KDE Plasma 5.3 Beta Brings Lot of Improvements

Slashdot - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 2:53pm
jones_supa writes: The KDE project today announced the release of KDE Plasma 5.3 beta. It brings better power management, improved Bluetooth support, improved widgets, Wayland support, new media center, and nearly 350 bugfixes. The power management improvements include settings that can be independently configured per activity, there is a new energy usage monitor available in KInfoCenter, and a battery applet identifies applications that hog power. Bluetooth applet brings added support for blocking and unblocking devices. New touchpad module has been added as well. The combined window manager and compositor KWin is now able to start a nested XWayland server, which acts as a bridge between the old X11 and the new Wayland world.

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Categories: Science

Google Sunsetting Old Version of Google Maps

Slashdot - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 2:26pm
New submitter Robertgilberts writes with word that Google is dropping the old version of Maps. The new version of Google Maps came out of preview back in February 2014 and was in beta for several months before that. The only way to access the old version of Google Maps was via a special URL or if you had a very old browser that did not support the new version of Google Maps. Consolation prize: There will still be a lighter-weight version, which "drops out many of the neat Google Maps features in exchange for speed and compatibility."

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Categories: Science

Seattle CEO Cuts $1 Million Salary To $70K, Raises Employee Salaries

Slashdot - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 2:11pm
First time accepted submitter fluffernutter writes Dan Price started his company, Gravity Payments, out of university when he was 19. Now he is cutting his $1 million salary to $70,000 and promising to raise all his employees' salaries. Dan is quoted as saying he made the move because "I think this is just what everyone deserves."Good business practice? Silly boosterism? Enlightened self-interest?

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Categories: Science

Boston Is All About Robots, Freedom, and Lobstah

Wired News - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 2:00pm

You can enjoy it all without being a Sox fan. Probably.

The post Boston Is All About Robots, Freedom, and Lobstah appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Top VC Firm Says Techies Need to Get Along With Government

Wired News - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 2:00pm

Andreessen Horowitz is launching a new unit to help tech startups work with, instead of against, the government.

The post Top VC Firm Says Techies Need to Get Along With Government appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Botox makes unnerving journey into our nervous system

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:40pm
Researchers have shown how Botox -- also known as Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A -- is transported via our nerves back to the central nervous system. Botox -- best known for its ability to smooth wrinkles -- has been extremely useful for the treatment of over-active muscles and spasticity as it promotes local and long-term paralysis. To date, it has generally been accepted as safe.
Categories: Science

Wildfires emit more greenhouse gases than assumed in California climate targets

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:40pm
A new study quantifies the amount of carbon stored and released through California forests and wildlands. The results indicate that wildfires and deforestation are contributing more than expected to the carbon emissions, which could affect the ability to meet state mandatory goals to reduce greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by 2020.
Categories: Science

Victorian baby teeth could help predict future health of children today

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:40pm
Baby teeth from children who died during the 1845-52 Irish famine could help us predict the future health of children born today, according to new research. Investigators found that the biochemical composition of teeth that were forming in the womb and during a child's early years not only provided insight into the health of the baby's mother, it even showed major differences between those infants who died and those who survived beyond early childhood.
Categories: Science

Protein building blocks for nanosystems

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:39pm
Scientists have developed the concept of protein adaptor based nano-object assembly (PABNOA). PABNOA makes it possible to assemble gold nanoparticles in various structures with the help of ring-shaped proteins while defining the precise distance between these particles. This opens up the possibility of producing bio-based materials with new optical and plasmonic properties. The field of nanoplasmonics focuses on miniscule electromagnetic waves metal particles emit when they interact with light. The principle behind the production of these materials could also be applied to develop nanosystems that convert light into electrical energy as well as bio-based materials with new magnetic properties.
Categories: Science

Palaeolithic remains show cannibalistic habits of human ancestors

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:39pm
Analysis of ancient cadavers recovered at a famous archaeological site confirm the existence of a sophisticated culture of butchering and carving human remains, according to a team of scientists.
Categories: Science

A 'pin ball machine' for atoms and photons

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:39pm
A team of physicists proposes the combination of nano-photonics with ultracold atoms for simulating quantum many-body systems and creating new states of matter.
Categories: Science

Scientists use brain stimulation to boost creativity, set stage to potentially treat depression

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:38pm
The first direct evidence has been found demonstrating that a low dose of electric current can enhance the brain's natural alpha oscillations to boost creativity by an average of 7.4 percent. Next up: using the method to treat depression, scientists say.
Categories: Science

Faculty in doctoral programs more responsive to white male prospective students, research finds

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:38pm
Faced with requests to meet with potential doctoral students of easily identifiable gender, race or ethnicity, faculty in almost every academic discipline are significantly more responsive to white males than to women and minorities, according to research.
Categories: Science

Can Online Reporting System Help Prevent Sexual Assaults On Campus?

Slashdot - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:30pm
jyosim writes Studies have shown that as many as 90 percent of campus rapes are committed by repeat offenders. A new system is designed to help identify serial assaulters, by letting students anonymously report incidents in order to look for patterns. But some argue that having the ability to report someone with just the click of a button may not be a good thing. Andrew T. Miltenberg, a New York lawyer who represents young men accused of sexual misconduct, says though the system seems well intended, he is concerned about dangers it may pose to students who are accused. 'We're all guilty of pressing send on an angry text or email that, had we had to put it into an actual letter and proofread, we probably wouldn't have sent,' he says.

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Categories: Science

Nifty All-in-One Coffee Maker Lets You Brew Java Anywhere

Wired News - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:00pm

Truly great coffee still demands a certain degree of preciousness, which doesn’t often lend itself to portability. A new all-in-one coffee maker aims to change that.

The post Nifty All-in-One Coffee Maker Lets You Brew Java Anywhere appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

The Weird Shifter That Made Audi’s R8 Sports Car a Legend

Wired News - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 1:00pm

The Audi R8 was most amazing for how daringly different it was---especially that gated shifter.

The post The Weird Shifter That Made Audi’s R8 Sports Car a Legend appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

How Many Hoaxes Are On Wikipedia? No One Knows

Slashdot - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 12:49pm
An anonymous reader writes The Washington Post's Caitlin Dewey has written a lengthy feature covering one of Wikipedia's most intractable problems: carefully inserted hoax information that is almost impossible to detect. Dewey's investigation starts with the recent discovery of the nonexistent Australian god "Jar'Edo Wens" (which lasted almost ten years), and discusses a Wikipediocracy post about a recent experiment by critic Greg Kohs, in which 30 articles received cleverly-chosen minor falsehoods. More than half survived for more than two months. Included is also a chart showing that editing participation in Wikipedia has "atrophied" since 2007. It is quite rare to see a feature in a major media outlet as critical as this, of Wikipedia and its little-known internal problems. Especially on the heels of a very favorable CBS 60 Minutes report. As Kohs says, "I think this has proved, beyond a reasonable doubt, that it's not fair to say Wikipedia is 'self-correcting.'"

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Categories: Science

With biosimilar drug development on the rise, researchers explore efficacy

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 12:44pm
A new article focuses on the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody to be approved in Europe. "While there is growing interest in biosimilars and their potential to reduce the cost of treatment for a number of debilitating diseases, clinicians and patients alike still have some questions," said an author. "Using a detailed background on the clinical development of the first EMA approved biosimilar monoclonal antibody, this article creates a useful framework for consideration of these new drug options."
Categories: Science

A sniff of happiness: Chemicals in sweat may convey positive emotion

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 12:43pm
Humans may be able to communicate positive emotions like happiness through the smell of our sweat, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that we produce chemical compounds, or chemosignals, when we experience happiness that are detectable by others who smell our sweat.
Categories: Science

After prostate cancer, start walking, experts say

Science Daily - Thu, 16/04/2015 - 12:43pm
Walking at an easy pace for about three hours every week may be just enough physical activity to help prostate cancer survivors reduce damaging side effects of their treatment, according to a new study. "Non-vigorous walking for three hours per week seems to improve the fatigue, depression and body weight issues that affect many men post-treatment," said the lead author of the study. "If you walk even more briskly, for only 90 minutes a week, you could also see similar benefits in these areas."
Categories: Science