Perfect NCAA Bracket? Near Impossible: Mathematician says

Science Daily - 1 hour 23 min ago
The odds of picking a perfect bracket for the NCAA men’s basketball March Madness championship tournament are a staggering less than one in 9.2 quintillion (that’s 9,223,372,036,854,775,808), according to a mathematics professor.
Categories: Science

Four Probes to 'Catch' Gigantic Energy Bursts In Space | Video

Space.com - 1 hour 37 min ago
In NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, 4 identical space craft will study 'magnetic reconnection' when magnetic fields lines from the Sun cross paths with Earth releasing bursts of energy toward the ground.
Categories: Science

Feds Admit Stingray Can Disrupt Bystanders' Communications

Slashdot - 1 hour 49 min ago
linuxwrangler writes The government has fought hard to keep details about use and effects of the controversial Stingray device secret. But this Wired article points to recently released documents in which the government admits that the device can cause collateral damage to other network users. The controversy has heated to the point that Florida senator Bill Nelson has made statements that such devices will inevitably force lawmakers to come up with new ways to protect privacy — a comment that is remarkable considering that the Stingray is produced by Harris Corporation which is headquartered in Nelson's home state.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Is 'the dress' white and gold or blue and black? Visual perception expert weighs in

Science Daily - 1 hour 51 min ago
On Feb. 26, a picture of a cocktail dress originally uploaded to the blog Tumblr swept the Internet and managed to divide the population over a simple question: What color is the dress? Some viewers saw gold and white while others insisted the dress is blue and black. Some people claimed they could see either interpretation, but only one of them at a time. It made people stop and ask, "What exactly is going on with this image?"
Categories: Science

We’ll Never See a Supercar Like the Bugatti Veyron Again

Wired News - 2 hours 1 min ago

The Veyron stands as the apex of the old-school automobile, a testament to the power of technology used without conscience or compromise.

The post We’ll Never See a Supercar Like the Bugatti Veyron Again appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Your Car Doesn’t Care What Phone You Use

Wired News - 2 hours 3 min ago

The act of buying a smartphone today feels less like choosing a gadget than picking sides in an endless feudal conflict, but there's one place where an unlikely ceasefire in the platform wars has emerged: the dashboard of your car.

The post Your Car Doesn’t Care What Phone You Use appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Pens filled with high-tech inks for do-it-yourself sensors

Science Daily - 2 hours 25 min ago
A new simple tool developed by nanoengineers is opening the door to an era when anyone will be able to build sensors, anywhere, including physicians in the clinic, patients in their home and soldiers in the field. Scientists have developed high-tech inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose. They tested the sensors to measure glucose and pollution.
Categories: Science

Reducing animal testing for skin allergies

Science Daily - 2 hours 26 min ago
The JRC has validated and recommended a new method which is not based on animal testing, to identify chemicals that can trigger skin allergies, estimated to affect already 20% of the population in Europe.
Categories: Science

World's First Lagoon Power Plants Unveiled In UK

Slashdot - 2 hours 31 min ago
AmiMoJo writes Plans to generate electricity from the world's first series of tidal lagoons have been unveiled in the UK. The six lagoons — four in Wales and one each in Somerset and Cumbria — will capture incoming and outgoing tides behind giant sea walls, and use the weight of the water to power turbines. The series of six lagoons could generate 8% of the UK's electricity for an investment of £12bn. Tidal Lagoon Power wants £168 per MWh hour for electricity in Swansea, reducing to £90-£95 per MWh for power from a second, more efficient lagoon in Cardiff. The £90 figure compares favorably with the £92.50 price for power from the planned Hinkley nuclear station, especially as the lagoon is designed to last 120 years — at a much lower risk than nuclear. Unlike power from the sun and wind, tidal power is predictable. Turbines capture energy from two incoming and two outgoing tides a day, and are expected to be active for an average of 14 hours a day. Friends of the Earth Cymru, said the group is broadly in favor of the Swansea lagoon.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

One Free iPhone App Now Enables Encrypted Voice Calls and Texts

Wired News - 2 hours 33 min ago

If you own an iPhone or Android handset and care about your privacy, there’s no longer much of an excuse not to encrypt every conversation you have. Now a free, zero-learning-curve app exists for both text and voice that can keep those communications fully encrypted, so that no one but the person holding the phone […]

The post One Free iPhone App Now Enables Encrypted Voice Calls and Texts appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Flight Brings Us Closer to Balloon-Powered Space Tourism

Wired News - 2 hours 33 min ago

World View broke the record for the highest-altitude parafoil flight late last week and inched closer to making near-space tourism a reality in the process.

The post Flight Brings Us Closer to Balloon-Powered Space Tourism appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Intel’s New Chip Could Give Cheap Smartphones a Big Boost

Wired News - 2 hours 35 min ago

Intel's new Atom X mobile chips are sure to drive the industry trend of high-capability, low-cost smartphones to even greater extremes.

The post Intel’s New Chip Could Give Cheap Smartphones a Big Boost appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Google+ As We Knew It Is Dead, But Google Is Still a Social Network

Wired News - 2 hours 52 min ago

As a Facebook and Twitter competitor, Google+ never really stood a chance. By some combination of odd design, confusing nomenclature—remember Circles? Sparks?—and the simple fact that no one ever really used it, Google’s grand plan to unite its many products into a single social product just didn’t pan out. So it should surprise no one […]

The post Google+ As We Knew It Is Dead, But Google Is Still a Social Network appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Science

Interactive Edition of the Nuclear Notebook

Slashdot - 2 hours 53 min ago
Lasrick writes The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has just launched a very cool interactive graphic to go with their famed Nuclear Notebook, the feature that tracks the world's nuclear arsenals. Now you can see at a glance who has nuclear weapons, when they got them, and how those numbers compare to each other. A short introductory video gives some background on the success of the Notebook, which has been tracking nukes since 1987.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Science

Forbidden atomic transitions: Controlling matter 1,000 times more precisely using high-resolution spectroscopy

Science Daily - 3 hours ago
A new twist on an old tool lets scientists use light to study and control matter with 1,000 times better resolution and precision than previously possible. Physicists have demonstrated "ponderomotive spectroscopy," which allows researchers to peer more deeply into the structure of atoms and direct their behavior at a much finer scale. The new technique could have applications in quantum computing.
Categories: Science

Genetically speaking, mammals are more like their fathers

Science Daily - 3 hours 48 sec ago
You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents -- the mutations that make us who we are and not some other person -- we actually 'use' more of the DNA that we inherit from our dads.
Categories: Science

Scientists override body's inflammatory response

Science Daily - 3 hours 52 sec ago
Scientists who have discovered the mechanism of a protein that suppresses inflammation in the body, say the information could potentially be used to develop new drugs to control inflammation. The study is universally applicable to all types of inflammation in patients of all ages, in conditions ranging from the common cold to serious life-threatening illnesses, authors noted.
Categories: Science

Low sugar uptake in brain appears to exacerbate Alzheimer's disease

Science Daily - 3 hours 2 min ago
A deficiency in the protein responsible for moving glucose across the brain's protective blood-brain barrier appears to intensify the neurodegenerative effects of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new mouse study. The research suggests that targeting the protein called GLUT1 could help prevent or slow the effects of Alzheimer's, especially among those at risk for the disease.
Categories: Science

Core work: Iron vapor gives clues to formation of Earth and moon

Science Daily - 3 hours 2 min ago
One of the world's most powerful radiation sources provides scientists clues about Earth's formation and how iron vaporizes.
Categories: Science

Scientists crack piece of neural code for learning, memory

Science Daily - 3 hours 2 min ago
Researchers describe how postmortem brain slices can be 'read' to determine how a rat was trained to behave in response to specific sounds, a new article suggests. The work provides one of the first examples of how specific changes in the activity of individual neurons encode particular acts of learning and memory in the brain.
Categories: Science