Did a Timer Error Change the Outcome of a Division I College Basketball Game?

Slashdot - 1 hour 5 min ago
New submitter javakah writes: Controversy has erupted from the February 10th basketball game between Boise State and Colorado State, and speculation is that a timer may have made an incorrect assumption about the number of frames per second the game was recorded in, and ultimately lead to an erroneous result. With the game tied in overtime, Boise State had the ball out-of-bounds with 0.8 seconds left on the game clock. The ball was thrown in-bounds, the shot went in, and the game clock showed that the Boise State player got the shot off with 0.4 seconds left. However there was a problem: the game clock did not start until a fraction of a second after the in-bounds player touched the ball. Referees decided to use video replay to examine whether the player had gotten the shot off within 0.8 seconds or not. To do this, they used a timer embedded in the video replay system. This embedded timer indicated that 1.3 seconds had passed between the time that the in-bounds player touched the ball and when he got the shot off. (Read more, below.)

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Categories: Science

Google Brain Researchers Make Significant Progress On Language Modeling

Slashdot - 1 hour 28 min ago
New submitter integralclosure writes: Using neural networks, Google Brain researchers have significantly improved a computer's ability to model English (achieving extremely low perplexity score on a large dataset). Using the model they were able to generate random sentences, such as the following: 'Yuri Zhirkov was in attendance at the Stamford Bridge at the start of the second half but neither Drogba nor Malouda was able to push on through the Barcelona defence.' The sentences are generally coherent and mostly grammatically correct. Advances seem to be a replay of neural networks' dominance in the Imagenet competition.

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Categories: Science

Hackers of Ukrainian Utilities Probably Hit Mining and Railroad Targets, Too

Slashdot - 1 hour 45 min ago
itwbennett writes: Trend Micro said Thursday that its latest technical research shows that the same malware — dubbed BlackEnergy and KillDisk — were likely used in attacks on a mining company and a railway operator that preceded the devastating power-company hacks and that those earlier attacks may have been test runs. 'The malware used in the attacks, known as Black Energy, has been linked by the security firm iSight Partners to a group nicknamed the Sandworm Team, which is suspected to be from Russia,' writes Jeremy Kirk.

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Categories: Science

Asics Buys Runkeeper in Another Shoe and Software Team-Up

Wired News - 1 hour 50 min ago

The fitness apps are going fast.

The post Asics Buys Runkeeper in Another Shoe and Software Team-Up appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Science

Austrian Minister Calls For a Constitutional Right To Pay In Cash

Slashdot - 2 hours 26 min ago
New submitter sittingnut writes: Bloomberg reports that Austrian Deputy Economy Minister Harald Mahrer has called for a constitutional right to use cash to protect their privacy. According to the report, Mahrer said, "We don't want someone to be able to track digitally what we buy, eat and drink, what books we read and what movies we watch. We will fight everywhere against rules," including caps on cash purchases. EU finance ministers at a meeting in Brussels last Friday urged the European Commission, the EU's executive arm, to "explore the need for appropriate restrictions on cash payments exceeding certain thresholds," " to crack down on "illicit cash movements."

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Categories: Science

Catastrophic failure of South American Ice Age dam changed Pacific Ocean circulation and climate

Science Daily - 2 hours 46 min ago
The catastrophic release of fresh water from a vast south American lake at the end of the last Ice Age was significant enough to change circulation in the Pacific Ocean according to new research. The study reveals that the lake, which was about one third the size of Wales, drained several times between 13,000 and 8,000 years ago, with devastating consequences.
Categories: Science

Sleep apnea takes a toll on brain function

Science Daily - 2 hours 47 min ago
People with sleep apnea show significant changes in the levels of two important brain chemicals, which could be a reason that many have symptoms that impact their day-to-day lives, new research concludes.
Categories: Science

Genome studies can help identify lifestyle risks for diseases

Science Daily - 2 hours 47 min ago
A type of study commonly used to pinpoint genetic variants associated with diseases can also be used to identify the lifestyle predictors that increase the risk of a disease -- something that is often overlooked in genetic studies.
Categories: Science

Gene switch may repair DNA and prevent cancer

Science Daily - 2 hours 47 min ago
New discoveries are bringing scientists closer to understanding how DNA repairs itself with a chemical modification which, when absent, can lead to tumor formation.
Categories: Science

Giant flightless bird wandered the Arctic 50 million years ago

Science Daily - 2 hours 47 min ago
New research confirms there really was a giant, flightless bird with a head the size of a horse's wandering about in the winter twilight of the high Arctic some 53 million years ago.
Categories: Science

Pirate Bay Browser Streaming Technology Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare

Slashdot - 3 hours 6 min ago
An anonymous reader writes: Last week the Pirate Bay added support for streaming video torrents inside the browser in real-time. Kickass Torrents followed the next week. The technology they used is called Torrents Time. A security researcher has discovered that this technology which is a mix of client and server side code is actually a security and user privacy disaster. Attackers can carry out XSS attacks on TPB and KAT, the app runs on Mac as root, attackers can hijack downloads and force malicious code on the user's PC, and advertisers can collect info on any user that has Torrents Time installed.

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Categories: Science

Gene signature could lead to a new way of diagnosing Lyme Disease

Science Daily - 3 hours 34 min ago
Researchers may have found a new way to diagnose Lyme disease, based on a distinctive gene “signature” they discovered in white blood cells of patients infected with the tick-borne bacteria.
Categories: Science

New lens ready for its close-up

Science Daily - 3 hours 34 min ago
Researchers have always thought that flat, ultrathin optical lenses for cameras or other devices were impossible because of the way all the colors of light must bend through them. But researchers have developed a new method of creating optics that are flat and thin yet can still perform the function of bending light to a single point, the basic step in producing an image.
Categories: Science

Gene previously observed only in brain is important driver of metastatic breast cancer

Science Daily - 3 hours 34 min ago
One gene that was once thought only to be found in the brain is also expressed in breast cancer and helps promote the growth and spread of the disease, research shows. Additionally, the scientists showed how a version of the gene with edited RNA prevents metastasis.
Categories: Science

Diabetics who use verapamil have lower glucose levels, data show

Science Daily - 3 hours 34 min ago
While causal relationship cannot be inferred, findings of a new study are “absolutely encouraging," says the lead author of a new report. The study shows for the first time that there is an association of verapamil use and lower fasting glucose levels in humans with diabetes
Categories: Science

Happy 89th Birthday John Green!

Cryptomundo - 3 hours 44 min ago
Happy Birthday John from all of us at Cryptomundo!
Categories: Fortean

UCL Scientists Push 1.125Tbps Through a Single Coherent Optical Receiver

Slashdot - 3 hours 46 min ago
Mark.JUK writes: A team of researchers working in the Optical Networks Group at the University College London in England claim to have achieved the "greatest information rate ever recorded using a single [coherent optical] receiver", which was able to handle a record data speed of 1.125 Terabits per second (Tbps). The result, which required a 15 sub-carrier 8GBd DP-256QAM super-channel (15 channels of data) and total bandwidth of 121.5GHz, represents an increase of 12.5% relative to the previous record (1Tbps). Now they just need to test it using some long fibre optic cable because optical signals tend to become distorted when they travel over thousands of kilometers.

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Categories: Science

Important role of nucleocytoplasmic transport in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

Science Daily - 3 hours 52 min ago
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two devastating adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. No cure exists for these diseases. Ten percent of ALS patients suffer from a familial form of the disease, while FTD is caused in 40% of patients by a genetic defect. In 2011, the most important genetic cause of ALS and FTD was discovered. The causative mutation was a repetition of a piece of non-coding DNA, a so called tandem repeat, in a gene with an unknown function, named C9orf72. A team of scientists has now discovered that proteins translated from this tandem repeat interfere with the nucleocytoplasmic transport which they found is essential for causing ALS and FTD.
Categories: Science

Expert opinion on how to address the skyrocketing prices of cancer drugs

Science Daily - 3 hours 54 min ago
Many patients with cancer find themselves in great financial distress, in part because the costs of cancer-fighting drugs are skyrocketing. Is it possible to create public policy that will rein in these prices and cut patients' out-of-pocket costs? Not without significant tradeoffs, that could reduce patients' access to some cancer medications, says a physician, cancer researcher and health economist.
Categories: Science

New study confirms different generics have equal efficacy when treating epilepsy

Science Daily - 3 hours 54 min ago
A new study tested two generic lamotrigine (prescription antiepileptic) products and found no detectable difference in clinical effects among patients in the trial.
Categories: Science