What digital divide? Seniors embrace social technology

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
Contrary to popular belief, older adults enjoy emailing, instant messaging, Facebook and other forms of social technology. Not only that, but such online networking appears to reduce seniors' loneliness and even improve their health.
Categories: Science

WhatsApp To Share Some Data With Facebook

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:11pm
Two years ago when Facebook bought WhatsApp, the instant messaging client said that the deal would not affect the digital privacy of its users. Things are changing now, WhatsApp said Thursday. The Facebook-owned app will share with the company some member information, as well as some analytics data of its users. Bloomberg reports: WhatsApp announced a change to its privacy policy today that allows businesses to communicate with users. The messages could include appointment reminders, delivery and shipping notifications or marketing material, the company said in its revised terms of service. In a blog post, WhatsApp said it will be testing these business features over the coming months. The strategy is an important step for Facebook as it attempts to make money from its most expensive acquisition. In addition to the messages from businesses, WhatsApp said it would begin sharing more information about its users with the "Facebook family." The data, including a person's phone number, could be used to better targets ads when browsing Facebook or Instagram, WhatsApp said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

How easy is it to spot a lie?

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:09pm
'Who broke Grandma's favorite vase?' As you listen to a chorus of 'I don't know' and 'Not me,' how will you determine the culprit? Conventional wisdom says, divide and conquer, but what does scientific research show us about questioning a group of people at one time?
Categories: Science

Coffee drinking habits can be written in our DNA, study finds

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:09pm
Researchers have identified a gene that appears to curb coffee consumption. People with a DNA variation in a gene called PDSS2 tend to drink fewer cups of coffee, the study found.
Categories: Science

Linux Took Over the Web. Now, It’s Taking Over the World

Wired News - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 2:09pm
25 years after Linus Torvalds unveiled Linux, the free operating system is still finding new uses. The post Linux Took Over the Web. Now, It's Taking Over the World appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Science

Record-Breaking Astronaut Jeff Williams Congratulated By Scott Kelly | Video

Space.com - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 1:42pm
NASA's Jeff Williams recently became the first astronaut to surpass 520 days in Space. It was a record previously held by Scott Kelly.
Categories: Science

Researchers Create Algorithm That Diagnoses Depression From Your Instagram Feed

Slashdot - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 1:00pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Inverse: Harvard University's Andrew Reece and the University of Vermont's Chris Danforth crafted an algorithm that can correctly diagnose depression, with up to 70 percent accuracy, based on a patient's Instagram feed alone. After a careful screening process, the team analyzed almost 50,000 photos from 166 participants, all of whom were Instagram users and 71 of whom had already been diagnosed with clinical depression. Their results confirmed their two hypotheses: first, that "markers of depression are observable in Instagram user behavior," and second, that "these depressive signals are detectable in posts made even before the date of first diagnosis." The duo had good rationale for both hypotheses. Photos shared on Instagram, despite their innocent appearance, are data-laden: Photos are either taken during the day or at night, in- or outdoors. They may include or exclude people. The user may or may not have used a filter. You can imagine an algorithm drooling at these binary inputs, all of which reflect a person's preferences, and, in turn, their well-being. Metadata is likewise full of analyzable information: How many people liked the photo? How many commented on it? How often does the user post, and how often do they browse? Many studies have shown that depressed people both perceive less color in the world and prefer dark, anemic scenes and images. The majority of healthy people, on the other hand, prefer colorful things. [Reece and Danforth] collected each photo's hue, saturation, and value averages. Depressed people, they found, tended to post photos that were more bluish, unsaturated, and dark. "Increased hue, along with decreased brightness and saturation, predicted depression," they write. The researchers found that happy people post less than depressed people, happy people post photos with more people in them than their depressed counterparts. and that depressed participants were less likely to use filters. The majority of "healthy" participants chose the Valencia filter, while the majority of "depressed" participants chose the Inkwell filter. Inverse has a neat little chart embedded in their report that shows the usage of Instagram filters between depressed and healthy users.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science

Potentially deadly heart condition plagues family members around same age

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:51pm
People with a family member who had an aortic dissection—a spontaneous tear in one of the body’s main arteries—should take note of the age that family member was when the aortic dissection occurred. According to a new study, aortic dissections have the potential to run in families and often occur within 10 years of the same age.
Categories: Science

The more we know, the easier we are to deceive

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:49pm
Knowing a lot about a subject means you are more likely to have false memories about it.
Categories: Science

Clever car racking and intelligent software double number of cars in shipping containers

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:49pm
Shipping cars could be safer and more efficient than ever before, thanks to innovative solutions.
Categories: Science

Number of tuberculosis cases in India is double current estimates, says new study

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
The number of cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India may be up to two to three times higher than current estimates, suggests a new study. TB is a bacterial infection, spread through inhaling tiny droplets from the coughs or sneezes of an infected person. India has the highest number of TB cases in the world, and accounts for at least a quarter of all cases worldwide.
Categories: Science

Designing better ways to let go of digital memories than 'delete'

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
Researchers are looking at better ways of helping grieving people let go of emotionally-charged digital content after the death of loved ones or the break-up of relationships.
Categories: Science

Nerve cells with a sense of rhythm

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
The performances of our brain like thinking, remembering, perceiving and motion control can only arise through the interaction of the network of nerve cells. Now, neuroscientists show how nerve cells communicate with each other in neural networks.
Categories: Science

Researchers identify possible pathway to reboot immune system after bone-marrow transplants

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
New research has shown how a cell surface molecule, Lymphotoxin ? receptor, controls entry of T-cells into the thymus, and as such presents an opportunity to understanding why cancer patients who undergo bone-marrow transplant are slow to recover their immune system.
Categories: Science

Artificial retinas: Promising leads towards clearer vision

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
A major therapeutic challenge, the retinal prostheses that have been under development during the past ten years can enable some blind subjects to perceive light signals, but the image thus restored is still far from being clear.  By comparing in rodents the activity of the visual cortex generated artificially by implants against that produced by “natural sight”, scientists have identified two factors that limit the resolution of prostheses.  Based on these findings, they were able to improve the precision of prosthetic activation.
Categories: Science

Nanovesicles in predictable shapes

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
Beads, disks, bowls and rods: scientists have demonstrated the first methodological approach to control the shapes of nanovesicles. This opens doors for the use of nanovesicles in biomedical applications, such as drug delivery in the body, they say.
Categories: Science

Promising route to the scalable production of highly crystalline graphene films

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
Researchers discovered a procedure to restore defective graphene oxide structures that cause the material to display low carrier mobility. By applying a high-temperature reduction treatment in an ethanol environment, defective structures were restored, leading to the formation of a highly crystalline graphene film with excellent band-like transport. These findings are expected to come into use in scalable production techniques of highly crystalline graphene films.
Categories: Science

Sitting in traffic jams is officially bad for you

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:48pm
Pollution levels inside cars were found to be up to 40% higher while in traffic jams or at a red traffic light compared to free-flowing traffic conditions, new research indicates. The World Health Organization has placed outdoor air pollution among the top ten health risks faced by humans, linking with seven million premature deaths a year.
Categories: Science

An effective and low-cost solution for storing solar energy

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:47pm
Solar energy can be stored by converting it into hydrogen. But current methods are too expensive and don't last long. Using commercially available solar cells and none of the usual rare metals, researchers have now designed a device that outperforms in stability, efficiency and cost.
Categories: Science

New study questions timing in mitral valve repairs

Science Daily - Thu, 25/08/2016 - 12:47pm
Doctors say new research is showing that patients who suffer from isolated mitral valve regurgitation may need surgery before symptoms appear.
Categories: Science