Facebook Took Its Giant Internet Drone On Its First Test Flight

Slashdot - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:42pm
An anonymous reader writes: A year ago, Facebook unveiled Aquila, its effort to put giant drones in the skies to beam Internet connectivity to areas in the developing world without mobile broadband Internet. Today, the company announced it has completed the first full-scale test of its Aquila drone, after months of testing one-fifth-size models. On June 28, the experimental aircraft (featuring a V-shaped wingspan the width of a Boeing 737) took off from the Yuma Proving Grounds in Yuma, Arizona, and flew for 96 minutes at low altitude, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg and many others watched in the dawn sunlight.. Possibly years of work remain before Facebook's connectivity effort fully takes off, according to a head engineer, including figuring out how to keep the drones aloft for hours at a time, and how to effectively send Internet with lasers.Quartz points out that Facebook may not have been given the permission to test the drones. From the article:Earlier this year, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) finalized its regulations for flying commercial drones in the US. These regulations, which require commercial drones to be kept within the line of sight of the person flying the drone, and that the drones be kept below 400 feet, do not go into effect until August. Prior to these regulations, any company wishing to fly or test drones outdoors in the US required an exemption from the FAA, called a Section 333. Quartz checked with the FAA last year to ask whether Facebook had one of these exemptions, and was told it did not. (We've asked the FAA again, and Facebook, to see if the company has since received permission to fly drones in the US.) The FAA has started to fine some companies that operate drones commercially without an exemption, including a nearly $2 million fine for a company that was flying drones over people in New York and Chicago without permission.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Does social status affect generosity?

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:41pm
High-ranking people don't always turn out to be selfish jerks. It all depends on whether they feel worthy of their prominent social position, new research indicates.
Categories: Science

Imaging software predicts how you look with different hair styles, colors, appearances

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:41pm
How can we predict if a new haircut will look good without physically trying it? Or explore what missing children might look like if their appearance is changed? A new personalized image search engine developed by a computer vision researcher lets a person imagine how they would look with different hairstyles or appearances.
Categories: Science

New detector at South Pole shows early success at neutrino hunting

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:41pm
The Askaryan Radio Array team recently published a performance review of the first two stations to come online, showing great potential for the detector to push forward understanding of the cosmos once it's fully operational.
Categories: Science

New research gleans climate change insight from lizard genome

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:41pm
Using genomic data from three lizard species, researchers gleaned insights not available before on the impact of climate change on the distribution of animal populations in South American forests. The findings improve ways of modeling the distribution of biodiversity in the past and future.
Categories: Science

Researchers temporarily turn off brain area to better understand function

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:41pm
Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining brain.
Categories: Science

Researchers find first direct evidence that A. aegypti mosquito transmits Zika virus

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:39pm
Researchers have now directly connected the Aedes aegypti mosquito with Zika transmission in the Americas, during an outbreak in southern Mexico. The findings will help scientists to better target efforts for controlling the population of mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus.
Categories: Science

Scorpionfish too deep for SCUBA divers caught by submersible turns out to be a new species

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:39pm
Manned submersible Curasub, sneaking around the twilight depths of the Caribbean island of Curacao in search of currently unknown species, has found yet another new one. The newly discovered scorpionfish is the deepest-living member of its genus in the area. It also stands out in its appearance, including its colors.
Categories: Science

Artificial muscle for soft robotics: Low voltage, high hopes

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:39pm
A dielectric elastomer with a broad range of motion that requires relatively low voltage and no rigid components has now been created by scientists. This type of actuator could be used in everything from wearable devices to soft grippers, laparoscopic surgical tools, entirely soft robots or artificial muscles in more complex robotics.
Categories: Science

One-third of students report elevated psychological distress, survey shows

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:39pm
More than one in three -- an estimated 328,000 -- students in grades seven to 12 report moderate-to-serious psychological distress, according to new survey results in Ontario, Canada. Girls are twice as likely as boys to experience psychological distress, the study indicates.
Categories: Science

Chronic low back pain linked to higher rates of illicit drug use

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:39pm
People living with chronic low back pain (cLBP) are more likely to use illicit drugs -- including marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine -- compared to those without back pain, reports a study.
Categories: Science

Here's why run-down schools trigger low test scores

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:38pm
More than 230 New York City public middle schools were involved in a study that found a chain reaction at work: leaking toilets, smelly cafeterias, broken furniture, and run-down classrooms made students feel negatively which lead to high absenteeism and in turn, contributed to low test scores and poor academic achievement.
Categories: Science

Wrist fractures linked to poor balance in elderly patients

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:38pm
Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study.
Categories: Science

GPS jamming: Keeping ships on the 'strait' and narrow

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:38pm
Researchers are investigating how to prevent shipping Global Positioning Signals (GPS) being jammed in potential cyberattacks that may cause vessels to go off course and collide or run aground.
Categories: Science

Prevalence, severity of tinnitus in the US

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:28pm
Approximately one in 10 adults in the US have tinnitus, and durations of occupational and leisure time noise exposures are correlated with rates of tinnitus and are likely targetable risk factors, according to a study.
Categories: Science

New intellectual disability syndrome caused by genetic damage to single gene

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:27pm
Scientists have found a gene responsible for an intellectual disability disorder and proven how it works. The research, details the role of a gene called BCL11A in a new intellectual disability syndrome.
Categories: Science

Diabetes could be due to failure of beta cell 'hubs'

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:27pm
The significant role of beta cell 'hubs' in the pancreas has been demonstrated for the first time, suggesting that diabetes may due to the failure of a privileged few cells, rather than the behavior of all cells.
Categories: Science

What hunter-gatherers can tell us about fundamental human social networks

Science Daily - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:25pm
Long before the advent of social media, human social networks were built around sharing a much more essential commodity: food. Now, researchers reporting on the food sharing networks of two contemporary groups of hunter-gatherers provide new insight into fundamental nature of human social organization.
Categories: Science

Apple Patches Stagefright-Like Bug In IOS

Slashdot - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 6:00pm
Reader Trailrunner7 writes: Apple has fixed a series of high-risk vulnerabilities in iOS, including three that could lead to remote code execution, with the release of iOS 9.3.3. One of those code-execution vulnerabilities lies in the way that iOS handles TIFF files in various applications (Alternate source: Fortune ). Researchers at Cisco's TALOS team, who discovered the flaw, said that the vulnerability has a lot of potential for exploitation. "This vulnerability is especially concerning as it can be triggered in any application that makes use of the Apple Image I/O API when rendering tiled TIFF images. This means that an attacker could deliver a payload that successfully exploits this vulnerability using a wide range of potential attack vectors including iMessages, malicious web pages, MMS messages, or other malicious file attachments opened by any application that makes use of the Apple Image I/O API for rendering these types of files," Cisco TALOS said in a blog post.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

How Poker Theory Explains Ted Cruz’s Convention Speech

Wired News - Thu, 21/07/2016 - 5:36pm
Donald Trump is a jackal. But so is Ted Cruz. The post How Poker Theory Explains Ted Cruz's Convention Speech appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science