AT&T To Match Google Fiber In Kansas City, Charge More If You Want Privacy

Slashdot - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 3:01am
An anonymous reader writes: When Google Fiber started bringing gigabit internet to cities around the U.S., we wondered how the incumbent ISPs would respond. Now we know: AT&T has announced they will match Google Fiber's gigabit offerings in Kansas City. Of course, there are some caveats. First, AT&T's rollout may stop as it fights the Obama administration over net neutrality. Not that it would be a nationwide rollout anyway: "AT&T does not plan to offer the ultra-fast Internet lines to every home in the market. Rather, he said the company would calculate where demand is strongest and the investment in stringing new cables promised a decent return." There are also some interesting pricing concerns. The company plans to charge $70/month for gigabit service, but that's a subsidized price. Subsidized by what, you ask? Your privacy. AT&T says if you want to opt out of letting them track your browsing history, you'll have to pay $29 more per month. They say your information is used to serve targeted advertising, and includes any links you follow and search terms you enter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

AT&T To Match Google Fiber In Kansas City, Charge More If You Want Privacy

Slashdot - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 3:01am
An anonymous reader writes: When Google Fiber started bringing gigabit internet to cities around the U.S., we wondered how the incumbent ISPs would respond. Now we know: AT&T has announced they will match Google Fiber's gigabit offerings in Kansas City. Of course, there are some caveats. First, AT&T's rollout may stop as it fights the Obama administration over net neutrality. Not that it would be a nationwide rollout anyway: "AT&T does not plan to offer the ultra-fast Internet lines to every home in the market. Rather, he said the company would calculate where demand is strongest and the investment in stringing new cables promised a decent return." There are also some interesting pricing concerns. The company plans to charge $70/month for gigabit service, but that's a subsidized price. Subsidized by what, you ask? Your privacy. AT&T says if you want to opt out of letting them track your browsing history, you'll have to pay $29 more per month. They say your information is used to serve targeted advertising, and includes any links you follow and search terms you enter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

AT&T To Match Google Fiber In Kansas City, Charge More If You Want Privacy

Slashdot - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 3:01am
An anonymous reader writes: When Google Fiber started bringing gigabit internet to cities around the U.S., we wondered how the incumbent ISPs would respond. Now we know: AT&T has announced they will match Google Fiber's gigabit offerings in Kansas City. Of course, there are some caveats. First, AT&T's rollout may stop as it fights the Obama administration over net neutrality. Not that it would be a nationwide rollout anyway: "AT&T does not plan to offer the ultra-fast Internet lines to every home in the market. Rather, he said the company would calculate where demand is strongest and the investment in stringing new cables promised a decent return." There are also some interesting pricing concerns. The company plans to charge $70/month for gigabit service, but that's a subsidized price. Subsidized by what, you ask? Your privacy. AT&T says if you want to opt out of letting them track your browsing history, you'll have to pay $29 more per month. They say your information is used to serve targeted advertising, and includes any links you follow and search terms you enter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

AT&T To Match Google Fiber In Kansas City, Charge More If You Want Privacy

Slashdot - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 3:01am
An anonymous reader writes: When Google Fiber started bringing gigabit internet to cities around the U.S., we wondered how the incumbent ISPs would respond. Now we know: AT&T has announced they will match Google Fiber's gigabit offerings in Kansas City. Of course, there are some caveats. First, AT&T's rollout may stop as it fights the Obama administration over net neutrality. Not that it would be a nationwide rollout anyway: "AT&T does not plan to offer the ultra-fast Internet lines to every home in the market. Rather, he said the company would calculate where demand is strongest and the investment in stringing new cables promised a decent return." There are also some interesting pricing concerns. The company plans to charge $70/month for gigabit service, but that's a subsidized price. Subsidized by what, you ask? Your privacy. AT&T says if you want to opt out of letting them track your browsing history, you'll have to pay $29 more per month. They say your information is used to serve targeted advertising, and includes any links you follow and search terms you enter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

AT&T To Match Google Fiber In Kansas City, Charge More If You Want Privacy

Slashdot - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 3:01am
An anonymous reader writes: When Google Fiber started bringing gigabit internet to cities around the U.S., we wondered how the incumbent ISPs would respond. Now we know: AT&T has announced they will match Google Fiber's gigabit offerings in Kansas City. Of course, there are some caveats. First, AT&T's rollout may stop as it fights the Obama administration over net neutrality. Not that it would be a nationwide rollout anyway: "AT&T does not plan to offer the ultra-fast Internet lines to every home in the market. Rather, he said the company would calculate where demand is strongest and the investment in stringing new cables promised a decent return." There are also some interesting pricing concerns. The company plans to charge $70/month for gigabit service, but that's a subsidized price. Subsidized by what, you ask? Your privacy. AT&T says if you want to opt out of letting them track your browsing history, you'll have to pay $29 more per month. They say your information is used to serve targeted advertising, and includes any links you follow and search terms you enter.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Most coronary patients in Europe are not meeting their lifestyle, therapeutic and risk factor targets after hospitalisation

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:49am
Fewer than one half of all European patients following a heart attack are even receiving the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation and preventive care, research shows. In reviewing the results the investigators note considerable variation between European countries in lifestyle and risk factor management, the use of cardioprotective medication, and the provision of rehabilitations services.
Categories: Science

Letter From the Editor: What It’s Like to Fall in Love in the Digital Age

Wired News - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:45am

Spring evenings in New York City can be magic. Sometimes a lingering winter chill will settle in just after dark, but I remember one Tuesday in April1 2010 as particularly spectacular: The air was cool instead of cold, carrying the first hint of a thaw, and it was crystalline—the better to watch the sun set […]

The post Letter From the Editor: What It’s Like to Fall in Love in the Digital Age appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Virtual-Reality Porn Is Coming, and Your Fantasies May Never Be the Same

Wired News - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:45am

You’re not watching a scene anymore; you’re inhabiting it. And by being there, you’re implicated in whatever’s happening.

The post Virtual-Reality Porn Is Coming, and Your Fantasies May Never Be the Same appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Mystery Mars plume baffles scientists

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:08am
Plumes seen reaching high above the surface of Mars are causing a stir among scientists studying the atmosphere on the Red Planet. On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on the planet.
Categories: Science

Mad Scientists at MIT Are Designing Chairs That Assemble Themselves

Wired News - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:07am

It took this chair 7 hours to fully assemble itself. Not lightning fast, but an impressive starting point.

The post Mad Scientists at MIT Are Designing Chairs That Assemble Themselves appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Women active a few times weekly have lower risk of heart disease, stroke and blood clots

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:05am
Middle-aged women physically active a few times per week have lower risks of heart disease, stroke and blood clots than inactive women. More frequent physical activity does not appear to lower the risks further, research shows.
Categories: Science

Interaction between light and sound in nanoscale waveguide

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:04am
Scientists have demonstrated interaction between light and sound in a nanoscale area. Their findings elucidate the physics of light-matter coupling at these scales – and pave the way for enhanced signal processing on mass-producible silicon photonic chips. In the last decade, the field of silicon photonics has gained increasing attention as a key driver of lab-on-a-chip biosensors and of faster-than-electronics communication between computer chips. The technology builds on tiny structures known as silicon photonic wires, which are roughly a hundred times narrower than a typical human hair. These nanowires carry optical signals from one point to another at the speed of light. They are fabricated with the same technological toolset as electronic circuitry. Fundamentally, the wires work only because light moves slower in the silicon core than in the surrounding air and glass.
Categories: Science

Changing stem cell structure may help fight obesity

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:04am
Scientists have found that reducing the size of tiny hair like structures on stem cells stops them turning into fat. The discovery could be used to develop a way of preventing obesity.
Categories: Science

Criminologist 'hacks' the hacker

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:04am
We often view hackers as evil geniuses, but perhaps a more accurate depiction would be a talented -- though sometimes mischievous -- craft worker, according to a researcher. The way society views hackers is not representative of the whole hacking culture. Simply stated: Hacking is more than breaking into security systems and computer networks.
Categories: Science

Terror attacks offer insights for first responders

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:04am
When terrorists strike, emergency workers who have the proper training, information access and a positive work environment will make better decisions, according to research.
Categories: Science

Researcher has some questions for the interview

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:03am
Interviews begin with questions, but a researcher is instead questioning the interview, and the answers are mapping the history and unexplored conceptual areas of this familiar information-gathering tool.
Categories: Science

Organizational culture, climate predicts use of evidence-based practices in treatment of youth with psychiatric disorders

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:03am
Many mental health therapists use treatments that have little evidence to support them. A new multi-institution study has found that an organization's culture and climate are better predictors of the use of evidence-based practices than an individual therapist's characteristics in the treatment of children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders.
Categories: Science

When strep throat is something else: Forgotten bacterium is cause of many severe sore throats in young adults

Science Daily - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:03am
New research suggests that Fusobacterium necrophorum more often causes severe sore throats in young adults than streptococcus — the cause of the much better known strep throat. The findings, suggest physicians should consider F. necrophorum when treating severe sore throat in young adults and adolescents that worsens.
Categories: Science

Animal Sex Is Dangerous and Horrifying. So Why Does Sex Exist at All?

Wired News - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 1:00am

You’ve probably heard about duck penises—that they’re shaped like corkscrews, and that females have vaginas that corkscrew in the opposite direction. That one’s easy. But animal sex gets a whole lot weirder, with sexual dismemberment, servitude, and freaky parasitism that makes the duck’s corkscrew seem practically…um…straight? The current issue of our magazine is all about […]

The post Animal Sex Is Dangerous and Horrifying. So Why Does Sex Exist at All? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

PC-BSD: Set For Serious Growth?

Slashdot - Tue, 17/02/2015 - 12:58am
Artem Tashkinov writes: Luke Wolf, a KDE developer, argues that PC-BSD might become a serious desktop OS contender by year 2020, since Linux so far has failed to grasp any serious market share. He writes, "Consider this: In the past 10 years has the distribution you run changed significantly in what it offers over other distributions? I think you'll find the answer is largely no. I do have to give a shout out to openSUSE for the OBS, but otherwise I've used my desktop in the same exact way that I have always used it within the continuity of distribution X,Y, or Z since I started using them. Distributions simply aren't focused on desktop features, they're leaving it up to the DEs to do so." He continues, "PC-BSD on the other hand in fitting with the BSD mindset of holistic solutions is focused on developing desktop features and is moving rapidly to implement them." What do you think?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science