For people with Down Syndrome, varying test results can make it harder to get the right vision prescription

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:33pm
Even objective, automated vision testing—using a device called an autorefractor—gives variable results in patients with Down syndrome, reports a new study.
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Wood filter removes toxic dye from water

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:33pm
Engineers have developed a new use for wood: to filter water. Scientists added nanoparticles to wood, then used it to filter toxic dyes from water.
Categories: Science

How Not to Make a Movie About Tech

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 9:20pm
'The Circle' (a techno-thriller movie starring Tom Hanks and Emma Watson) is a dated, far-fetched parable about an imaginary villain -- and far less scary than its television counterpart, says Alyssa Bereznak, a staff writer at The Ringer. An anonymous reader shares the article, removing the excerpts that could spoil the plot: Hollywood is keen on illustrating the awesome power of modern-day tech companies and the elite class of entrepreneurs who run them. But lately the most effective way to do that is not to focus on what's possible, but to illustrate the real-life personalities that control the near future of tech. Stylistically, a show like HBO's Silicon Valley couldn't be further from a production like The Circle, and yet it succeeds in threading together a host of issues in tech culture, including major corporations' monopoly-like power to squash competitors, manipulate the unwitting tech press, and bypass the interests of their employees and users for the sake of better stock prices. Now at the beginning of its fourth season, the show is lauded for its highly researched, accurate depictions of the Bay Area's power players -- so much so that it has spurred at least one Business Insider post dedicated to identifying each character's real-life inspiration. (The show has even featured a handful of cameos from the industry's power brokers, including Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel and Alphabet executive chairman Eric Schmidt.) Even if it does take place in a comedy created by the man who gave us Beavis and Butt-Head, the show's researched interpretation of real life is a much more compelling way to display the tech world's flaws, rather than simply relying on imagined scaremongering.

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Cloudflare Helps Serve Up Hate Online: Report

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:40pm
An anonymous reader writes: If you've been wondering how hate has proliferated online, especially since the 2016 election, ProPublica has some answers. According to ProPublica, Cloudflare -- a major San Francisco-based internet company -- enables extremist web sites to stay in business by providing them with internet data delivery services. Cloudflare reportedly also keeps to a policy of turning over contact information of anyone who complains to operators of the offending sites, thus exposing the complainants to personal harassment.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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New research shows illegal levels of arsenic found in baby foods

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Almost half of baby rice food products contain illegal levels of inorganic arsenic despite new regulations set by the EU, new research concludes.
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Can trusting your doctor help reduce pain?

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Getting a shot at your doctor's office can be a stressful experience. But what if you knew your doctor was from your hometown, liked the same food as you, or shared your religious beliefs? Now that you feel more culturally connected to your doctor, will the shot hurt less?
Categories: Science

New math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistry

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have developed new mathematical techniques to advance the study of molecules at the quantum level. Mathematical and algorithmic developments along these lines are necessary for enabling the detailed study of complex hydrocarbon molecules that are relevant in engine combustion.
Categories: Science

Direct and not indirect childhood abuse linked to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Adolescents who were physically abused or sexually abused were more likely to engage in non-suicidal self-injury than their non-abused counterparts, according to a new study.
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Biofuel pays for itself with goods made from waste

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
A recent discovery may unlock the potential of biofuel waste -- and ultimately make biofuels competitive with petroleum. The researchers solved the structure of LigM, an enzyme that breaks down molecules derived from the biofuel waste product lignin. This opens a path toward new molecules and new, marketable products.
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The digitization of medical knowledge

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have challenged traditional teaching and learning concepts employed in medical training. A comparison with conventional learning methods led them to conclude that tablet-based, multimedia-enhanced training improves medical examination results. Their study clearly shows that an integrated program of tablet-based theoretical training and clinical practice enhances medical training.
Categories: Science

Advanced prostate cancer treatment failure due to cell reprogramming

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that reprograms tumor cells in patients with advanced prostate cancer, reducing their response to anti-androgen therapy. The findings, based on a study in mice, could help to determine which patients should avoid anti-androgen therapy and identify new treatments for people with advanced prostate cancer.
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Snow in Hawai'i: What does the future hold?

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers, led by climate modelers, used satellite images to quantify recent snow cover distributions patterns on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. They developed a regional climate model to simulate the present-day snowfalls and then to project future Hawaiian snowfalls. Their results indicate that the two volcano summits are typically snow-covered at least 20 days each winter, but that the snow cover will nearly disappear by the end of the century.
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Noise created by humans is pervasive in US protected areas

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Anthropogenic, or human-caused, noise pervades many US protected areas and habitats of endangered species, but is rarely managed as a threat in these highly valued areas.
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Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor control

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
A new connection between two regions of the brain has been discovered that may help explain how motor skills develop. Working with infant rats, the scientists found that the hippocampus and the red nucleus, part of the brain stem, synchronize during REM sleep.
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The genetic history of Bantu speakers and their relationship to African-Americans

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:15pm
Researchers have used genetic analysis to model the much-debated migration paths, and mingling patterns, of Bantu-speaking people as they disseminated across Africa.
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Sugar-sweetened beverages becoming more affordable around the world

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:14pm
A new study concludes that sugar-sweetened beverages have become more affordable around the globe, and are likely to become even more affordable and more widely consumed.
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Teasing apart the effects of higher mutation load on fitness

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:14pm
As animals increasingly acquire interacting mutations that result in loss of gene function, the relative decline in their fitness may only be exacerbated, a new study in humans and fruit flies suggests.
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Policies to curb short-lived climate pollutants could yield major health benefits

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:14pm
A commitment to reducing global emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) such as methane and black carbon could slow global warming while boosting public health and agricultural yields, aligning the Paris Climate Agreement with global sustainable development goals, a new analysis by an international panel of scientists shows.
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With more light, chemistry speeds up

Science Daily - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:14pm
Light initiates many chemical reactions. Experiments have for the first time demonstrated that increasing the intensity of illumination some reactions can be significantly faster. Here, acceleration was achieved using pairs of ultrashort laser pulses.
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Known Flaws in Mobile Data Backbone Allow Hackers To Trick 2FA

Slashdot - Thu, 04/05/2017 - 8:00pm
A known security hole in the networking protocol used by cellphone providers around the world played a key role in a recent string of attacks that drained bank customer accounts, according to a report published Wednesday. From the article: For years, researchers, hackers, and even some politicians have warned about stark vulnerabilities in a mobile data network called SS7. These flaws allow attackers to listen to calls, intercept text messages, and pinpoint a device's location armed with just the target's phone number. Taking advantage of these issues has typically been reserved for governments or surveillance contractors. But on Wednesday, German newspaper The Suddeutsche Zeitung reported that financially-motivated hackers had used those flaws to help drain bank accounts. This is much bigger than a series of bank accounts though: it cements the fact that the SS7 network poses a threat to all of us, the general public. And it shows that companies and services across the world urgently need to move away from SMS-based authentication to protect customer accounts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science