 12 “supercentenarians,” people who are 110 years old or older, more than any other pathologist. Further details on his research can be found at www.grg.org.

He is survived by a wife Natalie, a daughter Electra McBurnie, and one granddaughter, Cailyn McBurnie. He is in cryopreservation at Alcor Life Extension Foundation with the expectation of future revival.

Categories: Science

Programmer Father Asks: What Gets Little Girls Interested In Science?

Slashdot - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 5:33am
nbauman writes Programmer David Auerbach is dismayed that, at a critical developmental age, his 4-year-old daughter wants to be a princess, not a scientist or engineer, he writes in Slate. The larger society keeps forcing sexist stereotypes on her, in every book and toy store. From the article: "Getting more women into science and technology fields: Where’s the silver bullet? While I might get more hits by revealing the One Simple Trick to increase female participation in the sciences, the truth is there isn’t some key inflection point where young women’s involvement drops off. Instead, there is a series of small- to medium-sized discouraging factors that set in from a young age, ranging from unhelpful social conditioning to a lack of role models to unconscious bias to very conscious bias. Any and all of these can figure into why, for example, women tend to underrate their technical abilities relative to men. I know plenty of successful women in the sciences, but let’s not fool ourselves and say the playing field in the academic sciences or the tech world is even. My wife attributes her pursuit of programming to being a loner and pretty much ignoring wider society while growing up: 'Being left alone with a computer (with NO INTERNET TO TELL ME WHAT I COULDN’T DO) was the deciding factor,' she tells me."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science