Energy efficiency upgrades ease strain of high energy bills in low-income families

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:16pm
Low-income families bear the brunt of high-energy costs and poor thermal comfort from poorly maintained apartment buildings. To study how energy efficiency upgrades could help, researchers surveyed residents in a low-income community in New York City and found that while energy efficiency upgrades varied by ownership status, low-income single-family homeowners reaped the greatest benefits. Overall, respondents experienced improved thermal comfort, enhanced health and safety and reduced energy costs as a result of the upgrades.
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Researchers make ultrasensitive conductivity measurements

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:16pm
A new way has been uncovered to measure the conductivity of electronic components at optical frequencies for high-speed, nanoscale device components ultimately as small as a single molecule.
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New obesity treatment prevents bone loss during weight loss

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:16pm
Using the intestinal hormone GLP-1 in obesity treatment prevents the loss of bone mass otherwise frequently associated with major weight loss. According to the researchers behind the study, the results may have a significant bearing on future obesity treatment.
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Youth on the autism spectrum overly sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:16pm
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, a team of researchers has shown for the first time that children with autism spectrum disorder who are overly sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently.
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Interest in learning about skin cancer appears to increase during summer

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:16pm
Google searches for information on melanoma and skin cancer increased over the summer months during a five-year period, although the level of interest did not correlate with the melanoma mortality to incidence ratio, suggesting that increased search volumes may not be associated with early detection, according to research.
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Genetically modified fish on the loose?

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:16pm
Transgenic fish may soon enter commercial production, but little is known about their possible effects on ecosystems, should they escape containment. Further, risk-assessment efforts are often hampered by an inability to comprehensively model the fishes' fitness in the wild, experts say.
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New drug can clear all psoriasis symptoms

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:15pm
A new psoriasis drug has resulted in 40 percent of people showing a complete clearance of psoriatic plaques after 12 weeks of treatment and over 90 percent showing improvement.
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All change for bacterial outer membrane proteins

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:15pm
The discovery of how a group of bacteria rapidly adapts to changing growth conditions could have implications for future antibiotic development, according to research.
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When trees aren't 'green'

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:15pm
Most of us don’t consider forests a source of pollution. As natural bodies, they should be good for the environment. But a recent study in Japan shows that older cedar and cypress plantations are causing as much pollution as a poorly managed agricultural field or urban setting.
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Robot eyes will benefit from insect vision

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:14pm
The way insects see and track their prey is being applied to a new robot under development, in the hopes of improving robot visual systems.
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Common antibiotic may be the answer to many multidrug-resistant bacterial infections

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:14pm
The common antibiotic azithromycin kills many multidrug-resistant bacteria very effectively — when tested under conditions that closely resemble the human body and its natural antimicrobial factors. The researchers believe the finding could prompt an immediate review of the current standard of care for patients with certain so-called “superbug” infections.
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Syllables that oscillate in neuronal circuits

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:14pm
Speech, emitted or received, produces an electrical activity in neurons that neuroscientists measure in the form of "cortical oscillations." To understand speech, as for other cognitive or sensory processes, the brain breaks down the information it receives to integrate it and give it a coherent meaning. But researchers could not confirm whether oscillations were signs of neuronal activity, or whether these oscillations played an active role in speech processing. Researchers reached such conclusions after having created a computerized model of neuronal microcircuits, which highlights the crucial role of neuronal oscillations to decode spoken language, independently of speakers' pace or accent.
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Dramatic ice sheet collapse 135 thousand years ago triggered strong global climate change

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:14pm
The climatic events that ended the ice age before last are surprisingly different to those of the last ice age, an international team of scientists has found. These findings will help scientists understand the processes that control Earth's dramatic climate changes at the end of an ice age.
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Obesity linked to adrenal disorder in teens may increase risk for cardiovascular disease

Science Daily - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:14pm
Adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have significantly increased amounts of abdominal fat tissue, placing them at greater risk for harmful conditions linked to obesity, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), researchers note.
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Unraveling the Enigma of Saturn’s Huge, Ghostly Halo

Wired News - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 5:00pm

The Phoebe ring around Saturn is far bigger than astronomers thought.

The post Unraveling the Enigma of Saturn’s Huge, Ghostly Halo appeared first on WIRED.









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Nobel Prize-Winning Scientist Criticizes Role of Women In Labs

Slashdot - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 4:45pm
An anonymous reader writes: Tim Hunt is an English biochemist most notable for winning the 2001 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine. Today he's become notable for something else entirely — at the World Conference of Science Journalists, Hunt suggested science labs should be segregated by gender. He said, "Let me tell you about my trouble with girls three things happen when they are in the lab You fall in love with them, they fall in love with you and when you criticize them, they cry." As you might expect, this set off a firestorm of criticism. Many asked Hunt to treat women in labs with the same respect he is afforded, and others held it up as an explicit example of the sexism that pervades the scientific community. Hunt later issued an apology, saying, "I'm very sorry that what I thought were light hearted ironic remarks were taken so seriously, and I'm very sorry if people took offence. I certainly did not mean to demean women, but rather be honest about my own shortcomings."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Mystery on Mercury: Strange Pattern of Huge Cliffs Defy Explanation

Space.com - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 4:03pm
A baffling new mystery has turned up on Mercury — a pattern of giant cliffs and ridges on the planet's surface that defies any explanation that scientists have currently been able to offer.
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Ask Slashdot: What Hardware Is In Your Primary Computer?

Slashdot - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 4:02pm
An anonymous reader writes: Here's something we haven't done in a while: list the specs of your main system (best one) so we can see what kinds of computers Slashdot geeks use. Context would be interesting, too — if you're up for it, explain how and why you set it up as you did, as well as the computer's primary purpose(s). Things you can list include (but are not limited to): CPU, motherboard, video card, memory, storage (SSD/HDD), exotic Controllers (RAID or caching), optical drives, displays, peripherals, etc. We can compare and contrast, see what specs are suitable for what purposes, and perhaps learn a trick or two.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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EasyJet’s Using Drones to Check Planes for Lightning Damage

Wired News - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 4:00pm

Budget carrier easyJet wants to inspect planes for damage from lightning strikes using automated drones.

The post EasyJet’s Using Drones to Check Planes for Lightning Damage appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Science

Lone Spiral Galaxy Seen By Upgraded Hubble Camera | Video

Space.com - Wed, 10/06/2015 - 3:32pm
Average distances between galaxies are relatively much smaller than average distances between individual stars. Not so galaxy NGC 6503, which is on its own in a region known as the Local Void, about 17 million light years away from Earth.
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