Feast on These New Netflix Delights After You Gorge on Stuffing

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 12:00pm

It can seems like there’s an annoying cousin for every room in the house. Thankfully, streaming video offers sweet digital sanctuary. Here's what to watch.

The post Feast on These New Netflix Delights After You Gorge on Stuffing appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Moving Walls Transform a Tiny Apartment Into a 5-Room Home

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30am

The solution allows the owner to have several spacious rooms---just not all at once.

The post Moving Walls Transform a Tiny Apartment Into a 5-Room Home appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

30 Years of Iconic Criterion Covers Collected in One Beautiful Book

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30am

Criterion Designs is a beautiful book that captures 30 years of iconic movie covers.

The post 30 Years of Iconic Criterion Covers Collected in One Beautiful Book appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Fantastically Wrong: Why Is the Sky Blue? It’s Packed With Sexy Energy, of Course

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30am

I know of a simple box that can radically improve your health, a device so powerful that the FDA once banned it and condemned its inventor to prison. But luckily, and quite graciously, its design has been left unpatented, free for all who might care to harness the mysterious “orgone energy” that pervades our universe. […]

The post Fantastically Wrong: Why Is the Sky Blue? It’s Packed With Sexy Energy, of Course appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Twitter Tries Out Coupons Despite Everything Groupon Taught Us

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30am

Twitter on Tuesday morning announced that it is testing Twitter Offers, a new product that lets retailers tweet special cash-back deals, which users can then claim in brick-and-mortar stores with their linked credit and debit cards. But will people actually use it?

The post Twitter Tries Out Coupons Despite Everything Groupon Taught Us appeared first on WIRED.


Categories: Science

Spotify Doesn’t Hurt Artists: My Band Would Be Nowhere Without It

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30am

If more big acts follow Taylor Swift’s lead, bands like ours could lose an important outlet to have their music heard.

The post Spotify Doesn’t Hurt Artists: My Band Would Be Nowhere Without It appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Oops: After Threatening Hacker With 440 Years, Prosecutors Settle for a Misdemeanor

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:30am

The defense attorney for one young hacker with ties to Anonymous argues prosecutors indicted his client on 44 baseless felony charges as an intimidation and smear tactic.

The post Oops: After Threatening Hacker With 440 Years, Prosecutors Settle for a Misdemeanor appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

13 Cat-Approved Gifts for Fabulous Felines (And Their Humans)

Wired News - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 11:15am

It's not like I just sit around licking myself all day. I have opinions about things. I've got a Pinterest page. Come the holidays, I would prefer to not be forgotten.

The post 13 Cat-Approved Gifts for Fabulous Felines (And Their Humans) appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 10:15am
An anonymous reader writes: I live in a relatively large college town that's within easy driving distance of several major metropolitan centers. In many ways, the infrastructure around here is top-notch. The major exception is the electrical grid. Lightning storm? Power outage. Heavy winds? Power outage. Lots of rain? Power outage. Some areas around town are immune to this — like around the hospital, for obvious reasons. But others seem to lose power at the drop of hat. Why is this? If it were a tiny village or in the middle of nowhere, it would make sense to me. What problems do the utility companies face that they can't keep service steady? Do you deal with a lot of outages where you live? I'm not sure if it's just an investment issue or a technological one. It hasn't gotten better in the decade I've lived here, and I can imagine it will only get worse as the infrastructure ages.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NSF Commits $16M To Build Cloud-Based and Data-Intensive Supercomputers

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 7:16am
aarondubrow writes: As supercomputing becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, new kinds of computing resources and more inclusive modes of interaction are required. The National Science Foundation announced $16M in awards to support two new supercomputing acquisitions for the open science community. The systems — "Bridges" at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and "Jetstream," co-located at the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute and The University of Texas at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center — respond to the needs of the scientific computing community for more high-end, large-scale computing resources while helping to create a more inclusive computing environment for science and engineering. Reader 1sockchuck adds this article about why funding for the development of supercomputers is more important than ever: America's high-performance computing (HPC) community faces funding challenges and growing competition from China and other countries. At last week's SC14 conference, leading researchers focused on outlining the societal benefits of their work, and how it touches the daily lives of Americans. "When we talk at these conferences, we tend to talk to ourselves," said Wilf Pinfold, director of research and advanced technology development at Intel Federal. "We don't do a good job communicating the importance of what we do to a broader community." Why the focus on messaging? Funding for American supercomputing has been driven by the U.S. government, which is in a transition with implications for HPC funding. As ComputerWorld notes, climate change skeptic Ted Cruz is rumored to be in line to chair a Senate committee that oversees NASA and the NSF.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NSF Commits $16M To Build Cloud-Based and Data-Intensive Supercomputers

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 7:16am
aarondubrow writes: As supercomputing becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, new kinds of computing resources and more inclusive modes of interaction are required. The National Science Foundation announced $16M in awards to support two new supercomputing acquisitions for the open science community. The systems — "Bridges" at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and "Jetstream," co-located at the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute and The University of Texas at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center — respond to the needs of the scientific computing community for more high-end, large-scale computing resources while helping to create a more inclusive computing environment for science and engineering. Reader 1sockchuck adds this article about why funding for the development of supercomputers is more important than ever: America's high-performance computing (HPC) community faces funding challenges and growing competition from China and other countries. At last week's SC14 conference, leading researchers focused on outlining the societal benefits of their work, and how it touches the daily lives of Americans. "When we talk at these conferences, we tend to talk to ourselves," said Wilf Pinfold, director of research and advanced technology development at Intel Federal. "We don't do a good job communicating the importance of what we do to a broader community." Why the focus on messaging? Funding for American supercomputing has been driven by the U.S. government, which is in a transition with implications for HPC funding. As ComputerWorld notes, climate change skeptic Ted Cruz is rumored to be in line to chair a Senate committee that oversees NASA and the NSF.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

NSF Commits $16M To Build Cloud-Based and Data-Intensive Supercomputers

Slashdot - Wed, 26/11/2014 - 7:16am
aarondubrow writes: As supercomputing becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, new kinds of computing resources and more inclusive modes of interaction are required. The National Science Foundation announced $16M in awards to support two new supercomputing acquisitions for the open science community. The systems — "Bridges" at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and "Jetstream," co-located at the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute and The University of Texas at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center — respond to the needs of the scientific computing community for more high-end, large-scale computing resources while helping to create a more inclusive computing environment for science and engineering. Reader 1sockchuck adds this article about why funding for the development of supercomputers is more important than ever: America's high-performance computing (HPC) community faces funding challenges and growing competition from China and other countries. At last week's SC14 conference, leading researchers focused on outlining the societal benefits of their work, and how it touches the daily lives of Americans. "When we talk at these conferences, we tend to talk to ourselves," said Wilf Pinfold, director of research and advanced technology development at Intel Federal. "We don't do a good job communicating the importance of what we do to a broader community." Why the focus on messaging? Funding for American supercomputing has been driven by the U.S. government, which is in a transition with implications for HPC funding. As ComputerWorld notes, climate change skeptic Ted Cruz is rumored to be in line to chair a Senate committee that oversees NASA and the NSF.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science