'Ageless' silicon throughout Milky Way may indicate a well-mixed galaxy

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:31pm
New surveys of the element silicon may mean that the Milky Way is more efficient at mixing its contents than previously thought, thereby masking the telltale signs of chemical aging.
Categories: Science

How to get adults to eat their vegetables? Study explores potential of spices and herbs use

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:30pm
Researchers interested in developing interventions to encourage adults to make better food choices are investigating whether using more spices and herbs, like ginger, curry, rosemary, or garlic, for example, can help adults consume more vegetables as part of their diet.
Categories: Science

Super-resolution spectral imaging to monitor dynamic processes in real time

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:30pm
A new approach to increase resolution of multichannel spectrometers has now been developed by a team of researchers.
Categories: Science

Maybe Don't Manually Install Windows 10 Creators Update, Says Microsoft

Slashdot - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:22pm
Two weeks after Microsoft started rolling out Windows 10 Creators Update, the company has asked the users to avoid manually installing the major update. A report adds: But why? Because the update is causing problems for users. The first phase of the rollout targeted newer devices -- those most likely to be able to run the OS update with the minimum of problems -- and Microsoft is using the feedback from that first batch of updated systems to decide when to begin the next phase of the rollout. "For example, our feedback process identified a Bluetooth accessory connectivity issue with PCs that use a specific series of Broadcom radios," an executive said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Do medical marijuana laws promote illicit cannabis use and disorder?

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:19pm
Illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders increased at a greater rate in states that passed medical marijuana laws than in other states, according to latest research. The new study is among the first to analyze the differences in cannabis use and cannabis use disorders before and after states passed medical marijuana laws, as well as differentiate between earlier and more recent periods and additionally examine selected states separately.
Categories: Science

Dairy 'excellent' source of protein for children, new study deems

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:19pm
Researchers are using pigs as a model to study the best way of evaluating protein quality in foods eaten by children.
Categories: Science

Google Doodle Celebrates Cassini Probe's 'Grand Finale' Saturn Dive

Space.com - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 3:15pm
Today, Google is honoring NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn with an adorable Google Doodle featuring the spacecraft swooping between the planet and its rings.
Categories: Science

Windows is Bloated, Thanks to Adobe's Extensible Metadata Platform

Slashdot - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:40pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Over the weekend, I put together a little tool that scans executable files for PNG images containing useless Adobe Extensible Metadata Platform (XMP) metadata. I ran it against a vanilla Windows 10 image and was surprised that Windows contains a lot of this stuff. Adobe XMP, generally speaking, is an Adobe technology that serializes metadata like titles, internal identifiers, GPS coordinates, and color information into XML and jams it into things, like images. This data can be extremely valuable in some cases but Windows doesn't need or use this stuff. It just eats up disk space and CPU cycles. Thanks to horrible Adobe Photoshop defaults, it's very easy to unknowingly include this metadata in your final image assets. So easy, almost all the images on this site are chock full of it. But you can appreciate my surprise when a bunch of important Windows binaries showed up in my tool.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Scientists using high tech microscope find clues to an autoimmune disease

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:30pm
Using a unique microscope capable of illuminating living cell structures in great detail, researchers have found clues into how a destructive autoimmune disease works, setting the stage for more discoveries in the future.
Categories: Science

Early blood signatures of vaccine immunogenicity

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:30pm
Within seven days of vaccination, a blood test early after vaccination can predict whether vaccines based on living, modified viruses have had the desired effect. This is one of the results of a new study on systems analysis of immune responses induced by a highly promising vaccine against Ebola. This result can inform and accelerate rational development of other new vaccines based on living viruses.
Categories: Science

Watch Live Now! Search for Life Stars in House Science Committee Hearing

Space.com - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:30pm
The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology is holding a full committee hearing today on the search for life beyond Earth. The hearing began at 10 a.m. EDT (1400 GMT) and you can watch it here, courtesy of the House.
Categories: Science

Clearing out old cells could extend joint health, stop osteoarthritis

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:22pm
Selectively removing old or 'senescent' cells from joints could stop and even reverse the progression of osteoarthritis, researchers report after a preclinical study in mice and human cells.
Categories: Science

Jupiter and the theory of relativity gets the blame for celestial bodies changing course

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:22pm
In the case of solar system bodies passing close to the sun, there are two important effects playing a crucial role in the orbital evolution. One of the effects is from the general relativity and the other effect is from Newtonian theory of gravitation.
Categories: Science

US Launches Minuteman III ICBM From Silo in Test | Video

Space.com - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:09pm
The intercontinental ballistic missile was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26, 2017.
Categories: Science

You’ll Never Guess Who Does Diversity Right: Uber

Wired News - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:00pm
Opinion: Amid scandal, Uber is getting something right: diversity. The post You'll Never Guess Who Does Diversity Right: Uber appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Cassini Is Ready to Sacrifice Itself for the Good of the Solar System

Wired News - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:00pm
After two decades of discoveries, Cassini is out of fuel and ready to retire. The post Cassini Is Ready to Sacrifice Itself for the Good of the Solar System appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Suicide of an Uber Engineer: Widow Blames Job Stress

Slashdot - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 2:00pm
An anonymous reader shares a report: Joseph Thomas thought he had it made when he landed a $170,000 job as a software engineer at Uber's San Francisco headquarters last year. [...] But his time at Uber turned into a personal tragedy, one that will compel the ride-hailing company to answer questions before a judge about its aggressive work culture. Always adept with computers, Joseph Thomas worked his way up the ladder at tech jobs in his native Atlanta, then at LinkedIn in Mountain View, where he was a senior site reliability engineer. He turned down an offer from Apple to go to Uber, because he felt he could grow more with the younger company and was excited about the chance to profit from stock options when it went public. But at Uber, Thomas struggled in a way he'd never experienced in over a decade in technology. He worked long hours. He told his father and his wife that he felt immense pressure and stress at work, and was scared he'd lose his job. [...] One day in late August, Zecole (the wife) came home from dropping their boys off at school. Joseph was sitting in his car in the garage. She got into the passenger seat to talk to him. Then she saw the blood. Joseph had shot himself. [...] Uber declined to comment on the legal dispute and said Thomas never complained to the company of extreme stress or racial discrimination.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Synthetic two-sided gecko's foot could enable underwater robotics

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 1:54pm
Geckos are well known for effortlessly scrambling up walls and upside down across ceilings. Even in slippery rain forests, the lizards maintain their grip. Now scientists have created a double-sided adhesive that copies this reversible ability to stick and unstick to surfaces even in wet conditions. They say their development could be useful in underwater robotics, sensors and other bionic devices.
Categories: Science

Longer-lasting pain relief with MOFs

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 1:54pm
To treat headaches, back pain or fever, most of us have reached for ibuprofen at one point or another. But we often have to take doses every four to six hours if the pain warrants it. Now scientists are working on a way to package the commonly used drug so it can last longer. Their approach could also be used to deliver other drugs orally that currently can only be taken intravenously.
Categories: Science

The automation of art: A legal conundrum

Science Daily - Wed, 26/04/2017 - 1:54pm
Deep Neural Networks are systems that are able to simulate human perception by 'memorizing' complex patterns on a mathematical level. One application for this is in the arts, where these systems are used for their creative potential. As DNN's become more popular, there is the danger of an unchecked proliferation of copyright protections, which risks stifling creativity. In order to prevent this, we should focus on the human element within the complex technological processes that engender automated art.
Categories: Science