Fast, non-destructive test for two-dimensional materials

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 6:56pm
A fast, nondestructive optical method for analyzing defects in two-dimensional materials has been developed, with applications in electronics, sensing, early cancer diagnosis and water desalination.
Categories: Science

Unravelling the mystery of DNA attacks in cells' powerhouse could pave way for new cancer treatments

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 6:55pm
A five-year study has found the mechanism responsible for repairing damage to mitochondrial DNA. This discovery could pave the way for new treatments for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, say the researchers. This research may also have important implications for clinical advances in so called ‘three-parent baby’ mitochondrial donation.
Categories: Science

We're Getting Closer To Mass Production of Bones, Organs, and Implants

Slashdot - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 6:40pm
Medical researchers have been able to create certain kinds of living cells with 3D printers for more than a decade. Now a few companies are getting closer to mass production of higher-order tissues (bone, cartilage, organs) and other individually tailored items, including implants. From an article: Organovo has successfully transplanted human liver tissue into mice to cure chronic liver failure. Pending the success of human trials, possible applications include the $3 billion market for inherited conditions such as hemophilia. [...] Aspect prints tissue cells to create structures that resemble parts of the human body, such as an airway or meniscus, to spur easier research on treatments for, say, asthma or muscle tears. By taking muscle cells from a lung, for example, the company built respiratory tissue that responded to common asthma inhalers as a person's body should. [...] Materialise designs custom 3D-printable implants, surgical guides, and other medical devices. It's waiting on approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for implants designed to fuse bones.

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Categories: Science

Report Shows Another Diversity Challenge: Retaining Employees

Slashdot - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 6:00pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Women, blacks and Latinos are far more likely to quit jobs in tech than white or Asian men, according to a new report by the Kapor Center for Social Impact. The Oakland nonprofit commissioned an online survey by the Harris Poll, which asked 2,006 people who voluntarily left tech jobs in the past three years about why they quit. It found women were twice as likely to leave as men (alternative link), while black and Latino tech workers were 3.5 times likelier to quit than white or Asian colleagues. The most common reason they gave for their departures was workplace mistreatment.

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Categories: Science

The Internet-of-Things is Maturing

Slashdot - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 5:40pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: The "Internet of Things" (IoT) category is starting to mature in terms of startup investments, according to a new report from Silicon Valley venture capital firm Wing. Like any other trendy area of tech, IoT is in the midst of its own hype cycle, so it's important to get a more detailed picture of how the money is flowing.

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Categories: Science

The ocean detectives

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 5:20pm
Three new groups of viruses that attack microorganisms from the archaeal marine group, Euryarchaeota have been discovered by scientists. In all, 26 viruses previously unknown to science were found.
Categories: Science

Qualcomm Says Apple To Stop Paying Royalties

Slashdot - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 5:20pm
Apple has decided to withhold royalty payments to its contract manufacturers that are owed to Qualcomm, until a legal dispute between the companies is resolved, the chipmaker said on Friday. From a report: Qualcomm, the largest maker of chips used in smartphones, said it will not receive royalties from Apple's contract manufacturers for sales made during the quarter ended March 31. San Diego, California-based Qualcomm also slashed its profit and revenue forecasts for the current quarter, to account for the lost royalty revenue.

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Categories: Science

Counting the cuts in Mohs surgery: A way to improve care and reduce costs

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 5:15pm
In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind.
Categories: Science

Plague bacteria take refuge in amoebae

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 5:15pm
Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, can survive within the ubiquitous soil protozoan, the amoeba, by producing proteins that protect against the latter microbe's digestion, report scientists.
Categories: Science

Modern metabolic science yields better way to calculate indoor carbon dioxide

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 5:14pm
The air we breathe out can help us improve the quality of the air we breathe in. But to do so, one needs a reliable way to calculate the concentration of carbon dioxide we produce indoors. Researchers have developed a new computation method that uses well-established concepts from the study of human metabolism and exercise physiology to significantly improve how this important data is derived.
Categories: Science

An Open Letter on DRM To the Inventor of the Web, From the Inventor of Net Neutrality

Slashdot - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:40pm
Tim Wu, a law professor at the Colombia University, and best known for coining the term "net neutrality," has published an open letter to Tim Berners-Lee, the creator of the web and director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). In the letter, Wu has asked Berners-Lee to "seriously consider extending a protective covenant to legitimate circumventers who have cause to bypass EME, should it emerge as a W3C standard." Cory Doctorow, writes for BoingBoing: But Wu goes on to draw a connection between the problems of DRM and the problems of network discrimination: DRM is wrapped up in a layer of legal entanglements (notably section 1201 of America's Digital Millennium Copyright Act), which allow similar kinds of anticompetitive and ugly practices that make net neutrality so important. This is a live issue, too, because the W3C just held the most contentious vote in its decades-long history, on whether to publish a DRM standard for the web without any of the proposed legal protections for companies that create the kinds of competing products and services that the law permits, except when DRM is involved. As Wu points out, this sets up a situation where the incumbents get to create monopolies that produce the same problems for the open web that network neutrality advocates -- like Berners-Lee -- worry about.

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Categories: Science

Helpful tool allows physicians to more accurately predict parathyroid cancer recurrence

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:16pm
A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk. Consequently, the tool also helps to determine the optimum postoperative strategy, including aggressive surveillance and additional treatments, according to study results.
Categories: Science

Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:16pm
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study.
Categories: Science

Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:16pm
Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.
Categories: Science

The First 100 Days: What Trump Has Done on Space So Far

Space.com - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:00pm
The Trump administration has already moved aggressively in a number of areas, such as tax policy, health care, immigration and environmental regulation. But it hasn't done a lot regarding space science and exploration.
Categories: Science

'We Don't Planet' Episode 1: What's the Structure of the Sun?

Space.com - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:00pm
Learn all about the structure of the sun in the first episode of the astrophysics video-explainer series "We Don't Planet."
Categories: Science

Slashdot Asks: Should an Employee Be Fired For Working On Personal Side Projects During Office Hours?

Slashdot - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 4:00pm
An anonymous reader writes: I found this article that talks about whether an engineer should be fired if s/he is working on a side project. Several people who have commented in the thread say that the employer should first talk to the person and understand why they are working on personal projects during the office hours. One reason, as many suggested, could be that the employee might not have been fairly compensated despite being exceptionally good at the job. In which case, the problem resides somewhere in the management who has failed to live up to the expectations. What do you folks think? Let's not just focus on engineers, per se. It could be an IT guy (who might have a lot of free time in hand), or a programmer.

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Categories: Science

First endoscopic stricturotomy with needle knife study for intestinal strictures in IBD

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 3:35pm
The first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder has been released by physicians. The results appear to be promising.
Categories: Science

Hubble's bright shining lizard star

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 3:35pm
The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy.
Categories: Science

Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale

Science Daily - Fri, 28/04/2017 - 3:35pm
Using a specialized electron microscope outfitted with a pattern generator, scientists turned an imaging instrument into a lithography tool that could be used to create and study materials with new properties.
Categories: Science