Earlier menopause linked to everyday chemical exposures

Science Daily - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 7:14pm
Women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower levels of these chemicals, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

Scientist-Artist Ed Belbruno Stars in Award-Winning Film

Space.com - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:58pm
Skilled mathematician and passionate painter Ed Belbruno – whose worldview and life experiences differ from what is typically expected of a scientist – is profiled in the new documentary, "Painting the Way to the Moon."
Categories: Science

Nobel Laureate and Laser Inventor Charles Townes Passes

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:52pm
An anonymous reader writes Charles Hard Townes, a professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, who shared the 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics for invention of the laser and subsequently pioneered the use of lasers in astronomy, died early Tuesday in Oakland. He was 99. "Charlie was a cornerstone of the Space Sciences Laboratory for almost 50 years,” said Stuart Bale, director of the lab and a UC Berkeley professor of physics. “He trained a great number of excellent students in experimental astrophysics and pioneered a program to develop interferometry at short wavelengths. He was a truly inspiring man and a nice guy. We’ll miss him.”

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Categories: Science

The Digital Divide Is Not Binary

Wired News - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:45pm

Economic growth and social inclusion, critical issues for many countries, will be promoted by bringing the four-plus billion non-Internet users around the world online. The common view of this digital divide is that it separates the Internet “haves” from the “have-nots”; dividing those who are online from those who would like to get online, but […]

The post The Digital Divide Is Not Binary appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

Consumers Are in the Connected Car’s Driver Seat in 2015

Wired News - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:45pm

Since last year’s CES, the connected car has been a hot topic for the automotive industry and consumers alike. The rise of innovative technology along with better connectivity capabilities have set the stage for an in-car experience that will rival the one you can have in the comfort of your living room. Car manufacturers and […]

The post Consumers Are in the Connected Car’s Driver Seat in 2015 appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

SpaceX's Reusable Mega-Rocket Plan Is Simply Amazing (Video)

Space.com - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:33pm
An amazing new video from SpaceX shows the spaceflight company's incredible plans for a reusable mega-rocket.
Categories: Science

Living on Other Planets: What Would It Be Like?

Space.com - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:18pm
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live on the moon? What about Mars, or Venus or Mercury? We sure have and that's why we decided to find out what it might be like to live on other worlds in our solar system, from Mercury to Pluto and beyond
Categories: Science

Sony Partners With Spotify to Launch a PlayStation Streaming Service

Wired News - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:17pm

For Sony, it's out with the old, and in with the new.

The post Sony Partners With Spotify to Launch a PlayStation Streaming Service appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

What Would It Be Like to Live on Mercury?

Space.com - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:16pm
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live on Mercury. So did we. Mercury's gravity, temperatures and weather are all very different from Earth's. Here's how.
Categories: Science

Chimps with higher-ranking moms do better in fights

Science Daily - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:13pm
For chimpanzees, just like humans, teasing, taunting and bullying are familiar parts of playground politics. An analysis of twelve years of observations of playground fights between young chimpanzees in East Africa finds that chimps with higher-ranked moms are more likely to win.
Categories: Science

Playing with puzzles, blocks may build children's spatial skills

Science Daily - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:13pm
Play may seem like fun and games, but new research shows that specific kinds of play are actually associated with development of particular cognitive skills. Data from an American nationally representative study show that children who play frequently with puzzles, blocks, and board games tend to have better spatial reasoning ability. Being able to reason about space, and how to manipulate objects in space, is a critical part of everyday life, helping us to navigate a busy street, put together a piece of furniture, even load the dishwasher. And these skills are especially important for success in particular academic and professional domains, including science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).
Categories: Science

Anthropology: Ancient skull from Galilee cave offers clues to the first modern Europeans

Science Daily - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:13pm
The discovery of a 55,000-year-old partial skull in Northern Israel provides new insights into the migration of modern humans out of Africa. A key event in human evolution was the expansion of modern humans of African origin across Eurasia, replacing all other forms of hominin (humans and their predecessors), around 40,000-60,000 years ago. However, due to the scarcity of human fossils from this period, these ancestors of all present-day non-African modern populations have largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers describe a partial skull that dates to around 55,000, which was found at Manot Cave in Israel's Western Galilee.
Categories: Science

Spiky 'hedgehog particles' for safer paints, fewer VOC emissions

Science Daily - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:12pm
A new process that can sprout microscopic spikes on nearly any type of particle may lead to more environmentally friendly paints and a variety of other innovations.
Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use

Slashdot - Wed, 28/01/2015 - 6:10pm
concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science