News Briefs 08-12-2014

Have you had your passport stamped?

Thanks David.

Quote of the Day:

We cannot be sure that we study something real, because we do not know what reality is; we can only be sure that our study will help us understand more, far more, about ourselves.

Jacques Vallee, Passport to Magonia

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Charles Pope's picture
Member since:
23 October 2009
Last activity:
6 hours 34 min

The new Moses movie (in theaters starting this Friday) is so far best known for its "all white" cast":
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/29...

Reviewers have also found the climax of the movie (in the "Parting of the Sea" scene) a bit anticlimactic as well:
http://screencrush.com/exodus-gods-and-k...

Rotten Tomatoes gives it 2 stars (ouch):
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/exodus_g...

Moses looks like a cross between a Samurai Warrior and a Knight Templar:
http://screenrant.com/exodus-gods-kings-...

It just recently dawned upon me what the cosmological basis of the Exodus story had been:

http://www.dailygrail.com/blogs/Charles-...

This past week I contacted Astrophysicist Hakeem Oluseyi and he emailed me right back. I hope to have some discussions with him over the holidays.

LastLoup's picture
Member since:
6 April 2010
Last activity:
3 hours 59 min

Did Moses part the Red Sea? No he parted the Reed Sea, but that aside it's very possible since he did study with the sages and mysteries of Midian that he learned how to read the moon and tides. I think the theory provided that an earthquake caused a shift that resulted in the creation and collapse of the land bridge is still valid.

China to America: To answer the question in the title, I believe so yes. There is a Native American legend of the Wasco or Sea Wolf of a giant sea serpent like animal with the head of a wolf and elongated body. There was a small bronze like statue found in China that has the same features as the beast with a wolf head and long body described as a sea serpent and dated back to the 15th century. If I can find the article I will post it here but it was a few years ago. This and many other curiosities in Native American legend make me believe.

Black panther: I strongly believe they are a population created from a group of cats released from a circus combined with people's "pets" escaped. Why is it so hard for Australian authorities to believe that people like to keep big cats, especially uniquely colored ones, as pets? Note: Mass hysteria is not an excuse for everything.

Image of the Day: Damn Nature...you hungry!

...I forgot how I got here but everyone seems to be heading off in that direction. I hope someone brought food. I have a feeling this is going to be a long journey................

Charles Pope's picture
Member since:
23 October 2009
Last activity:
6 hours 34 min

Hi LastLoup,

The Biblical Exodus is a composite history. There was an Exodus at the end of every major dynasty, and generally a female ruler/pharaoh was "resisting" each one. There was Nitocris at the end of the Old Kingdom, Sobeknefru at the end of the Middle Kingdom. Hatshepsut at the end of the Hyksos, Queen Tiye at the end of the 18th Dynasty, and so forth. The Exodus routes were not identical. One was across the Red Sea and another across the Reed Sea (Egyptian Delta). It was always a variation on the original theme, and the Biblical narrative melds all of these together. Akhenaten played Moses in his time. Hammurabi (Auibre Hor) played Moses earlier. Apophis was the Hyksos Moses. Sargon (Inyotef A) was a Moses figure from the late Old Kingdom. Archetypal Moses was the god Re, who turned the Nile red and pacified the enraged goddess Hathor (who had taken the form of a flood) in order to deliver the people from destruction.

What I didn't realize until lately was that the female ruler/goddess was modeled after Tiamat and the stock Moses role was modeled after Marduk. In the Enuma Elish, Tiamat assumes a male personae (or takes a male consort) called Kingu, who is defeated and ultimately sacrificed for the benefit of mankind. This seems to have provided the precedent for the pharaoh to perish after Moses had parted the flood waters in the Exodus.

LastLoup's picture
Member since:
6 April 2010
Last activity:
3 hours 59 min

All very interesting and plausible. Thanks for sharing.

...I forgot how I got here but everyone seems to be heading off in that direction. I hope someone brought food. I have a feeling this is going to be a long journey................

emlong's picture
Member since:
18 September 2007
Last activity:
6 hours 59 min

To what extent is the Bible a repetition of "expected" or de rigueur components of ancient tale telling forms?