Visualizing RNAi at work

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:14pm
Researchers have revealed the molecular mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi), the phenomenon by which the synthesis of a specific protein is inhibited, by real time observation of target RNA cleavage at the single-molecule level.
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Mechanism of biological multi-fuel engine

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:13pm
Researchers have constructed the atomic model structure of the protein complex that corresponds to the stator (stationary part of a motor that surrounds the rotating part of a motor) of the E. coli flagellar motor for the first time by molecular simulation based on previously published experimental data, and elucidated the mechanism by which ions, including hydrogen ions (protons), are transferred through the stator.
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Geology: Slow episodic slip probably occurs in the plate boundary

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:13pm
Scientists have discovered slow-moving low-frequency tremors which occur at the shallow subduction plate boundary in Hyuga-nada, off east Kyushu. This indicates the possibility that the plate boundary in the vicinity of the Nankai Trough is slipping episodically and slowly (over days or weeks) without inducing a strong seismic wave.
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Drug inhibits infection that causes watery diarrhea

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:13pm
Researchers have demonstrated that heparin, a type of sulfated polysaccharide, inhibits infection with Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan that causes diarrhea in humans and other mammals. This will facilitate the development of anti-cryptosporidial agents.
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Transcriptional mechanisms governing cartilage formation

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:13pm
Researchers have identified modes of Sox9 action during cartilage formation by analyzing big data on Sox9 location, chromatin state, and gene expression over the whole mouse genome. This finding will contribute to the understanding of cartilage diseases caused by genomic mutation and genome-based drug discovery for disease therapies.
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New genomic aberrations of gastric cancer could pave the way for precision medicine

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:13pm
Scientists have discovered a relationship between Asian gastric cancers and the fusion of two genes.
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Schools start mapping cosmic rays and solar wind

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:12pm
A satellite experiment to study cosmic rays and the solar wind that was devised by school students is now successfully collecting data in space. LUCID, the Langton Ultimate Cosmic ray Intensity Detector, uses particle detectors from CERN to study the radiation environment in low Earth orbit.
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How cancer cells avoid shutdown

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm
Researchers unravel mechanisms by which a protein that promotes tumor growth is produced during stress. The specific protein concerned in the team's study is the protease cathepsin L, a certain enzyme. It is long known that high levels of this protease in breast cancers are associated with high metastasis rates and poor survival of the patients.
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Does that 'green' plasticizer make my PVC flexible enough for you?

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm
A study of an eco-friendly solvent helping to make PVC plastic more flexible reveals the molecular-level interaction of hydrogen bonds between the two ingredients. What gives plastic objects their flexibility and reduces their brittleness is the concentration of plasticizer. For example, a chemical solvent of the phthalate family called DOP is often used. The trouble is there are concerns that phthalates present health risks. So there is a demand for more alternatives. Now, scientists have examined the effect of using DEHHP, a new eco-friendly plasticizer, used in combination with PVC.
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Structural shift elucidated with large-scale atomic simulations

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm
Iron-nickel alloys are ubiquitous: they are found at the earth's core and in meteorites. What is fascinating about such alloys is that their inner structure can change with rapid temperature swings. Heated up above 730 °C (1,340 °F), these alloys enter what is referred to as an austenitic phase. Alternatively, they can be turned into very hard alloys, referred to as a martensitic phase, by subjecting them to extremely rapid cooling. Now a team of scientists from Germany has, for the first time, created a large-scale simulation involving 275,000 atoms representing iron-nickel alloys in proportions found in nature. They show that transitions from one alloy structure to the other occurs in both an orderly and a disorderly way, depending on whether it is heated up or cooled down, respectively.
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Emotion knowledge fosters attentiveness

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm
Young children, who possess a good understanding of their own emotions and of those of their fellow human beings early on, suffer fewer attention problems than their peers with a lower emotional understanding, a new study shows.
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Five-day space weather forecasts?

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm
Coronal mass ejections (CME), billion-ton solar plasma eruptions moving towards Earth at up to 2500 kilometers per second, can cause extensive and expensive disruption by damaging power, satellite and communication networks. A UK consortium is proposing an operational mission, called Carrington-L5, to give a five-day warning of hazardous solar activity that could inflict severe damage to our infrastructure.
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Reconstructing the Michelangelo bronzes

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm
Engineers, imagers and anatomists are helping Art historians to try to understand how the two mysterious Renaissance bronzes were made and why they look the way they do by making accurate replicas of the originals. The latest technology -- neutron imaging, XRF analysis, 360 degree laser scanning, 3D printing, and real-time x-ray videography -- has been involved in this Renaissance ‘whodunnit’.
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Top Designers Give Us Their Summer Reading Picks

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm

We asked a dozen of the best designers around which books they think are worth bringing to the beach. Taken together, the recommendation form also a master class in design.

The post Top Designers Give Us Their Summer Reading Picks appeared first on WIRED.











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Review: GoPro Hero4 Session

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 1:00pm

GoPro's new Hero4 Session is a small, cube-shaped camera that's totally waterproof, no case required.

The post Review: GoPro Hero4 Session appeared first on WIRED.











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Hacking Team Hacked, Attackers Grab 400GB of Internal Data

Slashdot - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 12:56pm
Several readers sent word that notorious surveillance company Hacking Team has itself been hacked. Attackers made off with 400GB worth of emails, documents, and source code. The company is known for providing interception tools to government and law enforcement agencies. According to the leaked files, Hacking Team has customers in Egypt, South Korea, Kazakhstan, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Lebanon, Mongolia, Russia, Germany, Sudan, and the United States — to name a few. It has been labeled an enemy of the internet by Reporters Without Borders. "Clients have had their passwords exposed as well, as several documents related to contracts and configurations have been circulating online." Nobody knows yet who perpetrated the hack.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Safer, with more benefits: Parents' vaccine views shifting

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 12:53pm
Over the same time period that multiple outbreaks of measles and whooping cough made headlines around the country, parents' views on vaccines became more favorable.
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Learning from biology to accelerate discovery

Science Daily - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 12:53pm
A new review paper explores the strategies nature employs to achieve different functions and the mechanics at play within those functions. Surveying everything from sea cucumbers and Venus flytraps to human muscles and trees, the review paper broadly explores the strategies that biology employs to create different functions and the mechanics at play within those functions.
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Silicon Valley Is Filling Up With Ex-Obama Staffers

Slashdot - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 12:13pm
HughPickens.com writes: Edward-Isaac Dovere reports in Politico that the fastest-growing chapter of the Obama alumni association is in Silicon Valley. For the people who helped get Obama elected and worked for him once he did, there's something about San Francisco and its environs that just feels right: the emphasis on youth and trying things that might fail, chasing that feeling of working for the underdog, and even using that word "disrupting" to describe what they do. "A lot of people who moved out here were present at the creation of the Obama '08 campaign," says Tommy Vietor. "There's a piece of them that wants to replicate that." Vietor left the White House two years ago, and he and his business partner, former Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau, founded a communications strategy firm with a focus on speechwriting for tech and other start-ups. "If you're writing for a CEO out here, they're more likely to be your peer than your grandfather," says Vietor. "They're young, they're cool, they get it." Other former Obama staffers who have come to Silicon Valley include former campaign manager and White House adviser David Plouffe at Uber, Kyle O'Connor at Nest, Semonti Stephens at Twitter; Mike Masserman, at Lyft; Brandon Lepow at Facebook; Nicole Isaac, at LinkedIn; Liz Jarvis-Shean at Civis; Jim Green and Vivek Kundra at Salesforce, Alex McPhillips at Google; Gillian Bergeron, at NextDoor; Natalie Foster at the Institute for the Future; Catherine Bracy at Code for America; Hallie Montoya Tansey at Target Labs. Nick Papas, John Baldo, Courtney O'Donnell and Clark Stevens at AirBnB, and Jessica Santillo at Uber. There are so many former Obama staffers in the Bay Area that a recent visit by former White House senior adviser David Axelrod served as a reunion of sorts, with more than a dozen campaign and White House veterans gathering over lunch to discuss life after the administration. Obama himself rarely misses an opportunity to come to San Francisco. He says he loves the energy there, loves the people and according to Dovere, the city's ultra-liberal leanings mean he was greeted as a rock star even during the dark days before last year's midterms. Obama's even become friendly with Elon Musk. "There should be a welcome booth at the SFO airport," says Jon Carson, the former Organizing for Action executive director now at SolarCity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Genetically Modified Animals Will Be on Your Plate in No Time

Wired News - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 12:00pm

Scientists have been changing genes in livestock embryos for decades in efforts to boost production. And it might be time for them to show up on your plate.

The post Genetically Modified Animals Will Be on Your Plate in No Time appeared first on WIRED.











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