BEAM Inflatable Habitat to Launch to Space Station Next Week

Space.com - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 11:30am
Future space stations could be built on Earth and be inflated in space. A prototype of this kind of technology will fly to the International Space Station next week.
Categories: Science

The Apple-FBI Battle Is Over, But the New Crypto Wars Have Just Begun

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 11:00am
At least everyone knows about encryption now. The post The Apple-FBI Battle Is Over, But the New Crypto Wars Have Just Begun appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

‘Chatty Maps’ Chart Your City’s Sounds From Street to Street

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 11:00am
Chatty Maps gives you an interactive look at the soundscapes of 12 different cities. The post 'Chatty Maps' Chart Your City's Sounds From Street to Street appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Science Education Is Woefully Uncreative. That Has to Change

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 11:00am
Is science a creative endeavor? Yes! However, most people don't think so, so our science classes are typically deficient in creativity. The post Science Education Is Woefully Uncreative. That Has to Change appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

It’d Be Great to Kick ISIS Offline—If It Were Possible

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 11:00am
ISIS is notorious for its effective use of social media. That takes a sophisticated public relations strategy. It also takes a working Internet connection. The post It'd Be Great to Kick ISIS Offline—If It Were Possible appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

The Designer Who Peered Into Microscopes and Saw High Art

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 11:00am
Carl Strüwe pointed a camera at a microscope lens in 1926. The result is a beautiful blend of science and art. The post The Designer Who Peered Into Microscopes and Saw High Art appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

How Often Do Asteroids Hit Jupiter?

Space.com - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 10:15am
On March 17, a small asteroid or comet slammed into Jupiter, causing a fireball that amateur astronomers spotted from Earth. Such events, while spectacular, aren't rare; the giant planet's powerful gravity makes it the solar system's punching bag.
Categories: Science

Boeing Starliner's 'Last Room on Earth' for Astronauts – Photo Tour

Space.com - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 9:45am
Starliner Spacecraft's 'Last Room on Earth' for Astronauts – Photo Tour
Categories: Science

Watch Live: Microsoft’s Build Keynote

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 9:30am
Stream live video from the Microsoft Build conference today in San Francisco. We're expecting updates on Windows 10, Hololens, Xbox, and Microsoft services. The post Watch Live: Microsoft's Build Keynote appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Review: 12 Ways the 9.7-inch iPad Pro Is Different

Wired News - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 9:15am
Considering upgrading to a new iPad Pro so you can use it as your only computer and kiss your laptop goodbye? Here's what you really need to know. The post Review: 12 Ways the 9.7-inch iPad Pro Is Different appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

CNBC Just Collected Your Password and Shared It With Marketers

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 8:49am
SpacemanukBEJY.53u writes: An article published by CNBC on Tuesday offered tips on how to create a secure password, complete with a form that tested submitted passwords. While well-intended, security experts said it exposed passwords to third-party advertisers. Also, the form created to test a password didn't use SSL/TLS, which meant someone on the same network could have sniffed it. Even worse, the tool claimed to not store the passwords, but an acute observer found they were actually being inputted into a Google Docs spreadsheet. CNBC quickly withdrew the article.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Weird, Oozing Super-Earth Planet Has Hot Nights, Even Hotter Days

Space.com - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:32am
The first super-Earth planet to get its photo taken may be super-weird and super-hot, and perhaps have super-runny lava in spots on its surface, researchers say.
Categories: Science

Torvalds' Secret Sauce For Linux: Willing To Be Wrong

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:32am
An anonymous reader writes: Linux turns 25 this year(!!). To mark the event, IEEE Spectrum has a piece on the history of Linux and why it succeeded where others failed. In an accompanying question and answer with Linus Torvalds, Torvalds explains the combination of youthful chutzpah, openness to other's ideas, and a willingness to unwind technical decisions that he thinks were critical to the OS's development: "I credit the fact that I didn't know what the hell I was setting myself up for for a lot of the success of Linux. [...] The thing about bad technical decisions is that you can always undo them. [...] I'd rather make a decision that turns out to be wrong later than waffle about possible alternatives for too long."

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Categories: Science

VR 'Space Invaders' on ISS - It’s 1978 Again In Orbit | Video

Space.com - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 5:25am
It has been 38 years since Tomohiro Nishikado created the classic arcade game and now astronauts aboard the International Space Station entered the game virtuallly with "Pr
Categories: Science

Valve Loses Australian Court Battle Over Steam

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 3:01am
angry tapir writes: Valve Software has lost court action launched against it by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. The Australian court case centered on the refund policies of Valve Software's Steam digital distribution service. Some of Steam's refund policies contradicted the statutory guarantees of the Australian Consumer Law, the court found. A hearing on penalties is yet to be held. Such "false or misleading representations about guarantees" include: consumers were not entitled to a refund for digitally downloaded games purchased from Valve via the Steam website or Steam Client (in any circumstances); Valve had excluded statutory guarantees and/or warranties that goods would be of acceptable quality; and Valve had restricted or modified statutory guarantees and/or warranties of acceptable quality. Valve has contested ACCC's arguments on a number of grounds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

The World's Largest Renewable Energy Developer Could Go Broke

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 1:46am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Huffington Post: There is a "substantial risk" that SunEdison may file for bankruptcy, the world's largest renewable energy developer said in a regulatory filing on Tuesday. The company's fall isn't a referendum on the solar industry as a whole, as much as it is on SunEdison's aggressive growth strategy fueled by excessive debt and financial engineering, analysts say. SunEdison "just thought they were smarter than everyone else," said David Levine, the founder and CEO of Geostellar, a solar energy marketplace that has done deals with the company. SunEdison loaded up a total of $11 billion in debt to develop or acquire renewable energy projects. The company's shares have fallen steeply since they hit a high of $30 in July. They were at just $1.26 before the filing. The stock immediately dropped another 40 percent when the market opened after the filing, and the company was trading at just $0.59 by Tuesday lunchtime.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Internet of Seals: Vodafone Connects Marine Mammals To IoT

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 12:51am
Mickeycaskill writes: Researchers in Scotland claim to be the first to connect marine mammals to the Internet of Things (IoT) as part of a study into declining populations of harbor seals in the north and east of the country. Several seals in Orkney, an archipelago off the north cost, will be tagged and their behavior monitored by scientists at the Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) at the University of St Andrews. The data is transmitted using Vodafone's M2M network and the tags are designed to simply fall off when seals molt. Researchers say the use of cellular networks will greatly improve their data gathering capabilities. The data collected will be used to help form Scottish marine policy in areas such as offshore wind farms and unexplained seal deaths.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Company Creates Gun That Looks Like a Cellphone

Slashdot - Wed, 30/03/2016 - 12:06am
Earthquake Retrofit writes: Sometimes you want to carry your gun in peace, but people keep drawing attention to your piece. This very issue plagued Kirk Kjellberg, the creator of Ideal Conceal, a [.380-caliber pistol] that folds up to look like a smartphone. "A boy spotted me in [a] restaurant and said loudly, 'Mommy, Mommy, that guy's got a gun!' And then pretty much the whole restaurant stared at me," Kjellberg told NBC News. He developed Ideal Conceal to avoid those awkward situations. According to NBC News, "In locked position, the two-shot plastic gun with a metal core can be discreetly slipped into pockets, like a real phone. But 'with one click of the safety it opens and is ready to fire,' Ideal Conceal claims. The Department of Homeland Security has contacted him about the pistol, and he plans on giving them x-rays of it so law enforcement can distinguish it from cellphones during airport screenings. An Ideal Conceal prototype is slated for June, with sales beginning in October. The gun is listed for $395."

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Categories: Science

Why ISIS Is Winning The Online Propaganda War

Slashdot - Tue, 29/03/2016 - 11:24pm
blottsie writes: The U.S. government has been unable to fight the Islamic State on the one battlefield it currently commands: the Internet. Exemplified by an August 2014 video produced by the State Department, the U.S. remains ineffective at combating violent extremism online. A definitive report by the Daily Dot explores how ISIS succeeds in spreading its message and recruiting new militants, and why the U.S. government continues to fail in its efforts to stop ISIS online.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Remote Italian village could harbor secrets of healthy aging

Science Daily - Tue, 29/03/2016 - 10:53pm
To understand how people can live longer throughout the world, researchers in the United States and Italy have teamed up to study a group of 300 citizens, all over 100 years old, living in a remote Italian village nestled between the ocean and mountains on the country's coast.
Categories: Science