A Martian Marine Comes into Her Own on 'The Expanse'

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 11:00am
The Martian marine Bobbie Draper made a big splash with her arrival in "The Expanse" Season 2. Now, we'll be seeing a lot more of the character as her storyline kicks into gear.
Categories: Science

Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Plans Crewed Launch Within a Year

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 11:00am
The spaceflight company Blue Origin, which was founded by Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos, plans to launch its first crewed flight to suborbital space soon.
Categories: Science

Venus Is Leaving the Evening Sky Soon: How to See It

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 11:00am
Venus' current crescent phase, which can be glimpsed even through binoculars, is one of the leading celestial attractions for astronomy neophytes. Check out this celestial sight on March 23, 24 and 25, when Earth and Venus are on the same side of the sun.
Categories: Science

Parenthood Can Help You Live Longer In Older Age, Research Suggests

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 10:00am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Parenthood could boost your chances of living longer in your later years, according researchers who believe the effect could be down to children helping with care and support. While previous research has shown that adults with children live longer than those without, the new study unpicks how the effect plays out in older age. Modig and colleagues used national registry data to follow almost 1.5 million Swedes born between 1911 and 1925 as they aged. The team found that while the risk of death increased with age for all adults, having children was linked to greater longevity. The results are published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. At the age of 60, men who had children had almost two years more on their remaining life expectancy than those without, at 20.2 and 18.4 years respectively. A similar trend was seen for women aged 60, with life expectancies of 23.1 years for those without children and 24.6 years for mothers. By contrast at the age of 80, parents had a life expectancy of 7.7 years for men and 9.5 years for women, compared to 7 years for men without children and 8.9 years for women without children. The findings reveal that the benefits of having children became more pronounced with age -- an effect that was greater for men than women. Furthermore, the team found that having children had a stronger impact on the longevity of men who were not married than those with a spouse.

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Categories: Science

Supersonic Planes Are Mounting a Comeback—Without That Earth-Shaking Boom

Wired News - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 9:30am
You could be flying cross-country at better than Mach 1 within a decade. The post Supersonic Planes Are Mounting a Comeback—Without That Earth-Shaking Boom appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Mesmerizing Space Spiral Surrounds Binary Star System in New Views

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 7:23am
Astronomers have peered deep into the perplexing structure of the binary star system LL Pegasi, revealing new details about its intricate spiral rings and how they formed.
Categories: Science

SpaceX to Make 2nd Attempt to Launch Satellite Early Thursday: Watch Live

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 7:10am
SpaceX plans to launch a commercial communications satellite early Thursday morning (March 16), and you can watch the liftoff live.
Categories: Science

Goodbye, Mimas! Saturn Moon Stuns in Cassini's Final Photo Shoot

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 7:00am
The Cassini spacecraft snagged a final close-up view of Saturn's smallest major moon, Mimas, as it nears the end of its exploration mission at the ringed planet.
Categories: Science

Researchers Convert Biomass To Hydrogen Using Sunlight

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 7:00am
New submitter omaha393 writes: Cambridge chemists have developed a new catalytic approach capable of converting biomass into hydrogen gas using only sunlight as an energy source. The method converts lignocellulose, one of Earth's most abundant biomaterials, into hydrogen gas and organic byproducts when in a basic water and in the presence of the cadmium sulfide/oxide nanoparticle catalysts. The new method, published in Nature Energy, offers a relatively cheap fuel alternative that researchers are looking to scale up to meet consumer demands at the industrial level. Per R&D Magazine: "'With this in place we can simply add organic matter to the system and then, provided it's a sunny day, produce hydrogen fuel,' says joint lead author David Wakerley. 'Future development can be envisioned at any scale.'" In addition to lignocellulose, the team was also able to produce hydrogen gas using unprocessed material including wood, paper and leaves. Further reading: New Atlas; ScienceDaily

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Categories: Science

Dark Matter Took Much Longer To Condense Than Normal Matter, New Study | Video

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 6:00am
Using the Very Large Telescope, astronomers ‘peered way back in time’ to study 10 billion year old disc galaxies according to the European Southern Observatory. They found that dark matter was not concentrated around those galaxies.
Categories: Science

Dark Matter Was Likely a Minor Ingredient in Early Galaxies, Study Finds

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 6:00am
Although the invisible substance known as dark matter dominates galaxies nowadays, it was apparently only a minor ingredient of galaxies in the early universe, a new study finds.
Categories: Science

Earth’s Radiation Belts’ Reaction to Injection of Electrons Visualized

Space.com - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 5:19am
A geomagnetic storm injected electrons into the radiation belts in June 2015. The Magnetic Electron and Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Van Allen Probes gave scientists a new perspective on the belt’s reaction.
Categories: Science

Kickstarter Campaign Aims To Add a Full Android Device To the Back of Your iPhone

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 3:30am
A new Kickstarter campaign aims to expand the iPhone's functionality with its "Eye Smart iPhone Case," which features a fully functional Android device built into the case itself. The campaign was launched on March 1 and has already raised over $100,000. Mac Rumors reports: An always-on 5-inch AMOLED display is built into the case, which runs the Android 7.1 Nougat operating system. The case connects to the iPhone using its Lightning port to enable file transfers, power delivery, and more. A microSD card slot provides up to 256GB of storage for holding photos, videos, and other media, all of which is accessible using the Android file explorer. A built-in 2,800 mAh battery provides additional charge to the iPhone, and the Eye case itself supports Qi wireless charging. Two SIM card slots are included, and higher-end models support 4G LTE connectivity, so up to three phone numbers can be used with an iPhone. Android exclusive features, like native call recording, the file explorer, customization, file transfers, and Android apps are all made available to iPhone users via the Eye case. A 3.5mm headphone jack lets iPhone owners with an iPhone 7 or an iPhone 7 Plus to use wired headphones with the device, and the Eye case includes NFC, an IR blaster and receiver for controlling TVs and other devices, and a car mount. It's available for the iPhone 6 and later, and will allegedly be available for the new wave of iPhones coming in 2017 within a month of their release. The Smart iPhone Case is available for a Super early bird pledge of $95, with prices going up for 4G connectivity. The estimated retail price is between $189 and $229.

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Categories: Science

West African Village Weighs Using Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In Malaria Fight

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 2:05am
New submitter omaha393 writes: A public engagement campaign is underway in the hopes of convincing Burkina Faso residents to allow the release of genetically modified mosquitoes to combat deadly mosquito-borne pathogens. GM mosquitoes rely on a technology called "gene drives." Different gene drives offer different solutions, typically leading to subsequent broods being sterile, predominantly male, resistant to infection or nonviable due to toxic traits. Researchers in this case are only in the preliminary stages of releasing sterile males but hope to begin wider releases of GM mosquitoes in about 6 years. Burkina Faso is not the only country to pursue GM mosquitoes in efforts to prevent disease. Brazil has become a testing ground for wide release, and last fall voters in Florida Keys approved measures to begin releasing GM mosquitoes to fight the spread of Zika. Both the WHO and the U.S. FDA have approved the technique, but skeptics are critical of the method.

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Categories: Science

Most People Would Give Lab-Grown Meat a Try, New Survey Reveals

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 1:25am
Clive Phillips and Matti Wilks report via ScienceAlert: In a recent survey, published this month in PLOS One, we investigated the views of people in the United States, a country with one of the largest appetites for meat and an equally large appetite for adopting new technologies. A total of 673 people responded to the survey, done online via Amazon Mechanical Turk, in which they were given information about in vitro meat (IVM) and asked questions about their attitudes to it. Although most people (65 percent), and particularly males, were willing to try IVM, only about a third said they would use it regularly or as a replacement for farmed meat. But many people were undecided: 26 percent were unsure if they would use it as a replacement for farmed meat and 31 percent unsure if they would eat it regularly. This suggests there is scope to persuade consumers that they should convert to IVM if a suitable product is available. As an indication of this potential, 53 percent said it was seen as preferable to soy substitutes. The biggest concerns were about IVM's taste and lack of appeal, particularly in the case of meats seen as healthy, such as fish and chicken, where only two-thirds of people that normally ate them said that they would if it was produced by in vitro methods. By contrast, 72 percent of people who normally eat beef and pig products would still do so if they were produced as IVM.

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Categories: Science

Uber Is Using In-App Podcasts To Dissuade Seattle Drivers From Unionizing

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 12:45am
Uber doesn't like unionization, like many corporations. In January, the company sued the city of Seattle to challenge the city's authority to implement a law that would allow ride-share drivers to unionize. The Verge is reporting today that the company has been using in-app podcasts to dissuade their Seattle drivers from unionizing by explaining, in their view, how the city's unionization law would negatively affect drivers. From the report: Uber spokesperson Nathan Hambley pushed back on a story from The Wall Street Journal over the weekend that suggested Uber drivers in Seattle were forced to choose whether or not to listen to the company-produced podcasts every day before they can begin picking up riders. The podcasts, which are produced in a number of geographic markets for Uber drivers, appear as notifications at the bottom of the app that can be dismissed or ignored -- or acted upon to start the latest podcast episode, which usually run under 10 minutes. Drivers are not required to listen to the podcast, said Hambley in an interview. "They are not required to look down at the notification at all. The most prominent button is to go on or offline to accept rides." The notification first appears as the limited message on the left, and, if the driver swipes up, the full message appears. The notification remains at the bottom of the driver screen regardless of whether it is ignored, or if the podcast is listened to or not.

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Categories: Science

Chrome 57 Limits Background Tabs Usage To 1% Per CPU Core

Slashdot - Wed, 15/03/2017 - 12:05am
An anonymous reader quotes a report from BleepingComputer: Starting with Chrome 57, released last week, Google has put a muzzle on the amount of resources background tabs can use. According to Google engineers, Chrome 57 will temporarily delay a background tab's JavaScript timers if that tab is using more than 1% of a CPU core. Further, all background timers are suspended automatically after five minutes on mobile devices. The delay/suspension will halt resource consumption and cut down on battery usage, something that laptop, tablet, and smartphone owners can all relate. Google hinted in late January that it would limit JavaScript timers in background tabs, but nobody expected it to happen as soon as last week's Chrome release. By 2020, Google hopes to pause JavaScript operations in all background pages.

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Categories: Science

You Can Now Send, Request Money In Gmail On Android

Slashdot - Tue, 14/03/2017 - 11:20pm
While Google Wallet has been integrated into Gmail on the web since 2013, it has yet to be available for mobile users. Today, Google is officially rolling out the new integration so that users of the Gmail app on Android will be able to send or request money with anyone -- even those who don't have a Gmail email address. TechCrunch reports: The user experience has been designed to make exchanging money as easy as attaching a file, Google explains in its announcement. To access the new feature, you tap the attachment icon (the paperclip), then choose either send or request money, depending on your needs. A pop-up window appears where you can input the amount and add a note, and send. The entire process takes place in the Gmail app -- you don't have to have Google Wallet installed. In addition, recipients can configure it so the money they receive through Gmail goes directly into their bank account. There are no fees involved, notes Google. The goal, seemingly, is to take on quick payment apps like PayPal, Venmo or Square Cash, by offering a feature to move money right within Gmail's app. This could be useful for those times where the money is already a topic of an email conversation -- like when you're planning a trip with friends, or getting the family to go in together on a gift for your parents, for example.

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Categories: Science

Location of spinal correction influences risk of proximal junctional kyphosis development

Science Daily - Tue, 14/03/2017 - 11:04pm
A new study reports that PJK risk following lumbar spinal fusion depends on the level of the spine fused. Specifically, the authors – who include members of the International Spine Study Group (ISSG) from multiple academic centers – found that fusing the lower portion of lumbar spine results in a decreased risk of PJK.
Categories: Science

Reducing radiation could safely cut breast cancer treatment costs

Science Daily - Tue, 14/03/2017 - 11:03pm
More than half of older women with early stage breast cancer received more radiation therapy than what might be medically necessary, adding additional treatment and health care costs, according to a study.
Categories: Science