Genes that influence dizygotic twinning and fertility

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:21pm
Medical researchers have obtained a breakthrough in identifying genes that increase the chance for mothers to have dizygotic twins. Researchers believe the findings represent a significant advance in the identification of key mechanisms controlling ovarian function and provide a greater understanding of female fertility and infertility.
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Costs for orally administered cancer drugs skyrocket

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:21pm
New cancer drugs, taken in pill form, have become dramatically more expensive in their first year on the market compared with drugs launched 15 years ago, calling into question the sustainability of a system that sets high prices at market entry in addition to rapidly increasing those prices over time.
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Study identifies a key to bone formation, vertebrate evolution

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:21pm
Researchers have identified a key action of a watershed gene critical to bone formation and the evolution of vertebrates. The Sp7 or Osterix gene more than likely emerged from an ancestral gene family about 400 million years ago, expanding the diversity of life and programming the development of bone-secreting osteoblast cells. The closest living relatives to vertebrates, including sea squirts and lampreys, lack bone and an Sp7 gene.
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Cell transplant treats Parkinson's in mice under control of designer drug

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:21pm
A neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell. The cells in question are neurons and make the neurotransmitter dopamine, whose deficiency is the culprit in the widespread movement disorder Parkinson's disease.
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Speedy bridge repair

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:21pm
Normally, it takes weeks to repair the cracking or spalling of columns on just one bridge damaged in an earthquake. Now a team of researchers has developed a new process of fixing damaged bridge columns that takes as little as a few days.
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Study pinpoints mechanism that allows cells with faulty DNA to reproduce

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:19pm
Researchers have figured out how some cells do an end-run on replication quality control -- opening the door to developing new cancer-quashing treatments.
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Stem cell study finds mechanism that controls skin and hair color

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:19pm
A pair of molecular signals controls skin and hair color in mice and humans -- and could be targeted by new drugs to treat skin pigment disorders like vitiligo, according to a new report.
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Infant attention span suffers when parents' eyes wander during playtime

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:19pm
Caregivers whose eyes wander during playtime -- due to distractions such as smartphones or other technology, for example -- may raise children with shorter attention spans, according to a new study.
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Age-dependent changes in pancreatic function related to diabetes identified

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:19pm
Age-dependent changes in pancreatic function related to diabetes have been identified by researchers. The research collaboration to procure and analyze human pancreatic tissue from deceased donors illustrates how the organ’s function changes as we age, and could point the way toward new diabetes treatments, say investigators.
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Steam Computer Gaming Network Now Accepting Bitcoin

Slashdot - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 5:10pm
An anonymous reader shares an article on Fortune Magazine: The popular Steam computer game network has started accepting bitcoin in a move aimed at making it easier for players in countries like Brazil and China to make payments. Bitcoin transactions will be integrated into game shopping from Steam, which is owned by Valve Software and claims over 100 million users worldwide. Users will be able to use any bitcoin wallet to scan and pay for games or other items without revealing sensitive financial information via software from Bitpay.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Narrow band imaging can reduce recurrence of bladder tumors

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:42pm
Research into bladder tumor surgery has found that using narrow band imaging can significantly reduce the risk of disease recurrence. According to the World Cancer Research Fund, bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer in the world.
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Stem cells know how to open up and unwind

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:41pm
Research has revealed a new understanding of how an open genome structure supports the long-term and unrestricted developmental potential in embryonic stem cells. This insight provides new avenues for improving the quality and stability of embryonic stem cells – an essential requirement to fulfil their promise in regenerative medicine.
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Eating chocolate each day could reduce heart disease, diabetes risk

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:41pm
New study could lead to physicians recommending daily consumption of small amounts of dark chocolate. The new paper concludes that further observational research is needed to understand the role chocolate may play in insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disorders.
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Fungal spores could ‘hijack’ human immune cells to spread infection

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:41pm
Scientists have announced a major breakthrough in their understanding of how the fungus Aspergillus terreus -- the cause of serious illness in humans -- can move around the body, rather than remaining in the lungs as with similar fungal infections.
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Insane ‘Swooping’ Skydiving Makes Your Tandem Jump Look Lame

Wired News - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:32pm
In canopy piloting, the goal isn't to get to the ground safely. It's to get there as quickly as possible. The post Insane 'Swooping' Skydiving Makes Your Tandem Jump Look Lame appeared first on WIRED.
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Could Earth's Light Blue Color Be a Signature of Life?

Space.com - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:32pm
Earth's pale blue color contains some unique signatures of life, a new study shows. This finding could help scientists identify life on distant planets.
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Atari Co-Founder: Mobile Games Make Me Want To Throw My Phone

Slashdot - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:30pm
Will Freeman, reporting for The Guardian (condensed): One industry veteran sees arcades and mobile gaming as almost indistinct. He is Nolan Bushnell, co-founder of Atari. Often referred to as the godfather of video games (a phrase he dislikes), he is just about to make his debut in mobile game development, having established a partnership with Dutch publisher Spil, where he will help deliver at least three as-yet-unnamed titles. "When you look at mobile and arcade gaming, they're identical," Bushnell says. "Mobile has some of the same game constraints for the player, and that 'easy to learn, and difficult to master' metric." [...] "Generally, a tremendous number of mobile games are poorly designed," he says. "They can be so focused on graphics that they forget they have to get the timing right, and they have to have proper scoring constructs. I have been so pissed off with some mobile games I've wanted to throw my phone, even if I'm only going to hurt my phone there, and not the game."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Insect outbreaks reduce wildfire severity

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:25pm
Outbreaks by the mountain pine beetle and western spruce budworm can actually reduce wildfire severity, surprising new research shows. The findings contrast sharply with popular attitudes -- and some US forest policies.
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Drug research could prevent secondary cataract

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:24pm
Scientists may have found a way to prevent complications from surgery to treat cataract -- the world's leading cause of blindness. It's estimated that by the year 2020, 32 million people will need cataract surgery -- which works well to restore vision, but can lead to 'secondary cataract' forming. The research team reveal how a new focus for drugs to treat age-related macular degeneration could reduce the need for millions of follow-up eye operations.
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Some moths behave like butterflies to mate

Science Daily - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 4:24pm
A new study led by Universitat Autchr('242')noma de Barcelona researcher Vchr('237')ctor Sarto describes a striking example of evolutionary convergence in the order of Lepidoptera. A diurnal moth species has adopted sexual communication rules that are specific to butterflies and has even lost pheromone glands
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