High school football players show brain changes after one season, even in absence of concussions

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:06pm
Some high school football players exhibit measurable brain changes after a single season of play even in the absence of concussion, according to a new study.
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Imaging shows brain connection breakdown in early Alzheimer's disease

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:06pm
Changes in brain connections visible on MRI could represent an imaging biomarker of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. As many as 5 million Americans are affected, a number expected to grow to 14 million by 2050.
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PET/CT shows pituitary abnormalities in veterans with PTSD

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:06pm
Hybrid imaging with positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the pituitary region of the brain is a promising tool for differentiating military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from those with mild traumatic brain injury, according to a new study.
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3-D printing used to guide human face transplants

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:06pm
Researchers are using computed tomography and 3-D printing technology to recreate life-size models of patients' heads to assist in face transplantation surgery, according to a new study.
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Researchers design model to predict effects of chemical substances on health

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:05pm
The analysis of drugs, natural products, and chemical substances found in the environment allows the identification of the chemical fragments responsible for a therapeutic or deleterious effect on human health. This knowledge may be valuable for the design of drugs with fewer secondary effects, for associating diseases, and for identifying new uses for drugs currently on the market.
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Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon and MATE Editions Released

Slashdot - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:05pm
linuxscreenshot writes The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 17.1 'Rebecca' MATE. Linux Mint 17.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use. Linux Mint 17.1 MATE edition comes with two window managers installed and configured by default: Marco (MATE's very own window manager, simple, fast and very stable); Compiz (an advanced compositing window manager which can do wonders if your hardware supports it). Among the various window managers available for Linux, Compiz is certainly the most impressive when it comes to desktop effects. Screenshots can be found here.

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Herschel observes Andromeda's past and future stars

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:04pm
Recently, the infrared Herschel Space Observatory, has taken a series of beautiful high-resolution infrared images of Andromeda. It is the first time we can see M31, at these wavelengths, at such a high resolution. The quality and sensitivity of the Herschel data is so good scientists were able to study the properties of individual regions in Andromeda as small as about 400 light years.
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Understanding the Brain's 'Suffocation Alarm'

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:04pm
Panic disorder is a severe form of anxiety in which the affected individual feels an abrupt onset of fear, often accompanied by profound physical symptoms of discomfort. Scientists have known from studying twins that genes contribute to the risk of panic disorder, but very little is known about which specific genes are involved. Two of the most common and terrifying symptoms of this severe anxiety are a sense of shortness of breath and feelings of suffocation. One theory exists that panic disorder involves an overly sensitive “suffocation alarm system” in the brain that evolved to protect us from suffocating, and that panic attacks result when this alarm gets triggered by signals of impending suffocation like rising carbon dioxide levels.
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Bilingualism delays Alzheimer's manifestation by more than four years

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:04pm
The symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) manifest themselves about four to five years later in bilinguals as opposed to monolinguals. In bilinguals, the disease onset was estimated at the age of 77, while in monolinguals, this was at the age of 73.
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Mass extinction led to many new species of bony fish

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:04pm
Today, ray-finned fish, which belong to the bony fish, are by far the most biodiverse fish group in both salt- and freshwater. Their spectacular variety of forms ranges from eels, tuna, flounders and angler fish all the way to seahorses. With around 1,100 species, the second most biodiversegroup is the cartilaginous fish, which are almost exclusively marine and include sharks, rays and chimaeras. Exactly why bony fish managed to prevail in different habitats is the subject of debate: Do they have a better body plan, which is suited to more ecological niches than that of the cartilaginous fish? Or are other factors involved in their successful distribution? Paleontologists now reveal that climate catastrophes in the past played a crucial role in the dominance of ray-finned fish today.
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Causal link between antibiotics, childhood asthma dismissed

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:04pm
Researchers have dismissed previous claims that there is a link between the increased use of antibiotics in society and a coinciding rise in childhood asthma. The study includes half a million children and shows that exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy or early in life does not appear to increase the risk of asthma.
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Breast cancer vaccine shows promise in small clinical trial

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:03pm
A breast cancer vaccine is safe in patients with metastatic breast cancer, results of an early clinical trial indicate. Preliminary evidence also suggests that the vaccine primed the patients’ immune systems to attack tumor cells and helped slow the cancer’s progression.
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HIV drug blocks bone metastases in prostate cancer

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:03pm
Although prostate cancer can be successfully treated in many men, when the disease metastasizes to the bone, it is eventually lethal. The receptor CCR5, targeted by HIV drugs, is also key in driving prostate cancer metastases, suggesting that blocking this molecule could slow prostate cancer spread.
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Child treated in U.S. emergency department every 3 minutes for a toy-related injury

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:03pm
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have found that an estimated 3,278,073 children were treated in United States emergency departments from 1990 through 2011 for a toy-related injury. Children of different ages face different hazards from toys, the lead investigator said. Children younger than 3 years of age are at particular risk of choking on small toys and small parts of toys. During the study period, there were more than 109,000 cases of children younger than 5 swallowing or inhaling "foreign bodies," the equivalent of almost 14 cases per day.
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Preoperative interventions improve patient outcomes after cardiac surgery

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:03pm
Implementing a readiness bundle of preoperative interventions was associated with reduced risk of mortality and morbidity, shorter intubation times and shorter hospital stays for urgent patients after CABG surgery, a study has demonstrated.
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Structure of Neuron-Connecting Synaptic Adhesion Molecules Discovered

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:00pm
A research team has found the three-dimensional structure of synaptic adhesion molecules, which orchestrate synaptogenesis. The research findings also propose the mechanism of synapses in its initial formation.
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Longer and more accurate shelf-life with 'Smart' packaging material technologies

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:00pm
Companies in an A*STAR IMRE-led industry consortium will have access to new active packaging that protects perishables with a layered plastic that is not only extremely effective at keeping out oxygen and moisture, but extends the shelf-life of food by absorbing oxygen that may be present in packaging.
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Does sleep really shorten when we get older?

Science Daily - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:00pm
As we age, the quality of our sleep gets gradually worse. People who were able to sleep deeply all night in their twenties become increasingly likely to wake up in the night in their forties. This is a common change to sleeping patterns that can happen to anyone as a result of aging, and is not abnormal. As we enter old age, our sleep becomes even lighter and we wake up frequently during our sleep. In a new article, an author reviews sleeping and aging, and gives some advice.
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WIRED Space Photo of the Day for December 2014

Wired News - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 2:00pm

Follow Space Photo of the Day on Twitter The 2013 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery The 2012 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery For caption information and links to high-resolution images, please use the full-screen version of this gallery. For more mind-blowing space photos, see the entire WIRED Space Photo of the […]

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Categories: Science

Armies of Helper Robots Keep Amazon's Warehouses Running Smoothly

Slashdot - Mon, 01/12/2014 - 1:45pm
jones_supa writes Amazon is continuing to maintain its vision of an automatic warehouse. Since acquiring robot-maker Kiva, a Massachusetts company, for $775 million in cash in 2012, the e-commerce retailer has been increasingly implementing automation at its gargantuan fulfillment centers. This holiday season, Amazon's little helper is an orange, 320-pound robot. The 15,000 robots are part of the company's high-tech effort to serve customers faster. By lifting shelves of Amazon products off the ground and speedily delivering them to employee stations, the robots dramatically reduce the manual labor to locate and carry items. The Kiva robots, which resemble overgrown Roombas, are capable of lifting as much as 750 pounds and glide across Amazon's warehouse floors by following rows of sensors. Because Kiva-equipped facilities eliminate the need for wide aisles for humans to walk down, eighth-generation centers can also hold 50% more inventory than older warehouses. As Amazon is doing well, the company says that increase of automation hasn't yet led to staff reduction.

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Categories: Science