Evolutionary advantage of the common periwinkle

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:48pm
A special kind of small sulfur-rich proteins, the metallothioneins, have an extraordinarily large capability for binding heavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widely considered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain and a one-third higher detoxification capacity. This feature may help the snail survive in heavy-metal-polluted environments.
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Lighting up antibiotic resistance

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:48pm
Carbapenems are among the 'antibiotics of last resort' and can fight infections for which other drugs have long lost their effectiveness. However, even carbapenem-resistant pathogenic strains have emerged over the last decades.
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Successful method to reduce dental implant failure

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:48pm
Scientists are evaluating the effectiveness of a new nanocoating for dental implants to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis.
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On the trail of Parkinson's disease

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:48pm
The molecular causes of diseases such as Parkinson's need to be understood as a first step towards combating them. Chemists recently succeeded in analyzing what happens when selective mutations of the alpha-synuclein protein occur -- a protein that is closely linked to Parkinson's disease.
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Severe psoriasis predominantly affects men

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:48pm
The fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men.
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Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccines

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:48pm
Through experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.
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Amazon Wins $1.5 Billion Tax Dispute Over IRS

Slashdot - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:40pm
Amazon.com on Thursday won a more than $1.5 billion tax dispute with the Internal Revenue Service over transactions involving a Luxembourg unit more than a decade ago. From a report: Judge Albert Lauber of the U.S. Tax Court rejected a variety of IRS arguments, and found that on several occasions the agency abused its discretion, or acted arbitrarily or capriciously. Amazon's ultimate tax liability from the decision was not immediately clear. The world's largest online retailer has said the case involved transactions in 2005 and 2006, and could boost its federal tax bill by $1.5 billion plus interest. It also said a loss could add "significant" tax liabilities in later years. Amazon made just $2.37 billion of profit in 2016, four times what it made in the four prior years combined, on revenue of $136 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Image of the Day

Space.com - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:15pm
Astronaut Thomas Pesquet, who is taking a spacewalk with Shane Kimbrough today, will be adding lubricant to the Latching End Effector, the "hand" at the end of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System, otherwise known as Dextre.
Categories: Science

Enough With the Unoriginal Sci-Fi. Looking at You, Life

Wired News - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:00pm
Even if you haven't seen this movie, you've seen this movie. The post Enough With the Unoriginal Sci-Fi. Looking at You, Life appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Hollywood Producer Blames Rotten Tomatoes For Convincing People Not To See His Movie

Slashdot - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 2:00pm
An anonymous reader shares a VanityFair report: These days, it takes less than 60 seconds to know what the general consensus on a new movie is -- thanks to Rotten Tomatoes, the review aggregator site that designates a number score to each film based on critical and user reviews. Although this may be convenient for moviegoers not necessarily interested in burning $15 on a critically subpar film, it is certainly not convenient for those Hollywood directors, producers, backers, and stars who toiled to make said critically subpar film. In fact, the site may be "the worst thing that we have in today's movie culture" -- at least according to Brett Ratner, the Rush Hour director/producer who recently threw the financial weight of his RatPac Entertainment behind Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Sure, the blockbuster made over $850 million worldwide in spite of negative reviews ... but just think of how much more it could have made had it not had a Rotten Tomatoes score of 27 percent! Last week, while speaking at the Sun Valley Film Festival, Ratner said, "The worst thing that we have in today's movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. I think it's the destruction of our business."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Dwarf Planet Ceres' Water-Ice Deposits Tied to Its Changing Tilt

Space.com - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 1:53pm
The location of newfound water-ice deposits on Ceres are linked to wild swings in the dwarf planet's tilt over the eons, a new study suggests.
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The Clever Lindlund Ruler Measures the Digital and Physical Worlds

Wired News - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 1:30pm
The Lindlund ruler closes the gap between analog and digital design. The post The Clever Lindlund Ruler Measures the Digital and Physical Worlds appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Rogue One’s Director Reveals the Secrets of That Crazy Vader Scene

Wired News - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 1:00pm
According to Gareth Edwards, the scene almost didn't happen. Here's how he pulled it off. The post Rogue One’s Director Reveals the Secrets of That Crazy Vader Scene appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Sea Ice Extent Sinks To Record Lows At Both Poles

Slashdot - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 1:00pm
According to NASA, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached on March 7 a record low wintertime maximum extent. On the opposite side of the planet, Antartica ice hit its lowest extent ever recorded by satellites (since satellites began measuring sea ice in 1979) on March 3 at the end of summer in the Southern Hemisphere. Science Daily reports: Total polar sea ice covered 6.26 million square miles (16.21 million square kilometers), which is 790,000 square miles (2 million square kilometers) less than the average global minimum extent for 1981-2010 -- the equivalent of having lost a chunk of sea ice larger than Mexico. The ice floating on top of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas shrinks in a seasonal cycle from mid-March until mid-September. As the Arctic temperatures drop in the autumn and winter, the ice cover grows again until it reaches its yearly maximum extent, typically in March. The ring of sea ice around the Antarctic continent behaves in a similar manner, with the calendar flipped: it usually reaches its maximum in September and its minimum in February. This winter, a combination of warmer-than-average temperatures, winds unfavorable to ice expansion, and a series of storms halted sea ice growth in the Arctic. This year's maximum extent, reached on March 7 at 5.57 million square miles (14.42 million square kilometers), is 37,000 square miles (97,00 square kilometers) below the previous record low, which occurred in 2015, and 471,000 square miles (1.22 million square kilometers) smaller than the average maximum extent for 1981-2010.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Artificial photosynthesis steps into the light

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 12:30pm
A new project aims to create an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for advanced solar cells. The technique could lead to unique catalysts for other applications.
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An algorithm that knows when you'll get bored with your favorite mobile game

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 12:30pm
Researchers have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. This information is useful for game studios so that they can design strategies to maintain the player's interest.
Categories: Science

Computer program developed to diagnose and locate cancer from a blood sample

Science Daily - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 12:30pm
Researchers in the United States have developed a computer program that can simultaneously detect cancer and identify where in the body the cancer is located, from a patient's blood sample.
Categories: Science

Photo of the Week: Scientists Fire Up the World’s Largest Artificial Sun (Without Melting Earth)

Wired News - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 12:30pm
"Synlight," as it's called, puts out light 10,000 times as intense as that of the sun. The post Photo of the Week: Scientists Fire Up the World’s Largest Artificial Sun (Without Melting Earth) appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Witness 60 Years of Glorious F1 Race Car Evolution

Wired News - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 11:30am
From the front engined tubes to of yore to the mystic aerodynamic future. The post Witness 60 Years of Glorious F1 Race Car Evolution appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Tech Bigwigs Know How Addictive Their Products Are. Why Don’t the Rest of Us?

Wired News - Fri, 24/03/2017 - 11:30am
The world's greatest technocrats follow the cardinal rule of drug dealing: never get high on your own supply. The post Tech Bigwigs Know How Addictive Their Products Are. Why Don’t the Rest of Us? appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science