Human brain houses diverse populations of neurons, new research shows

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 7:01pm
A team of researchers has developed the first scalable method to identify different subtypes of neurons in the human brain. The research lays the groundwork for 'mapping' the gene activity in the human brain and could help provide a better understanding of brain functions and disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia and depression.
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Fix for 3-billion-year-old genetic error could dramatically improve genetic sequencing

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 7:01pm
Researchers found a fix for a 3-billion-year-old glitch in one of the major carriers of information needed for life, RNA, which until now produced errors when making copies of genetic information. The discovery will increase precision in genetic research and could dramatically improve medicine based on a person's genetic makeup.
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Moral dilemma with driverless cars: Who gets protected, the driver or pedestrians?

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 7:01pm
A new study shows that the public is conflicted over safety scenarios concerning driverless cars, taking a notably inconsistent approach to the safety of autonomous vehicles, should they become a reality on the roads.
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Good bacteria vital to coral reef survival

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 7:01pm
Good bacteria could be the key to keeping coral healthy, able to withstand the impacts of global warming and to secure the long term survival of reefs worldwide, say researchers.
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A strategy for 'convergence' research to transform biomedicine

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:59pm
A new report calls for increased support of 'convergence research,' which integrates physical and life sciences for revolutionary advances in biomedical research.
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Scientists reveal single-neuron gene landscape of the human brain

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:59pm
A team of scientists has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal 'transcriptomes.' Their research reveals a surprising diversity in the molecules that human brain cells use in transcribing genetic information from DNA to RNA and producing proteins.
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WHO'S TB care advice violated standards, researchers say

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:58pm
The World Health Organization (WHO) violated sound standards of medical care and human rights by nudging poorer countries to follow less expensive, untested and largely ineffective treatment protocols for tuberculosis patients, a new paper argues.
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Index could help identify women at risk for rapid bone loss

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:58pm
Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study.
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Volkswagen To Pay $10.2 Billion In Emissions Lawsuit

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:40pm
Reader Khashishi writes: Slashdot has been following the story of Volkswagen manipulating diesel emissions tests for some time now. The control software contained algorithms which reduced emissions during testing but not during normal driving. Well, now Volkswagen has agreed to pay $10.2 billion (alternate source: BBC) to settle the case, according to Associated Press. This is higher than the $430 million damages estimated in this story. It appears that vehicle owners will have the choice of fixing their cars or selling them back. Most of the money will go towards fixing the cars, buying them back, and compensating owners.

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Categories: Science

People Want Self-Driving Cars That Save Lives. Especially Theirs

Wired News - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:00pm
A new study in Science finds people want self-driving cars that serve the greater good—until they're the passenger. The post People Want Self-Driving Cars That Save Lives. Especially Theirs appeared first on WIRED.
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Google Launches Android Programming Course For Absolute Beginners

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 6:00pm
If you're on the fence on whether or not should you spring for learning how to code, Google is willing to offer a helping hand. The company has partnered with Udacity to offer a "nanodegree" class designed for people with no programming experience at all. The program costs $199 per month. ZDNet reports:The course material, developed by Google, is hosted on learning platform Udacity and builds on earlier programs such as the Android Nanodegree for Beginners. The basics course takes around four weeks if the student commits six hours a week and upon completion they'll have created two basic apps built in Android Studio."Google, in partnership with Udacity, is making Android development accessible and understandable to everyone, so that regardless of your background, you can learn to build apps that improve the lives of people around you," Google announced on its developer blog.

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Categories: Science

We’ve Reached the End of Ancillary Justice, and We’ve Got … Thoughts

Wired News - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 5:32pm
Ann Leckie's Ancillary Justice proved challenging in many ways---mentally, emotionally, grammatically. But like Breq, we're stronger and more human for it. The post We’ve Reached the End of Ancillary Justice, and We’ve Got … Thoughts appeared first on WIRED.
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Senate Report Says Charter, Time Warner Cable Overcharges Its Customers

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 5:20pm
According to an investigation by a U.S. Senate, Charter and its new subsidiary Time Warner Cable have been overcharging customers at least $7.2 million per year for equipment and service. Time Warner Cable over-billed customers nationwide an estimated $639,948 between January and April period this year. This projects the sum to a yearly total of $1,919,844. Charter admitted that it overbilled its customers by "at least $442,691 per month." A report on BroadcastingCable states:The study found that "Time Warner Cable estimates that, in 2015, it overbilled 40,193 Ohio customers a total of $430,393 and 4,232 Missouri customers a total of $44,152," while "Charter estimates that it has annually overcharged approximately 5,897 Missouri customers a total of $494,000 each year. Charter does not provide service in Ohio." The report also said that Charter and Time Warner Cable have taken steps to correct the situation as a result of the investigation.

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Categories: Science

BitTorrent Adds Music, Video Streaming Options With Re-Launched BitTorrent Now

Slashdot - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:40pm
Dan Rys, reporting for Billboard:As streaming continues to consolidate its foothold as a major force in the music-listening community, more and more players are getting into the increasingly crowded space. Today, BitTorrent announced it is adding an ad-supported streaming option to its BitTorrent Bundle offerings, which is officially re-launching as BitTorrent Now. But before anyone thinks the company is throwing its hat into the ring alongside Spotify, Apple Music and Tidal (or even Netflix and Hulu), BitTorrent Now isn't designed as a full-catalog competitor. Rather, its streaming component will be part of the distribution framework established with BitTorrent Bundle in 2013, giving artists who use its direct-to-fan platform the option to allow fans to stream their releases rather than download them. BitTorrent Now is currently available as an app on Android devices, with iOS and Apple TV apps on the horizon "shortly," according to a rep.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Tech-Backed Immigration Actions Blocked By SCOTUS Split Decision

Wired News - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:34pm
The decision leaves millions of people vulnerable to deportation. The post Tech-Backed Immigration Actions Blocked By SCOTUS Split Decision appeared first on WIRED.
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Chemical signal can make it easier to personalize medication

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:30pm
An international research team has searched for possible non-genetic causes of common immune diseases and discovered that there is a signal called hydroxymetylcytosine (HMC) in many regions of DNA, with genetic changes associated with several immune diseases.
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Evolutionary biologists show that sexual selection increases the number of species and impacts global diversity

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:30pm
When you're a firefly, finding "the one" can change the world. Literally. A new study demonstrates that for fireflies, octopuses and other animals that choose mates via bioluminescent courtship, sexual selection increases the number of species -- thereby impacting global diversity.
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Probing giant planets' dark hydrogen

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:30pm
Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the universe, but there is still so much we have to learn about it. One of the biggest unknowns is its transformation under the extreme pressures and temperatures found in the interiors of giant planets, where it is squeezed until it becomes liquid metal, capable of conducting electricity. New work measures the conditions under which hydrogen undergoes this transition in the lab and finds an intermediate 'dark hydrogen' state.
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An effective but painful treatment

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:30pm
Photodynamic therapy is an effective treatment for early-stage skin cancer. However, this therapy can cause patients severe pain. The reason for this was previous a mystery to researchers. Physiologists have now discovered that it is due to two specific ion channels.
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The silencer: Study reveals how a cancer gene promotes tumor growth

Science Daily - Thu, 23/06/2016 - 4:29pm
A new study describes how a known cancer gene, EGFR, silences genes that typically suppress tumors. The finding may lead to the development of more effective, individualized treatment for patients with lung cancer and other cancer types.
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